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Banyan VINES Commands

Banyan VINES Commands

The Banyan Virtual Network System (VINES) protocol is a networking system for personal computers. This proprietary protocol was developed by Banyan and is derived from the Xerox Network Systems (XNS) protocol. Cisco's implementation of VINES was designed in conjunction with Banyan.

Cisco's implementation of Banyan VINES provides routing of VINES packets on all media. Although the software automatically determines a metric value that it uses to route updates based on the delay set for the interface, Cisco's software implementation allows you to customize the metric. Cisco's implementation also offers address resolution to respond to address requests. Media Access Control (MAC)-level echo support is also available for Ethernet, IEEE 802.2, Token Ring, and Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) media. Name-to-address mapping for VINES host names is also supported, as are access lists to filter outgoing packets.


Note Not all Cisco access servers support Banyan VINES. For more information, refer to the release notes for the release you are running.

Use the commands in this chapter to configure and monitor VINES networks. For VINES configuration information and examples, refer to the "Configuring Banyan VINES" chapter in the Network Protocols Configuration Guide, Part 3.

clear vines cache

To delete entries from the VINES fast-switching cache, use the clear vines cache EXEC command.

clear vines cache [interface interface | neighbor address | server network | counters]

Syntax Description

interface interface

(Optional) Deletes from the fast-switching cache table any entry that has one or more paths that go through the specified interface.

neighbor address

(Optional) Deletes from the fast-switching cache table any entry that has one or more paths via the specified neighbor router.

server network

(Optional) Deletes from the fast-switching cache table any entry whose network number part of the destination address matches the specified network address. The argument network can be either a 4-byte hexadecimal number or a 4-byte decimal number (if you have issued a vines decimal command).

counters

(Optional) Deletes the fast-switching cache and counters.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The fast-switching cache is a table of routes used when fast switching is enabled.

If you do not specify any keywords or arguments, all entries in the fast-switching cache are deleted.

Examples

The following example deletes all entries from the VINES fast-switching cache table:

clear vines cache 

The following example deletes all entries whose destination server has the address 30002E6D:

clear vines cache server 30002E6D

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show vines cache
vines decimal
vines route-cache

clear vines ipc

To delete VINES Interprocess Communications Protocol (IPC) connection blocks, use the clear vines ipc EXEC command.

clear vines ipc number

Syntax Description

number

Hexadecimal number of the IPC connection to delete.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

An IPC connection entry is built each time the Cisco IOS software initiates or receives an IPC DATA message from a router that is not already in this table.

Examples

The following example deletes IPC connection 0x1D from the table of VINES IPC connections:

clear vines ipc 1D

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show vines ipc

clear vines neighbor

To delete entries from the neighbor table, use the clear vines neighbor EXEC command.

clear vines neighbor {address | *}

Syntax Description

address

Address of the neighbor entry whose entry should be deleted from the neighbor table. The argument is a 6-byte hexadecimal number in the format network:host where network is 4 bytes and host is 2 bytes.

*

Deletes all entries from the neighbor path table except the entry for the local router.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The neighbor table contains an entry for each of the router's neighbor nodes.

Deleting an entry from the neighbor table also deletes any routes in the routing table that have that neighbor as the first hop and all fast-switching cache entries that have that neighbor as the first hop in any of their paths.

Example

The following example deletes all entries from the neighbor table:

clear vines neighbor *

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clear vines route
show vines neighbor
show vines route
vines decimal
vines neighbor
vines route

clear vines route

To delete network addresses from the routing table, use the clear vines route EXEC command.

clear vines route {network | *}

Syntax Description

network

Network number of the entry to delete from the routing table. The argument network can be either a 4-byte hexadecimal number, a 4-byte decimal number (if you have issued a vines decimal command), or a host name (if you have issued a vines enhancements command).

*

Deletes all entries from the routing table.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Deleting an entry from the routing table with the clear vines route command also deletes any entries in the fast-switching table that are a part of that logical network.

Example

The following example deletes all entries from the VINES routing table:

clear vines route *

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clear vines route
show vines neighbor
show vines route
vines decimal
vines host
vines route

clear vines traffic

To clear all VINES-related statistics that are displayed by the show vines traffic command, use the clear vines traffic EXEC command.

clear vines traffic

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The clear vines traffic command clears only the statistics displayed by the show vines traffic command. It has no effect on the value of the VINES counters retrieved by Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP).

Example

The following example zeros all VINES-related traffic statistics:

clear vines traffic 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show vines traffic

ping

To determine basic network connectivity, use the ping EXEC command.

ping [vines] [address]

Syntax Description

vines

(Optional) Specifies the VINES protocol. If you omit this keyword, the Cisco IOS software prompts for it.

address

(Optional) Address of system to ping. If you omit the address, the software prompts for it.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The ping command determines network connectivity by sending datagrams to another host on the network.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the ping command:

Router# ping vines 27AF92:1
Type escape sequence to abort. 
Sending 5, 100-byte VINES Echos to 27AF92:1,
timeout is 2 seconds: 
!!!!! 
Success rate is 100 percent, round-trip min/avg/max = 4/7/8 ms
Router# ping
Protocol [ip]: vines
Target VINES address: 27AF92:1 
Repeat count [5]: 10
Datagram size [100]: 500
Timeout in seconds [2]: 
Verbose [n]: 
Type escape sequence to abort. 
Sending 10, 500-byte VINES Echos to 27AF92:1,
timeout is 2 seconds: 
!!!!!!!!!! 
Success rate is 100 percent, round-trip min/avg/max = 4/7/8 ms

show vines access

To display the VINES access lists currently defined, use the show vines access EXEC command.

show vines access [access-list-number]

Syntax Description

access-list-number

(Optional) Number of the access list to display.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If no access list number is specified, all access lists are displayed.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show vines access command:

Router# show vines access
Vines access list 1
 deny      SPP 30015800:0001 00000000:00000000 202 00123456:8005 00000000:0000 249
 permit  IP 00000000:0000 FFFFFFFF:FFFF 00000000:0000 FFFFFFFF:FFFF
Vines access list 101
 deny      SPP 00112233:0001 00000000:0000 0006 0000 
                         00123456:8005 00000000:00000000 0000 FFFF permit  IP 00000000:0000 FFFFFFFF:FFFF 00000000:0000 FFFFFFFF:FFFF

Table 7 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 7: Show VINES Access Field Descriptions
Field Description

Vines access list...

Number of the VINES access list.

deny

Networks to which access is denied.

permit

Networks to which access is permitted.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

vines access-list (extended)
vines access-list (simple)
vines access-list (standard)

show vines cache

To display the contents of the VINES fast-switching cache, use the show vines cache EXEC command.

show vines cache [address | interface type number | neighbor address | server network]

Syntax Description

address

(Optional) Displays the entry in the fast-switching cache for the specified station.

interface type number

(Optional) Displays all neighbors in the fast-switching cache that are accessible via the specified interface type and number.

neighbor address

(Optional) Displays all routes in the VINES fast-switching cache that have the specified neighbor as their first hop. The argument address is a 6-byte hexadecimal number in the format network:host, where network is 4  bytes and host is 2 bytes, a 4-byte decimal number in the same format (if you have issued a vines decimal command), or a host name (if you have issued a vines enhancements command).

server network

(Optional) Displays all entries in the VINES fast-switching cache that are in the specified logical network. The argument network can be either a 4-byte hexadecimal number or a 4-byte decimal number (if you have issued a vines decimal command).

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If no keywords or arguments are specified, all entries in the fast-switching cache are displayed.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from show vines cache command. This sample shows all entries in the VINES fast-switching cache.

Router# show vines cache
VINES fast switching cache information:
  Current: 0 entries, 0 paths
  History:
      Added:          0 server,          0 router,          0 client
    Updated:          0 server,          0 router,          0 client
    Expired:          0 server,          0 router,          0 client
    Removed:          0 server,          0 router,          0 client
    Flushes:          4 by neighbor,           1 by server
                      8 by interface,          1 entire table
Hash    Destination          Int        Age    Length    Type    MAC Header
13/00  Router1                *T0            46      16/18    1          10005A746A3600003080FB06BCBC03BA
27/00  Router2                  E1            11      14/14    1          00000C01D87C00000C0158010BAD
                                          *T0            11      16/18    1          00003000435500003080FB06BCBC03BA
3E/00  Router3                *T0            42      16/18    1          10005A6FBC15000003080FB06BCBC03BA
72/00  30002E6D:0001      E1            32      14/14    1          00000C01D87C00000C0158010BAD
                                          *T0            32      16/18    1          00003000435500003080FB07BCBC03BA
                                            T0            32      16/18    1          10005A6FBC1500003080FB06BCBC03BA
                                            T0            32      16/18    1          10005A6FBC1500003080FB06BCBC03BA
FE/00  Router4                *E2          264      14/14    1          00000C0124EA00000C0151AF0BAD

Table 8 describes fields shown in the display.

Note that neighbor information is not explicitly displayed by the show vines cache command. However, you can determine it by looking at the neighbor and routing tables (using the show vines neighbor and show vines route commands, respectively).


Table 8: Show VINES Cache Field Descriptions
Field Description

Current:

Number of entries and paths currently in the cache.

History:

Number of events since the last time the counters were cleared.

   Added:

Number of server, router, and client entries added to the cache.

   Updated:

Number of server, router, and client entry updates.

   Expired:

Number of server, router, and client entries that timed out.

   Removed:

Number of server, router, and client entries removed from the cache.

   Flushes:

Number of neighbor, server, interface, and entire table flushes.

Hash

Position of this entry in the neighbor table.

Destination

Name or address of the destination station.

Int

Interface out which the packet is sent. An asterisk preceding the interface name indicates that this is the next entry that will be used for the destination.

Age

Age of the entry, in seconds.

Length

Stored length of the packet's MAC header, followed by a slash and the actual length of the MAC header. Both lengths do not include the length of the Type field. These two lengths may differ because the initial bytes of Token Ring and FDDI frames are not stored.

Type

Local encapsulation type.

MAC Header

MAC header used to reach the destination.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clear vines route
show vines neighbor
show vines route
vines decimal
vines route-cache

show vines host

To display the entries in the VINES host name table, use the show vines host EXEC command.

show vines host [name]

Syntax Description

name

(Optional) Displays the entry in the VINES name table that has the specified name.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If no name is specified, all entries in the host name table are displayed.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show vines host command:

Router# show vines host
Name                    Address
Router1              0027AF9A:0001
Router2              0027D0E4:0001
Router3              002ABFAA:0001
Router4              30015800:0001

Table 9 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 9: Show VINES Host Field Descriptions
Field Description

Name

Name of the VINES host.

