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Table of Contents

debug serial interface
debug serial packet
debug service-module
debug smrp all
debug smrp group
debug smrp mcache
debug smrp neighbor
debug smrp port
debug smrp route
debug smrp transaction
debug snmp packet
debug snmp requests
debug sntp adjust
debug sntp packets
debug sntp select
debug source bridge
debug source error
debug source event
debug span
debug sse
debug standby
debug stun packet
debug sw56
debug syscon perfdata
debug syscon sdp
debug syslog-server
debug tacacs
debug tacacs events

debug serial interface

Use the debug serial interface EXEC command to display information on a serial connection failure. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug serial interface

Usage Guidelines

If the show interface serial command shows that the line and protocol are down, you can use the debug serial interface command to isolate a timing problem as the cause of a connection failure. If the keepalive values in the mineseq, yourseen, and myseen fields are not incrementing in each subsequent line of output, there is a timing or line problem at one end of the connection.


Note While the debug serial interface command typically does not generate a lot of output, nevertheless use it cautiously during production hours. When SMDS is enabled, for example, it can generate considerable output.

The output of the debug serial interface command can vary, depending on the type of WAN configured for an interface: Frame Relay, HDLC, HSSI, SMDS, or X.25. The output also can vary depending on the type of encapsulation configured for that interface. The hardware platform also can affect debug serial interface output.

The following sections show and describe sample debug serial interface output for various configurations.

Sample Displays

Debug Serial Interface for Frame Relay Encapsulation

The following message is displayed if the encapsulation for the interface is Frame Relay (or HDLC) and the router attempts to send a packet containing an unknown packet type:

Illegal serial link type code xxx
Debug Serial Interface for HDLC

The following is sample output from the debug serial interface command for an HDLC connection when keepalives are enabled. This output shows that the remote router is not receiving all the keepalives the router is sending. When the difference in the values in the myseq and mineseen fields exceeds three, the line goes down and the interface is reset.


Table 118 describes the significant fields.


Table 118: Debug Serial Interface Field Descriptions for HDLC
Field Description

Serial1

Interface through which the serial connection is taking place.

HDLC

The serial connection is an HDLC connection.

myseq 636119

The myseq counter increases by one each time the router sends a keepalive packet to the remote router.

mineseen 636119

The value of the mineseen counter reflects the last myseq sequence number the remote router has acknowledged receiving from the router. The remote router stores this value in its yourseen counter and sends that value in a keepalive packet to the router.

yourseen 515032

The yourseen counter reflects the value of the myseq sequence number the router has received in a keepalive packet from the remote router.

line up

The connection between the routers is maintained. Value changes to "line down" if the values of the myseq and myseen fields in a keepalive packet differ by more than three. Value returns to "line up" when the interface is reset. If the line is in loopback mode, ("looped") appears after this field.

Table 119 describes additional error messages that the debug serial interface command can generate for HDLC.


Table 119: Debug Serial Interface Error Messages for HDLC
Field Description

Illegal serial link type code xxx, PC = 0xnnnnnn

This message is displayed if the router attempts to send a packet containing an unknown packet type.

Illegal HDLC serial type code xxx, PC = 0xnnnnn

This message is displayed if an unknown packet type is received.

Serial 0: attempting to restart

This message is displayed periodically if the interface is down. The hardware is then reset to hopefully correct the problem.

Serial 0: Received bridge packet sent to nnnnnnnnn

This message is displayed if a bridge packet is received over a serial interface configured for HDLC, and bridging is not configured on that interface.

Debug Serial Interface for HSSI

On an HSSI interface, the debug serial interface command can generate the following additional error message:

HSSI0: Reset from 0xnnnnnnn

This message indicates that the HSSI hardware has been reset. The 0xnnnnnnn variable is the address of the routine requesting that the hardware be reset; this value is useful only to development engineers.

Debug Serial Interface for ISDN Basic Rate

Table 120 describes error messages that the debug serial interface command can generate for ISDN Basic Rate.


Table 120: Debug Serial Interface Error Messages for ISDN Basic Rate
Message Description

BRI: D-chan collision

A collision on the ISDN D-channel has occurred; the software will retry transmission.

Received SID Loss of Frame Alignment int.

The ISDN hardware has lost frame alignment. This usually indicates a problem with the ISDN network.

Unexpected IMP int: ipr = 0xnn

The ISDN hardware received an unexpected interrupt. The 0xnn variable indicates the value returned by the interrupt register.

BRI(d): RX Frame Length Violation. Length=n

BRI(d): RX Nonoctet Aligned Frame

BRI(d): RX Abort Sequence

BRI(d): RX CRC Error

BRI(d): RX Overrun Error

BRI(d): RX Carrier Detect Lost

Any of these messages can be displayed when a receive error occurs on one of the ISDN channels. The (d) indicates which channel it is on. These messages can indicate a problem with the ISDN network connection.

BRI0: Reset from 0xnnnnnnn

The BRI hardware has been reset. The 0xnnnnnnn variable is the address of the routine that requested that the hardware be reset; it is useful only to development engineers.

BRI(d): Bad state in SCMs scm1=x scm2=x scm3=x

BRI(d): Bad state in SCONs scon1=x scon2 =x scon3=x

BRI(d): Bad state ub SCR; SCR=x

Any of these messages can be displayed if the ISDN hardware is not in the proper state. The hardware is then reset. If the message is displayed constantly, it usually indicates a hardware problem.

BRI(d): Illegal packet encapsulation=n

This message is displayed if a packet is received, but the encapsulation used for the packet is not recognized. It can indicate that the interface is misconfigured.

Debug Serial Interface for an MK5025 Device

Table 121 describes the additional error messages that the debug serial interface command can generate for an MK5025 device.


Table 121: Debug Serial Interface Err or Messages for an MK5025 Device
Message Description

MK5(d): Reset from 0xnnnnnnnn

This message indicates that the hardware has been reset. The 0xnnnnnnn variable is the address of the routine that requested that the hardware be reset; it is useful only to development engineers.

MK5(d): Illegal packet encapsulation=n

This message is displayed if a packet is received, but the encapsulation used for the packet is not recognized. Possibly an indication that the interface is misconfigured.

MK5(d): No packet available for packet realignment

This message is displayed in cases where the serial driver attempted to get a buffer (memory) and was unable to do so.

MK5(d): Bad state in CSR0=(x)

This message is displayed if the hardware is not in the proper state. The hardware is then reset. If this message is displayed constantly, it usually indicates a hardware problem.

MK5(d): New serial state=n

This message is displayed to indicate that the hardware has interrupted the software. It displays the state that the hardware is reporting.

MK5(d): DCD is down.

MK5(d): DCD is up.

If the interrupt indicates that the state of carrier has changed, one of these messages is displayed to indicate the current state of DCD.

Debug Serial Interface for SMDS Encapsulation

When encapsulation is set to SMDS, debug serial interface displays SMDS packets that are sent and received, as well as any error messages resulting from SMDS packet transmission.

The error messages that the debug serial interface command can generate for SMDS follow.

The following message indicates that a new protocol requested SMDS to encapsulate the data for transmission. SMDS is not yet able to encapsulate the protocol.

SMDS: Error on Serial 0, encapsulation bad protocol = x

The following message indicates that SMDS was asked to encapsulate a packet, but no corresponding destination E.164 SMDS address was found in any of the static SMDS tables or in the ARP tables:

SMDS send: Error in encapsulation, no hardware address, type = x

The following message indicates that a protocol such as CLNS or IP has been enabled on an SMDS interface, but the corresponding multicast addresses have not been configured. The n variable displays the link type for which encapsulation was requested.

SMDS: Send, Error in encapsulation, type=n

The following messages can occur when a corrupted packet is received on an SMDS interface. The router expected x, but received y.

SMDS: Invalid packet, Reserved NOT ZERO, x y
SMDS: Invalid packet, TAG mismatch x y
SMDS: Invalid packet, Bad TRAILER length x y

The following messages can indicate an invalid length for an SMDS packet:

SMDS: Invalid packet, Bad BA length x
SMDS: Invalid packet, Bad header extension length x
SMDS: Invalid packet, Bad header extension type x
SMDS: Invalid packet, Bad header extension value x

The following messages are displayed when the debug serial interface command is enabled:

Interface Serial 0 Sending SMDS L3 packet:
SMDS: dgsize:x type:0xn src:y dst:z

If the debug serial interface command is enabled, the following message can be displayed when a packet is received on an SMDS interface, but the destination SMDS address does not match any on that interface:

SMDS: Packet n, not addressed to us

debug serial packet

Use the debug serial packet EXEC command to display more detailed serial interface debugging information than you can obtain using debug serial interface command. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug serial packet

Usage Guidelines

The debug serial packet command generates output that is dependent on the type of serial interface and the encapsulation that is running on that interface. The hardware platform also can impact debug serial packet output.

