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Table of Contents

Router and Network Monitoring Commands

Router and Network Monitoring Commands

This chapter describes the commands used to monitor the router and network.

For system management configuration tasks and examples, refer to the chapter entitled "Monitoring the Router and Network" in the Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide.

buckets-of-history-kept

To set the number of history buckets that are kept during the response time reporter probe's lifetime, use the buckets-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

buckets-of-history-kept size
no buckets-of-history-kept

Syntax Description

size

Number of history buckets kept during the response time reporter probe's lifetime. The default is 50 buckets.

Default

50 buckets

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

A response time reporter probe can collect history and capture statistics. By default, history is not collected. When a problem arises where history is useful (for example, a large number of timeouts are occurring), you can configure the lives-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration command to collect history. You can optionally adjust the buckets-of-history-kept, filter-for-history, and samples-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration commands.

When the number of buckets reaches the size specified, no further history for this life is stored.


Note Collecting history increases the RAM usage. Only collect history when you think there is a problem. For general network response time information, use statistics.

If history is collected, each bucket contains one or more history entries from the probe. When the probe type is pathEcho, an entry is created for each hop along the path that the probe takes to reach its destination. The type of entry stored in the history table is controlled by the filter-for-history response time reporter configuration command. The total number of entries stored in the history table is controlled by the combination of samples-of-history-kept, buckets-of-history-kept, and lives-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration commands.

Each time the probe starts a response time reporter operation, a new bucket is created until the number of history buckets matches the specified size or the probe's lifetime expires. History buckets do not wrap. The probe's lifetime is defined by the rtr schedule global configuration command. The probe starts a response time reporter operation based on the seconds specified by the frequency response time reporter configuration command.

Example

The following example configures probe 1 to keep 25 history buckets during the probe's lifetime:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.161.21
  buckets-of-history-kept 25
  lives-of-history-kept 1

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

filter-for-history
lives-of-history-kept
rtr
rtr schedule
samples-of-history-kept

cdp enable

To enable Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) on an interface, use the cdp enable interface configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable CDP on an interface.

cdp enable
no cdp enable

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled at the global level and on all supported interfaces.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

CDP is enabled by default at the global level and on each supported interface in order to send or receive CDP information. However, some interfaces, such as ATM interfaces, do not support CDP.


Note The cdp enable, cdp timer, and cdp run commands affect the operation of the IP on demand routing feature (that is, the router odr global configuration command). For more information on the router odr command, see the "On-Demand Routing Commands" chapter in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.

Example

The following example enables CDP on Ethernet interface 0:

interface ethernet 0
  cdp enable

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

cdp run

cdp holdtime

To specify the amount of time the receiving device should hold a CDP packet from your router before discarding it, use the cdp holdtime global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to revert to the default setting.

cdp holdtime seconds
no cdp holdtime

Syntax Description

seconds

Specifies the hold time to be sent in the CDP update packets.

Default

180 seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

CDP packets are sent with time-to-live, or hold time, that is nonzero after an interface is enabled and a hold time of 0 immediately before an interface is idled down.

The CDP hold time must be set to a higher number of seconds than the time between CDP transmissions, which is set using the cdp timer command.

Example

In the following example, the CDP packets being sent from your router should be held by the receiving device for 60 seconds before being discarded. You might want to set the hold time lower than the default setting of 180 seconds if information about your router changes often and you want the receiving devices to purge this information more quickly.

cdp holdtime 60

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

cdp timer
show cdp

cdp run

To enable CDP, use the cdp run global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable CDP.

cdp run
no cdp run

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

CDP is enabled on your router by default, which means the Cisco IOS software will receive CDP information. CDP also is enabled on supported interfaces by default. To disable CDP on an interface, use the no cdp enable interface configuration command.


Note The cdp enable, cdp timer, and cdp run commands affect the operation of the IP on demand routing feature (that is, the router odr global configuration command). For more information on the router odr command, see the "On-Demand Routing Commands" chapter in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.

Example

The following example disables CDP:

no cdp run

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

cdp enable

cdp timer

To specify how often the Cisco IOS software sends CDP updates, use the cdp timer global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to revert to the default setting.

cdp timer seconds
no cdp timer

Syntax Description

seconds

Specifies how often the Cisco IOS software sends CDP updates.

Default

60 seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

The trade-off with sending more frequent transmissions is providing up-to-date information versus using bandwidth more often.


Note The cdp enable, cdp timer, and cdp run commands affect the operation of the IP on demand routing feature (that is, the router odr global configuration command). For more information on the router odr command, see the "On-Demand Routing Commands" chapter in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.

Example

In the following example, CDP updates are sent every 80 seconds, less frequently than the default setting of 60 seconds. You might want to make this change if you are concerned about preserving bandwidth.

cdp timer 80

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

cdp holdtime
show cdp

clear cdp counters

To reset CDP traffic counters to zero (0), use the clear cdp counters privileged EXEC command.

clear cdp counters

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Example

The following example clears the CDP counters. The show cdp traffic output shows that all of the traffic counters have been reset to zero (0).

Router# clear cdp counters
Router# show cdp traffic
CDP counters:
        Packets output: 0, Input: 0
        Hdr syntax: 0, Chksum error: 0, Encaps failed: 0
        No memory: 0, Invalid packet: 0, Fragmented: 0

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clear cdp table
show cdp traffic

clear cdp table

To clear the table that contains CDP information about neighbors, use the clear cdp table privileged EXEC command.

clear cdp table

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Example

The following example clears the CDP table. The output of the show cdp neighbors command shows that all information has been deleted from the table.

Router# clear cdp table 
CDP-AD: Deleted table entry for neon.cisco.com, interface Ethernet0
CDP-AD: Deleted table entry for neon.cisco.com, interface Serial0
Router# show cdp neighbors
Capability Codes: R - Router, T - Trans Bridge, B - Source Route Bridge
                  S - Switch, H - Host, I - IGMP
 
Device ID        Local Intrfce     Holdtme    Capability    Platform    Port ID

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clear cdp counter
show cdp neighbors

distributions-of-statistics-kept

To set the number of statistic distributions kept per hop during the response time reporter probe's lifetime, use the distributions-of-statistics-kept response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

distributions-of-statistics-kept size
no distributions-of-statistics-kept

Syntax Description

size

Number of statistic distributions kept per hop. The default is 1 distribution.

Default

1 distribution

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

In most situations, you do not need to change the statistic distribution size for the response time reporter. Only change the size when distributions are needed (for example, when performing statistical modeling of your network).


Note Increasing the distributions also increases the RAM usage. The total number of statistics distributions captured will be: the value of distributions-of-statistics-kept times the value of hops-of-statistics-kept times the value of paths-of-statistics-kept times the value of hours-of-statistics-kept.

When the number of distributions reaches the size specified, no further distribution information is stored.

Example

The following example sets the distribution to 5 and the distribution interval to 10 ms. This means that the first distribution will contain statistics from 0 to 9 ms, the second distribution will contain statistics from 10 to 19 ms, the third distribution will contain statistics from 20 to 29 ms, the fourth distribution will contain statistics from 30 to 39 ms, and the fifth distribution will contain statistics from 40 ms to infinity.

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.161.21
  distributions-of-statistics-kept 5
  statistics-distribution-interval 10 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

hops-of-statistics-kept
hours-of-statistics-kept
paths-of-statistics-kept
rtr
statistics-distribution-interval

filter-for-history

To define the type of information kept in the history table for the response time reporter probe, use the filter-for-history response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

filter-for-history {none | all | overThreshold | failures}
no filter-for-history {none | all | overThreshold | failures}

Syntax Description

none

No history kept. This is the default.

all

All probe operations attempted are kept in the history table.

overThreshold

Only packets that are over the threshold are kept in the history table.

failures

Only packets that fail for any reason are kept in the history table.

Default

none

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the filter-for-history command to control what gets stored in the history table for the response time reporter. To control how much history gets saved in the history table, use the lives-of-history-kept, buckets-of-history-kept, and the samples-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration commands.

A probe can collect history and capture statistics. By default, history is not collected. When a problem arises where history is useful (for example, a large number of timeouts are occurring), you can configure the lives-of-history-kept command to collect history.


Note Collecting history increases the RAM usage. Only collect history when you think there is a problem. For general network response time information, use statistics.

Example

In the following example, only probe packets that fail are kept in the history table:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.161.21
  lives-of-history-kept 1
  filter-for-history failures

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

buckets-of-history-kept
lives-of-history-kept
rtr
samples-of-history-kept

frequency

To set the rate at which the response time reporter probe starts a response time operation, use the frequency response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

frequency second
no frequency

Syntax Description

second

Number of seconds between the probe's response time reporter operations. The default value is 60 seconds.

Default

60 seconds

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Caution For normal operation, do not set the frequency value to less than 60 seconds for the following reasons: It is not needed when keeping statistics (the default), and it can slow down the WAN because of the potential overhead that numerous probes can cause.

If the probe takes longer to execute the current response time reporter operation than the specified frequency value, a statistics counter called busy is incremented in lieu of starting a second operation.