Address

Address of the VINES host.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

vines host

show vines interface

To display status of the VINES interfaces configured in the Cisco IOS software and the parameters configured on each interface, use the show vines interface EXEC command.

show vines interface [type number]

Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Interface type.

number

(Optional) Interface number.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If you omit all keywords, this command displays values for all interfaces, and displays all VINES global parameters.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show vines interface command:

Router# show vines interface
VINES address is 3000902D:0001
    Next client will be 3000902D:8001
    Addresses are displayed in hexadecimal format.
    Slowest update interval is 90 seconds
    Roll Call timer queue:
      Neighbor Router3-Et2-0000.0c01.24ea in 180 seconds
    Sequence: 01029DD7, Packet ID: 00000003
    Reassembly timer queue:    (empty)
    Retry timer queue:    (empty)
    Participating in vines time of day synchronization
Hssi0 is down, line protocol is down
    VINES protocol processing disabled
Fddi0 is up, line protocol is up
    VINES broadcast encapsulation is ARPA
    Interface metric is 0008 [0 5000] (0.1000 seconds)
    Split horizon is enabled
    ARP processing is dynamic, state is learning (for another 18 seconds)
    Special serverless net processing enabled
    Outgoing access list is not set
    Fast switching is enabled
    Routing updates every 90 seconds. Next in 50 seconds.
    Next synchronization update in 11:58:17.
    Nodes present:    0 5.5x servers, 0 5.5x routers, 0 5.5x clients
                                    0 4.11 servers, 0 4.11 routers, 0 4.11 clients
    Neighbors: none.

Table 10 describes the fields that may be shown in the display.


Table 10: Show VINES Interface Field Descriptions
Field Description

VINES address

Address of the router.

Next client will be

Address the router assigns to the next client that requests an address. This line is important only if the router has been configured via the vines arp-enable command to respond to address assignment requests.

Addresses

Indicates whether addresses are displayed as decimal or hexadecimal numbers.

Slowest update interval

Indicates the longest time interval (in seconds) between routing updates on any of the router's interfaces.

Roll Call timer
Neighbor

Displays a list of all neighbor paths for which a Routing Table Protocol (RTP) request is sent on a regular basis, and the interval until that timer expires.

Sequence

Current Sequenced Routing Update Protocol (SRTP) sequence number for this router.

Packet ID

Identifier number that is used on the last SRTP update message sent by this router.

Reassembly timer

Displays a list of all neighbor paths for which an SRTP update is currently being reassembled, and the interval until that timer expires.

Retry timer

Displays a list of all neighbor paths for which an SRTP request is currently being retried, and the interval until that timer expires.

Participating in vines time of day synchronization

Indicates whether the router is participating in VINES time-of-day synchronization. This is controlled by the vines time participate global configuration command.

Hssi0/Ethernet 0/Ethernet 1/Fddi0 is up/down

Type and number of interface, and whether it is currently active and inserted into network (up) or inactive and not inserted (down).

Line protocol is

Indicates whether the software processes that handle the line protocol believe the interface is usable (that is, whether keepalives are successful). This field can report the values "up," "down," and "administratively down."

VINES protocol processing disabled

Indicates that VINES processing is not enabled on the interface (that is, you have not issued a vines metric command on the interface).

VINES broadcast encapsulation

Type of encapsulation used for VINES broadcast packets, as defined with the vines encapsulation command. This field can report the values "arpa," "vines-tr," and "snap."

Interface metric

Metric that has been configured for the interface with the vines metric command. The metric is shown in internal form, configuration form, and in seconds.

Split horizon

Indicates whether split horizon has been enabled or disabled (via the vines split-horizon command).

ARP processing

Indicates whether this interface will process ARP packets, as specified by the vines arp-enable command.

Special serverless net processing

Indicates whether this interface is defined via the vines serverless command as being connected to a serverless network.

Outgoing access list

Indicates whether an access list is set.

Fast switching

Indicates whether fast switching has been enabled via the vines route-cache command). The value reported in this field can be "enabled," "disabled," or "not supported."

Routing updates every
   Next in

Frequency of routing updates, in seconds. This also indicates when the next routing update will be transmitted on the interface. You set the update interval with the vines update interval command.

Routing updates

Indicates whether routing updates contain all entries in the routing table or just changes to the table since the last update was sent. You set the method used with the vines update deltas command.

Next synchronization

Indicates when the next SRTP synchronization update will be sent.

Nodes present

Indicates the number and type of all VINES-speaking devices present on the given physical network segment.

Neighbors: none

List of all VINES neighbors on that interface and what version of the RTP protocol they are running (0 means RTP, and 1 means SRTP).

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search onlineto find documentation of related commands.

vines arp-enable
vines encapsulation
vines metric
vines route-cache

show vines ipc

To display information about any currently active IPC connections, use the show vines ipc EXEC command.

show vines ipc

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Information about the IPC protocol formats, data sequences, and state machines can be found in Banyan documentation.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show vines ipc command:

Router# show vines ipc
Vines IPC Status:
Next Port: 513
Next Connection: 3
Next check in: 27 sec
Connection 2, state: connected
 Local address: Router1, id 0002, last port: 0200
 Remote address: Router2, id 0002, last port: 0001
 Last send seq: 0005, Last rcvd seq: 0005
 Next send ack: 0005, Last sent ack: 0005
 Server metric 4, last hop 0, bias 0, total 800 (ms)
 Send ACK in 0 ms, Retransmit in 0 ms
 Idle check in 0 sec
 Retransmit queue contains 0 packets
 No packet in reassembly

Table 11 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 11: Show VINES IPC Field Descriptions
Field Description

Next Port:

IPC port number that the router uses when a new, unique IPC port number is needed.

Next Connection:

IPC connection number that the Cisco IOS software uses when a new, unique IPC connection number is needed.

Next check in:

When the software makes the next pass of the IPC connection table to examine each of the connection-specific timers.

Connection 2, state:

State of a particular connection. Possible states are connecting, connected, idle, and dead.

Local address:

VINES IP address of the local side of the connection.

last port:

Last port number used on this particular connection by the local host.

Remote address:

VINES IP address of the remote side of the connection.

last port:

Last port number used on this particular connection by the remote host.

Last send seq:

Last sequence number sent on this particular connection used by the local host.

Last rcvd seq:

Last sequence number received on this particular connection used by the local host.

Next send ack:

Next acknowledgment number that is sent on this particular connection by the local host.

Last sent ack:

Last acknowledgment number that has been sent on this particular connection by the local host.

Server metric

Metric value from this host to the remote host's server or router.

last hop

Metric value from the remote host's server or router to the remote host itself. If the remote host is a server or router, this value should be zero.

bias

Bias added to the metric to account for variance in the round-trip delay of a message going to the remote host.

total

Total metric value used to reach the remote host. It is the sum of the three previous numbers.

Send ACK

Time, in seconds, until the next acknowledgment message is sent by the local host.

Retransmit

Time, in seconds, until a message is retransmitted by the local host.

Idle check in

Time, in seconds, until this connection is checked to see if it has been idle for 30 seconds.

Retransmit queue contains... packets

Number of messages that have been sent but not acknowledged.

No packet in reassembly

Number of packets that have been received and are being reassembled into a larger message.

show vines neighbor

To display the entries in the VINES neighbor table, use the show vines neighbor EXEC command.

show vines neighbor [address | interface type number | server number]

Syntax Description

address

(Optional) Displays the entry for the specified neighbor.

interface type number

(Optional) Displays all neighbor paths in the neighbor table that use the specified interface.

server number

(Optional) Displays all entries in the neighbor table that have the specified network number.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If no keywords or arguments are specified, all entries in the neighbor table are displayed.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show vines neighbor command. This sample shows all entries in the VINES neighbor table.

Router# show vines neighbor
6 neighbors, 7 paths, version 14, next update 34 seconds
Address                Hardware Address      Type    Int        Flag Age    Metric    Uses
Router1                -                                    HDLC    Se0        R0*    n/a      0230            7
Router2                -                                    -          -            C1      -                -            -
Router3                0000.0c01.24ea          ARPA    Et2        R0*    42        0020            9
Router4                -                                    PPP      Se1        R1      n/a      0230            0
 Router4              0000.0c01.0506          ARPA    Et0        R1.    n/a      0020            0
 Router4              0000.0c01.9ac9          VINES  To0        R1*    n/a      0020            0

The following is sample output from the show vines neighbor command for a specific server. This sample shows all entries in the VINES neighbor table for router3.

Router# show vines neighbor router3
3 neighbors, 4 paths, version 7, next update 24 seconds
Address                    Hardware Address          Type    Int              Flag    Age    Metric      Uses
Router3                    0000.0c01.24ea              ARPA    Et2              R0*      42      0020                9
    RTP Counters:
        Interface Ethernet2, address Router3-Et2-0000.0c01.24ea
            Timers:
                Roll Call: 00:03:00
            Received counters:
                Requests:      00000000
                Responses:    00000000
                Updates:        00000000
                Redirects:    00000000
                Unknown:        00000000

Table 12 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 12: Show VINES Neighbor Field Descriptions
Field Description

neighbors

Number of neighbors in the neighbor table.

paths

Number of paths to the neighbor.

version

Version number of the VINES neighbor table. The number is incremented each time a route or path is added to or deleted from this table.

next update

Time, in seconds, until the next routing update is sent.

Address

Address of the neighbor station. The neighbor's name is displayed if you have issued a vines enhancements command.

Hardware Address

MAC address of the router interface through which the VINES neighbor in this entry can be reached.

Type

Type of MAC-level encapsulation used to communicate with this neighbor.

Int

Type and number of interface through which the VINES neighbor can be reached.

Flag

This field is a three-column field.

The first column indicates how the path was learned. It can be one of the following values:

  • C---Connected (that is, this is the entry for this router).

  • D---Learned via an RTP redirect message.

  • P---Placeholder. This neighbor is currently used as the next hop for a static route.

  • R---Learned via an RTP update message.

  • S---Static path entry (entered with the vines neighbor command).

The second column indicates what version of the RTP protocol this neighbor is running. It can be one of the following values:

  • 0---Version 0 of the RTP protocol. This is the version used by VINES servers prior to VINES version 5.50.

  • 1---Version 1 of the RTP protocol, commonly called SRTP. This is the version used by VINES servers in VINES version 5.50 and later.

The third column indicates how this path is used. It can be one of the following values:

  • *---An asterisk means that this is the next path used when forwarding a frame to that neighbor.

  • .---A dot means that this is the alternate path used in round-robin fashion.

  • Blank---No value means this is a backup path that is not used.

In the sample output, there are two paths to Router4 with the same metric. These two paths will be used in a round-robin fashion, and the Token Ring path will be the next one of the two used. There is a third path to Router4 via the serial line, but this will not be used unless both of the other paths are lost.

Age

Age of this VINES neighbor table entry, in seconds. This entry shows an age of "n/a" for RTP Version 0 neighbors on WAN interfaces, when the interface has been configured for delta-only updates. In all other cases, this entry contains a number.

Metric

Distance to this neighbor. This normally is the same as the interface metric, but may be different because of network topology or router configuration.

Uses

For all entries except placeholders, indicates the number of times that path was used to forward a packet. For placeholder entries, indicates the number of static routes that use the neighbor as the first hop.

RTP Counters:

This section shows counters that are specific to a neighbor port that is running the RTP protocol only. If the neighbor has multiple interfaces, multiple sections show up in this part of the display.

Interface...

Identifies the network interface and full identifier for a neighbor port.

Timers:
Roll Call

Identifies whether the roll call timer is active for this neighbor, and if so, when it will expire.