The debug serial packet command displays output for only SMDS encapsulations.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug serial packet command when SMDS is enabled on the interface.

Router# debug serial packet
Interface Serial2 Sending SMDS L3 packet:
SMDS Header: Id: 00 RSVD: 00 BEtag: EC Basize: 0044
Dest:E18009999999FFFF Src:C12015804721FFFF Xh:04030000030001000000000000000000
SMDS LLC: AA AA 03 00 00 00 80 38
SMDS Data: E1 19 01 00 00 80 00 00 0C 00 38 1F 00 0A 00 80 00 00 0C 01 2B 71
SMDS Data: 06 01 01 0F 1E 24 00 EC 00 44 00 02 00 00 83 6C 7D 00 00 00 00 00
SMDS Trailer: RSVD: 00 BEtag: EC Length: 0044

As the above shows, when encapsulation is set to SMDS, debug serial packet displays the entire SMDS header (in hex), as well as some payload data on transmit or receive. This information is useful only when you have an understanding of the SMDS protocol. The first line of the output indicates either Sending or Receiving.

debug service-module

Use the debug service-module EXEC command to display debugging information that monitors the detection and clearing of network alarms on the integrated channel service unit/data service unit (CSU/DSU) modules. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug service-module

Usage Guidelines

Use this command to enable and disable debug logging for the serial 0 and serial 1 interfaces when an integrated CSU/DSU is present. This command enables debugging on all interfaces.

Network alarm status can also be viewed through the use of the show service-module command.


Note The debug output varies depending on the type of service module installed in the router.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug service-module command:

Router# debug service-module
SERVICE_MODULE(1): loss of signal ended after duration 00:05:36
SERVICE_MODULE(1): oos/oof ended after duration 01:05:14
SERVICE_MODULE(0): Unit has no clock
SERVICE_MODULE(0): detects loss of signal
SERVICE_MODULE(0): loss of signal ended after duration 00:00:33

debug smrp all

Use the debug smrp all EXEC command to display information about Simple Multicast Routing Protocol (SMRP) activity. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug smrp all

Usage Guidelines

Because the debug smrp all command displays all SMRP debugging output, it is processor intensive and should not be enabled when memory is scarce or in very high traffic situations.

For general debugging, use the debug smrp all command and turn off excessive transactions with the no debug smrp transaction command. This combination of commands will display various state changes and events without displaying every transaction packet. For debugging a specific feature such as a routing problem, use the debug smrp route and debug smrp transaction commands to see if packets are sent and received and which specific routes are affected. The show smrp traffic command is highly recommended as a troubleshooting method because it displays the SMRP counters.

For examples of the type of output you may see, refer to each of the commands listed in the "Related Commands" section.

Related Commands

debug smrp group
debug smrp mcache
debug smrp neighbor
debug smrp port
debug smrp route
debug smrp transaction

debug smrp group

Use the debug smrp group EXEC command to display information about SMRP group activity. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug smrp group

Usage Guidelines

The debug smrp group command displays information when a group is created or deleted and when a forwarding entry for a group is created, changed, or deleted.

For more information, refer to the show smrp group command described in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 2.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug smrp group command showing a port being created and deleted on group AT 20.34. (AT signifies that this is an AppleTalk network group.)

Router# debug smrp group
SMRP: Group AT 20.34, created on port 20.1 by 20.2
SMRP: Group AT 20.34, deleted on port 20.1

Table 122 lists the messages that may be generated with the debug smrp group command concerning the forwarding table.


Table 122: Debug SMRP Group Message Descriptions
Messages Descriptions

Group address, deleted on port address

Group entry was deleted from the group table for the specified port.

Group address, forward state changed from state to state

Group's state changed. Possible states are join, forward, and leave.

Group address, deleted forward entry

Group was deleted from the forwarding table.

Group address, created on port address by address

Group entry was created in the table for the specified port.

Group address, added by address to the group

A secondary router has added this group to its group table.

Group address, discard join request from address, not responsible

Discard Join Group request if the router is not the primary router on the local connected network or if it is not the port parent of the route.

Group address, join request from address

Request to join the group was received.

Group address, forward is found

Forward entry for the group was found in the forwarding table.

Group address, forward state is already joining, ignored

Request to join the group is in progress, so the second request was discarded.

Group address, no forward found

Forward entry for the group was not found in the forwarding table.

Group address, join request discarded, fw discarded, fwd parent port not operational

Request to join the group was discarded because the parent port is not available.

Group address, created forward entry - parent address child address

Forward entry was created in the forwarding table for the parent and child address.

Group address, creator no longer up on address

Group creator has not been heard from for a specified time and is deemed no longer available.

Group address, pruning duplicate path on address

Duplicate path was removed. If we are forwarding and we are a child port, and our port parent address is not pointing to our own port address, we are in a duplicate path.

Group address, member no longer up on address

Group member has not been heard from for a specified time and is deemed no longer available.

Group address, no more child ports in forward entry

Forward entry for group no longer has any child ports. As a result, the forward entry is no longer necessary.

Related Command

debug smrp all

debug smrp mcache

Use the debug smrp mcache EXEC command to display information about SMRP multicast fast-switching cache entries. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug smrp mcache

Usage Guidelines

Use the show smrp mcache command (described in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 2) to display the entries in the SMRP multicast cache, and use the debug smrp mcache command to see whether the cache is being populated and invalidated.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug smrp mcache command. In this example, the cache is created and populated for group AT 11.124. (AT signifies that this is an AppleTalk network group.)

Router# debug smrp mcache
SMRP: Cache created
SMRP: Cache populated for group AT 11.124
                mac - 090007400b7c00000c1740d9
                net - 001fef7500000014ff020a0a0a
SMRP: Forward cache entry created for group AT 11.124
SMRP: Forward cache entry validated for group AT 11.124
SMRP: Forward cache entry invalidated for group AT 11.124
SMRP: Forward cache entry deleted for group AT 11.124 

Table 123 lists all the messages that can be generated with the debug smrp mcache command concerning the multicast cache.


Table 123: Debug SMRP Mcache Message Descriptions
Messages Descriptions

Cache populated for group address

SMRP packet was received on a parent port that has fast switching enabled. As a result, the cache was created and the MAC and network headers were stored for all child ports that have fast switching enabled. Use the show smrp port appletalk command with the optional interface type and number to display the switching path.

Cache memory allocated

Memory was allocated for the multicast cache.

Forward cache entry created/deleted for group address

Forward cache entry for the group was added to or deleted from the cache.

Forward cache entry validated for group address

Forward cache entry is validated and is now ready for fast switching.

Forward cache entry invalidated for group address

Cache entry is invalidated because some change (such as port was shut down) occurred to one of the ports.

Related Command

debug smrp all

debug smrp neighbor

Use the debug smrp neighbor EXEC command to display information about SMRP neighbor activity. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug smrp neighbor

Usage Guidelines

The debug smrp neighbor command displays information when a neighbor operating state changes. A neighbor is an adjacent router. For more information, refer to the show smrp neighbor command described in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 2.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug smrp neighbor command. In this example, the neighbor on port  30.02 has changed state from normal operation to secondary operation.

Router# debug smrp neighbor
SMRP: Neighbor 30.2, state changed from "normal op" to "secondary op"

Table 124 lists all the messages that can be generated with the debug smrp neighbor command concerning the neighbor table.


Table 124: Debug SMRP Neighbor Message Descriptions
Messages Descriptions

Neighbor address, state changed from state to state

Neighbor's state changed. Possible states are primary operation, secondary operation, normal operation, primary negotiation, secondary negotiation, and down.

Neighbor address, neighbor added/deleted

Neighbor was added to or removed from the neighbor table.

SMRP neighbor up/down

Neighbor is available for service or unavailable.

Neighbor address, no longer up

Neighbor is unavailable because it has not been heard from for a specified duration.

Related Command

debug smrp all

debug smrp port

Use the debug smrp port EXEC command to display information about SMRP port activity. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug smrp port

Usage Guidelines

The debug smrp port command displays information when a port operating state changes.

For more information, refer to the show smrp port command described in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 2.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug smrp port command. In this example, port 30.1 has changed state from secondary negative to secondary operation to primary negative.