The value specified for the frequency command cannot be less than the value specified for the timeout response time reporter configuration command.

Example

The following example configures the probe to execute a response time reporter operation every 90 seconds:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.176
  frequency 90

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rtr
timeout

hops-of-statistics-kept

To set the number of hops for which statistics are maintained per path for the response time reporter probe, use the hops-of-statistics-kept response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

hops-of-statistics-kept size
no hops-of-statistics-kept

Syntax Description

size

Number of hops for which statistics are maintained per path. The default is 16 hops for type pathEcho and 1 hop for type echo.

Default

16 hops for type pathEcho

1 hop for type echo

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

One hop is the passage of a timed packet from this router to another network device. The other network device (is assumed to) be a device along the path to the destination (including the destination) when the probe type is pathEcho, or just the destination when the type is echo.

When the number of hops reaches the size specified, no further hop information is stored.

Example

The following example monitors probe 2's statistics for only 10 hops:

rtr 2
  type pathecho protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.177
  hops-of-statistics-kept 10

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

distributions-of-statistics-kept
hours-of-statistics-kept
paths-of-statistics-kept
rtr
statistics-distribution-interval

hours-of-statistics-kept

To set the number of hours for which statistics are maintained for the response time reporter probe, use the hours-of-statistics-kept response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

hours-of-statistics-kept hours
no hours-of-statistics-kept

Syntax Description

hours

Number of hours that the router maintains statistics. The default is 2  hours.

Default

2 hours

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

When the number of hours exceeds the specified value, the statistics table wraps (that is, the oldest information is replaced by newer information).

Example

The following example maintains probe 2's statistics for 3 hours:

rtr 2
  type pathecho protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.177
  hours-of-statistics-kept 3

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

distributions-of-statistics-kept
hops-of-statistics-kept
paths-of-statistics-kept
rtr
statistics-distribution-interval

lives-of-history-kept

To set the number of lives maintained in the history table for the response time reporter probe, use the lives-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

lives-of-history-kept lives
no lives-of-history-kept

Syntax Description

lives

Number of lives maintained in the history table for the probe. The default is 0 lives.

Default

0 lives

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The default value (0 lives) means that history is not collected for the probe. To disable history collection, use the default value for the lives-of-history-kept command rather than the filter-for-history none response time reporter configuration command. The lives-of-history-kept command disables history collection before the probe's operation is attempted, and the filter-for-history command checks for history inclusion after the probe's operation attempt is made.

When the number of lives exceeds the specified value, the history table wraps (that is, the oldest information is replaced by newer information).

When a probe makes a transition from pending to active, a life starts. When a probe's life ends, the probe makes a transition from active to pending.

Example

The following example maintains probe 1's history for 5 lives:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.176
  lives-of-history-kept 5

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

buckets-of-history-kept
filter-for-history
rtr
samples-of-history-kept

owner

To configure the SNMP owner of the response time reporter probe, use the owner response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

owner text
no owner

Syntax Description

text

Name of the SNMP owner from 0 to 255 ASCII characters. The default is none.

Default

No owner is specified.

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The owner name contains one or more of the following: ASCII form of the network management station's transport address, network management station name (that is, the domain name), and network management personnel's name, location, or phone number. In some cases, the agent itself will be the owner of the probe. In these cases, the name can begin with "agent."

Example

The following example sets probe 1's owner is set:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.176
  owner 172.16.1.189 cwb.cisco.com John Doe RTP 555-1212

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rtr

paths-of-statistics-kept

To set the number of paths for which statistics are maintained per hour for the response time reporter probe, use the paths-of-statistics-kept response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

paths-of-statistics-kept size
no paths-of-statistics-kept

Syntax Description

size

Number of paths for which statistics are maintained per hour. The default is 5 paths for type pathEcho and 1 path for type echo.

Default

5 paths for type pathEcho

1 path for type echo

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

A path is the route the probe's request packet takes through the network to get to its destination. The probe may take a different path to reach its destination for each response time reporter operation.

When the number of paths reaches the size specified, no further path information is stored.

Example

The following example maintains probe 2's statistics for only 3 paths:

rtr 2
  type pathEcho protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.177
  paths-of-statistics-kept 3

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

distributions-of-statistics-kept
hops-of-statistics-kept
hours-of-statistics-kept
rtr
statistics-distribution-interval

request-data-size

To set the protocol data size in the payload of the response time reporter probe's request packet, use the request-data-size response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

request-data-size byte
no request-data-size

Syntax Description

byte

Size of the protocol data in the payload of the probe's request packet. Range is 0 to the protocol's maximum. The default is 1 byte.

Default

1 byte

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

When the protocol name has the suffix "appl," the packet uses both a request and respond data size (see the response-data-size response time reporter configuration command), and the data size is 12  bytes smaller than the normal payload size (this 12 bytes is the ARR Header used to control send and data response sizes).

Example

The following example sets probe 3's request packet size to 40 bytes:

rtr 3
  type echo protocol snalu0echoappl cwbc0a
  request-data-size 40

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

response-data-size
rtr

response-data-size

To set the protocol data size in the payload of the response time reporter probe's response packet, use the response-data-size response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

response-data-size byte
no response-data-size

Syntax Description

byte

Size of the protocol data in the payload in the probe's response packet. For "appl" protocols, the default is 0 bytes. For all others, the default is the same value as the request-data-size.

Default

For "appl" protocols, 0 bytes

For all others, the same value as the request-data-size

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The response-data-size command is only applicable for protocols defined with the type command that end in "appl" (for example, snalu0echoappl). When the protocol ends in "appl," the response data size is 12 bytes smaller than normal payload size.

Example

The following example sets probe 3's response packet size to 1440 bytes:

rtr 3
  type echo protocol snalu0echoappl cwbc0a
  response-data-size 1440

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

request-data-size
rtr

rmon

To enable Remote Network Monitoring (RMON) on an Ethernet interface, use the rmon interface configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable RMON on the interface.

rmon {native | promiscuous}
no rmon

Syntax Description

native

Enables RMON on the Ethernet interface. In native mode, the router processes only packets destined for this interface.

promiscuous

Enables RMON on the Ethernet interface. In promiscuous mode, the router examines every packet.

Default

RMON is disabled on the interface.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command enables RMON on Ethernet interfaces of Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series routers only. A generic RMON console application is recommended in order to use the RMON network management capabilities. SNMP must also be configured. RMON provides visibility of individual nodal activity and allows you to monitor all nodes and their interaction on a LAN segment. When the rmon command is issued, the router automatically installs an Ethernet statistics study for the associated interface.


Note RMON can be very data and processor intensive. Users should measure usage effects to ensure that router performance is not degraded and to minimize excessive management traffic overhead. Native mode is less intensive than promiscuous mode.

All Cisco IOS software Release 11.3 feature sets support RMON alarm and event groups. Additional RMON groups are supported in certain feature sets. Refer to the Release Notes for feature set descriptions. As a security precaution, support for the packet capture group allows capture of packet header information only; data payloads are not captured.

The RMON MIB is described in RFC 1757.

Example

The following example enables RMON on Ethernet interface 0 and allows the router to examine only packets destined for the interface:

interface ethernet 0
  rmon native

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rmon alarm
rmon event
rmon queuesize
show rmon

rmon alarm

To set an alarm on any MIB object, use the rmon alarm global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable the alarm.

rmon alarm number variable interval {delta | absolute} rising-threshold value [event-number]
falling-threshold value [event-number] [owner string]
no rmon alarm number

Syntax Description

number

Alarm number, which is identical to the alarmIndex in the alarmTable in the Remote Monitoring (RMON) MIB.

variable

MIB object to monitor, which translates into the alarmVariable used in the alarmTable of the RMON MIB.

interval

Time in seconds the alarm monitors the MIB variable, which is identical to the alarmInterval used in the alarmTable of the RMON MIB.

delta

Tests the change between MIB variables, which affects the alarmSampleType in the alarmTable of the RMON MIB.

absolute

Tests each MIB variable directly, which affects the alarmSampleType in the alarmTable of the RMON MIB.

rising-threshold value

Value at which the alarm is triggered.

event-number

(Optional) Event number to trigger when the rising or falling threshold exceeds its limit. This value is identical to the alarmRisingEventIndex or the alarmFallingEventIndex in the alarmTable of the RMON MIB.

falling-threshold value

Value at which the alarm is reset.

owner string

(Optional) Specifies an owner for the alarm, which is identical to the alarmOwner in the alarmTable of the RMON MIB.

Default

No alarms configured

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The MIB object must be specified as a dotted decimal value after the entry sequence (for example, ifEntry.10.1). You cannot specify the variable name and the instance (for example, ifInOctets.1) or the entire dotted decimal notation. The variable must be of the form entry.integer.instance.

To disable the RMON alarms, you must use the no form of the command on each configured alarm. For example, enter no rmon alarm 1, where the 1 identifies which alarm is to be removed.

See RFC 1757 for more information about the RMON alarm group.