Received Counters

Indicates the number and type of RTP packets received from this neighbor port.

SRTP Counter:

This section shows counters that are specific to a neighbor port that is running the SRTP protocol. If the neighbor has multiple interfaces, multiple sections show up in this part of the display.

Interface

Identifies the network interface and full identifier for a neighbor port.

Timers:
Reassembly

Identifies whether the reassembly timer is active for this neighbor, and if so, when it will expire.

Timers:
Retry

Identifies whether the retry timer is active for this neighbor, and if so, when it will expire.

Received Counters

Indicates the number, type, and sequence number of matching SRTP packets received from this neighbor port.

Transmitted Counters

Indicated the number and type of SRTP packets transmitted explicitly to this neighbor port.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clear vines neighbor
clear vines route
show vines cache
vines enhancements
vines neighbor
vines update deltas
vines update interval

show vines route

To display the contents of the VINES routing table, use the show vines route EXEC command.

show vines route [number | neighbor address | metric]

Syntax Description

number

(Optional) Displays the routing table entry for the specified network.

neighbor address

(Optional) Displays all routes in the VINES routing table that have the specified neighbor as their first hop.

metric

(Optional) Display routes by metric.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If no keywords or arguments are specified, all entries in the routing table are displayed.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show vines route command. This sample shows all entries in the VINES routing table.

Router# show vines route
Worf                            Worf                            R0*              2              2            0
Succubus                    Succubus                    R1*              2              2            0
Aloe                            -                                  C1                -              -            -
Vera                            Vera                            R0*              2              2            0
Falcon                        Falcon            R0*              2              2            0
Zangbutt                    Worf                            R0*              2              4            0
Zangbutt                    Vera                            R0                2              4            0

The following is sample output from the show vines route command for a specific neighbor. This sample shows all entries in the VINES routing table for router1.

Router# show vines route router1
8 servers, 10 routes, version 58, next update 32 seconds
Network              Neighbor          Flags          Age            Metric      Uses        Origin        Local        Flags
Router1              Router2            R0*              n/a              0250            0         001AFE7B    00010FCA    0009

Table 13 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 13: Show VINES Route Field Descriptions
Field Description

servers

Number of servers in the routing table.

routes

Number of routes in the routing table.

version

Version number of the VINES routing table. This number is incremented each time a server or route is added to or deleted from this table.

next update

Time, in seconds, until the next routing update is sent.

Hash

Position of this entry in the routing table.

Network

Name or number of the remote network. Networks take the name of the server that defines the network.

Neighbor

Next hop to the destination network.

Flags

This field is a series of single-column fields.

The first column indicates how the route was learned. It can be one of the following values:

  • C---Connected (that is, this is the entry for this router).

  • D---Learned via an RTP redirect message.

  • R---Learned via an RTP update message.

  • S---Static entry (entered with the vines route command).

The second column indicates what version of the RTP protocol this router is running. It can be one of the following values:

  • 0---Version 0 of the RTP protocol. This is the version used by VINES servers prior to VINES version 5.50. This version number is also shown if the route was learned via a pre-5.50 server, and thus the version information was lost.

  • 1---Version 1 of the RTP protocol, commonly called SRTP. This is the version used by VINES servers in VINES version 5.50 and later.

An asterisk in the third column indicates that this route is used next when forwarding a frame to that server.

The fourth column indicates whether that route is used to forward a broadcast from a serverless network. It can be one of the following values:

  • N---This server is considered to be the nearest server and is on a directly connected network.

  • n---This server is considered to be the nearest server but is not on a directly connected network.

The fifth column contains the letter "S" if the route is in a suppression state.

The sixth column contains the letter "h" if this path has a metric that is higher than the best metric for this neighbor. This indicates that the path is not eligible for use in load sharing.

Age

Age of this VINES routing table entry, in seconds. An age of n/a indicates the destination is accessible via a neighbor that is sending delta-only updates. Note that even though the neighbor entry for Pica has an age, there is no age available for its routing table entry or other routing entries reachable via Pica. This is because the periodic hello messages from Pica contain no routing information, only neighbor reachability information.

Metric

Distance to this server. This normally is the distance to the neighbor router plus the distance advertised by that neighbor. This does not hold for static routes.

Uses

Number of times this route has been used to forward a packet.

Origin

Last known timestamp that originated from this server. If this field is not valid, as indicated by the following set of flags, it will be zero.

Local

Local timestamp then this route entry was learned or last changed.

Flags

This field is a series of bit flags presented as a hexadecimal number. The following are the defined values:

  • 0001---The neighbor of this server reaches it through a LAN interface.

  • 0002---The neighbor of this server reaches it through a WAN interface.

  • 0004---The neighbor of this server reaches it through a non-VINES interface.

  • 0008---The origin timestamp for this entry is not valid. The entry is either for a pre-5.50 server, or the entry was learned via a pre-5.50 server.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clear vines neighbor
clear vines route
show vines cache
vines route
vines neighbor
vines update deltas
vines update interval

show vines service

To display information about the application layer support, use the show vines service EXEC command.

show vines service [fs | nsm | ss | vs]

Syntax Description

fs

(Optional) Displays file service information.

nsm

(Optional) Displays network and system management service information.

ss

(Optional) Displays server service information.

vs

(Optional) Displays security service information.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show vines service command:

Router# show vines service
Vines Files Service:
        Name:          FS@Doc-ags+1@Servers (FS)
        Ports:        Well Known 6, Transient 0
        Timer:        not running
Network & System Management Service:
        Name:          NSM@Doc-ags+1@Servers (NSM)
        Ports:        Well Known 25, Transient 0
        Timer:        not running
Server Service:
        Name:          SS@Doc-ags+1@Servers (SS)
        Ports:        Well Known 7, Transient 0
        Emulates: 5.50(0), Supports: 3.22(49) - 6.99(49)
        Timer:        not running
VINES Security Service:
        Name:          VS@Doc-ags+1@Servers (VS)
        Ports:        Well Known 19, Transient 0
        Timer:        not running

Table 14 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 14: Show VINES Service Field Descriptions
Field Description

Name:

Name of the service.

Ports:

Ports on which the service is running.

Timer:

Time at which this service will wake up and perform some periodic functions.

The following is sample output from the show vines service command using the fs, nsm, ss, and vs keywords:

Router# show vines service fs
Vines Files Service:
    Periodic timer not running.
Router# show vines service nsm
Network & System Management Service:
    Next wakeup in 00:00:29.
Router# show vines service ss
Server Service:
    Next wakeup in 00:20:04.
    Time is 07:52:31 ET Sep 11 1998
    Time last set by 300EF792:0001, 00:10:13 ago.
    Time epoch is SS@Rdtp-10@Servers-1, started 00:10:14 ago.
    Configuration:
Capable of providing time services to clients.
Listening to VINES time of day synchronization.
Participating in vines time of day synchronization.
Sending time messages to the broadcast address.
        
Router# show vines service vs
VINES Security Service:
    Periodic timer not running.

Table 15 describes the fields shown in the displays.


Table 15: Show VINES Service (fs, nsm, ss, and vs) Field Descriptions
Field Description

Periodic timer not running

Indicates that this service has no periodic functions to perform.

Next wakeup in...

Time, in seconds, until the service performs its periodic actions. For the Server service, this is to send a time synchronization message. For the Network System and Management (NSM) service, this is to send any requested trace packets. The periodic interval for the NSM service is 30 seconds when no trace messages are pending.

Time is...

Current time (in the format hours:minutes:seconds) and date.

Time last set...

Server that last adjusted the time, how much it adjusted the time, and how long ago it was adjusted. For times within the last 24 hours, the time format is hours:minutes:seconds. For times longer ago than 24  hours, the time format is weekswdaysd.

Time epoch is...

Name of the current time epoch (in the format name-number), and when it was established.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

vines time access-group
vines time participate
vines time services
vines time use-system

show vines traffic

To display the statistics maintained about VINES protocol traffic, use the show vines traffic EXEC command.

show vines traffic [type number]

Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Interface type.

number

(Optional) Interface number.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If no interface is specified, values for all interfaces are displayed.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show vines traffic command:

Router# show vines traffic
SYSTEM TRAFFIC:
    Rcvd:  204 total, 12708 bytes, 0 format errors, 0 not enabled,
                15 local dst, 189 bcast, 0 forwarded
                0 no route, 0 zero hops
                0 checksum errors, 3 IP unknown, 0 IPC unknown
                3 bcast forwarded, 1 bcast helpered, 0 dup bcast
    Sent:  21 packets, 1278 bytes
                0 unicast, 21 bcast, 0 forwarded
                0 encap failed, 0 access failed, 0 down
                0 bcast fwd, 3 not fwd (toward source)
                0 notlan, 0 not gt4800, 0 no pp charge
      ARPv0:  Rcvd 0/0/0/0/0, Sent 0/0/0/0
      ARPv1:  Rcvd 0/0/0/0/0, Sent 0/0/0/0
          ICP:  Rcvd 0/0/0, Send 0/0
          IPC:  Rcvd 17, Sent 8
      RTPv0:  Rcvd 2/10/0/0/170/0/0/5, Sent 0/6/00/0/91/10/0
      RTPv1:  Rcvd 0/0/0/0/0/0, Sent 0/3/60/0
          SPP: Rcvd 0, Sent 0
        Echo:  Rcvd 5, Sent 5
      Proxy:  Rcvd 0, Sent 0
IPC TRAFFIC BY PORT NUMBER:
Broadcast:  Other:00000000,  01:00000000, 02:00000000, 03:00000000,  04:00000000
                            05:00000000,  06:00000000, 07:00000000, 08:00000000,  09:00000000
                            0A:00000000,  0B:00000000, 0C:00000000, 0D:00000000,  0E:00000000
                            0F:00000000,  10:00000000, 11:00000000, 12:00000000,  13:00000000
                            14:00000000,  15:00000000, 16:00000000, 17:00000000,  18:00000000
                            19:00000000
  Helpered:  Other:00000000,  01:00000000, 02:00000000, 03:00000000,  04:00000000
                            05:00000000,  06:00000000, 07:00000000, 08:00000000,  09:00000000
                            0A:00000000,  0B:00000000, 0C:00000000, 0D:00000000,  0E:00000000
                            0F:00000000,  10:00000000, 11:00000000, 12:00000000,  13:00000000
                            14:00000000,  15:00000000, 16:00000000, 17:00000000,  18:00000000
                            19:00000000
    Unicast:  Other:00000000,  01:00000000, 02:00000000, 03:00000000,  04:00000000
                            05:00000000,  06:00000000, 07:00000000, 08:00000000,  09:00000000
                            0A:00000000,  0B:00000000, 0C:00000000, 0D:00000000,  0E:00000000
                            0F:00000000,  10:00000000, 11:00000000, 12:00000000,  13:00000000
                            14:00000000,  15:00000000, 16:00000000, 17:00000000,  18:00000000
                            19:00000000
  Proxied:  Other:00000000,  01:00000000, 02:00000000, 03:00000000,  04:00000000
                            05:00000000,  06:00000000, 07:00000000, 08:00000000,  09:00000000
                            0A:00000000,  0B:00000000, 0C:00000000, 0D:00000000,  0E:00000000
                            0F:00000000,  10:00000000, 11:00000000, 12:00000000,  13:00000000
                            14:00000000,  15:00000000, 16:00000000, 17:00000000,  18:00000000
                            19:00000000
P_Replies:  Other:00000000,  01:00000000, 02:00000000, 03:00000000,  04:00000000
                            05:00000000,  06:00000000, 07:00000000, 08:00000000,  09:00000000
                            0A:00000000,  0B:00000000, 0C:00000000, 0D:00000000,  0E:00000000
                            0F:00000000,  10:00000000, 11:00000000, 12:00000000,  13:00000000
                            14:00000000,  15:00000000, 16:00000000, 17:00000000,  18:00000000
                            19:00000000
Interface Hssi0:
    Rcvd:  0 packets, 0 bytes, 0 format errors, 0 not enabled,
                0 local dst, 0 bcast, 0 forwarded,
                0 no route, 0 zero hops
                0 checksum errors, 0 IP unknown, 0 IPX unknown
                0 bcast forwarded, 0 bcast helpered, 0 dup bcast
    Sent:  0 packets, 0 bytes
                0 unicast, 0 bcast, 0 forwarded
                0 encap failed, 0 access failed, 0 down
                0 bcast fwd, 0 not fwd (toward source)
                0 notlan, 0 not gt4800, 0 no pp charge
      ARPv0:  Rcvd 0/0/0/0/0, Sent 0/0/0/0
      ARPv1:  Rcvd 0/0/0/0/0, Sent 0/0/0/0
          ICP:  Rcvd 0/0/0, Send 0/0
          IPC:  Rcvd 0, Sent 8
      RTPv0:  Rcvd 0/10/0/0/0/0/0/0, Sent 0/0/00/0/0/0/0
      RTPv1:  Rcvd 0/0/0/0/0/0, Sent 0/3/60/0
          SPP: Rcvd 0, Sent 0
        Echo:  Rcvd 0, Sent 0
      Proxy:  Rcvd 0, Sent 0

