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FreeBSD Handbook

The FreeBSD Documentation Project

Welcome to FreeBSD! This handbook covers the installation and day to day use of FreeBSD Release 3.2. This manual is a work in progress and is the work of many individuals. Many sections do not yet exist and some of those that do exist need to be updated. If you are interested in helping with this project, send email to the FreeBSD documentation project mailing list . The latest version of this document is always available from the FreeBSD World Wide Web server. It may also be downloaded in a variety of formats and compression options from the FreeBSD FTP server or one of the numerous mirror sites. You may also want to Search the Handbook.

Redistribution and use in source (SGML DocBook) and 'compiled' forms (SGML, HTML, PDF, PostScript, RTF and so forth) with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:

  1. Redistributions of source code (SGML DocBook) must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer as the first lines of this file unmodified.

  2. Redistributions in compiled form (transformed to other DTDs, converted to PDF, PostScript, RTF and other formats) must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

Important: THIS DOCUMENTATION IS PROVIDED BY THE FREEBSD DOCUMENTATION PROJECT "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE FREEBSD DOCUMENTATION PROJECT BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS DOCUMENTATION, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.


Table of Contents
I. Getting Started
1. Introduction
1.1. FreeBSD in a Nutshell
1.2. A Brief History of FreeBSD
1.3. FreeBSD Project Goals
1.4. The FreeBSD Development Model
1.5. About the Current Release
2. Installing FreeBSD
2.1. Supported Configurations
2.2. Preparing for the Installation
2.3. Installing FreeBSD
2.4. MS-DOS User's Questions and Answers
3. Unix Basics
3.1. The Online Manual
3.2. GNU Info Files
4. Installing Applications: The Ports collection
4.1. Why Have a Ports Collection?
4.2. How Does the Ports Collection Work?
4.3. Getting a FreeBSD Port
4.4. Skeletons
4.5. What to do when a port does not work.
4.6. Some Questions and Answers
4.7. Making a port yourself
II. System Administration
5. Configuring the FreeBSD Kernel
5.1. Why Build a Custom Kernel?
5.2. Building and Installing a Custom Kernel
5.3. The Configuration File
5.4. Making Device Nodes
5.5. If Something Goes Wrong
6. Security
6.1. DES, MD5, and Crypt
6.2. S/Key
6.3. Kerberos
6.4. Firewalls
7. Printing
7.1. What the Spooler Does
7.2. Why You Should Use the Spooler
7.3. Setting Up the Spooling System
7.4. Simple Printer Setup
7.5. Using Printers
7.6. Advanced Printer Setup
7.7. Alternatives to the Standard Spooler
7.8. Acknowledgments
8. Disks
8.1. Using sysinstall
8.2. Using command line utilities
8.3. * Non-traditional Drives
9. Backups
9.1. Tape Media
9.2. Backup Programs
9.3. What about backups to floppies?
10. Disk Quotas
10.1. Configuring Your System to Enable Disk Quotas
10.2. Setting Quota Limits
10.3. Checking Quota Limits and Disk Usage
10.4. * Quotas over NFS
11. The X Window System
12. PC Hardware compatibility
12.1. Resources on the Internet
12.2. Sample Configurations
12.3. Core/Processing
12.4. Input/Output Devices
12.5. Storage Devices
12.6. * Other
13. Localization
13.1. Russian Language (KOI8-R encoding)
13.2. German Language (ISO 8859-1)
III. Network Communications
14. Serial Communications
14.1. Serial Basics
14.2. Terminals
14.3. Dialin Service
14.4. Dialout Service
14.5. Setting Up the Serial Console
15. PPP and SLIP
15.1. Setting up User PPP
15.2. Setting up Kernel PPP
15.3. Setting up a SLIP Client
15.4. Setting up a SLIP Server
16. Advanced Networking
16.1. Gateways and Routes
16.2. NFS
16.3. Diskless Operation
16.4. ISDN
17. Electronic Mail
17.1. Basic Information
17.2. Configuration
17.3. FAQ
IV. Advanced topics
18. The Cutting Edge: FreeBSD-current and FreeBSD-stable
18.1. Staying Current with FreeBSD
18.2. Staying Stable with FreeBSD
18.3. Synchronizing Source Trees over the Internet
18.4. Using make world to rebuild your system
19. Contributing to FreeBSD
19.1. What Is Needed
19.2. How to Contribute
19.3. Donors Gallery
19.4. Core Team Alumni
19.5. Derived Software Contributors
19.6. Additional FreeBSD Contributors
19.7. 386BSD Patch Kit Patch Contributors
20. Source Tree Guidelines and Policies
20.1. MAINTAINER on Makefiles
20.2. Contributed Software
20.3. Encumbered files
20.4. Shared Libraries
21. Adding New Kernel Configuration Options
21.1. What's a Kernel Option, Anyway?
21.2. Now What Do I Have to Do for it?
22. Kernel Debugging
22.1. Debugging a Kernel Crash Dump with kgdb
22.2. Debugging a crash dump with DDD
22.3. Post-mortem Analysis of a Dump
22.4. On-line Kernel Debugging Using DDB
22.5. On-line Kernel Debugging Using Remote GDB
22.6. Debugging a Console Driver
23. Linux Mode
23.1. How to Install the Linux Mode
23.2. How to Install Mathematica on FreeBSD
23.3. How does the Linux mode work?
24. FreeBSD Internals
24.1. The FreeBSD Booting Process
24.2. PC Memory Utilization
24.3. DMA: What it Is and How it Works
24.4. The FreeBSD VM System
V. Appendices
25. Obtaining FreeBSD
25.1. CD-ROM Publishers
25.2. FTP Sites
25.3. CTM Sites
25.4. CVSup Sites
25.5. AFS Sites
26. Bibliography
26.1. Books & Magazines Specific to FreeBSD
26.2. Users' Guides
26.3. Administrators' Guides
26.4. Programmers' Guides
26.5. Operating System Internals
26.6. Security Reference
26.7. Hardware Reference
26.8. UNIX History
26.9. Magazines and Journals
27. Resources on the Internet
27.1. Mailing lists
27.2. Usenet newsgroups
27.3. World Wide Web servers
27.4. Email Addresses
27.5. Shell Accounts
28. FreeBSD Project Staff
28.1. The FreeBSD Core Team
28.2. The FreeBSD Developers
28.3. The FreeBSD Documentation Project
28.4. Who Is Responsible for What
29. PGP keys
29.1. Officers
29.2. Core Team members
29.3. Developers