Example

The following example configures an RMON alarm using the rmon alarm command:

rmon alarm 10 ifEntry.20.1 20 delta rising-threshold 15 1 falling-threshold 0
          owner jjohnson

This example configures RMON alarm number 10. The alarm monitors the MIB variable ifEntry.20.1 once every 20 seconds until the alarm is disabled, and checks the change in the variable's rise or fall. If the ifEntry.20.1 value shows a MIB counter increase of 15 or more, such as from 100000 to 100015, the alarm is triggered. The alarm in turn triggers event number  1, which is configured with the rmon event command. Possible events include a log entry or a SNMP trap. If the ifEntry.20.1 value changes by 0 (falling-threshold 0), the alarm is reset and can be triggered again.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rmon
rmon event
show rmon

rmon event

To add or remove an event in the RMON event table that is associated with an RMON event number, use the rmon event global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable RMON on the interface.

rmon event number [log] [trap community] [description string] [owner string]
no rmon event number

Syntax Description

number

Assigned event number, which is identical to the eventIndex in the eventTable in the RMON MIB.

log

(Optional) Generates an RMON log entry when the event is triggered and sets the eventType in the RMON MIB to log or log-and-trap.

trap community

(Optional) SNMP community string used for this trap. Configures the setting of the eventType in the RMON MIB for this row as either snmp-trap or log-and-trap. This value is identical to the eventCommunityValue in the eventTable in the RMON MIB.

description string

(Optional) Specifies a description of the event, which is identical to the event description in the eventTable of the RMON MIB.

owner string

(Optional) Owner of this event, which is identical to the eventOwner in the eventTable of the RMON MIB.

Default

No events configured

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

This command applies only to the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series.

See RFC 1757 for more information about the RMON MIB.

Example

The following example enables the rmon event command:

rmon event 1 log trap eventtrap description "High ifOutErrors" owner sdurham 

This example configuration creates RMON event number 1, which is defined as High ifOutErrors, and generates a log entry when the event is triggered by an alarm. The user sdurham owns the row that is created in the event table by this command. This configuration also generates a Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) trap when the event is triggered.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rmon
show rmon

rmon queuesize

To change the size of the queue that holds packets for analysis by the Remote Network Monitoring (RMON) process, use the rmon queuesize global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default value.

rmon queuesize size
no rmon queuesize

Syntax Description

size

Number of packets allowed in the queue awaiting RMON analysis. Default queue size is 64 packets.

Default

64 packets

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command applies to the RMON function, which is available on Ethernet interfaces of Cisco  2500 series and Cisco  AS5200 series routers only.

You might want to increase the queue size if the RMON function indicates it is dropping packets. You can determine this from the output of the show rmon command or from the etherStatsDropEvents object in the etherStats table. A feasible maximum queue size depends on the amount of memory available in the router and the configuration of the buffer pool.

Example

The following example configures the RMON queue size to be 128 packets:

rmon queuesize 128

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rmon
show rmon

rtr

To configure a response time reporter probe, use the rtr global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove all configuration information for a probe including the probe's schedule, reaction configuration, and reaction triggers.

rtr probe
no rtr probe

Syntax Description

probe

Number of the response time reporter probe (instance) to configure.

Default

None

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

A probe is used for the purpose of collecting response time information.

Each platform has a limit on the number of probes that can be configured. In general this limit is less than 20.

Debugging is supported only on the first 32 probe numbers.

The response time reporter feature allows customers to monitor the performance of their network, network resources, and applications by measuring response times and availability. With this feature, a customer can perform troubleshooting, problem notification, and preproblem analysis. The response time reporter feature is currently available only with the IBM feature set of the Cisco IOS software. For more information, refer to the "Monitoring the Router and Network" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide and the Cisco Round-Trip Time Monitor (RTTMON) MIB.

This command places you in response time reporter configuration mode.


Note After you schedule a probe with the rtr schedule global configuration command, you cannot modify the probe's configuration. To modify the probe's configuration after it is scheduled, use the no rtr command. You can now reenter the probe's configuration with the rtr command.

Use the following response time reporter configuration commands (config-rtr) to configure the probe's characteristics:

After you configure a probe, you must schedule the probe. For information on scheduling a probe, refer to the rtr schedule global configuration command. You can also optionally set reaction triggers for the probe. For information on reaction triggers, refer to the rtr reaction-configuration and rtr  reaction-trigger global configuration commands.

To display the probe's current configuration settings, use the show rtr configuration EXEC command.

Example

In the following example, probe 1 is configured to perform end-to-end response time operations using an SNA LU Type 0 connection with the host name cwbc0a. Only the type response time reporter configuration command is required; all others are optional.

rtr 1
  type echo protocol snalu0echoappl cwbc0a
  request-data-size 40
  response-data-size 1440

Note If probe 1 already existed and it has not been scheduled, you are placed into response time reporter configuration command mode. If the probe already exists and has been scheduled, this command will fail.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rtr reaction-configuration
rtr reaction-trigger
rtr reset
rtr schedule

rtr reaction-configuration

To configure certain actions to occur based on events under the control of the response time reporter, use the rtr reaction-configuration global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the probe's default values.

rtr reaction-configuration probe [connection-loss-enable] [timeout-enable]
[threshold-falling milliseconds] [threshold-type option] [action-type option]
no rtr reaction-configuration probe

Syntax Description

probe

Number of the response time reporter probe to configure.

connection-loss-enable

(Optional) Enable checking for connection loss in connection-oriented protocols. The default is disabled.

timeout-enable

(Optional) Enable checking for response time reporting operation timeouts based on the timeout value configured for the probe with the timeout response time reporter configuration command. The default is disabled.

threshold-falling milliseconds

(Optional) Set the falling threshold (standard RMON-type hysteresis mechanism) in milliseconds. When the falling threshold is met, generate a resolution reaction event. The probe's rising over threshold is set with the threshold response time reporter configuration command. The default value is 3000 ms.

threshold-type option

(Optional) Specify the algorithm used by the response time reporter to calculate over and falling threshold violations. Option can be one of the following keywords:

· never---Do not calculate threshold violations (the default).

· immediate---When the response time exceeds the rising over threshold or drops below the falling threshold, immediately perform the action defined by action-type.

· consecutive [occurrences]---When the response time exceeds the rising threshold consecutively 5 times or drops below the falling threshold consecutively 5 times, perform the action defined by action-type. Optionally specify the number of consecutive occurrences. The default is 5.

· xofy [x-value y-value]---When the response time exceeds the rising threshold 5 out of the last 5 times or drops below the falling threshold 5 out of the last 5 times, perform the action defined by action-type. Optionally specify the number of violations that must occur and the number that must occur within a specified number. The default is 5 for both x-value and y-value.

· average [attempts]---When the average of the last 5 response times exceeds the rising threshold or when the average of the last 5 response times drops below the falling threshold, perform the action defined by action-type. Optionally specify the number of operations to average. The default is the average of the last 5 response time operations. For example: if the probe's threshold is 5000 ms and the probe's last 3  attempts results are 6000, 6000, and 5000 ms, the average would be 6000+6000+5000=17000/3>5000, thus violating the 5000-ms threshold.

action-type option

(Optional) Specify what action or combination of actions the probe performs when you configure connection-loss-enable or timeout-enable, or threshold events occur. For the action-type to occur for threshold events, the threshold-type must be defined to anything other than never. Option can be one of the following keywords:

· none---No action is taken.

· trapOnly---Send an SNMP trap on both over and falling threshold violations.

· nmvtOnly---Send an SNA NMVT Alert on over threshold violation and an SNA NMVT Resolution on falling threshold violations.

· triggerOnly---Have one or more target probe's operational state make the transition from "pending" to "active" on over (and falling) threshold violations. The target probes are defined with the rtr reaction-trigger command. A target probe will continue until its life expires as specified by the target probe's life value configured with the rtr schedule global configuration command. A triggered target probe must finish its life before it can be triggered again.

· trapAndNmvt---Send a combination of trapOnly and nmvtOnly.

· trapAndTrigger---Send a combination of trapOnly and triggerOnly.

· nmvtAndTrigger---Send a combination of nmvtOnly and triggerOnly.

· trapNmvtAndTrigger---Send a combination of trapOnly, nmvtOnly, and triggerOnly.

Default

No reactions are generated.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Triggers are used for diagnostics purposes and are not used in normal operation.

You can use triggers to assist you in determining where delays are happening in the network when excessive delays are being seen on an end-to-end basis.

The reaction applies only to attempts to the target (that is, attempts to any hops along the path in pathEcho do not generate reactions).


Note Keywords are not case sensitive and are shown in mixed case for readability only.

Example

In the following example, probe 19 sends an SNMP trap when there is an over or falling threshold violation:

rtr reaction-configuration 19 threshold-type immediate action-type trapOnly

Figure 2 shows that an alert (rising trap) would be issued immediately when the response time exceeds the rising threshold and a resolution (falling trap) would be issued immediately when the response time drops below the falling threshold.