Table 16 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 16: Show VINES Traffic Field Descriptions
Field Description

SYSTEM TRAFFIC:

This section displays statistics about all VINES packets handled by the Cisco IOS software.

Rcvd:

This section displays statistics about VINES packets received by the software.

 packets

Total number of VINES packets received.

 bytes

Total bytes in all the VINES packets received.

 format errors

Number of VINES packets that had errors in the format of the VINES IP header. Currently, the only thing checked is the length field in the header. The number of packets with format errors is included in the count of total packets received (in the Rcvd: field).

 not enabled

Number of VINES packets received on an interface on which VINES was not enabled. These packets are not included when counting the total packets received (in the Rcvd: field).

 local dst

Number of packets accepted for further processing because they were addressed to the router's unicast address.

 bcast

Number of packets accepted for further processing because they were addressed to the router's broadcast address.

 orwarded

Number of packets not accepted for further processing but that were simply forwarded out another interface.

 no route

Number of packets discarded because the Cisco IOS software did not know how to reach the destination.

 zero hops

Number of packets discarded because the hop count field in the VINES IP header was zero.

 checksum errors

Number of packets accepted for further processing (the sum of the "local dest" and "bcast" fields) that were discarded because the checksum was bad.

 IP unknown

Number of packets accepted (the sum of the "local dest" and "bcast" fields) that were discarded because the IP protocol type was unknown.

 IPC unknown

Number of packets accepted for further processing (the sum of the "local dest" and "bcast" fields) that were discarded because the IPC port number was unknown.

 bcast forwarded

Number of broadcast packets accepted for further processing (as shown in the "bcast" field) that were forwarded because they had a nonzero hop count. (Note that the sum of the "bcast forwarded," "bcast helpered," and "dup bcast" fields will not equal the total number of broadcast packets received.)

 bcast helpered

Number of broadcast packets accepted (as shown in the "bcast" field) that were "helpered" to a Banyan server. (Note that the sum of the "bcast forwarded," "bcast helpered," and "dup bcast" fields will not equal the total number of broadcast packets received.)

 dup bcast

Number of broadcast packets accepted (as shown in the "bcast" field) that were classified as duplicates and discarded. (Note that the sum of the "bcast forwarded," "bcast helpered," and "dup bcast" fields will not equal the total number of broadcast packets received.)

Sent:

This section displays statistics about VINES packets sent by the router.

 packets

Total number of VINES packets sent.

 bytes

Total bytes in all the VINES packets sent.

 unicast

Number of unicast packets originating at the router.

 bcast

Number of broadcast packets originating at the router.

 forwarded

Number of unicast packets that were forwarded from another interface.

 encap failed

Number of packets not sent because of an encapsulation failure. This usually happens when entries in a map for a public data network, such as X.25 or Frame Relay, are missing.

 access failed

Number of packets not sent because the destination was denied by an access list.

 down

Number of packets not sent because the interface was down.

 bcast fwd

Number of broadcast packets that were forwarded from another interface.

 not fwd (toward source)

Number of broadcast packets that were not forwarded because this interface is the interface on which the broadcast was received.

 not lan

Number of broadcast packets that were not forwarded because they were marked for LANs only and this interface is not a LAN (for example, it might be a serial interface.)

 not gt

Number of broadcast packets that were not forwarded because they were marked for high-speed interfaces only and this interface is a low-speed interface (line speed of 4800 baud or less).

 no pp charge

Number of broadcast packets that were not forwarded because they were marked to send only to networks that do not have per-packet charging and this interface is to a network that has per-packet charging.

ARPv0:

This section displays statistics about VINES ARP packets sent and received.

 Rcvd x/x/x/x/x

Number of ARP packets received of type 0, 1, 2, 3, and other.

 Sent x/x/x/x

Number of ARP packets sent of type 0, 1, 2, and 3.

ARPv1:

This section displays statistics about VINES SARP packets sent and received.

 Rcvd x/x/x/x/x

Number of SARP packets received of type 0, 1, 2, 3, and other.

 Sent x/x/x/x

Number of SARP packets sent of type 0, 1, 2, and 3.

ICP:

This section displays statistics about VINES ICP packets sent and received.

 Rcvd x/x/x

Number of ICP packets received of type 0, 1, and other.

 Sent x/x

Number of ICP packets sent of type 0 and 1.

IPC:

This section displays statistics about VINES IPC packets sent and received.

 Rcvd

Number of IPC packets received.

 Sent

Number of IPC packets sent.

RTPv0:

This section displays statistics about VINES RTP packets sent and received.

 Rcvd x/x/x/x/x/x/x/x

Number of RTP packets received of type 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and other. The counts of type 0, type 2, type 3, and other RTP packets should always be zero.

 Sent x/x/x/x/x/x/x

Number of RTP packets sent of type 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6.

RTPv1:

This section displays statistics about VINES SRTP packets sent and received.

 Rcvd x/x/x/x/x

Number of SRTP packets received of type 0, 1, 2, 3, and other. The count of other SRTP packets should always be zero.

 Sent x/x/x/x/x

Number of SRTP packets sent of type 0, 1, 2, 3.

SPP:

This section displays statistics about VINES Sequence Packet Protocol (SPP) packets sent and received.

Rcvd

Number of SPP packets received

 Sent

Number of SPP packets sent.

Echo:

This section displays statistics about VINES echo packets sent and received.

 Rcvd

Number of MAC-level echo packets received.

 Sent

Number of MAC-level echo packets sent.

Proxy:

This section displays statistics about VINES proxies sent and received. A proxy is when a client sends a query directly to the router for which the router does not have the intelligence to respond. The Cisco IOS software then sends these queries to a Banyan server, and when it receives the response from the server, the software relays it back to the client.

 Rcvd

Number of proxy queries received.

 Sent

Number of proxy queries sent.

IPC TRAFFIC BY PORT NUMBER:

This section displays statistics about VINES IPC packets. The information displayed in this section is particularly useful when a serverless network is connected to the router.

 Broadcast:

Number of VINES IPC messages, by destination port number, received by the router because they were addressed to the VINES IP broadcast address.

 Helpered:

Number of broadcast messages that were sent toward a Banyan server because they were received on an interface for a serverless network.

 Unicast:

Number of VINES IPC messages, by destination port number, received by the router because they were specifically addressed to the VINES IP address of the router.

 Proxied:

Number of unicast messages received that were sent to a Banyan server because they were received on a serverless interface and because the router did not know how to respond to the message.

 P_Replies:

Number of responses to a proxy query that were received from a Banyan server.

Interface

This section displays statistics about the individual interfaces in the router. The fields in this section have the same meanings as the fields of the same name in the "SYSTEM TRAFFIC" section, except that the statistics are for the particular interface, not for the entire router.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clear vines traffic
vines serverless

trace

To determine the path that a packet takes when traversing a VINES network, use the trace EXEC command.

trace [vines | oldvines] [address]

Syntax Description

vines

(Optional) Specifies the VINES protocol. This trace is compatible with the Banyan VINES traceroute function.

oldvines

(Optional) Specifies the VINES protocol. This trace is compatible with our trace function prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.2.

address

(Optional) Address of a node. This is a 6-byte hexadecimal number in the format network:host, where network is 4  bytes and host is 2 bytes.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0. The oldvines keyword first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

The trace EXEC command supports the Banyan traceroute function. This enables trace requests on a VINES network to reach all servers on the network.

This command does not produce the names of any VINES servers that are traversed.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the VINES trace command when you specify the vines keyword:

Router# trace vines
Target Vines address: wayfinder
Source Vines address: coinspinner
From: 0002801578 Coinspinner                  To: 0002609380 Wayfinder
Server                                          Gate                                              metric media address
0002801578 Coinspinner          0805371606 Router                            4          40 000030C0FEB6
0805371606 Router                    0002609380 Wayfinder                      2      2560 10005A746A36

The following is sample output from the VINES trace command when you specify the oldvines keyword:

Router# trace oldvines
Target vines address: 27AF92:1 
Numeric display [n]:
Timeout in seconds [3]:
Probe count [3]:
Minimum Time to Live [0]:
Maximum Time to Live [15]:
Type escape sequence to abort. 
Tracing the route to COINSPINNER (27AF92:1)
 0 Farslayer (30002A2D:1) 0 msec 4 msec 4 msec
 1 Coinspinner (27AF92:1) 4 msec 4 msec 8 msec

The value nn msec indicates the round-trip time for each probe in milliseconds, for each node.

vines access-group

To apply an access list to an interface, use the vines access-group interface configuration command. To remove the access list, use the no form of this command.

vines access-group access-list-number
no vines access-group access-list-number

Syntax

access-list-number

Number of the access list. All outgoing packets defined with either standard or extended access lists and forwarded through the interface are filtered by the entries in this access list. For standard access lists, access-list-number is a decimal number from 1 to 100. For extended access lists, access-list-number is a decimal number from 101 to 200.

Description

Default

No access list is applied.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The vines access-group command applies an access list created with the vines access-list (standard) command to an interface.

You can apply only one access list to an interface.