Router# debug smrp port
SMRP: Port 30.1, state changed from "secondary neg" to "secondary op"
SMRP: Port 30.1, secondary router changed from 0.0 to 30.1
SMRP: Port 30.1, state changed from "secondary op" to "primary neg"

Table 125 lists all the messages that can be generated with the debug smrp port command concerning the port table.


Table 125: Debug SMRP Port Message Descriptions
Messages Descriptions

Port address, port created/deleted

Port entry was added to or removed from the port table.

Port address, line protocol changed to state

Line protocol for the port is up or down.

Port address, state changed from state to state

Port's state changed. Possible states are primary operation, secondary operation, normal operation, primary negotiation, secondary negotiation, and down.

Port address, primary/secondary router changed from address to address

Primary or secondary router's port address changed.

Related Command

debug smrp all

debug smrp route

Use the debug smrp route EXEC command to display information about SMRP routing activity. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug smrp route

Usage Guidelines

For more information, refer to the show smrp route command described in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 2.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug smrp route command. In this example, poison notification is received from port 30.2. Poison notification is the receipt of a poisoned route on a nonparent port.

Router# debug smrp route
SMRP: Route AT 20-20, poison notification from 30.2
SMRP: Route AT 30-30, poison notification from 30.2

Table 126 lists all the messages that can be generated with the debug smrp route command concerning the routing table. In Table 126, the term route does not refer to an address but rather it is a network range.


Table 126: Debug SMRP Route Message Descriptions
Messages Descriptions

Route address, deleted/created as local network

Route entry was removed from or added to the routing table.

Route address, from address has invalid distance value

Route entry from the specified address has an incorrect distance value and was ignored.

Route address, unknown route poisoned by address ignored

Route entry received from the specified address is bad and was ignored.

Route address, created via address - hop number tunnel number

New route entry added to the routing table with the specified number of hops and tunnels.

Route address, from address - overlaps existing route

Route entry received from the specified address overlaps an existing route and was ignored.

Route address, poisoned by address

Route entry has been poisoned by neighbor. Poisoned routes have distance of 255.

Route address, poison notification from address

A poison notification is a poisoned route that is received from a non-parent port.

Route address, worsened by parent address

The distance to the route has worsened (become higher), received from the parent neighbor.

Route address, improved via address - number -> number hop, number -> number tunnel

The distance to the route has improved (become lower), received from a neighbor.

Route address, switched to address - higher address than address

A tie condition exists, and because this router had the highest network address, it was used to forward the packet.

Route address, parent port changed address -> address

Parent port address change occurred. The parent port address of a physical network segment determines which router should handle Join Group and Leave Group requests.

SMRP bad distance vector

Packet has an invalid distance vector and was ignored.

Route address, has been poisoned

Route has been poisoned. Poisoned routes are purged from the routing table after a specified time.

Related Command

debug smrp all

debug smrp transaction

Use the debug smrp transaction EXEC command to display information about SMRP transactions. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug smrp transaction

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug smrp transaction command. In this example, a secondary node request is sent out to all routers on port 30.1.

Router# debug smrp transaction 
SMRP: Transaction for port 30.1, secondary node request (seq 8435) sent to all routers
SMRP: Transaction for port 30.1, secondary node request (seq 8435) sent to all routers
SMRP: Transaction for port 30.1, secondary node request (seq 8435) sent to all routers
SMRP: Transaction for port 30.1, secondary node request (seq 8435) sent to all routers

Table 127 lists all the messages that can be generated with the debug smrp route command.


Table 127: Debug SMRP Transaction Message Descriptions
Messages Descriptions

Transaction for port address, packet-type command-type (grp/sec number) sent to/received from address

Port message concerning a packet or command was sent to or received from the specified address.

Transaction for group address on port address, (seq number) sent to/received from address

Group message for a specified port was sent to or received from the specified address.

Unrecognized transaction for port address

An unrecognized message was received and ignored by the port.

Discarded incomplete request

An incomplete message was received and ignored.

Response in wrong state in HandleRequest

A message was received with the wrong state and was ignored.

SMRP bad packet type

An SMRP packet was received with a bad packet type and was ignored.

Packet discarded, Bad Port ID

A packet was received with a bad port ID and was ignored.

Packet discarded, Check Packet failed

A packet was received with a failed check packet and was ignored.

Related Command

debug smrp all

debug snmp packet

To display information about every SNMP packet sent or received by the router, use the debug  snmp packet EXEC command. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug snmp packet

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug snmp packet command. In this example, the router receives a get-next request from the host at 172.16.63.17 and responds with the requested information.

Router# debug snmp packet
SNMP: Packet received via UDP from 172.16.63.17 on Ethernet0 
SNMP: Get-next request, reqid 23584, errstat 0, erridx 0 
  sysUpTime = NULL TYPE/VALUE 
 system.1 = NULL TYPE/VALUE 
 system.6 = NULL TYPE/VALUE
SNMP: Response, reqid 23584, errstat 0, erridx 0 
 sysUpTime.0 = 2217027 
 system.1.0 = Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software  
 system.6.0 = 
SNMP: Packet sent via UDP to 172.16.63.17

Based on the kind of packet sent or received, the output may vary. For get-bulk requests, a line similar to the following is displayed:

SNMP: Get-bulk request, reqid 23584, nonrptr 10, maxreps 20

For traps, a line similar to the following is displayed:

SNMP: V1 Trap, ent 1.3.6.1.4.1.9.1.13, gentrap 3, spectrap 0

Table 128 describes the significant fields in these displays.


Table 128: Debug SNMP Packet Field Descriptions
Field Description

Get-next request

Indicates what type of SNMP PDU the packet is. Possible types are:

  • Get request

  • Get-next request

  • Response

  • Set request

  • V1 Trap

  • Get-bulk request

  • Inform request

  • V2 Trap

Depending on the type of PDU, the rest of this line displays different fields. The indented lines following this line list the MIB object names and corresponding values.

reqid

Request identification number. This number is used by the SNMP manager to match responses with requests.

errstat

Error status. All PDU types other than response will have an errstat of  0. If the agent encounters an error while processing the request, it will set errstat in the response PDU to indicate the type of error.

erridx

Error index. This value will always be 0 in all PDUs other than responses. If the agent encounters an error, the erridx will be set to indicate which varbind in the request caused the error. For example, if the agent had an error on the 2nd varbind in the request PDU, the response PDU will have an erridx equal to 2.

nonrptr

Non-repeater value. This value and the maximum repetition value are used to determine how many varbinds are returned. Refer to RFC  1905 for details.

maxreps

Maximum repetition value. This value and the non-repeater value are used to determine how many varbinds are returned. Refer to RFC  1905 for details.

ent

Enterprise object identifier. Refer to RFC 1215 for details.

gentrap

Generic trap value. Refer to RFC 1215 for details.

spectrap

Specific trap value. Refer to RFC 1215 for details.

debug snmp requests

To display information about every SNMP request made by the SNMP manager, use the debug  snmp requests EXEC command. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug snmp requests

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug snmp requests command:

Router# debug snmp requests
SNMP Manager API: request
  dest: 171.69.58.33.161, community: public
  retries: 3, timeout: 30, mult: 2, use session rtt
  userdata: 0x0

Table 129 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 129: Debug SNMP Requests Field Descriptions
Field Description

SNMP Manager API

Indicates that the router sent an SNMP request.

dest

Destination of the request.

community

Community string sent with the request.

retries

Number of times the request has been resent.

timeout

Request timeout, or how long the router will wait before resending the request.

mult

Timeout multiplier. The timeout for a resent request will be equal to the previous timeout multiplied by the timeout multiplier.

use session rtt

Indicates that the session's average round-trip time should be used in calculating the timeout value.

userdata

Internal IOS data.

debug sntp adjust

Use the debug sntp adjust EXEC command to display information about SNTP clock adjustments. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug sntp adjust

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the debug sntp adjust command output when an offset to the time reported by the configured NTP server is calculated. The offset indicates the difference between the router time and the actual time (as kept by the server) and is displayed in milliseconds. The clock time is then successfully changed to the accurate time by adding the offset to the current router time.

Router# debug sntp adjust
Delay calculated, offset 3.48
Clock slewed.

The following is sample output from the debug sntp adjust command when an offset to the time reported by a broadcast server is calculated. Since the packet is a broadcast packet, no transmission delay can be calculated. However, in this case, the offset is too large, so the clock is reset to the correct time.