Figure 2: Example of Rising and Falling Thresholds

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rtr
rtr reaction-trigger
threshold
timeout

rtr reaction-trigger

To define a second response time reporter probe to make the transition from a "pending" state to an "active" state when one of the trigger action-type options are defined with the rtr  reaction-configuration global configuration command, use the rtr  reaction-trigger global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the trigger combination.

rtr reaction-trigger probe target-probe
no rtr reaction-trigger probe

Syntax Description

probe

Number of the probe in the "active" state that has the action-type set with the rtr reaction-configuration global configuration command.

target-probe

Number of the probe in the "pending" state that is waiting to be triggered with the rtr global configuration command.

Default

No trigger combination is defined.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Triggers are usually used for diagnostics purposes and are not used in normal operation.

Example

In the following example, probe 1's state is changed from pending state to active state when probe  2's action-type occurs:

rtr reaction-trigger 2 1

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rtr
rtr reaction-configuration
rtr schedule

rtr reset

To perform a shutdown and restart of the response time reporter, use the rtr reset global configuration command.

rtr reset

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Caution Use the rtr reset command only in extreme situations such as the incorrect configuration of a number of probes.

The rtr reset command stops all probes, clears response time reporter configuration information, and returns the response time reporter feature to the startup condition. This command does not reread the response time reporter configuration stored in startup-config in NVRAM. You must retype the configuration or perform a config memory command.

Example

The following example resets the response time reporter feature:

rtr reset

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rtr

rtr schedule

To configure the time parameters for a response time reporter probe, use the rtr schedule global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to stop the probe and restart it with the default parameters (that is, pending).

rtr schedule probe [life seconds] [start-time {pending | now | hh:mm [month day |
day month]}] [ageout seconds]
no rtr schedule probe

Syntax Description

probe

Number of the response time reporter probe to schedule.

life seconds

(Optional) Number of seconds the probe actively collects information. The default is 3600 seconds (one hour).

start-time

(Optional) Time when the probe starts collecting information. If the start-time is not specified, no information is collected until the start-time is configured or a trigger occurs that performs a start-time now.

pending

No information is collected. This is the default value.

now

Information is immediately collected.

hh:mm

Information is collected at the specified time (use a 24-hour clock). The time is the current day if you do not specify the month and day.

month

(Optional) Name of the month. If month is not specified, the current month is used. This requires a day.

day

Number of the day in the range 1 to 31. If day is not specified, the current day is used. This requires a month.

ageout seconds

(Optional) Number of seconds to keep the probe when it is not actively collecting information. The default is 0 seconds (never ages out).

Default

Place the probe in a pending state (that is, the probe is started but not actively collecting information).

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

After you schedule the probe with the rtr schedule command, you cannot change the probe's configuration (with the rtr global configuration command). To change the probe's configuration, use the no form of the rtr global command and reenter the configuration information.

If the probe is in a pending state, you can define the conditions under which the probe makes the transition from pending to active with the rtr reaction-trigger and rtr reaction-configuration global configuration commands. When the probe is in an active state, it immediately begins collecting information.

The following time line shows the probe's age-out process:

W----------------------X----------------------Y----------------------Z

where:

Age out starts counting down at W and Y, is suspended between X and Y, and is reset to its configured size at Y.

It is possible for the probe to age out before it executes (that is, Z can occur before X). To ensure that this does not happen, the difference between the probe's configuration time and start time (X and W) must be less than the age-out seconds.


Note The total RAM required to hold the history and statistics tables is allocated at this time. This is to prevent router memory problems when the router gets heavily loaded and to lower the amount of overhead the feature causes on a router when it is active.

Example

In the following example, probe 25 begins actively collecting data at 3:00 p.m. on April 5. This probe will age out after 12 hours of inactivity, which can be before it starts or after it has finished with its life. When this probe ages out, all configuration information for the probe is removed (that is, the configuration information is no longer in the running-config in RAM.

rtr schedule 25 life 43200 start-time 15:00 apr 5 ageout 43200

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rtr
rtr reaction-configuration
rtr reaction-trigger

samples-of-history-kept

To set the number of entries kept in the history table per bucket for the response time reporter probe, use the samples-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

samples-of-history-kept samples
no samples-of-history-kept

Syntax Description

samples

Number of entries kept in the history table per bucket. The default is 16  entries for type pathEcho and 1 entry for type echo.

Default

16 entries for type pathEcho

1 entry for type echo

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the samples-of-history-kept command to control how many entries are saved in the history table. To control the type of information that gets saved in the history table, use the filter-for-history command. To set how many buckets get created in the history table, use the buckets-of-history-kept command.

A probe can collect history and capture statistics. By default, history is not collected. When a problem arises where history is useful (for example, a large number of timeouts are occurring), you can configure the lives-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration command to collect history.


Note Collecting history increases the usage of RAM. Only collect history when you think there is a problem. For general network response time information, use statistics.

Example

In the following example, ten entries are kept in the history table for each of the of probe's three lives:

rtr 1
  type pathecho protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.176
  lives-of-history-kept 3
  samples-of-history-kept 10

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

buckets-of-history-kept
filter-for-history
lives-of-history-kept
rtr

show cdp

To display global CDP information, including timer and hold-time information, use the show cdp privileged EXEC command.

show cdp

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show cdp command. Global CDP timer and hold-time parameters are set to the defaults of 60 and 180 seconds, respectively.

Router# show cdp
Global CDP information:
        Sending CDP packets every 60 seconds
        Sending a holdtime value of 180 seconds

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

cdp holdtime
cdp timer
show cdp entry
show cdp interface
show cdp neighbors
show cdp traffic

show cdp entry

To display information about a neighbor device listed in the CDP table, use the show cdp entry privileged EXEC command.

show cdp entry {* | entry-name [protocol | version]}

Syntax Description

*

Shows all of the CDP neighbors.

entry-name

Name of neighbor about which you want information.

You can enter an asterisk (*) at the end of an entry-name, such as show cdp entry dev*, which would show information about the neighbor, device.cisco.com.

protocol

(Optional) Limits the display to information about the protocols enabled on a router.

version

(Optional) Limits the display to information about the version of software running on the router.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show cdp entry command with no limits. Information about the neighbor device.cisco.com is displayed, including device ID, address and protocol, platform, interface, hold time, and version.

Router# show cdp entry device.cisco.com
-------------------------
Device ID: device.cisco.com
Entry address(es):
  IP address: 192.168.68.18
    CLNS address: 490001.1111.1111.1111.00
    DECnet address: 10.1
Platform: cisco 4500,  Capabilities: Router
Interface: Ethernet0/1,  Port ID (outgoing port): Ethernet0
Holdtime : 125 sec
Version :
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) 4500 Software (C4500-J-M), Version 11.1(10.4), MAINTENANCE INTERIM SOFTWARE
Copyright (c) 1986-1997 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Mon 07-Apr-97 19:51 by dschwart

The following is sample output from the show cdp entry protocol command. Only information about the protocols enabled on device.cisco.com is displayed.

Router# show cdp entry device.cisco.com protocol
Protocol information for device.cisco.com:
    IP address: 192.168.68.18
    CLNS address: 490001.1111.1111.1111.00
    DECnet address: 10.1

The following is sample output from the show cdp entry version command. Only information about the version of software running on device.cisco.com is displayed.

Router# show cdp entry device.cisco.com version 
Version information for device.cisco.com:
    Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) 4500 Software (C4500-J-M), Version 11.1(10.4), MAINTENANCE INTERIM SOFTWARE
Copyright (c) 1986-1997 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Mon 07-Apr-97 19:51 by dschwart

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show cdp
show cdp interface
show cdp neighbors
show cdp traffic

show cdp interface

To display information about the interfaces on which CDP is enabled, use the show cdp interface privileged EXEC command.

show cdp interface [type number]

Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Type of interface about which you want information.

number

(Optional) Number of the interface about which you want information.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Sample Displays

The following sample output form the show cdp interface command. Status information and information about CDP timer and hold time settings is displayed for all interfaces on which CDP is enabled.

Router# show cdp interface
Serial0 is up, line protocol is up, encapsulation is SMDS
    Sending CDP packets every 60 seconds
    Holdtime is 180 seconds
Ethernet0 is up, line protocol is up, encapsulation is ARPA
    Sending CDP packets every 60 seconds
    Holdtime is 180 seconds

The following is sample output from the show cdp interface command with an interface specified. Status information and information about CDP timer and holdtime settings is displayed for Ethernet interface 0 only.

Router# show cdp interface ethernet 0
Ethernet0 is up, line protocol is up, encapsulation is ARPA
    Sending CDP packets every 60 seconds
    Holdtime is 180 seconds

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show cdp
show cdp entry
show cdp neighbors
show cdp traffic

show cdp neighbors

To display information about neighbors, use the show cdp neighbors privileged EXEC command.

show cdp neighbors [type number] [detail]

Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Type of the interface connected to the neighbors about which you want information.

number

(Optional) Number of the interface connected to the neighbors about which you want information.

detail

(Optional) Displays detailed information about a neighbor (or neighbors) including network address, enabled protocols, hold time, and software version.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show cdp neighbors command. Device ID, interface type and number, holdtime settings, capabilities, platform, and port ID information about neighbors is displayed.