Example

The following example applies access list 1 to Ethernet interface 0:

interface ethernet 0
  vines access-group 1

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

vines access-list (extended)

vines access-list (extended)

To create an extended VINES access list, use this version of the vines  access-list global configuration command. To remove an extended access list, use the no form of this command.

vines access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} protocol source-address
source-mask
[source-port source-port-mask] destination-address
destination-mask
[destination-port destination-port-mask]
no vines access-list access-list-number

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 101 to 200.

deny

Denies access if the conditions are matched.

permit

Allows access if the conditions are matched.

protocol

VINES protocol ID number or name. The number can be a value from 1 to 255, or one of the following protocol keywords:

· arp---Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)

· icp---Internet Control Protocol (ICP)

· ip---VINES Internet Protocol

· ipc---Interprocess Communications (IPC)

· rtp---Routing Table Protocol (RTP)

· spp---Sequence Packet Protocol (SPP)

source-address

Address of the network from which the packet is being sent. This is a 6-byte hexadecimal number in the format network:host, where network is 4 bytes and host is 2 bytes.

source-mask

Mask to be applied to source-address. This is a 6-byte hexadecimal value. Place ones in the bit positions you want to mask. These bits correspond to the bits in the address that should be ignored.

source-port

(Optional) Number of the local port from which the packet is being sent. This argument is required when the protocol specified is IPC or SPP, and is not accepted when any other protocol is specified. It can be a number from 0x0000 to 0xFFFF. Well-known local port numbers have values from 0x0001 to 0x01FF. Transient local port numbers have values from 0x0200 to 0xFFFE. Table 17 in the "Usage Guidelines" section lists some IPC port numbers.

source-port-mask

(Optional) Mask to be applied to source-port. This argument is required when the protocol specified is IPC or SPP, and is not accepted when any other protocol is specified. It can be a number from 0x0000 to 0xFFFF. These bits correspond to the bits in the port that should be ignored.

destination-address

VINES address of the network to which the packet is being sent. This is a 6-byte hexadecimal number in the format network:host, where network is 4 bytes and host is 2 bytes.

destination-mask

Mask to be applied to destination-address. This is a 6-byte hexadecimal value. Place ones in the bit positions you want to mask. These bits correspond to the bits in the address that should be ignored.

destination-port

(Optional) Number of the local port to which the packet is being sent. This argument is required when the protocol specified is IPC or SPP, and is not accepted when any other protocol is specified. It can be a number from 0x0000 to 0xFFFF. Well-known local port numbers have values from 0x0001 to 0x01FF. Transient local port numbers have values from 0x0200 to 0xFFFE. Table 17 in the "Usage Guidelines" section lists some IPC port numbers.

destination-port-mask

(Optional) Mask to be applied to destination-port. This argument is required when the protocol specified is IPC or SPP, and is not accepted when any other protocol is specified. It can be a number from 0x0000 to 0xFFFF. These bits correspond to the bits in the port that should be ignored.

Default

No extended VINES access list is specified.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

An extended VINES access list filters packets based on their protocol, source and destination addresses, and source and destination address masks, and optionally on their source and destination ports, and source and destination port masks. This differs from the standard access list filters in that you can specify port masks.

Use the vines access-group command to assign an access list to an interface.

Keep the following in mind when configuring VINES network access control:

If you specify a protocol type of IPC, the port (either source-port or destination-port) can be one of the values shown in Table 17.


Table 17: Some VINES IPC Port Numbers
IPC Port Number (Hexadecimal) Service

0x0003

Back End (only on PCs; it is the 25th line notification)

0x0004

Mail Service

0x0006

"VINES Files" File Service

0x0007

Server Service

0x000F

StreetTalk Service

0x0012

Network Management

0x0013

VINES Security

0x0016

StreetTalk Directory Assistance

0x0017

StreetTalk Directory Assistance Service Listening Port

0x0019

Systems and Network Management

Example

In the following example, the first line prohibits communication from any client process to the service on IPC port 0x14; the second line permits all other communication.

vines access-list 101 deny   IPC 0:0 ffffffff:ffff 0x14 0 0:0 ffffffff:ffff 0 0xFFFF
vines access-list 101 permit IP 0:0 ffffffff:ffff     0:0 ffffffff:ffff

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

priority-list protocol
show vines access
vines access-group
vines access-list (simple)

vines access-list (simple)

To create a simple VINES access list, use this version of the vines  access-list global configuration command. To remove a simple access list, use the no form of this command.

vines access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} source-address source-mask
no vines access-list access-list-number

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Access list number. It is a number from 201 to 300.

deny

Denies access if the conditions are matched.

permit

Allows access if the conditions are matched.

source-address

Address of the network from which the packet is being sent. This is a 6-byte hexadecimal number in the format network:host, where network is 4  bytes and host is 2 bytes.

source-mask

Mask to be applied to source-address. This is a 6-byte hexadecimal value. Place ones in the bit positions you want to mask. These bits correspond to the bits in the address that should be ignored.

Default

No simple VINES access list is specified.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

A simple VINES access list filters packets based on their source address and source address mask. These access lists are used to decide from which stations to accept time updates.

Use the vines access-group command to assign an access list to an interface.

Keep the following in mind when configuring VINES network access control:

Example

The following example defines an access list that accepts time updates only from the servers on networks 30015800 and 30004355; it denies time updates from all other sources.

vines access-list 201 permit 30015800:0001 00000000:0000
vines access-list 201 permit 30004355:0001 00000000:0000
vines access-list 201 deny 00000000:0000 FFFFFFFF:FFFF
interface ethernet 0
  vines time access-group 201

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show vines access
vines access-group
vines access-list (extended)
vines time access-group
vines time participate
vines time services
vines time use-system

vines access-list (standard)

To specify a standard VINES access list, use this version of the vines  access-list global configuration command. To remove the access list, use the no form of this command.

vines access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} protocol source-address
source-mask
[source-port] destination-address destination-mask
[destination-port]
no vines access-list access-list-number

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 1 to 100.

deny

Denies access if the conditions are matched.

permit

Allows access if the conditions are matched.

protocol

VINES protocol ID number or name. It can be a value from 1 to 255 or one of the following protocol keywords:

· arp---Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)

· icp---Internet Control Protocol (ICP)

· ip---VINES Internet Protocol

· ipc---Interprocess Communications (IPC)

· rtp---Routing Table Protocol (RTP)

· spp---Sequence Packet Protocol (SPP)

source-address

Address of the network from which the packet is being sent. This is a 6-byte hexadecimal number in the format network:host, where network is 4  bytes and host is 2 bytes.

source-mask

Mask to be applied to source-address. This is a 6-byte hexadecimal value. Place ones in the bit positions you want to mask. These bits correspond to the bit in the address that should be ignored.

source-port

(Optional) Number of the local port from which the packet is being sent. This argument is required when the protocol specified is IPC or SPP, and is not accepted when any other protocol is specified. It can be a number from 0x0000 to 0xFFFF. Well-known local port numbers have values from 0x0001 to 0x01FF. Transient local port numbers have values from 0x0200 to 0xFFFE. Table 18 lists some IPC port numbers.

destination-address

Address of the network to which the packet is being sent. This is a 6-byte hexadecimal number in the format network:host, where network is 4 bytes and host is 2 bytes.

destination-mask

Mask to be applied to destination-address. This is a 6-byte hexadecimal value. Place ones in the bit positions you want to mask. These bits correspond to the bits in the address that should be ignored.

destination-port

(Optional) Number of the local port to which the packet is being sent. This argument is required when the protocol specified is IPC or SPP, and is not accepted when any other protocol is specified. It can be a number from 0x0000 to 0xFFFF. Well-known local port numbers have values from 0x0001 to 0x01FF. Transient local port numbers have values from 0x0200 to 0xFFFE. Table 18 in the "Usage Guidelines" section lists some IPC port numbers.

Default

No standard VINES access list is specified.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

A standard VINES access list filters packets based on their protocol, source and destination addresses, and source and destination address masks, and optionally on their source and destination ports.

Use the vines access-group command to apply an access list to an interface.

Keep the following in mind when configuring VINES network access control:

If you specify a protocol type of IPC, the port (either source-port or destination-port) can be one of the values shown in Table 18.


Table 18: Some IPC Port Numbers for a Standard VINES Access List
IPC Port Number (Hexadecimal) Service

0x0003

Back End (only on PCs; it is the 25th line notification)

0x0004

Mail Service

0x0006

"VINES Files" File Service

0x0007

Server Service

0x000F

StreetTalk Service

0x0012

Network Management

0x0013

VINES Security

0x0016

StreetTalk Directory Assistance

0x0017

StreetTalk Directory Assistance Service Listening Port

0x0019

Systems and Network Management

Examples

In the following example, the first line prohibits any communication on StreetTalk port (port number 0xF); the second line permits all other communication.

vines access-list 1 deny   IPC 0:0 ffffffff:ffff 0xf 0:0 ffffffff:ffff 0xf
vines access-list 1 permit IP 0:0 ffffffff:ffff     0:0 ffffffff:ffff

The following example filters all mail service on Ethernet interface 0 and permits all other traffic:

interface Ethernet 0
  vines access-group 101
!
vines access-list 101 deny ipc 0:0 FFFFFFFF:FFFF 4 0 0:0 FFFFFFFF:FFFF 0 0xF FFF

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

priority-list protocol
show vines access
vines access-group
vines access-list (extended)
vines access-list (simple)

vines arp-enable

To enable the processing of ARP packets, use the vines arp-enable interface configuration command. To disable the processing of ARP packets, use the no form of this command.

vines arp-enable [dynamic]
no vines arp-enable [dynamic]

Syntax Description

dynamic

(Optional) Responds to ARP and SARP requests on this interface only if there are no other VINES servers present.

Default

The interface always responds to ARP and SARP requests.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Client systems on VINES networks are assigned network addresses dynamically. When a VINES client boots, it has no knowledge of their addresses and preferred servers. Immediately after it initializes its hardware interface, the client sends broadcast requests asking a server to provide it with a network-layer address. In a network that has a server, Cisco routers do not normally respond to these broadcast requests. However, on a network that has only clients and no servers (called a serverless network), the Cisco IOS software does need to respond to the broadcast requests so that all the clients on that serverless network can acquire network addresses. By default, the software responds to ARP requests and assigns addresses to network clients only if there is no VINES server present on that network segment. When it does, the software then acts as a network communication service provider for the client. You may configure the software to respond to these requests even if a VINES servers is present, or never to respond to these requests. If the software assigns an address, it generates a unique network number based on its own VINES address.

A VINES file server must still be present somewhere on the network in order for the client to continue the booting process.

Examples

The following example configures a router when Ethernet interface 1 is a network that does not contain any VINES servers:

interface ethernet 0
  vines metric 2
!
interface ethernet 1
  vines metric 2

The following example configures a router to always provide ARP service on Ethernet interface 1, even when VINES servers are present on that network:

interface ethernet 0
  vines metric 2
!
interface ethernet 1
  vines metric 2
  vines arp-enable

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

vines propagate
vines serverless

vines decimal

To display VINES addresses in decimal notation, use the vines decimal global configuration command. To return to displaying the addresses in hexadecimal, use the no form of this command.

vines decimal
no vines decimal

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Addresses are displayed in hexadecimal.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When displaying addresses, the Cisco IOS software always uses a name if one has been configured via the vines enhancements command. The vines decimal command affects the radix in which the address is presented when a name is not available.