Router# debug sntp adjust
No delay calculated, offset 11.18
Clock stepped.

debug sntp packets

Use the debug sntp packets EXEC command to display information about SNTP packets sent and received. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug sntp packets

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the debug sntp packets command when a message is received:

Router# debug sntp packets
Received SNTP packet from 172.16.186.66, length 48
 leap 0, mode 1, version 3, stratum 4, ppoll 1024
 rtdel 00002B00, rtdsp 00003F18, refid AC101801 (172.16.24.1)
 ref B7237786.ABF9CDE5 (23:28:06.671 UTC Tue May 13 1997)
 org 00000000.00000000 (00:00:00.000 UTC Mon Jan 1 1900)
 rec 00000000.00000000 (00:00:00.000 UTC Mon Jan 1 1900)
 xmt B7237B5C.A7DE94F2 (23:44:28.655 UTC Tue May 13 1997)
 inp AF3BD529.810B66BC (00:19:53.504 UTC Mon Mar 1 1993)

The following is sample output from the debug sntp packets command when a message is sent:

Router# debug sntp packets
Sending SNTP packet to 172.16.25.1
 xmt AF3BD455.FBBE3E64 (00:16:21.983 UTC Mon Mar 1 1993)

Table 130 describes the significant fields.


Table 130: Debug SNTP Packets Field Descriptions
Field Description

length

Length of the SNTP packet.

leap

Indicates if a leap second will be added or subtracted.

mode

Indicates the mode of the router relative to the server sending the packet.

version

SNTP version number of the packet.

stratum

Stratum of the server.

ppoll

Peer polling interval.

rtdel

Total delay along the path to the root clock.

rtdsp

Dispersion of the root path.

refid

Address of the server which the router is currently using for synchronization.

ref

Reference timestamp.

org

Originate timestamp. This value indicates the time the request was sent by the router.

rec

Receive timestamp. This value indicates the time the request was received by the SNTP server.

xmt

Transmit timestamp. This value indicates the time the reply was sent by the SNTP server.

inp

Destination timestamp. This value indicate the time the reply was received by the router.

debug sntp select

Use the debug sntp select EXEC command to display information about SNTP server selection. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug sntp select

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show sample debug sntp select command. In this example, the router will synchronize its time to server at 172.16.186.66.

Router# debug sntp select
SNTP: Selected 172.16.186.66

debug source bridge

Use the debug source bridge EXEC command to display information about packets and frames transferred across a source-route bridge. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug source bridge

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the debug source bridge output for peer bridges using TCP as a transport mechanism. The remote source-route bridging (RSRB) network configuration has ring 2 and ring 1 bridged together through remote peer bridges. The remote peer bridges are connected via a serial line and use TCP as the transport mechanism.

Router# debug source bridge
RSRB: remote explorer to 5/131.108.250.1/1996 srn 2 [C840.0021.0050.0000]
RSRB: Version/Ring XReq sent to peer 5/131.108.250.1/1996
RSRB: Received version reply from 5/131.108.250.1/1996 (version 2)
RSRB: DATA: 5/131.108.250.1/1996 Ring Xchg Rep, trn 2, vrn 5, off 18, len 10
RSRB: added bridge 1, ring 1 for 5/131.108.240.1/1996
RSRB: DATA: 5/131.108.250.1/1996 Explorer trn 2, vrn 5, off 18, len 69
RSRB: DATA: 5/131.108.250.1/1996 Forward trn 2, vrn 5, off 0, len 92
RSRB: DATA: forward Forward srn 2, br 1, vrn 5 to peer 5/131.108.250.1/1996 

The following line indicates that a remote explorer frame has been sent to IP address 131.108.250.1 and, like all RSRB TCP connections, has been assigned port 1996. The bridge belongs to ring group  5. The explorer frame originated from ring number 2. The routing information field (RIF) descriptor has been generated by the local station and indicates that the frame was sent out via bridge  1 onto virtual ring 5.

RSRB: remote explorer to 5/131.108.250.1/1996 srn 2 [C840.0021.0050.0000]

The following line indicates that a request for remote peer information has been sent to IP address 131.108.250.1, TCP port 1996. The bridge belongs to ring group 5.

RSRB: Version/Ring XReq sent to peer 5/131.108.250.1/1996

The following line is the response to the version request previously sent. The response is sent from IP address 131.108.250.1, TCP port 1996. The bridge belongs to ring group 5.

RSRB: Received version reply from 5/131.108.250.1/1996 (version 2)

The following line is the response to the ring request previously sent. The response is sent from IP address 131.108.250.1, TCP port 1996. The target ring number is 2, virtual ring number is 5, the offset is 18, and the length of the frame is 10 bytes.

RSRB: DATA: 5/131.108.250.1/1996 Ring Xchg Rep, trn 2, vrn 5, off 0, len 10

The following line indicates that bridge 1 and ring 1 were added to the source-bridge table for IP address 131.108.250.1, TCP port 1996:

RSRB: added bridge 1, ring 1 for 5/131.108.250.1/1996

The following line indicates that a packet containing an explorer frame came across virtual ring 5 from IP address 131.108.250.1, TCP port 1996. The packet is 69 bytes in length. This packet is received after the Ring Exchange information was received and updated on both sides.

RSRB: DATA: 5/131.108.250.1/1996 Explorer trn 2, vrn 5, off 18, len 69

The following line indicates that a packet containing data came across virtual ring 5 from IP address 131.108.250.1 over TCP port 1996. The packet is being placed on the local target ring 2.The packet is 92 bytes in length.

RSRB: DATA: 5/131.108.250.1/1996 Forward trn 2, vrn 5, off 0, len 92

The following line indicates that a packet containing data is being forwarded to the peer that has IP 131.108.250.1 address belonging to local ring 2 and bridge 1. The packet is forwarded via virtual ring 5. This packet is sent after the Ring Exchange information was received and updated on both sides.

RSRB: DATA: forward Forward srn 2, br 1, vrn 5 to peer 5/131.108.250.1/1996

The following is sample output from the debug source bridge command for peer bridges using direct encapsulation as a transport mechanism. The RSRB network configuration has ring 1 and ring 2 bridged together through peer bridges. The peer bridges are connected via a serial line and use TCP as the transport mechanism.

Router# debug source bridge
RSRB: remote explorer to 5/Serial1 srn 1 [C840.0011.0050.0000]
RSRB: Version/Ring XReq sent to peer 5/Serial1
RSRB: Received version reply from 5/Serial1 (version 2)
RSRB: IFin: 5/Serial1 Ring Xchg, Rep trn 0, vrn 5, off 0, len 10
RSRB: added bridge 1, ring 1 for 5/Serial1

The following line indicates that a remote explorer frame was sent to remote peer Serial1, which belongs to ring group 5. The explorer frame originated from ring number 1. The routing information field (RIF) descriptor 0011.0050 was generated by the local station and indicates that the frame was sent out via bridge 1 onto virtual ring 5.

RSRB: remote explorer to 5/Serial1 srn 1 [C840.0011.0050.0000]

The following line indicates that a request for remote peer information was sent to Serial1. The bridge belongs to ring group 5.

RSRB: Version/Ring XReq sent to peer 5/Serial1

The following line is the response to the version request previously sent. The response is sent from Serial 1. The bridge belongs to ring group 5 and the version is 2.

RSRB: Received version reply from 5/Serial1 (version 2)

The following line is the response to the ring request previously sent. The response is sent from Serial1. The target ring number is 2, virtual ring number is 5, the offset is 0, and the length of the frame is 39 bytes.

RSRB: IFin: 5/Serial1 Ring Xchg Rep, trn 2, vrn 5, off 0, len 39

The following line indicates that bridge 1 and ring 1 were added to the source-bridge table for Serial1:

RSRB: added bridge 1, ring 1 for 5/Serial1

debug source error

Use the debug source error EXEC command to display source-route bridging errors. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug source error

Usage Guidelines

The debug source error command displays some output also found in the debug source bridge output. Refer to the debug source bridge command for other possible output.

Sample Displays

In all of the following examples of debug source error command messages, the variable number is the Token Ring interface. For example, if the line of output starts with SRB1, the output relates to the Token Ring 1 interface. SRB indicates a source-route bridging message. RSRB indicates a remote source-route bridging message. SRTLB indicates a source-route translational bridging message.

In the following example, a packet of protocol protocol-type was dropped:

SRBnumber drop: Routed protocol protocol-type

In the following example, an Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) packet was dropped. ARP is defined in RFC 826.

SRBnumber drop:TYPE_RFC826_ARP

In the following example, the current Cisco  IOS version does not support Qualified Logical Link Control (QLLC). Reconfigure the router with an image that has the IBM feature set.

RSRB: QLLC not supported in version version
Please reconfigure.

In the following example, the packet was dropped because the outgoing interface of the router was down:

RSRB IF: outgoing interface not up, dropping packet

In the following example, the router received an out-of-sequence IP sequence number in a Fast Sequenced Transport (FST) packet. FST has no recovery for this problem like TCP encapsulation does.