Router# show cdp neighbors
Capability Codes: R - Router, T - Trans Bridge, B - Source Route Bridge
                  S - Switch, H - Host, I - IGMP, r - Repeater
Device ID        Local Intrfce     Holdtme    Capability  Platform  Port ID
device1.cisco.com      Eth 0/1        122          T S       WS-C2900  2/11
device2.cisco.com      Eth 0/1        179           R        4500      Eth 0
device3.cisco.com     Eth 0/1        155           R        2500      Eth 0
device4.cisco.com    Eth 0/1        155           R        2509      Eth 0

The following is sample output for one neighbor from the show cdp neighbors detail command. Additional detail is shown about neighbors, including network address, enabled protocols, and software version:

Router# show cdp neighbors detail 
-------------------------
Device ID: device2.cisco.com
Entry address(es):
  IP address: 171.68.162.134
Platform: cisco 4500,  Capabilities: Router
Interface: Ethernet0/1,  Port ID (outgoing port): Ethernet0
Holdtime : 156 sec
Version :
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) 4500 Software (C4500-J-M), Version 11.1(10.4), MAINTENANCE INTERIM SOFTWARE
Copyright (c) 1986-1997 by Cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Mon 07-Apr-97 19:51 by dschwart

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show cdp
show cdp entry
show cdp interface
show cdp traffic

show cdp traffic

To display traffic information from the CDP table, use the show cdp traffic privileged EXEC command.

show cdp traffic

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show cdp traffic command.

Router# show cdp traffic
CDP counters:
        Packets output: 94, Input: 75
        Hdr syntax: 0, Chksum error: 0, Encaps failed: 0
        No memory: 0, Invalid packet: 0, Fragmented: 0

In this example, traffic information is displayed including the numbers of packets sent, the number of packets received, header syntax, checksum errors, failed encapsulations, memory problems, and invalid and fragmented packets is displayed. Header syntax indicates the number of packets CDP receives with that have an invalid header format.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show cdp
show cdp entry
show cdp interface
show cdp neighbors

show rmon

Use the show rmon EXEC command to display the current RMON agent status on the router.

show rmon [alarms | capture | events | filter | history | hosts | matrix | statistics | task | topn]

Syntax Description

alarms

(Optional) Displays the RMON alarm table.

capture

(Optional) Displays the RMON buffer capture table. Available on Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series only.

events

(Optional) Displays the RMON event table.

filter

(Optional) Displays the RMON filter table. Available on Cisco  2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series only.

history

(Optional) Displays the RMON history table. Available on Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series only.

hosts

(Optional) Displays the RMON hosts table. Available on Cisco  2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series only.

matrix

(Optional) Displays the RMON matrix table. Available on Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series only.

statistics

(Optional) Displays the RMON statistics table. Available on Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series only.

task

(Optional) Displays general RMON statistics. This is the default.

topn

(Optional) Displays the RMON top-n hosts table. Available on Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series only.

Default

If no option is specified, the task option is displayed.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Refer to the specific show rmon command for an example and description of the fields.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon command. All counters are from the time the router was initialized.

Router# show rmon
145678 packets input (34562 promiscuous), 0 drops
145678 packets processed, 0 on queue, queue utilization 15/64

Table 44 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 44: Show RMON Field Descriptions
Field Description

x packets input

Number of packets received on RMON-enabled interfaces.

x promiscuous

Number of input packets that were seen by the router only because RMON placed the interface in promiscuous mode.

x drops

Number of input packets that could not be processed because the RMON queue overflowed.

x packets processed

Number of input packets actually processed by the RMON task.

x on queue

Number of input packets that are sitting on the RMON queue, waiting to be processed.

queue utilization x/y

y is the maximum size of the RMON queue; x is the largest number of packets that were ever on the queue at a particular time.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
rmon queuesize
show rmon alarms
show rmon capture
show rmon events
show rmon filter
show rmon history
show rmon hosts
show rmon matrix
show rmon statistics
show rmon topn

show rmon alarms

Use the show rmon alarms EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON alarm table.

show rmon alarms

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON alarms to display alarm information with the show rmon alarms command.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon alarms command:

Router# show rmon alarms
Alarm 2 is active, owned by manager1
 Monitors ifEntry.1.1 every 30 seconds
 Taking delta samples, last value was 0
 Rising threshold is 15, assigned to event 12
 Falling threshold is 0, assigned to event 0
 On startup enable rising or falling alarm

Table 45 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 45: Show RMON Alarms Field Descriptions
Field Description

Alarm 2 is active, owned by manager1

Unique index into the alarmTable, showing the alarm status is active, and the owner of this row, as defined in the alarmTable of RMON.

Monitors ifEntry.1.1

Object identifier of the particular variable to be sampled. Equivalent to alarmVariable in RMON.

every 30 seconds

Interval in seconds over which the data is sampled and compared with the rising and falling thresholds. Equivalent to alarmInterval in RMON.

Taking delta samples

Method of sampling the selected variable and calculating the value to be compared against the thresholds. Equivalent to alarmSampleType in RMON.

last value was

Value of the statistic during the last sampling period. Equivalent to alarmValue in RMON.

Rising threshold is

Threshold for the sampled statistic. Equivalent to alarmRisingThreshold in RMON.

assigned to event

Index of the eventEntry that is used when a rising threshold is crossed. Equivalent to alarmRisingEventIndex in RMON.

Falling threshold is

Threshold for the sampled statistic. Equivalent to alarmFallingThreshold in RMON.

assigned to event

Index of the eventEntry that is used when a falling threshold is crossed. Equivalent to alarmFallingEventIndex in RMON.

On startup enable rising or falling alarm

Alarm that may be sent when this entry is first set to valid. Equivalent to alarmStartupAlarm in RMON.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rmon
rmon alarm
show rmon

show rmon capture

Use the show rmon capture EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON capture table.

show rmon capture

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON alarms and events to display alarm information with the show rmon capture command.

This command is available on the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon capture command:

Router# show rmon capture
Buffer 4096 is active, owned by manager1
  Captured data is from channel 4096
  Slice size is 128, download size is 128
  Download offset is 0
  Full Status is spaceAvailable, full action is lockWhenFull
  Granted 65536 octets out of 65536 requested
  Buffer has been on since 00:01:16, and has captured 1 packets
    Current capture buffer entries:
      Packet 1 was captured 416 ms since buffer was turned on
      Its length is 326 octets and has a status type of 0
      Packet ID is 634, and contains the following data:
00 00 0c 03 12 ce 00 00 0c 08 9d 4e 08 00 45 00    
01 34 01 42 00 00 1d 11 e3 01 ab 45 30 15 ac 15    
31 06 05 98 00 a1 01 20 9f a8 00 00 00 00 00 00    
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    
00 00 00 00 

Table 46 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 46: Show RMON Capture Field Descriptions
Field Description

Buffer 4096 is active

Equates to bufferControlIndex in the bufferControlTable of RMON. Uniquely identifies a valid (active) row in this table.

owned by manager1

Denotes the owner of this row. Equates to bufferControlOwner in the bufferControlTable of RMON.

Captured data is from channel

Equates to the bufferControlChannelIndex and identifies which RMON channel is the source of these packets.

Slice size is

Identifies the maximum number of octets of each packet that will be saved in this capture buffer. Equates to bufferControlCaptureSliceSize of RMON.

download size is

Identifies the maximum number of octets of each packet in this capture buffer that will be returned in an SNMP retrieval of that packet. Equates to bufferControlDownloadSliceSize in RMON.

Download offset is

Offset of the first octet of each packet in this capture buffer that will be returned in an SNMP retrieval of that packet. Equates to bufferControlDownloadOffset in RMON.

Full Status is spaceAvailable

Shows whether the buffer is full or has room to accept new packets. Equates to bufferControlFullStatus in RMON.

full action is lockWhenFull

Controls the action of the buffer when it reaches full status. Equates to bufferControlFullAction in RMON.

Granted 65536 octets

Actual maximum number of octets that can be saved in this capture buffer. Equates to bufferControlMaxOctetsGranted in RMON.

out of 65536 requested

Requested maximum number of octets to be saved in this capture buffer. Equates to bufferControlMaxOctetsRequested in RMON.

Buffer has been on since

Indicates how long the buffer has been available.

and has captured 1 packets

Number of packets captured since buffer was turned on. Equates to bufferControlCapturedPackets in RMON.

Current capture buffer entries:

Lists each packet captured.

Packet 1 was captured 416 ms since buffer was turned on

Its length is 326 octets and has a status type of 0

Zero indicates the error status of this packet. Equates to captureBufferPacketStatus in RMON, where its value options are documented.

Packet ID is

Index that describes the order of packets received on a particular interface. Equates to captureBufferPacketID in RMON.

and contains the following data:

Data inside the packet, starting at the beginning of the packet.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
show rmon

show rmon events

Use the show rmon events EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON event table.

show rmon events

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON events to display alarm information with the show rmon events command.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon events command:

Router# show rmon events
Event 12 is active, owned by manager1
 Description is interface-errors
 Event firing causes log and trap to community rmonTrap, last fired 00:00:00

Table 47 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 47: Show RMON Events Field Descriptions
Field Description

Event 12 is active, owned by manager1

Unique index into the eventTable, showing the event status is active, and the owner of this row, as defined in the eventTable of RMON.