Example

The following example displays VINES addresses in decimal:

vines decimal

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clear vines cache
clear vines neighbor
clear vines route
show vines cache
vines host

vines encapsulation

To set the MAC-level encapsulation used for VINES broadcast packets, use the vines encapsulation interface configuration command. To disable encapsulation, use the no form of this command.

vines encapsulation [arpa | snap | vines-tr]
no vines encapsulation

Syntax Description

arpa

(Optional) Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) encapsulation. This is the default encapsulation for Ethernet interfaces.

snap

(Optional) Subnetwork Access Protocol (SNAP) encapsulation. This encapsulation uses an IEEE 802.2 SNAP header. It is the default encapsulation for all media except Ethernet and Token Ring.

vines-tr

(Optional) Our VINES Token Ring encapsulation. This is the default encapsulation for Token Ring interfaces.

Defaults

ARPA encapsulation for Ethernet
VINES-TR Token Ring encapsulation for Token Ring
SNAP encapsulation for all other media

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can choose a MAC-level encapsulation type for each Ethernet, Token Ring, or IEEE 802.2 interface.

Setting the MAC-level encapsulation type with the vines encapsulation command affects broadcast packets sent by the Cisco IOS software. The software keeps track of which encapsulation is used by each of its neighbors and uses the same style of encapsulation when talking directly to a neighbor.

You should not use this command with the current versions of VINES software that are available. This command is present for future interoperability when Banyan begins using encapsulations other than the current default ones.

Example

The following example configures IEEE 802.2 SNAP encapsulation on Ethernet interface 0:

vines routing
!
interface ethernet 0
  vines metric 2
  vines encapsulation snap

vines enhancements

To enable split-horizon for routing updates and to generate flash updates, use the vines enhancements global configuration command. To turn VINES enhancement off, use the no form of this command.

vines enhancements
no vines enhancements

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The vines enhancements command applies only to non-sequenced RTP protocol and deals only with routing updates.

The vines enhancements command helps VINES enable split horizon when generating regular, periodic routing updates (routes learned from an interface are not advertised back to the same interface) and helps generates flash updates that are sent out to indicate topology changes for only the changed routes instead of full updates. Full updates are still sent periodically. When periodic or flash updates are sent out on a given interface, the updates do not include any information that was originally sent from that interface. This behavior is slightly different from the VINES server running pre-5.5.x Banyan VINES OS, which sends out the entire routing table in a flash update, even if only one route changed.


Note For routing updates only, when vines enhancements is enabled in global configuration mode by default, vines split-horizon is also enabled on the interface by default. In this case, if required, you can disable vines split-horizon on an interface like Frame Relay and X.25.

When vines enhancements is disabled in global configuration mode, vines split-horizon for RTP routing updates is disabled on all interfaces; however, one may still see vines split-horizon as enabled on the VINES interface when show vines interface interface command is entered. Split horizon remains enabled because vines split-horizon on individual VINES interface, in addition to controlling RTP updates, also controls whether or not retransmission of broadcasts is permitted on the receiving interface.

Example

The following example specifies the VINES enhancements:

vines routing
vines enhancements

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

vines split-horizon
vines update deltas
vines update interval

vines host

To associate a host name with a VINES address, use the vines host global configuration command. To delete the association, use the no form of this command.

vines host name address
no vines host name

Syntax Description

name

VINES host name. It can be any length and sequence of characters separated by white space.

address

Number of a VINES network. You enter it in the current VINES radix, in the format network:host, where network is 4 bytes and host is 2 bytes.

Default

Hosts are displayed by address.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Cisco IOS software maintains a table of the mappings between host names and addresses.

When displaying addresses, the software uses the name instead of the numerical address if you have configured one with the vines  host command.

Cisco IOS software provides only static name-to-address bindings for the VINES protocol. This is completely separate from Banyan's distributed naming system, StreetTalk. The software does not learn names from StreetTalk, nor does the software provide names to StreetTalk.

Example

The following example assigns names to four VINES servers:

! Cisco names
vines host FARSLAYER 30002A2D:0001
vines host DOOMGIVER 30000A83:0001
! VINES PS/2 server
vines host COINSPINNER 0027AF92:0001
! PC clone client
vines host STUFF 0027AF92:8001

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clear vines neighbor
clear vines route
show vines host
vines decimal

vines input-network-filter

To filter the information contained in routing messages received from other stations, use the vines  input-network-filter interface configuration command. To disable this filtering, use the no form of this command.

vines input-network-filter access-list-number
no vines input-network-filter

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. It is a decimal number from 201 to  300.

Default

No filtering.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

VINES routing messages contain topological entries that allow service and client nodes to select the best paths to destinations. This command provides filtering ability to administrators so that they may selectively determine which routing entries should be accepted from other routers and which routing entries should be dropped. This command may be useful in enforcing administrative policies of local server usage.

Example

The following example prevents a route to one specific server from ever being learned via Ethernet interface 0:

vines routing
!
vines access-list 201 deny 27AF9A:1 0:0
vines access-list 201 permit 0:0 FFFFFFFF:FFFF
!
interface ethernet 0
  vines metric 2
  vines input-network-filter 201

vines input-router-filter

To filter received routing messages based upon the address of the sending station, use the vines input-router-filter interface configuration command. To disable this filtering, use the no form of this command.

vines input-router-filter access-list-number
no vines input-router-filter

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. It is a decimal number from 201 to  300.

Default

No filtering.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

VINES routing messages contain topological entries that allow service and client nodes to select the best paths to destinations. This command provides filtering ability to administrators so that they may selectively determine the routers from which routing entries are accepted.

Example

The following example prevents the Cisco IOS software from ever learning routing information from a specific server on Ethernet interface 0:

vines routing
!
vines access-list 201 deny 27AF9A:1 0:0
vines access-list 201 permit 0:0 FFFFFFFF:FFFF
!
interface ethernet 0
  vines metric 2
  vines input-router-filter 201

vines metric

To enable VINES routing on an interface, use the vines metric interface configuration command. To disable VINES routing, use the no form of this command.

vines metric [whole [fractional]]
no vines metric

Syntax Description

whole

(Optional) Integer cost value associated with the interface. It is optional for all interface types. If you omit whole, the Cisco  IOS software automatically chooses a reasonable value. These values are listed in Table 19 in the "Usage Guidelines" section. For additional information, refer to the discussion and to Table 17. If whole is zero, then a fractional portion must be supplied.

fractional

(Optional) Fractional cost value associated with the interface expressed in 10,000ths. It is optional for all interface types, but may only be present if a whole number portion is specified. This number is rounded to the nearest 1/16. If you omit both whole and fractional numbers, the software automatically chooses a reasonable value. These values are listed in Table 19. For additional information, refer to the discussion in the "Usage Guidelines" section and to Table 17.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The metric is the cost value associated with the interface media type. It is generally inversely proportional to the speed of the interface. The lower the delay metric, the more likely it is that the software will use that interface.

The Cisco IOS software automatically chooses a reasonable metric. These numbers match as closely as possible the numbers a Banyan server would choose for an interface of the same type and speed.

When enabling VINES for a serial interface, you should keep in mind that the VINES metric is based upon the configured bandwidth for the interface. To ensure that the software selects the correct VINES metric, you must make sure that the correct bandwidth is configured. To do this, first issue the show interface command to determine the speed of the interface. Then issue the bandwidth command to set the bandwidth rate that is appropriate for that interface type and speed. After that, issue the vines metric command and the software will choose a metric appropriate to that speed. If you do not issue the bandwidth command first, you must either reissue the vines metric command or issue it with a metric number to get an appropriate metric.

Banyan servers use these metrics to compute timeouts when communicating with other hosts. If you do specify a metric, be careful that you do not set this number too high or too low. Doing so could disrupt the normal function of the Banyan servers.

Table 19 lists some example delay metric values.


Table 19: Example Delay Metric Values
Interface Type Old Format New Internal Format New Configuration File Format Seconds

FDDI

1

0010

10000

0.2000

Ethernet

2

0020

20000

0.4000

16-Mb Token Ring

2

0020

20000

0.4000

4-Mb Token Ring

4

0040

40000

0.8000

T1 High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC)

35

0230

35 0000

7.0000

56-kb HDLC

45

02D0

450000

9.0000

9600-baud HDLC

90

05A0

900000

18.0000

4800-baud HDLC

150

0960

1500000

30.0000

2400-baud HDLC

250

0F00

2500000

50.0000

1200-baud HDLC

450

1C20

4500000

90.0000

T1 X.25

45

02D0

450000

9.0000

56-kb X.25

55

0370

550000

11.0000

9600-baud X.25

100

0640

1000000

20.0000

4800-baud X.25

160

0A00

1600000

32.0000

2400-baud X.25

260

1040

2600000

52.0000

1200-baud X.25

460

1CC0

4600000

92.0000

Examples

The following example enables VINES routing on Ethernet interface 0 and sets the metric to 2:

vines routing
!
interface ethernet 0
  vines metric 2

The following example enables VINES routing on FDDI interface 0 and sets the metric to 0.25:

vines routing
!
interface fddi 0
  vines metric 0 2500

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

bandwidth
vines routing
vines update deltas
vines update interval

vines neighbor

To specify a static path to a neighbor station, use the vines neighbor interface configuration command. To remove a static path from the neighbor table, use the no form of this command.

vines neighbor address mac-address encapsulation [whole [fractional]]
no vines neighbor address mac-address

Syntax Description

address

VINES IP address of the station to which to add or remove a static path.

mac-address

MAC-level address used to reach the neighbor station.

encapsulation

Encapsulation type to use on the media. It can be one of the following values:

· arpa---Use ARPA encapsulation. This is recommended for Ethernet interfaces.

· snap---Use an IEEE 802.2 SNAP header. This is recommended for FDDI interfaces.

· vines-tr---Use our VINES Token Ring encapsulation. This is recommended for Token Ring interfaces.

whole

(Optional) Delay metric to use on the neighbor. If you omit this argument, the metric used is that specified with the vines  metric command for the selected interface.

fractional

(Optional) Fractional metric value associated with this neighbor. This number is rounded to the nearest 1/16. If you omit both whole and fractional numbers, the interface metric is used.

Default

No static paths are specified.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can configure static neighbor entries only on Ethernet, FDDI, and Token Ring interfaces.

The decision to use a static path or a dynamic path is always determined by the relative metric numbers.

Be careful when assigning static paths. If a static path is assigned with a better metric than the dynamic paths and the link associated with the static path is lost, traffic may stop being forwarded, even though an alternative path might be available.

The metric is the cost value associated with the interface media type. It is generally inversely proportional to the speed of the interface. The lower the delay metric, the more like it is that the software will use that interface.

This command is useful for testing VINES networks with test equipment that does not generate hello packets.

Table 20 lists some example delay metric values.


