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Previous: I. Making Yourself at Home Chapter 2Next: 2.2 Shell Setup Files-Which, Where, and Why
 

2. Logging In

Contents:
Customizing the Shell
Shell Setup Files-Which, Where, and Why
What Goes in Shell Setup Files?
Tip for Changing Account Setup: Keep a Shell Ready
Tips for Speeding up Slow Logins
Use Absolute Pathnames in Shell Setup Files
C Shell Setup Files Aren't Read When You Want Them to Be?
Identifying Login Shells
Speeding Up Your C Shell with set prompt Test
Gotchas in set prompt Test
Faster ksh and bash Startup with $- Test
Automatic Setups for Different Terminals
A .cshrc.$HOST File for Per Host Setup
motd.diff: Show New Lines in Login Messages
Unclutter Logins: Show Login Messages Just Once
Approved Shells: Using Unapproved Login Shell

2.1 Customizing the Shell

You probably know that shells can be customized to work the way you want them to with shell and environment variables (6.8, 6.1), command aliases, shell functions (10.1), and so on.

You can set variables and create aliases by hand at any time, but the shell will "forget" your settings when you log out. To use the same settings every time you log in, put the commands in special shell setup files (2.2) in your home directory. These files aren't just for setting things like shell variables. Shells can run any UNIX command when you log in and log out. All of this can save time and make your login session do more for you.

- JP


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