RSRB FST: bad sequence number dropping.

In the following example, the router was unable to locate the virtual interface:

RSRB: couldn't find virtual interface

In the following example, the peer router's TCP queue is full. TCPD indicates that this is a TCP debug.

RSRB TCPD: tcp queue full for peer

In the following example, the router was unable to send data to the peer router. A result of 1 indicates that the TCP queue is full. A result of -1 indicates that the RSRB peer is closed.

RSRB TCPD: tcp send failed for peer result

In the following example, the Routing Information Identifier was not set in the explorer packet going forward. The packet will not support SRB, so it is dropped.

vrforward_explorer - RII not set

In the following example, a packet sent to a virtual bridge in the router did not include a routing information field (RIF) to tell the router which route to use:

RSRB: no RIF on packet sent to virtual bridge

The following example indicates that the RIF did not contain any information or the length field was set to zero:

RSRB: RIF length of zero sent to virtual bridge

The following message occurs when the local service access point (LSAP) is out of range. The variable lsap-out is the value, type is the type of RSRB peer, and state is the state of the RSRB peer.

VRP: rsrb_lsap_out = lsap-out, type = type, state = state

In the following message, the router is unable to find another router with which to exchange bridge protocol data units (BPDU's). BPDU's are exchanged to set up the spanning tree and determine the forwarding path.

RSRB(span): BPDU's peer not found

Related Commands

debug source bridge
debug source event

debug source event

Use the debug source event EXEC command to display information on source-route bridging activity. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug source event

Usage Guidelines

Some of the output from the debug source bridge and debug source error commands is identical to the output of this command.


Note In order to use the debug source event command to display traffic source-routed through an interface, you first must disable
fast switching of SRB frames with the no source bridge route-cache interface configuration command.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug source event command:

Router# debug source event
RSRB0: forward (srn 5 bn 1 trn 10), src: 8110.2222.33c1 dst: 1000.5a59.04f9 
[0800.3201.00A1.0050]
RSRB0: forward (srn 5 bn 1 trn 10), src: 8110.2222.33c1 dst: 1000.5a59.04f9 
[0800.3201.00A1.0050]
RSRB0: forward (srn 5 bn 1 trn 10), src: 8110.2222.33c1 dst: 1000.5a59.04f9 
[0800.3201.00A1.0050]
RSRB0: forward (srn 5 bn 1 trn 10), src: 8110.2222.33c1 dst: 1000.5a59.04f9 
[0800.3201.00A1.0050]
RSRB0: forward (srn 5 bn 1 trn 10), src: 8110.2222.33c1 dst: 1000.5a59.04f9 
[0800.3201.00A1.0050]

Table 131 describes the significant fields.


Table 131: Debug Source Event Field Descriptions
Field Description

RSRB0:

Indication that this RIF cache entry is for the Token Ring 0 interface, which has been configured for remote source-route bridging. (SRB1, in contrast, would indicate that this RIF cache entry is for Token Ring 1, configured for source-route bridging.)

forward

Forward (normal data) packet, in contrast to a control packet containing proprietary Cisco bridging information.

srn 5

Ring number of the packet's source ring.

bn 1

Bridge number of the bridge this packet traverses.

trn 10

Ring number of the packet's target ring.

src: 8110.2222.33c1

Source address of the route in this RIF cache entry.

dst: 1000.5a59.04f9

Destination address of the route in this RIF cache entry.

[0800.3201.00A1.0050]

RIF string in this RIF cache entry.

In the following example messages, SRBnumber or RSRBnumber denotes a message associated with interface Token Ring number. A number of 99 denotes the remote side of the network.

SRBnumber: no path, s: source-MAC-addr d: dst-MAC-addr rif: rif

In the preceding example, a bridgeable packet came in on interface Token Ring number but there was nowhere to send it. This is most likely a configuration error. For example, an interface has source bridging turned on, but it is not connected to another source bridging interface or a ring group.

In the following example, a bridgeable packet has been forwarded from Token Ring number to the target ring. The two interfaces are directly linked.

SRBnumber: direct forward (srn ring bn bridge trn ring)

In the following examples, a proxy explorer reply was not generated because there was no way to get to the address from this interface. The packet came from the node with the first address.

SRBnumber: br dropped proxy XID, address for address, wrong vring (rem)
SRBnumber: br dropped proxy TEST, address for address, wrong vring (rem)
SRBnumber: br dropped proxy XID, address for address, wrong vring (local)
SRBnumber: br dropped proxy TEST, address for address, wrong vring (local)
SRBnumber: br dropped proxy XID, address for address, no path
SRBnumber: br dropped proxy TEST, address for address, no path

In the following example, an appropriate proxy explorer reply was generated on behalf of the second address. It is sent to the first address.

SRBnumber: br sent proxy XID, address for address[rif]
SRBnumber: br sent proxy TEST, address for address[rif]

The following example indicates that the broadcast bits were not set, or that the routing information indicator on the packet was not set:

SRBnumber: illegal explorer, s: source-MAC-addr d: dst-MAC-addr rif: 
rif

The following example indicates that the direction bit in the RIF field was set, or that an odd packet length was encountered. Such packets are dropped.

SRBnumber: bad explorer control, D set or odd

The following example indicates that a spanning explorer was dropped because the spanning option was not configured on the interface:

SRBnumber: span dropped, input off, s: source-MAC-addr d: dst-MAC-addr rif: 
rif

The following example indicates that a spanning explorer was dropped because it had traversed the ring previously:

SRBnumber: span violation, s: source-MAC-addr d: dst-MAC-addr rif: rif

The following example indicates that an explorer was dropped because the maximum hop count limit was reached on that interface:

SRBnumber: max hops reached - hop-cnt, s: source-MAC-addr d: 
dst-MAC-addr rif: rif

The following example indicates that the ring exchange request was sent to the indicated peer. This request tells the remote side which rings this node has and asks for a reply indicating which rings that side has.

RSRB: sent RingXreq to ring-group/ip-addr

The following example indicates that a message was sent to the remote peer. The label variable can be AHDR (active header), PHDR (passive header), HDR (normal header), or DATA (data exchange), and op can be Forward, Explorer, Ring Xchg, Req, Ring Xchg, Rep, Unknown Ring Group, Unknown Peer, or Unknown Target Ring.

RSRB: label: sent op to ring-group/ip-addr

The following example indicates that the remote bridge and ring pair were removed from or added to the local ring group table because the remote peer changed:

RSRB: removing bn bridge rn ring from ring-group/ip-addr
RSRB: added bridge bridge, ring ring for ring-group/ip-addr

The following example shows miscellaneous remote peer connection establishment messages:

RSRB: peer ring-group/ip-addr closed [last state n]
RSRB: passive open ip-addr(remote port) -> local port
RSRB: CONN: opening peer ring-group/ip-addr, attempt n
RSRB: CONN: Remote closed ring-group/ip-addr on open
RSRB: CONN: peer ring-group/ip-addr open failed, reason[code]

The following example shows that an explorer packet was propagated onto the local ring from the remote ring group:

RSRBn: sent local explorer, bridge bridge trn ring, [rif]

The following messages indicate that the remote source-route bridging code found the packet was in error:

RSRBn: ring group ring-group not found
RSRBn: explorer rif [rif] not long enough

The following example indicates that a buffer could not be obtained for a ring exchange packet (this is an internal error):

RSRB: couldn't get pak for ringXchg

The following example indicates that a ring exchange packet was received that had an incorrect length (this is an internal error):

RSRB: XCHG: req/reply badly formed, length pak-length, peer peer-id

The following example indicates that a ring entry was removed for the peer; the ring was possibly disconnected from the network, causing the remote router to send an update to all its peers.

RSRB: removing bridge bridge ring ring from peer-id ring-type

The following example indicates that a ring entry was added for the specified peer; the ring was possibly added to the network, causing the other router to send an update to all its peers.

RSRB: added bridge bridge, ring ring for peer-id

The following example indicates that no memory was available to add a ring number to the ring group specified (this is an internal error):

RSRB: no memory for ring element ring-group

The following example indicates that memory was corrupted for a connection block (this is an internal error):

RSRB: CONN: corrupt connection block

The following example indicates that a connector process started, but that there was no packet to process (this is an internal error):

RSRB: CONN: warning, no initial packet, peer: ip-addr peer-pointer

The following example indicates that a packet was received with a version number different from the one present on the router:

RSRB: IF New version. local=local-version, 
remote=remote-version,pak-op-code peer-id

The following example indicates that a packet with a bad op code was received for a direct encapsulation peer (this is an internal error):

RSRB: IFin: bad op op-code (op code string) from peer-id

The following example indicates that the virtual ring header will not fit on the packet to be sent to the peer (this is an internal error):

RSRB: vrif_sender, hdr won't fit

The following example indicates that the specified peer is being opened. The retry count specifies the number of times the opening operation is attempted.