Table 20: Example Delay Metric Values to Specify a Static Path
Interface Type Old Format New Internal Format New Configuration File Format Seconds

FDDI

1

0010

10000

0.2000

Ethernet

2

0020

20000

0.4000

16-Mb Token Ring

2

0020

20000

0.4000

4-Mb Token Ring

4

0040

40000

0.8000

T1 HDLC

35

0230

35 0000

7.0000

56-kb HDLC

45

02D0

450000

9.0000

9600-baud HDLC

90

05A0

900000

18.0000

4800-baud HDLC

150

0960

1500000

30.0000

2400-baud HDLC

250

0F00

2500000

50.0000

1200-baud HDLC

450

1C20

4500000

90.0000

T1 X.25

45

02D0

450000

9.0000

56-kb X.25

55

0370

550000

11.0000

9600-baud X.25

100

0640

1000000

20.0000

4800-baud X.25

160

0A00

1600000

32.0000

2400-baud X.25

260

1040

2600000

52.0000

1200-baud X.25

460

1CC0

4600000

92.0000

Example

The following example defines a static path to the neighbor station at address 12345678:0001 using ARPA encapsulation:

interface ethernet 0
  vines neighbor 12345678:0001 0001.0002.0003 arpa 20

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search onlineto find documentation of related commands.

clear vines neighbor
show vines neighbor
show vines route
vines route

vines output-network-filter

To filter the information contained in routing updates transmitted to other stations, use the vines  output-network-filter interface configuration command. To disable this filtering, use the no form of this command.

vines output-network-filter access-list-number
no vines output-network-filter

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. It is a decimal number from 201 to  300.

Default

No filtering.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

VINES routing messages contain topological entries that allow service and client nodes to select the best paths to destinations. This command provides filtering ability to administrators so that they may selectively determine which routing entries should be passed on to other routers. This command may be useful in enforcing administrative policies of local server usage.

Example

The following example prevents all routes from being advertised to Ethernet interface 0 except the route to a single server:

vines routing
!
vines access-list 201 permit 27AF9A:1 0:0
vines access-list 201 deny 0:0 FFFFFFFF:FFFF
!
interface ethernet 0
  vines metric 2
  vines output-network-filter 201

vines propagate

To modify how the Cisco IOS software forwards a broadcast packet, use the vines propagate interface configuration command. To return to the default forwarding scheme, use the no form of this command.

vines propagate [dynamic]
no vines propagate [dynamic]

Syntax Description

dynamic

(Optional) Propagate broadcasts on this interface only if there are no servers on any local network.

Default

Dynamic forwarding.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If you specify the vines propagate command with no keywords, broadcast messages are always propagated on the interface.

The vines propagate command affects how the software decides whether to forward a broadcast packet out an interface. The normal decision is based on the settings of both the "hop count" and "class" fields of the VINES IP header, and also whether any servers are present on any of the local network segments. In the default configuration, the software first looks to see if there are any local servers, and if so, follows the normal rules of VINES IP and forwards the broadcast out this interface based upon the "hop count" and the "class" field. If there are no local servers, then the software looks only at the "hop count" field before forwarding the broadcast out this interface. Enabling this command with no argument tells the software to always ignore the "class" field and make the forwarding decision based solely upon the "hop count" field. The no form of this command tells the software to always examine both the "hop count" and "class" fields.

Example

The following example always ignores the "class" field of the VINES IP header when deciding whether to forward a broadcast packet on serial interface 0:

interface serial 0
  vines propagate

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

vines arp-enable
vines serverless

vines redirect

To determine how frequently the Cisco IOS software sends an RTP redirect message on an interface, use the vines  redirect interface configuration command. To restore the default, use the no form of this command.

vines redirect [seconds]
no vines redirect

Syntax Description

seconds

(Optional) Interval, in seconds, that the software waits after sending a redirect message on an interface before it sends another redirect message on that same interface. If you specify a value of 0, the software never sends redirect messages on that interface.

Default

1 second

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

VINES routing redirect packets contain topological entries that allow service and client nodes to select the best paths to destinations. When a service node determines that it should not be forwarding packets between two nodes, it sends a redirect packet to the sending node informing it of the better path.

Example

The following example prevents redirect messages from ever being sent on Ethernet interface 0:

vines routing
!
interface ethernet 0
  vines metric 2
  vines redirect 0

vines route

To specify a static route to a server, use the vines route global configuration command. To remove a static route from the routing table, use the no form of this command.

vines route number address [whole [fractional]]
no vines route number address [whole [fractional]]

Syntax Description

number

Number of the server to which to add or remove the static route.

address

VINES IP address of the neighbor station to use to reach the server.

whole

(Optional) Metric value assigned to this route.

fractional

(Optional) Fractional cost value associated with this route.

Default

No static routes are specified.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The decision to use a static route or a dynamic route is always determined by the relative metric numbers.

Be careful when assigning static routes. If a static route is assigned with a better metric than the dynamic routes and the links associated with the static routes are lost, traffic may stop being forwarded, even though an alternative route might be available.

Floating static routes are static routes that can be overridden by dynamically learned routes. Floating static routes allow you to switch to another path whenever routing information for a destination is lost. One application of floating static routes is to provide back-up routes in topologies where dial-on-demand routing (DDR) is used.

To configure a floating static route, assign a metric to the static route that is worse (higher) than all dynamic routes. If you configure a floating static route, the Cisco IOS software checks to see if an entry for the route already exists in its routing table. If a dynamic route already exists, the floating static route is placed in reserve as part of a floating static route table. When the software detects that the dynamic route is no longer available, it replaces the dynamic route with the floating static route for that destination. If the route is later relearned dynamically, the dynamic route replaces the floating static route and the floating static route is again placed in reserve.


Note By default floating static routes are not redistributed into other dynamic protocols.

Examples

The following example establishes a static route to the server at ABCD1234:

vines route ABCD1234 12345678:1 35

The following example establishes a floating static route to the server at 3000000:

vines route 3000000 3001000:1 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clear vines neighbor
clear vines route
show vines neighbor
show vines route
vines neighbor
vines output-network-filter

vines route-cache

To enable fast switching, use the vines route-cache interface configuration command. To disable fast switching, use the no form of this command.

vines route-cache
no vines route-cache

Syntax Description

The command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The vines route-cache command enables the fast switching of VINES packets being transmitted out of the interface. However, forwarding of broadcast packets and responding to packets destined for the local router still occurs at the process level. When fast switching is disabled, all packets are forwarded at the process level.

Fast switching allows higher throughput by switching a packet using a cache created by previous packets. Fast switching provides load sharing on a per-packet basis just as slow switching does. Fast switching is enabled by default on all interfaces where it is supported. It is not supported on very old Ethernet, serial, and Token Ring interfaces, nor is it supported on serial interfaces using an encapsulation other than HDLC.

Packet transfer performance is generally better when fast switching is enabled. However, you may want to disable fast switching in order to save memory space on interface cards and help avoid congestion when high-bandwidth interfaces are writing large amounts of information to low-bandwidth interfaces.

When fast switching is enabled, the Cisco IOS software maintains a fast-switching cache table. When transmitting a packet that is eligible to be fast switched, the software first checks the fast-switching cache table. If it finds an entry for the destination, the software uses that path. Otherwise, it searches the standard routing table and places the route it finds into the fast-switching cache table. The next time the software receives a packet for that destination, it uses the route in the fast-switching cache table.

Example

The following example disables fast switching on serial interface 0:

interface serial 0
  bandwidth 19200
  vines metric
  no vines route-cache

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clear vines cache
show vines cache
show vines route

vines routing

To enable VINES routing, use the vines routing global configuration command. To disable VINES routing, use the no form of this command.

vines routing [address | recompute]
no vines routing

Syntax Description

address

(Optional) Network address of the router. You should specify an address on a router that does not have any Ethernet or FDDI interfaces. You also can specify an address in the unlikely event that two routers map themselves to the same address.

recompute

(Optional) Dynamically redetermine the router's network address.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Enabling VINES routing with the vines routing command starts both the VINES RTP and SRTP protocols. The Cisco IOS software dynamically determines which version of the VINES routing protocol stations on the network are using and then uses one or the other, or both protocols, as appropriate.

If a router contains Ethernet or FDDI interfaces, you do not need to specify an address because the Cisco IOS software automatically maps itself into the VINES address space that is reserved for Cisco routers. If you do specify an address, the software will use the specified address.

If a router contains only Token Ring interfaces (or Token Ring and serial interfaces), either the Token Ring interface must be fully initialized before you issue the vines routing command or you must specify an address in the vines routing command. This is because Token Ring interfaces have MAC addresses of 0000.0000.0000 until they are fully initialized.

Banyan has assigned Cisco a portion of the overall VINES network number space. This portion is the set of all numbers that begin with the first 11 bits (of the 32) of 0011 0000 000. This number set appears in all Cisco IOS software displays as a hexadecimal number beginning with 0x300 or 0x301. Devices attempt to automatically map themselves into our number space based upon the first nonzero Ethernet, Token Ring, or FDDI address found.

In theory, address conflicts are impossible, because VINES servers use their Banyan-assigned, unique key serial numbers as their network numbers and use a subnetwork number of one. Because the keys are unique, the server addresses are unique. VINES clients do not have addresses, per se. The clients use a modified version of the address of the first file server found on the physical network: they assume the server's network number and are assigned a subnetwork number by that server. This address-assignment scheme means that it is likely that two clients on the same physical LAN will have different addresses. It requires that the Cisco IOS software keep a cache of local neighbors as well as a cache of routing entries.

If you do not specify a network address and the software cannot compute one from a MAC address, the software selects a random address. There is no guarantee that this will be a unique address.

If you find that two routers have the same VINES network address, you should issue the vines  routing recompute command on both routers. When recomputing its address, the software uses the same method used when originally determining its network address. If you issue this command on a router on which you have enabled the processing of ARP packets (with the vines arp-enable command) and if the device's address changes when it is recomputed, any clients that received their VINES network addresses from the router will lose all network connectivity, and you will have to reboot them.

Older implementations of our software mapped themselves to numbers beginning with 0xF80. This was done before Banyan made the address assignment.

Example

The following example enables VINES routing on Ethernet interface 0:

vines routing
!
interface ethernet 0
  vines metric 2

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search onlineto find documentation of related commands.

vines arp-enable
vines metric
vines single-route

vines serverless

To configure a Banyan VINES network that does not have a server, use the vines serverless interface configuration command. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

vines serverless [dynamic | broadcast]
no vines serverless [dynamic | broadcast]

Syntax Description

dynamic

(Optional) Forward broadcasts toward one server only if there are no servers present on this interface.

broadcast

(Optional) Always flood broadcasts out all other router interfaces to reach all servers.

Default

Dynamic forwarding.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If all keywords are omitted, broadcasts are always forwarded toward one server.

The vines serverless command provides special processing for certain broadcast packets and certain packets directed at the router.