Description is interface-errors

Type of event, in this case an interface error.

Event firing causes log and trap

Type of notification that the router will make about this event. Equivalent to eventType in RMON.

community rmonTrap

If an SNMP trap is to be sent, it will be sent to the SNMP community specified by this octet string. Equivalent to eventCommunity in RMON.

last fired

Last time the event was generated.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rmon
rmon event
show rmon

show rmon filter

Use the show rmon filter EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON filter table.

show rmon filter

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON alarms and events to display alarm information with the show rmon filter command.

This command is available on the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon filter command:

Router# show rmon filter
Filter 4096 is active, and owned by manager1
 Data offset is 12, with 
 Data of    08 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ab 45 30 15 ac 15 31 06 
 Data Mask is ff ff 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff
 Data Not Mask is 0
 Pkt status is 0, status mask is 0, not mask is 0
 Associated channel 4096 is active, and owned by manager1
 Type of channel is acceptFailed, data control is off
 Generate event index 0
 Event status is eventFired, # of matches is 1482
 Turn on event index is 0, turn off event index is 0
  Description: 

Table 48 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 48: Show RMON Filter Field Descriptions
Field Description

Filter 4096 is active, and owned by manager1

Unique index of the filter, its current state, and the owner, as defined in the filterTable of RMON.

Data offset is

Offset from the beginning of each packet where a match of packet data will be attempted. Equivalent to filterPktDataOffset in RMON.

Data of

Data that is to be matched with the input packet. Equivalent to filterPktData in RMON.

Data Mask is

Mask that is applied to the match process. Equivalent to filterPktDataMask in RMON.

Data Not Mask is

Inversion mask that is applied to the match process. Equivalent to filterPktDataNotMask in RMON.

Pkt status is

Status that is to be matched with the input packet. Equivalent to filterPktStatus in RMON.

status mask is

Mask that is applied to the status match process. Equivalent to filterPktStatusMask in RMON.

not mask is

Inversion mask that is applied to the status match process. Equivalent to filterPktStatusNotMask in RMON.

Associated channel 4096 is active, and owned by manager1

Unique index of the channel, its current state, and the owner, as defined in the channelTable of RMON.

Type of channel is acceptFailed

This object controls the action of the filters associated with this channel. Equivalent to channelAcceptType of RMON.

data control is off

This object controls the flow of data through this channel. Equivalent to channelDataControl in RMON.

Generate event index 0

Value of this object identifies the event that is configured to be generated when the associated channelDataControl is on and a packet is matched. Equivalent to channelEventIndex in RMON.

Event status is eventFired

When the channel is configured to generate events when packets are matched, this message indicates the means of controlling the flow of those events. Equivalent to channelEventStatus in RMON.

# of matches is

Number of times this channel has matched a packet. Equivalent to channelMatches in RMON.

Turn on event index is

Value of this object identifies the event that is configured to turn the associated channelDataControl from off to on when the event is generated. Equivalent to channelTurnOnEventIndex in RMON.

Turn off event index is

Value of this object identifies the event that is configured to turn the associated channelDataControl from on to off when the event is generated. Equivalent to channelTurnOffEventIndex in RMON.

Description:

Comment describing this channel.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
show rmon

show rmon history

Use the show rmon history EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON history table.

show rmon history

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON alarms and events to display alarm information with the show rmon history command.

This command is available on the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon history command:

Router# show rmon history
Entry 1 is active, and owned by manager1
  Monitors ifEntry.1.1 every 30 seconds
  Requested # of time intervals, ie buckets, is 5
  Granted # of time intervals, ie buckets, is 5
    Sample # 14 began measuring at 00:11:00
      Received 38346 octets, 216 packets,
      0 broadcast and 80 multicast packets,
      0 undersized and 0 oversized packets,
      0 fragments and 0 jabbers,
      0 CRC alignment errors and 0 collisions.
      # of dropped packet events is 0
      Network utilization is estimated at 10

Table 49 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 49: Show RMON History Field Descriptions
Field Description

Entry 1 is active, and owned by manager1

Unique index of the history entry, its current state, and the owner as defined in the historyControlTable of RMON.

Monitors ifEntry.1.1

This object identifies the source of the data for which historical data was collected and placed in a media-specific table. Equivalent to historyControlDataSource in RMON.

every 30 seconds

Interval in seconds over which the data is sampled for each bucket in the part of the media-specific table associated with this historyControlEntry. Equivalent to historyControlInterval in RMON.

Requested # of time intervals, ie  buckets, is

Requested number of discrete time intervals over which data is to be saved in the part of the media-specific table associated with this historyControlEntry. Equivalent to historyControlBucketsRequested in RMON.

Granted # of time intervals, ie  buckets, is

Actual number of discrete time intervals over which data is to be saved in the part of the media-specific table associated with this historyControlEntry. Equivalent to historyControlBucketsGranted in RMON.

Sample # 14 began measuring at

Time at the start of the interval over which this sample was measured.

Received 38346 octets

Total number of octets of data (including those in bad packets) received on the network (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets). Equivalent to etherHistoryOctets in RMON.

x packets

Number of packets (including bad packets) received during this sampling interval. Equivalent to etherHistoryPkts in RMON.

x broadcast

Number of good packets received during this sampling interval that were directed to the broadcast address. Equivalent to etherHistoryBroadcastPkts in RMON.

x multicast packets

Number of good packets received during this sampling interval that were directed to a multicast address. Equivalent to etherHistoryMulticastPkts in RMON.

x undersized

Number of packets received during this sampling interval that were fewer than 64 octets long (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets) and were otherwise well formed. Equivalent to etherHistoryUndersizedPkts in RMON.

x oversized packets

Number of packets received during this sampling interval that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets) but were otherwise well formed. Equivalent to etherHistoryOversizePkts in RMON.

x fragments

Total number of packets received during this sampling interval that were fewer than 64 octets in length (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets), and had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error). Equivalent to etherHistoryFragments in RMON.

x jabbers

Number of packets received during this sampling interval that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets), and had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error). Note that this definition of jabber is different than the definition in IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5 (10BASE5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10BASE2). Equivalent to etherHistoryJabbers in RMON.

x CRC alignment errors

Number of packets received during this sampling interval that had a length (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets) from 64 to 1518 octets, inclusive, but had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error). Equivalent to etherHistoryCRCAlignErrors in RMON.

x collisions

Best estimate of the total number of collisions on this Ethernet segment during this sampling interval. Equivalent to etherHistoryCollisions in RMON.

# of dropped packet events is

Total number of events in which packets were dropped by the probe because of resources during this sampling interval. Note that this number is not necessarily the number of packets dropped, it is just the number of times this condition has been detected. Equivalent to etherHistoryDropEvents in RMON.

Network utilization is estimated at

Best estimate of the mean physical-layer network usage on this interface during this sampling interval, in hundredths of a percent. Equivalent to etherHistoryUtilization in RMON.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
show rmon

show rmon hosts

Use the show rmon hosts EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON hosts table.

show rmon hosts

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON alarms and events to display alarm information with the show rmon hosts command.

This command is available on the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon hosts command:

Router# show rmon hosts
Host Control Entry 1 is active, and owned by manager1
  Monitors host ifEntry.1.1
  Table size is 51, last time an entry was deleted was 00:00:00
    Creation Order number is 1
      Physical address is 0000.0c02.5808
      Packets: rcvd 6963, transmitted 7041
      Octets: rcvd 784062, transmitted 858530
      # of packets transmitted: broadcast 28, multicast 48
      # of bad packets transmitted is 0

Table 50 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 50: Show RMON Hosts Field Descriptions
Field Description

Host Control Entry 1 is active, and owned by manager1

Unique index of the host entry, its current state, and the owner as defined in the hostControlTable of RMON.

Monitors host ifEntry.1.1

This object identifies the source of the data for this instance of the host function. Equivalent to hostControlDataSource in RMON.

Table size is

Number of hostEntries in the hostTable and the hostTimeTable associated with this hostControlEntry. Equivalent to hostControlTableSize in RMON.

last time an entry was deleted was

Time when the last entry was deleted from the hostTable.

Creation Order number is

Index that defines the relative ordering of the creation time of hosts captured for a particular hostControlEntry. Equivalent to hostCreationOrder in RMON.

Physical address is

Physical address of this host. Equivalent to hostAddress in RMON.

Packets: rcvd

Number of good packets transmitted to this address. Equivalent to hostInPkts in RMON.

transmitted

Number of packets, including bad packets transmitted by this address. Equivalent to hostOutPkts in RMON.

Octets: rcvd

Number of octets transmitted to this address since it was added to the hostTable (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets), except for those octets in bad packets. Equivalent to hostInOctets in RMON.

transmitted

Number of octets transmitted by this address since it was added to the hostTable (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets), including those octets in bad packets. Equivalent to hostOutOctets in RMON.

# of packets transmitted:

Number of good packets transmitted by this address that were broadcast or multicast.