RSRB: CONN: opening peer peer-id retry-count

The following example indicates that the router, configured for FST encapsulation, received a version reply to the version request packet it had sent previously:

RSRB: FST Rcvd version reply from peer-id (version version-number)

The following example indicates that the router, configured for FST encapsulation, sent a version request packet to the specified peer:

RSRB: FST Version Request. op = opcode, peer-id

The following example indicates that the router received a packet with a bad op code from the specified peer (this is an internal error):

RSRB: FSTin: bad op opcode (op code string) from peer-id

The following example indicates that the TCP connection between the router and the specified peer is being aborted:

RSRB: aborting ring-group/peer-id (vrtcpd_abort called)

The following example indicates that an attempt to establish a TCP connection to a remote peer timed out:

RSRB: CONN: attempt timed out

The following example indicates that a packet was dropped because the ring group number in the packet did not correlate with the ring groups configured on the router:

RSRBnumber: ring group ring-group not found

debug span

Use the debug span EXEC command to display information on changes in the spanning-tree topology when debugging a transparent bridge. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug span

Usage Guidelines

This command is useful for tracking and verifying that the spanning-tree protocol is operating correctly.

Sample Display---IEEE Spanning Tree

The following is sample output from the debug span command for an IEEE BPDU packet:

Router# debug span
ST: Ether4 0000000000000A080002A02D6700000000000A080002A02D6780010000140002000F00

The following is sample output from the debug span command:


Table 132 describes the significant fields.


Table 132: Debug Span Field Descriptions---IEEE BPDU Packet
Field Description

ST:

Indication that this is a spanning tree packet.

Ether4

Interface receiving the packet.

(A) 0000

Indication that this is an IEEE BPDU packet.

(B) 00

Version.

(C) 00

Command mode:
00 indicates config BPDU.
80 indicates the Topology Change Notification (TCN) BPDU.

(D) 00

Topology change acknowledgment:
00 indicates no change.
80 indicates a change notification.

(E) 000A

Root priority.

(F) 080002A02D67

Root ID.

(G) 00000000

Root path cost (0 means the sender of this BPDU packet is the root bridge).

(H) 000A

Bridge priority.

(I) 080002A02D67

Bridge ID.

(J) 80

Port priority.

(K) 01

Port No. 1.

(L) 0000

Message age in 256ths of a second (0 seconds, in this case).

(M) 1400

Maximum age in 256ths of a second (20 seconds, in this case).

(N) 0200

Hello time in 256ths of a second (2 seconds, in this case).

(O) 0F00

Forward delay in 256ths of a second (15 seconds, in this case).

Sample Display---DEC Spanning Tree

The following is sample output from the debug span command for a DEC BPDU packet:

Router# debug span
ST: Ethernet4 E1190100000200000C01A2C90064008000000C0106CE0A01050F1E6A

The following is sample output from the debug span command:


Table 133 describes the significant fields.


Table 133: Debug Span Field Descriptions for a DEC BPDU Packet
Field Description

ST:

Indication that this is a spanning tree packet.

Ethernet4

Interface receiving the packet.

(A) E1

Indication that this is a DEC BPDU packet.

(B) 19

Indication that this is a DEC Hello packet. Possible values are as follows:
0x19---DEC Hello
0x02---Topology change notification (TCN)

(C) 01

DEC version.

(D) 00

Flag that is a bit field with the following mapping:
1---TCN
2---TCN acknowledgment
8---Use short timers

(E) 0002

Root priority.

(F) 00000C01A2C9

Root ID (MAC address).

(G) 0064

Root path cost (translated as 100 in decimal notation).

(H) 0080

Bridge priority.

(I) 00000C0106CE

Bridge ID.

(J) 0A

Port ID (in contrast to interface number).

(K) 01

Message age (in seconds).

(L) 05

Hello time (in seconds).

(M) 0F

Maximum age (in seconds).

(N) 1E

Forward delay (in seconds).

(O) 6A

Not applicable.

debug sse

Use the debug sse EXEC command to display information for the silicon switching engine (SSE) processor. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug sse

Usage Guidelines

Use the debug sse command to observe statistics and counters maintained by the SSE.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug sse command:

Router# debug sse
SSE: IP number of cache entries changed 273 274
SSE: bridging enabled
SSE: interface Ethernet0/0 icb 0x30 addr 0x29 status 0x21A040 protos 0x11
SSE: interface Ethernet0/1 icb 0x33 addr 0x29 status 0x21A040 protos 0x11
SSE: interface Ethernet0/2 icb 0x36 addr 0x29 status 0x21A040 protos 0x10
SSE: interface Ethernet0/3 icb 0x39 addr 0x29 status 0x21A040 protos 0x11
SSE: interface Ethernet0/4 icb 0x3C addr 0x29 status 0x21A040 protos 0x10
SSE: interface Ethernet0/5 icb 0x3F addr 0x29 status 0x21A040 protos 0x11
SSE: interface Hssi1/0 icb 0x48 addr 0x122 status 0x421E080 protos 0x11
SSE: cache update took 316ms, elapsed 320ms

The following line indicates that the SSE cache is being updated due to a change in the IP fast switching cache:

SSE: IP number of cache entries changed 273 274

The following line indicates that bridging functions were enabled on the SSE:

SSE: bridging enabled

The following lines indicate that the SSE is now loaded with information about the interfaces:

SSE: interface Ethernet0/0 icb 0x30 addr 0x29 status 0x21A040 protos 0x11
SSE: interface Ethernet0/1 icb 0x33 addr 0x29 status 0x21A040 protos 0x11
SSE: interface Ethernet0/2 icb 0x36 addr 0x29 status 0x21A040 protos 0x10
SSE: interface Ethernet0/3 icb 0x39 addr 0x29 status 0x21A040 protos 0x11
SSE: interface Ethernet0/4 icb 0x3C addr 0x29 status 0x21A040 protos 0x10
SSE: interface Ethernet0/5 icb 0x3F addr 0x29 status 0x21A040 protos 0x11
SSE: interface Hssi1/0 icb 0x48 addr 0x122 status 0x421E080 protos 0x11

The following line indicates that the SSE took 316 ms of processor time to update the SSE cache. The value of 320 ms represents the total time elapsed while the cache updates were performed.

SSE: cache update took 316ms, elapsed 320ms

debug standby

Use the debug standby EXEC command to display Hot Standby Protocol state changes. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug standby

Usage Guidelines

The debug standby command displays Hot Standby Protocol state changes and debugging information regarding transmission and receipt of Hot Standby Protocol packets. Use this command to determine whether hot standby routers recognize one another and take the proper actions.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug standby command:

Router# debug standby
SB: Ethernet0 state Virgin -> Listen
SB: Starting up hot standby process
SB:Ethernet0 Hello in 192.168.72.21 Active pri 90 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello in 192.168.72.21 Active pri 90 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello in 192.168.72.21 Active pri 90 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello in 192.168.72.21 Active pri 90 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB: Ethernet0 state Listen -> Speak
SB:Ethernet0 Hello out 192.168.72.20 Speak pri 100 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello in 192.168.72.21 Active pri 90 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello out 192.168.72.20 Speak pri 100 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello in 192.168.72.21 Active pri 90 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello out 192.168.72.20 Speak pri 100 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello in 192.168.72.21 Active pri 90 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB: Ethernet0 state Speak -> Standby
SB:Ethernet0 Hello out 192.168.72.20 Standby pri 100 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello in 192.168.72.21 Active pri 90 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello out 192.168.72.20 Standby pri 100 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello in 192.168.72.21 Active pri 90 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello out 192.168.72.20 Standby pri 100 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello in 192.168.72.21 Active pri 90 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB: Ethernet0 Coup out 192.168.72.20 Standby pri 100 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB: Ethernet0 state Standby -> Active
SB:Ethernet0 Hello out 192.168.72.20 Active pri 100 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello in 192.168.72.21 Speak pri 90 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello out 192.168.72.20 Active pri 100 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello in 192.168.72.21 Speak pri 90 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29
SB:Ethernet0 Hello out 192.168.72.20 Active pri 100 hel 3 hol 10 ip 192.168.72.29

Table 134 describes the significant fields.


Table 134: Debug Standby Field Descriptions
Field Description

SB

An abbreviation for "standby."