When you have a Banyan VINES network that has no server, by default the Cisco IOS software provides special processing for certain broadcast packets and certain packets directed at the router. This is necessary for proper functioning of the clients on a network without a server. This special processing allows a client to find the services that are provided by a server on another network. The dynamic nature of this processing allows the software to switch over from not providing serverless support to providing serverless support if the last server on a network fails. If you want the router to always provide serverless support, even when there are local servers present, you may override the default processing by issuing the vines serverless command with no argument. If you do not want the router to ever provide serverless support, you may also override the default in this way by issuing the no vines serverless command.

When the Cisco IOS software receives a zero-hop broadcast on a serverless network, it does not follow the normal processing rules for VINES packets and discard the frames. Instead, it looks in its routing table for the nearest Banyan server. If this server is on a directly connected network, the software resends the broadcast message on that network as a MAC-level broadcast so that server and any others present can respond to it. If the nearest Banyan server is not on a directly connected network, the software resends the broadcast message on that network as a MAC-level unicast message directed at the first hop to that server. The next router will perform these same steps, assuming it is also configured for serverless support. The router can also be configured to always flood these broadcasts on all interfaces by using the command vines serverless broadcast. The decision on whether or not to flood is a trade-off between network bandwidth and finding more servers.

If you have configured this interface to forward toward a single destination, you may see which server has been selected as the forwarding target by looking at the output of the show vines route command. All servers on the same physical network as the target server receive the broadcast.

Examples

The following example configures Ethernet interface 1, which is a network with no VINES servers:

interface ethernet 0
  vines metric 2
!
interface ethernet 1
  vines metric 2

The vines serverless command is not necessary because the default setting is what is desired.

The following example configures Ethernet interface 1, which is a network with no VINES servers to always flood broadcasts to all other interfaces in the router:

interface ethernet 0
  vines metric 2
!
interface ethernet 1
  vines metric 2
  vines serverless broadcast

The vines serverless command is necessary here because a nondefault setting is desired.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show vines route
vines arp-enable
vines propagate

vines single-route

To maintain only one route per server, use the vines single-route global configuration command. To allow multiple routes per server, use the no form of this command.

vines single-route
no vines single route

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Multiple routes

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

VINES servers and clients do not handle out-of-sequence packets well. If a VINES connection experiences slow performances due to low window size, enable the vines single-route command. This command can be enabled at any time after VINES routing has been enabled.

Example

The following example specifies the VINES single route:

vines routing
vines single-route

Related Command

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

vines routing

vines split-horizon

To use split horizon when sending routing updates, use the vines split-horizon interface configuration command. To disable split horizon, use the no form of this command.

vines split-horizon
no vines split-horizon

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The vines split-horizon command also affects whether broadcasts packets received on an interface are resent on the same interface. If enabled, broadcasts will not be resent on the same interface.

The vines split-horizon command determines how much information is included in routing updates sent out on an interface. It also determines whether received broadcasts are retransmitted on the same interface. When you enable split horizon, routing updates sent out on a given interface will not include any information that was originally learned from that interface, and broadcasts will not be retransmitted on the receiving interface. This is because split horizon is designed for networks that are either broadcast networks, or are fully connected mesh networks. In these types of networks, resending this information is a waste of network bandwidth because all other stations on that network have already heard the information. Disabling split horizon causes the Cisco IOS software to include all information in routing updates, and to resend broadcast packets on the network from which they were received.


Note When vines enhancements is disabled in global configuration mode, vines split-horizon for RTP routing updates is disabled on all interfaces; however, one may still see vines split-horizon as enabled on the VINES interface when show vines interface interface command is entered. Split horizon remains enabled because vines split-horizon on individual VINES interface, in addition to controlling RTP updates, also controls whether or not retransmission of broadcasts is permitted on the receiving interface.

You can use this command on any interface, but generally it makes sense to use it only for X.25 and Frame Relay interfaces. You should disable split horizon on X.25 and Frame Relay networks that are not fully connected mesh topologies.

Example

The following example disables split horizon on an X.25 network:

interface serial 0
  no vines split-horizon

Related Command

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

vines enhancements

vines srtp-enabled

To enable SRTP, use the vines srtp-enabled global configuration command. To disable SRTP, use the no form of this command.

vines srtp-enabled
no vines srtp-enabled

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

The router runs Banyan's RTP routing protocol only.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

When SRTP is enabled, the Cisco IOS software dynamically determines whether it needs to send RTP messages, SRTP messages, or both.

Example

The following example enables SRTP:

interface serial 0
  vines routing
  vines srtp-enabled

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

vines routing

vines time access-group

To control the servers from which the router will accept VINES network time, use the vines  time access-group global configuration command. To accept VINES network time messages from any server, use the no form of this command.

vines time access-group access-list-number
no vines time access-group

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. It is a decimal number from 201 to  300.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example applies an access list to incoming time messages:

vines access-list 201 permit 27AF9A:1 0:0
vines access-list 201 deny 0:0 FFFFFFFF:FFFF
!
vines time participate
vines time access-group 201

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show vines service
vines access-list (simple)
vines time destination
vines time participate
vines time services
vines time use-system

vines time destination

To control the servers to which the Cisco IOS software sends VINES network time, use the vines  time destination global configuration command. To send VINES network time messages to all servers, use the no form of this command.

vines time destination address
no vines time destination

Syntax Description

address

Destination VINES address for the network time messages.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

By default, the software sends VINES network time messages to the broadcast address.

You can enter the vines  time destination command up to 20 times for 20 destination addresses.

Example

The following example specifies the servers to receive VINES time messages:

vines time participate
vines time destination 0027AF9F:0001
vines time destination 300001239:001

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show vines service
vines time access-group
vines time participate
vines time services
vines time use-system

vines time participate

To enable participation in synchronizing time across a VINES network, use the vines time participate global configuration command. To disable this participation, use the no form of this command.

vines time participate
no vines time participate

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Cisco IOS software listens to time-synchronization messages on the network and tracks the network time. This command controls only the sending of time-synchronization messages by the software. Thus you can use the show vines service EXEC command to see the network time, even if the router is not actively participating in time synchronization.

Caution The use of global configuration command vines time services can affect the behavior of this command. Refer to that vines time services for more information.

Example

The following example disables participation in the sending of VINES time messages:

no vines time participate 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show vines service
vines access-list (simple)
vines access-group
vines time destination
vines time services
vines time set-system
vines time use-system

vines time services

To enable the Cisco IOS to provide time services for VINES clients and to enable participation in the synchronization of time across a VINES network, use the vines time services global configuration command. To disable participation in time synchronization and services, use the no form of this command.

vines time services
no vines time services

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Releases 11.0(21), 11.1(22) 11.2(15), and 11.3(3).

By default the Cisco IOS software participates in sending and listening to time-synchronization messages on the network. If participation is disabled via the no form of this command, the Cisco IOS software will neither listen to nor send time-synchronization messages to the network.

Caution To enable participation in synchronizing time across a VINES network, use the global configuration command vines time participate in conjunction with the command vines time services.
If you use the no vines time services command, all time services and synchronization will be automatically disabled, even if you have issued the vines time participate separately.

Example

The following example disables participation in the sending of VINES time messages and services:

no vines time services

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show vines service
vines access-list (simple)
vines access-group
vines time destination
vines time participate
vines time set-system
vines time use-system

vines time set-system

To set the internal time based upon the received VINES network time, use the vines time set-system global configuration command. To uncouple the time from VINES network time, use the no form of this command.

vines time set-system
no vines time set-system

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You should not use the vines time set-system command when running NTP on a router, because this command has no effect on these systems. NTP is considered to be a higher-priority clock than VINES, because it is a much more accurate timekeeping system.

Example

The following example sets the time from received VINES time messages:

vines time participate
vines time set-system

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show vines service
vines access-list (simple)

vines time destination
vines time participate
vines time use-system

vines time use-system

To set VINES network time based upon the internal time, use the vines time use-system global configuration command. To uncouple VINES network time from the time, use the no form of this command.

vines time use-system
no vines time use-system

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The vines time use-system command causes the Cisco IOS software to import the locally available time source (such as NTP, the calendar system, or DNSIX time) into the VINES time world as an authoritative clock. This is most useful when running NTP on the router. The router appears to the VINES network as a server dialing the NIST clock.

When you specify the vines time use-system command, VINES extracts the system time and propagates it into the VINES world only if the system time is valid. If you are running NTP, the system time becomes valid when NTP synchronizes with a master. If you are not running NTP, but you do have an internal calendar system, you can force that time to be valid by specifying the clock calendar-valid command. This allows VINES to propagate time based upon the clock chip of the calendar system.

Example

The following example sets VINES network time from the router's internal time:

ntp peer 131.108.13.111 version 2
!
vines time participate
vines time use-system

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clock calendar-valid
show vines service
vines access-list (simple)

vines time access-group
vines time destination
vines time use-system
vines time services

vines update deltas

To modify the manner in which routing updates are sent, use the vines update deltas interface configuration command. To return to the default method, use the no form of this command.

vines update deltas
no vines update deltas

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No deltas

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The vines update deltas command significantly modifies the way that routing information is propagated across the network.

On LAN media, using this command causes the Cisco IOS software to stop transmitting and to stop expecting periodic routing updates. Instead, the software transmits and expects a periodic hello message. The difference between these two messages is whether routing information is included. The software continues to send flash updates to inform its neighbors of any changes to current routing table information. This is the same frequency and type of routing updates used on LANs by VINES version 5.50, but Cisco's packet format differs from the VINES format.

On WAN media, using this command causes the software to transmit three normally spaced routing updates and then cease transmission. The software does not send periodic hello messages. The software will, however, continue to send flash updates to inform its neighbors of any changes to current routing table information. This is the same frequency and type of routing updates used on LANs by all versions of VINES, but Cisco's packet format differs from the VINES format.

Example

The following example modifies the propagation of routing update information on the WAN interface connected to serial interface 0:

interface serial 0
  vines metric
  vines update deltas

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show vines interface
show vines neighbor
show vines route
vines metric

vines update interval

To modify the frequency at which routing updates are sent, use the vines update interval interface configuration command. To return to the default frequency, use the no form of this command.

vines update interval [seconds]
no vines update interval [seconds]

Syntax Description

seconds

(Optional) Interval, in seconds, between the sending of periodic VINES routing updates. This can be a number in the range 0 to 232 and is rounded up to the nearest 5 seconds. The default value is 90 seconds. If you omit seconds or specify a value of 0, the default value of 90 seconds is used.

Default

90 seconds

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The vines update interval command controls the interval at which the Cisco IOS software sends routing updates. The routing update interval should be the same on all VINES-speaking entities on the same physical network.

For networks on which other vendors' entities are present, it is safe to use any setting in the range 30 to 100 seconds on networks. This is the range of update intervals supported by Banyan servers. You should use values outside of this range (with the exception of zero) only on networks that contain only Cisco routers. You can use a value of zero on networks with only Cisco routers or on WAN links connecting Cisco routers and Banyan servers. In this configuration, you must also address application-level security requirements.

For Banyan VINES sites that support "change-only" updates on LAN networks, you can use the vines update interval command in LAN networks with both Cisco routers and Banyan servers.

Example

The following example sets the update interval on serial interface 0 to a value of 270 seconds:

interface serial 0
  vines metric
  vines update interval 270

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show vines interface
show vines neighbor
show vines route
vines metric


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