# of bad packets transmitted is

Number of bad packets transmitted by this address.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
show rmon

show rmon matrix

Use the show rmon matrix EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON matrix table.

show rmon matrix

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON alarms and events to display alarm information with the show rmon matrix command.

This command is available on the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon matrix command:

Router# show rmon matrix
Matrix 1 is active, and owned by manager1
 Monitors ifEntry.1.1
 Table size is 451, last time an entry was deleted was at 00:00:00

Table 51 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 51: Show RMON Matrix Field Descriptions
Field Description

Matrix 1 is active, and owned by manager1

Unique index of the matrix entry, its current state, and the owner as defined in the matrixControlTable of RMON.

Monitors ifEntry.1.1

This object identifies the source of the data for this instance of the matrix function. Equivalent to matrixControlDataSource in RMON.

Table size is 451, last time an entry was deleted was at

Size of the matrix table and the time that the last entry was deleted.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
show rmon

show rmon statistics

Use the show rmon statistics EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON statistics table.

show rmon statistics

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON alarms and events to display alarm information with the show rmon statistics command.

This command is available on the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon statistics command:

Router# show rmon statistics
Interface 1 is active, and owned by config
  Monitors ifEntry.1.1 which has
  Received 60739740 octets, 201157 packets,
  1721 broadcast and 9185 multicast packets,
  0 undersized and 0 oversized packets,
  0 fragments and 0 jabbers,
  0 CRC alignment errors and 32 collisions.
  # of dropped packet events (due to lack of resources): 511
  # of packets received of length (in octets):
    64: 92955, 65-127: 14204, 128-255: 1116,
    256-511: 4479, 512-1023: 85856, 1024-1518:2547

Table 52 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 52: Show RMON Statistics Field Descriptions
Field Description

Interface 1 is active, and owned by config

Unique index of the statistics entry, its current state, and the owner as defined in the etherStatsTable of RMON.

Monitors ifEntry.1.1

This object identifies the source of the data that this etherStats entry is configured to analyze. Equivalent to etherStatsDataSource in RMON.

Received 60739740 octets

Total number of octets of data (including those in bad packets) received on the network (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets). Equivalent to etherStatsOctets in RMON.

x packets

Number of packets (including bad packets) received. Equivalent to etherStatsPkts in RMON.

x broadcast

Number of good packets received that were directed to the broadcast address. Equivalent to etherStatsBroadcastPkts in RMON.

x multicast packets

Number of good packets received that were directed to a multicast address. Equivalent to etherStatsMulticastPkts in RMON.

x undersized

Number of packets received that were fewer than 64 octets long (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets) and were otherwise well formed. Equivalent to etherStatsUndersizedPkts in RMON.

x oversized packets

Number of packets received that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets) but were otherwise well formed. Equivalent to etherStatsOversizePkts in RMON.

x fragments

Total number of packets received that were fewer than 64 octets in length (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets), and had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error). Equivalent to etherStatsFragments in RMON.

x jabbers

Number of packets received that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets), and had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error). Note that this definition of jabber is different than the definition in IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5 (10BASE5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10BASE2). Equivalent to etherStatsJabbers in RMON.

x CRC alignment errors

Number of packets received that had a length (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets) from 64 to 1518 octets, inclusive, but had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error). Equivalent to etherStatsCRCAlignErrors in RMON.

x collisions

Best estimate of the total number of collisions on this Ethernet segment. Equivalent to etherHistoryCollisions in RMON.

# of dropped packet events (due to lack of resources):

Total number of events in which packets were dropped by the probe because of a lack of resources. Note that this number is not necessarily the number of packets dropped, it is just the number of times this condition has been detected. Equivalent to etherStatsDropEvents in RMON.

# of packets received of length (in octets):

Separates the received packets (good and bad) by packet size in the given ranges (64, 65 to 127,128 to 255, 256 to 511, 512 to 1023, 1024 to 1516).

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
show rmon

show rmon topn

Use the show rmon topn EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON Top-N host table.

show rmon topn

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON events to display alarm information with the show rmon events command.

This command is available on the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 series only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon topn command:

Router# show rmon topn
Host Entry 1 of report 1 is active, owned by manager1
  The rate of change is based on hostTopNInPkts
  This report was last started at 00:00:00
  Time remaining in this report is 0 out of 0
  Hosts physical address is 00ad.beef.002b
  Requested # of hosts: 10, # of hosts granted: 10
Report # 1 of Top N hosts entry 1 is recording
Host 0000.0c02.5808 at a rate of 12

Table 53 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 53: Show RMON Top-N Field Descriptions
Field Description

Host Entry 1 of report 1 is active, owned by manager1

Unique index of the hostTopN entry, its current state, and the owner as defined in the hostTopNControlTable of RMON.

The rate of change is based on hostTopNInPkts

Variable for each host that the hostTopNRate variable is based on.

This report was last started at

Time the report was started.

Time remaining in this report is

Number of seconds left in the report currently being collected. Equivalent to hostTopNTimeRemaining in RMON.

out of

Number of seconds that this report has collected during the last sampling interval, or if this report is currently being collected, the number of seconds that this report is being collected during this sampling interval. Equivalent to hostTopNDuration in RMON.

Hosts physical address is

Host address.

Requested # of hosts:

Maximum number of hosts requested for the Top-N table. Equivalent to hostTopNRequestedSize in RMON.

# of hosts granted:

Maximum number of hosts granted for the Top-N table.Eqivalent to hostTopNGrantedSiz in RMON.

Report # 1 of Top N hosts entry 1 is recording

Report number and entry.

Host 0000.0c02.5808 at a rate of

Physical address of the host, and the amount of change in the selected variable during this sampling interval. Equivalent to hostTopNAddress and hostTopNRate in RMON.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
show rmon

show rtr application

Use the show rtr application EXEC command to display global information about the response time reporter feature.

show rtr application [tabular | full]

Syntax Description

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value. This is the default.

Default

Full format

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the show rtr application command to display information such as supported operation types and supported protocols.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr application command in full format.

Router# show rtr application 
        Response Time Reporter
Version: 1.0.0 Initial Round Trip Time MIB
Max Packet Data Size (ARR and Data): 16384
Time of Last Change in Whole RTR: *16:49:53.000 UTC Thu May 16 1996
System Max Number of Entries: 20
        Supported Operation Types
Type of Operation to Perform: echo
Type of Operation to Perform: pathEcho
        Supported Protocols
Protocol Type: ipIcmpEcho
Protocol Type: snaRUEcho
Protocol Type: snaLU0EchoAppl
Protocol Type: snaLU2EchoAppl

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show rtr configuration

show rtr collection-statistics

Use the show rtr collection-statistics EXEC command to display statistical errors for all response time reporter probes or the specified probe.

show rtr collection-statistics [probe] [tabular | full]

Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Number of the response time reporter probe to display.

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value. This is the default.

Default

Full format for all probes

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the show rtr collection-statistics command to display information such as the number of failed operations and the failure reason. You can also use the show rtr distribution-statistics and show  rtr  totals-statistics commands to display additional statistical information.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr collection-statistics command in full format.

Router# show rtr collection-statistics 1 
        Collected Statistics
Entry Number: 1
Start Time Index: *17:15:41.000 UTC Thu May 16 1996
Path Index: 1
Hop in Path Index: 1
Number of Failed Operations due to a Disconnect: 0
Number of Failed Operations due to a Timeout: 0
Number of Failed Operations due to a Busy: 0
Number of Failed Operations due to a No Connection: 0
Number of Failed Operations due to an Internal Error: 0
Number of Failed Operations due to a Sequence Error: 0
Number of Failed Operations due to a Verify Error: 0
Target Address: 172.16.1.176

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show rtr configuration
show rtr distributions-statistics
show rtr totals-statistics

show rtr configuration

Use the show rtr configuration EXEC command to display configuration values including all defaults for all response time reporter probes or the specified probe.

show rtr configuration [probe] [tabular | full]

Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Number of the response time reporter probe to display.

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value. This is the default.

Default

Full format for all probes

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr configuration command in full format:

Router# show rtr configuration 1
        Complete Configuration Table (includes defaults)
Entry Number: 1
Owner: "Sample Owner"
Tag: "Sample Tag Group"
Type of Operation to Perform: echo
Reaction and History Threshold (milliseconds): 5000
Operation Frequency (seconds): 60
Operation Timeout (milliseconds): 5000
Verify Data: FALSE
Status of Entry (SNMP RowStatus): active
Protocol Type: ipIcmpEcho
Target Address: 172.16.1.176
Request Size (ARR data portion): 1
Response Size (ARR data portion): 1
Life (seconds): 3600
Next Start Time: Start Time already passed
Entry Ageout (seconds): 3600
Connection Loss Reaction Enabled: FALSE
Timeout Reaction Enabled: FALSE
Threshold Reaction Type: never
Threshold Falling (milliseconds): 3000
Threshold Count: 5
Threshold Count2: 5
Reaction Type: none
Number of Statistic Hours kept: 2
Number of Statistic Paths kept: 1
Number of Statistic Hops kept: 1
Number of Statistic Distribution Buckets kept: 1
Number of Statistic Distribution Intervals (milliseconds): 20
Number of History Lives kept: 0
Number of History Buckets kept: 50
Number of History Samples kept: 1
History Filter Type: none

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show rtr application
show rtr collection-statistics
show rtr distributions-statistics
show rtr history
show rtr operational-state
show rtr reaction-trigger
show rtr totals-statistics

show rtr distributions-statistics

Use the show rtr distributions-statistics EXEC command to display statistic distribution information (captured response times) for all response time reporter probes or the specified probe.

show rtr distributions-statistics [probe] [tabular | full]

Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Number of the response time reporter probe to display.