Ethernet0

The interface on which a hot standby packet was sent or received.

Hello in

Hello packet received from the specified IP address.

Hello out

Hello packet sent from the specified IP address.

pri

Priority advertised in the hello packet.

hel

Hello interval advertised in the hello packet.

hol

Holddown interval advertised in the hello packet.

ip address

Hot standby group IP address advertised in the hello packet.

state

Transition from one state to another.

Coup out address

Coup packet sent by the router from the specified IP address.

The following line indicates that the router is initiating the Hot Standby Protocol. The standby ip interface configuration command enables hot standby.

SB: Starting up hot standby process

The following line indicates that a state transition occurred on the interface:

SB: Ethernet0 state Listen -> Speak

debug stun packet

Use the debug stun packet EXEC command to display information on packets traveling through the serial tunnel (STUN) links. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug stun packet [group] [address]

Syntax Description

group

(Optional) Decimal integer assigned to a group. Using this option limits output to packets associated with the specified STUN group.

address

(Optional) Output is further limited to only those packets containing the specified STUN address. The address argument is in the appropriate format for the STUN protocol running for the specified group.

Usage Guidelines

Because using this command is processor intensive, it is best to use it after hours, rather than in a production environment. It is also best to turn this command on by itself, rather than use it in conjunction with other debug commands.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug stun packet command:


The following line describes an X1 type of packet:

STUN sdlc: 0:00:04 Serial3         NDI: (0C2/008) U: SNRM    PF:1

Table 135 describes the significant fields in this line of debug stun packet output.


Table 135: Debug STUN Packet Field Descriptions
Field Description

STUN sdlc:

Indication that the STUN feature is providing the information.

0:00:04

Time elapsed since receipt of previous packet.

Serial3

Interface type and unit number reporting the event.

NDI:

The type of cloud separating the SDLC end nodes. Possible values follow:

  • NDI---Network input

  • SDI---Serial link

0C2

SDLC address of the SDLC connection.

008

A modulo value of 8.

U:SNRM

The frame type followed by the command or response type. In this case it is an Unnumbered frame that contains an SNRM (Set Normal Response Mode) command. The possible frame types are as follows:

  • I---Information frame

  • S---Supervisory frame. The possible commands and responses are: RR (Receive Ready), RNR (Receive Not Ready), and REJ (Reject).

  • U---Unnumbered frame. The possible commands are: UI (Unnumbered Information), SNRM, DISC/RD (Disconnect/Request Disconnect), SIM/RIM, XID Exchange Identification), TEST. The possible responses are UA (unnumbered acknowledgment), DM (Disconnected Mode), and FRMR (Frame Reject Mode)

PF:1

Poll/Final bit. The possible values are as follows:

  • 0---Off

  • 1---On

The following line of output describes an X2 type of packet:

STUN sdlc: 0:00:00 Serial3         SDI: (0C2/008) S: RR      PF:1 NR:000

All the fields in the previous line of output match those for an X1 type of packet, except the last field, which is additional. NR:000 indicates a receive count of 0; the range for the receive count is 0 to 7.

The following line of output describes an X3 type of packet:

STUN sdlc: 0:00:00 Serial3         SDI: (0C2/008) S:I PF:1 NR:000 NS:000

All fields in the previous line of output match those for an X2 type of packet, except the last field, which is additional. NS:000 indicates a send count of 0; the range for the send count is 0 to 7.

debug sw56

Use the debug sw56 EXEC command to display debug information for switched 56K services.

[no] debug sw56

The following shows sample output from the debug sw56 command:

router# debug sw56

debug syscon perfdata

Use the debug syscon perfdata EXEC command to display messages related to performance data collection. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug syscon perfdata

Usage Guidelines

This command is primarily useful to your technical support representative.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug syscon perfdata command. In this example, the CallFail poll group is configured and applied to shelf 1111. The system determines when the next polling cycle should occur and polls the shelf at the appropriate time. The data is stored in the file CallFail.891645120, and an older file is deleted.

SysCont# debug syscon perfdata
PERF: Applying 'CallFail' to shelf 1111
PERF: Setting up objects for SNMP polling: 'CallFail', shelf 1111
PERF: year hours mins secs msecs = 1998 15 11 1 5
PERF: Start 'CallFail' timer, next cycle in 0 mins, 59 secs
PERF: Timer event:  CallFail, 4 minutes
PERF: Polling 'CallFail', shelf 1111, pc 60AEFDF0
PERF: SNMP resp: Type 6, 'CallFail', shelf 1111, error_st 0
PERF: Logged polled data to disk0:/performance/shelf-1111/CallFail.891645120
PERF: Deleted disk0:/performance/shelf-1111/CallFail.891637469

debug syscon sdp

Use the debug syscon sdp EXEC command to display messages related to the Shelf Discovery Protocol (SDP). The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug syscon sdp

Usage Guidelines

Use this command to display information about SDP packets exchanged between the shelf and the system controller.

Sample Display

The following sample output from the debug syscon sdp command shows the system controller discovering a managed shelf. In the first few lines, the system controller receives a Hello packet from shelf 99 at 172.23.66.106. The system controller responds with a Hello packet. When the shelf sends another Hello packet, the system controller resets the timer and sends another packet.

Syscon# debug syscon sdp
SYSCTLR: Hello packet received via UDP from 172.23.66.106
%SYSCTLR-6-SHELF_ADD: Shelf 99 discovered located at address 172.23.66.106
Hello packet sent to the RS located at 172.23.66.106
SYSCTLR: Hello packet received via UDP from 172.23.66.106
Timer for shelf 99 updated, shelf is alive
Hello packet sent to the RS located at 172.23.66.106

The following sample output from the debug syscon sdp command shows the shelf contacting the system controller. The shelf sends a Hello packet to the system controller at 172.23.66.111. The system controller responds with the autoconfiguration commands. The remaining lines show the Hello packets exchanged between the shelf and the system controller.

Shelf# debug syscon sdp
SYSCTLR: Hello packet sent to the SYSCTLR at 172.23.66.111
SYSCTLR: Command packet received from SYSCTLR
Feb 24 17:24:16.713: %SHELF-6-SYSCTLR_ESTABLISHED: Configured via system controller 
located at 172.23.66.111
SYSCTLR: Rcvd HELLO from SYSCTLR at 172.23.66.111
SYSCTLR: Hello packet sent to the SYSCTLR at 172.23.66.111
SYSCTLR: Rcvd HELLO from SYSCTLR at 172.23.66.111

debug syslog-server

Use the debug syslog-server EXEC command to display information about the syslog server process. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug syslog-server

Usage Guidelines

This command outputs a message every time the syslog server receives a message. It also displays information about subfile creation, removal, and renaming.

Use this command when subfiles are not being created as configured or data is not being written to subfiles. This command is also useful for detecting syslog file size mismatches.

Sample Display

The following sample display shows output when the following command has been added to the configuration:

logging syslog-server 10 3 syslogs

This example shows the files being created. Use the dir disk0:/syslogs.dir command to view the contents of the newly created directory.

Router# debug syslog-server
SYSLOG_SERVER:Syslog file syslogs
SYSLOG_SERVER:Directory disk0:/syslogs.dir created.
SYSLOG_SERVER:Syslog file syslogs created successfully.

When a syslog message is received, the router checks to see if the current file will be too large when the new data is added. In this example, two messages are successfully added to the file.

SYSLOG_SERVER: Configured size : 10240 bytes
Current size : 0 bytes
Data size : 68 bytes
New size : 68 bytes
SYSLOG_SERVER: Wrote 68 bytes successfully.
SYSLOG_SERVER: Configured size : 10240 bytes
Current size : 68 bytes
Data size : 61 bytes
New size : 129 bytes
SYSLOG_SERVER: Wrote 61 bytes successfully.

Table 136 describes the significant fields.


Table 136: Debug Syslog-Server Field Descriptions
Field Description

Configured size

The maximum subfile size, as set in the logging syslog-server command.

Current size

The size of the current subfile before the new message is added.

Data size

The size of the syslog message.

New size

The size of the current subfile after the syslog message is added.

The following output indicates that the current file is too full to fit the next syslog message. The oldest subfile is removed, and the remaining files are renamed. A new file is created and opened for writing syslog messages.

SYSLOG_SERVER:Last archive subfile disk0:/syslogs.dir/syslogs.2 removed.
SYSLOG_SERVER: Subfile disk0:/syslogs.dir/syslogs.1 renamed as 
disk0:/syslogs.dir/syslogs.2.
SYSLOG_SERVER:subfile disk0:/syslogs.dir/syslogs.cur renamed as 
disk0:/syslogs.dir/syslogs.1.
SYSLOG_SERVER:Current subfile disk0:/syslogs.dir/syslogs.cur has been opened.

debug tacacs

Use the debug tacacs EXEC command to display information associated with the Terminal Access Controller Access Control System (TACACS). The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug tacacs

Usage Guidelines

TACACS is a distributed security system that secures networks against unauthorized access. Cisco supports TACACS under the Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA) security system.

Use the debug aaa authentication command to get a high-level view of login activity. When TACACS is used on the router, you can use the debug tacacs command for more detailed debugging information.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the debug aaa authentication command for a TACACS login attempt that was successful. The information indicates that TACACS+ is the authentication method used.

Router# debug aaa authentication
14:01:17: AAA/AUTHEN (567936829): Method=TACACS+
14:01:17: TAC+: send AUTHEN/CONT packet
14:01:17: TAC+ (567936829): received authen response status = PASS
14:01:17: AAA/AUTHEN (567936829): status = PASS

The following is sample output from the debug tacacs command for a TACACS login attempt that was successful as indicated by the status PASS.

Router# debug tacacs
14:00:09: TAC+: Opening TCP/IP connection to 192.168.60.15 using source 10.116.0.79
14:00:09: TAC+: Sending TCP/IP packet number 383258052-1 to 192.168.60.15 
(AUTHEN/START)
14:00:09: TAC+: Receiving TCP/IP packet number 383258052-2 from 192.168.60.15
14:00:09: TAC+ (383258052): received authen response status = GETUSER
14:00:10: TAC+: send AUTHEN/CONT packet
14:00:10: TAC+: Sending TCP/IP packet number 383258052-3 to 192.168.60.15 (AUTHEN/CONT)
14:00:10: TAC+: Receiving TCP/IP packet number 383258052-4 from 192.168.60.15
14:00:10: TAC+ (383258052): received authen response status = GETPASS
14:00:14: TAC+: send AUTHEN/CONT packet
14:00:14: TAC+: Sending TCP/IP packet number 383258052-5 to 192.168.60.15 (AUTHEN/CONT)
14:00:14: TAC+: Receiving TCP/IP packet number 383258052-6 from 192.168.60.15
14:00:14: TAC+ (383258052): received authen response status = PASS
14:00:14: TAC+: Closing TCP/IP connection to 192.168.60.15

The following is sample output from the debug tacacs command for a TACACS login attempt that was unsuccessful as indicated by the status FAIL.

Router# debug tacacs
13:53:35: TAC+: Opening TCP/IP connection to 192.168.60.15 using source
192.48.0.79
13:53:35: TAC+: Sending TCP/IP packet number 416942312-1 to 192.168.60.15
(AUTHEN/START)
13:53:35: TAC+: Receiving TCP/IP packet number 416942312-2 from 192.168.60.15
13:53:35: TAC+ (416942312): received authen response status = GETUSER
13:53:37: TAC+: send AUTHEN/CONT packet
13:53:37: TAC+: Sending TCP/IP packet number 416942312-3 to 192.168.60.15
(AUTHEN/CONT)
13:53:37: TAC+: Receiving TCP/IP packet number 416942312-4 from 192.168.60.15
13:53:37: TAC+ (416942312): received authen response status = GETPASS
13:53:38: TAC+: send AUTHEN/CONT packet
13:53:38: TAC+: Sending TCP/IP packet number 416942312-5 to 192.168.60.15
(AUTHEN/CONT)
13:53:38: TAC+: Receiving TCP/IP packet number 416942312-6 from 192.168.60.15
13:53:38: TAC+ (416942312): received authen response status = FAIL
13:53:40: TAC+: Closing TCP/IP connection to 192.168.60.15

Related Commands

debug aaa accounting
debug aaa authentication

debug tacacs events

Use the debug tacacs events EXEC command to display information from the TACACS+ helper process. The no form of this command disables debugging output.

[no] debug tacacs events

Usage Guidelines

Use the debug tacacs events command only in response to a request from service personnel to collect data when a problem has been reported.

Caution Use the debug tacacs events command with caution because it can generate a significant amount of output.

The TACACS protocol is used on routers to assist in managing user accounts. TACACS+ enhances the TACACS functionality by adding security features and cleanly separating out the authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) functionality.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the debug tacacs events command. In this example, the opening and closing of a TCP connection to a TACACS+ server are shown, as well as the bytes read and written over the connection and the connection's TCP status.

Router# debug tacacs events
%LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Async2, changed state to up 
00:03:16: TAC+: Opening TCP/IP to 192.168.58.104/1049 timeout=15 
00:03:16: TAC+: Opened TCP/IP handle 0x48A87C to 192.168.58.104/1049 
00:03:16: TAC+: periodic timer started
00:03:16: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 req=3BD868 id=-1242409656 ver=193 handle=0x48A87C 
(ESTAB)
expire=14 AUTHEN/START/SENDAUTH/CHAP queued 
00:03:17: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 ESTAB 3BD868 wrote 46 of 46 bytes 
00:03:22: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 CLOSEWAIT read=12 wanted=12 alloc=12 got=12 
00:03:22: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 CLOSEWAIT read=61 wanted=61 alloc=61 got=49 
00:03:22: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 received 61 byte reply for 3BD868 
00:03:22: TAC+: req=3BD868 id=-1242409656 ver=193 handle=0x48A87C (CLOSEWAIT) expire=9
AUTHEN/START/SENDAUTH/CHAP processed 
00:03:22: TAC+: periodic timer stopped (queue empty) 
00:03:22: TAC+: Closing TCP/IP 0x48A87C connection to 192.168.58.104/1049 
00:03:22: TAC+: Opening TCP/IP to 192.168.58.104/1049 timeout=15 
00:03:22: TAC+: Opened TCP/IP handle 0x489F08 to 192.168.58.104/1049 
00:03:22: TAC+: periodic timer started
00:03:22: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 req=3BD868 id=299214410 ver=192 handle=0x489F08 (ESTAB)
expire=14 AUTHEN/START/SENDPASS/CHAP queued 
00:03:23: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 ESTAB 3BD868 wrote 41 of 41 bytes 
00:03:23: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 CLOSEWAIT read=12 wanted=12 alloc=12 got=12 
00:03:23: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 CLOSEWAIT read=21 wanted=21 alloc=21 got=9 
00:03:23: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 received 21 byte reply for 3BD868 
00:03:23: TAC+: req=3BD868 id=299214410 ver=192 handle=0x489F08 (CLOSEWAIT) expire=13
AUTHEN/START/SENDPASS/CHAP processed 
00:03:23: TAC+: periodic timer stopped (queue empty) 

The TACACAS messages are intended to be self-explanatory or for consumption by service personnel only. However, the following messages shown above are briefly explained in the following text.

The following message indicates that a TCP open request to host 192.168.58.104 on port 1049 will time out in 15 seconds if it gets no response:

00:03:16: TAC+: Opening TCP/IP to 192.168.58.104/1049 timeout=15 

The following message indicates a successful open operation and provides the address of the internal TCP "handle" for this connection:

00:03:16: TAC+: Opened TCP/IP handle 0x48A87C to 192.168.58.104/1049 

The following message indicates that a TACACS+ request has been queued:

00:03:16: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 req=3BD868 id=-1242409656 ver=193 handle=0x48A87C 
(ESTAB) expire=14 AUTHEN/START/SENDAUTH/CHAP queued 

The message identifies the following:

The following message indicates that all 46 bytes were written to address 192.168.58.104 for request 3BD868:

00:03:17: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 ESTAB 3BD868 wrote 46 of 46 bytes 

The following message indicates that 12 bytes were read in reply to the request.:

00:03:22: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 CLOSEWAIT read=12 wanted=12 alloc=12 got=12 

The following message indicates that 49 more bytes were read, making a total of 61 bytes in all, which is all that was expected:

00:03:22: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 CLOSEWAIT read=61 wanted=61 alloc=61 got=49 

The following message indicates that a complete 61-byte reply has been read and processed for request 3BD868:

00:03:22: TAC+: 192.168.58.104 received 61 byte reply for 3BD868 00:03:22: TAC+: 
req=3BD868 id=-1242409656 ver=193 handle=0x48A87C (CLOSEWAIT) expire=9 
AUTHEN/START/SENDAUTH/CHAP processed 

The following message indicates that the TACACS+ server helper process switched itself off when it had no more work to do:

00:03:22: TAC+: periodic timer stopped (queue empty) 

Related Commands

debug aaa accounting
debug aaa authentication
debug aaa authorization
debug sw56


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