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information. This is the default.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value.

Default

Tabular format for all probes

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The distributions statistics consist of:

You can also use the show rtr collection-statistics and show rtr totals-statistics commands to display additional statistical information.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr distributions-statistics command in tabular format.

Router# show rtr distributions-statistics 
                Captured Statistics
               Multiple Lines per Entry
Line 1
Entry    = Entry Number
StartT   = Start Time of Entry (hundredths of seconds)
Pth      = Path Index
Hop      = Hop in Path Index
Dst      = Time Distribution Index
Comps    = Operations Completed
OvrTh    = Operations Completed Over Thresholds
SumCmp   = Sum of Completion Times (milliseconds)
Line 2
SumCmp2L = Sum of Completion Times Squared Low 32 Bits (milliseconds)
SumCmp2H = Sum of Completion Times Squared High 32 Bits (milliseconds)
TMax     = Completion Time Maximum (milliseconds)
TMin     = Completion Time Minimum (milliseconds)
Entry  StartT          Pth  Hop  Dst  Comps            OvrTh            SumCmp
    SumCmp2L      SumCmp2H      TMax              TMin
1          17417068      1      1      1      2                    0                      128
      8192            0                    64                  64

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show rtr collection-statistics
show rtr configuration
show rtr totals-statistics

show rtr history

Use the show rtr history EXEC command to display history collected for all response time reporter probes or the specified probe.

show rtr history [probe] [tabular | full]

Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Number of the response time reporter probe to display.

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information. This is the default.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value.

Default

Tabular format for all probes

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The response return codes are listed in Table 54.


Table 54: Response Return Codes
Code Meaning

1

Okay.

2

Disconnected.

3

Over threshold.

4

Timeout.

5

Busy.

6

Not connected.

7

Dropped.

8

Sequence error.

9

Verify error.

10

Application specific.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr history command in tabular format:

Router# show rtr history 
        Point by point History
          Multiple Lines per Entry
Line 1
Entry    = Entry Number
LifeI    = Life Index
BucketI    = Bucket Index
SampleI    = Sample Index
SampleT    = Sample Start Time
CompT    = Completion Time (milliseconds)
Sense    = Response Return Code
Line 2 has the Target Address
Entry  LifeI            BucketI        SampleI        SampleT        CompT            Sense
2          1                    1                    1                    17436548      16                    1
    AB 45 A0 16 
2          1                    2                    1                    17436551      4                      1
    AC 12 7    29 
2          1                    2                    2                    17436551      1                      1
    AC 12 5    22 
2          1                    2                    3                    17436552      4                      1
    AB 45 A7  22 
2          1                    2                    4                    17436552      4                      1
    AB 45 A0 16 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show rtr configuration

show rtr operational-state

Use the show rtr operational-state EXEC command to display the operational state of all response time reporter probes or the specified probe.

show rtr operational-state [probe] [tabular | full]

Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Number of the response time reporter probe to display.

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value. This is the default.

Default

Full format for all probes

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the show rtr operational-state command to determine whether a connection loss, timeout, and over threshold occurred; how much life the probe has left; whether the probe is active; and the completion time. It also displays the results of the latest operation attempt.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr operational-state command in full format:

Router# show rtr operational-state 1 
        Current Operational State
Entry Number: 1
Modification Time: *17:15:41.000 UTC Thu May 16 1996
Diagnostics Text: 
Last Time this Entry was Reset: Never
Number of Octets in use by this Entry: 2438
Connection Loss Occurred: FALSE
Timeout Occurred: FALSE
Over Thresholds Occurred: FALSE
Number of Operations Attempted: 6
Current Seconds Left in Life: 3336
Operational State of Entry: active
Latest Completion Time (milliseconds): 60
Latest Operation Return Code: ok
Latest Operation Start Time: *17:19:41.000 UTC Thu May 16 1996
Latest Target Address: 172.16.1.176

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show rtr configuration

show rtr reaction-trigger

Use the show rtr reaction-trigger EXEC command to display the reaction trigger information for all response time reporter probes or the specified probe.

show rtr reaction-trigger [probe] [tabular | full]

Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Number of the response time reporter probe to display.

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value. This is the default.

Default

Full format for all probes

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the show rtr reaction-trigger command to display the configuration status and operational state of target probes that will be triggered as defined with the rtr reaction-configuration global command.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr reaction-trigger command in full format:

Router# show rtr reaction-trigger 1
        Reaction Table
Entry Number: 1
Target Entry Number: 2
Status of Entry (SNMP RowStatus): active
Operational State: pending

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show rtr configuration

show rtr totals-statistics

Use the show rtr totals-statistics EXEC command to display the total statistical values (accumulation of error counts and completions) for all response time reporter probes or the specified probe.

show rtr totals-statistics [probe] [tabular | full]

Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Number of the response time reporter probe to display.

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value. This is the default.

Default

Full format for all probes

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The total statistics consist of the following items:

You can also use the show rtr distributions-statistics and show rtr collection-statistics commands to display additional statistical information.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr totals-statistics command in full format:

Router# show rtr totals-statistics 
        Statistic Totals
Entry Number: 1
Start Time Index: *17:15:41.000 UTC Thu May 16 1996
Age of Statistics Entry (hundredths of seconds): 48252
Number of Initiations: 10

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show rtr collection-statistics
show rtr configuration
show rtr distributions-statistics

show snmp

To check the status of SNMP communications, use the show  snmp EXEC command.

show snmp

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command provides counter information for SNMP operations. It also displays the chassis ID string defined with the snmp-server chassis-id command.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show snmp command:

Router# show snmp
Chassis: 01506199
37 SNMP packets input
    0 Bad SNMP version errors
    4 Unknown community name
    0 Illegal operation for community name supplied
    0 Encoding errors
    24 Number of requested variables
    0 Number of altered variables
    0 Get-request PDUs
    28 Get-next PDUs
    0 Set-request PDUs
78 SNMP packets output
    0 Too big errors (Maximum packet size 1500)
    0 No such name errors
    0 Bad values errors
    0 General errors
    24 Response PDUs
        13 Trap PDUs
SNMP logging: enabled
    Logging to 171.69.58.33.162, 0/10, 13 sent, 0 dropped.
SNMP Manager-role output packets
    4 Get-request PDUs
    4 Get-next PDUs
    6 Get-bulk PDUs
    4 Set-request PDUs
    23 Inform-request PDUs
    30 Timeouts
    0 Drops
SNMP Manager-role input packets
    0 Inform response PDUs
        2 Trap PDUs
        7 Response PDUs
        1 Responses with errors
SNMP informs: enabled
    Informs in flight 0/25 (current/max)
    Logging to 171.69.217.141.162
        4 sent, 0 in-flight, 1 retries, 0 failed, 0 dropped
    Logging to 171.69.58.33.162
        0 sent, 0 in-flight, 0 retries, 0 failed, 0 dropped

Table 55 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 55: Show SNMP Field Descriptions
Field Description

Chassis

Chassis ID string.

SNMP packets input

Total number of SNMP packets input.

   Bad SNMP version errors

Number of packets with an invalid SNMP version.

   Unknown community name

Number of SNMP packets with an unknown community name.

   Illegal operation for community    name supplied

Number of packets requesting an operation not allowed for that community.

   Encoding errors

Number of SNMP packets that were improperly encoded.

   Number of requested variables

Number of variables requested by SNMP managers.

   Number of altered variables

Number of variables altered by SNMP managers.

   Get-request PDUs

Number of get requests received.

   Get-next PDUs

Number of get-next requests received.

   Set-request PDUs

Number of set requests received.

SNMP packets output

Total number of SNMP packets sent by the router.

   Too big errors

Number of SNMP packets which were larger than the maximum packet size.

   Maximum packet size

Maximum size of SNMP packets.

   No such name errors

Number of SNMP requests that specified a MIB object which does not exist.

   Bad values errors

Number of SNMP set requests that specified an invalid value for a MIB object.

   General errors

Number of SNMP set requests that failed due to some other error. (It was not a noSuchName error, badValue error, or any of the other specific errors.)

   Response PDUs

Number of responses sent in reply to requests.

   Trap PDUs

Number of SNMP traps sent

SNMP logging

Indicates whether logging is enabled or disabled.

   sent

Number of traps sent.

   dropped

Number of traps dropped. Traps are dropped when the trap queue for a destination exceeds the maximum length of the queue, as set by the snmp-server queue-length command.

SNMP Manager-role output packets

Information related to packets sent by the router as an SNMP manager.

   Get-request PDUs

Number of get requests sent.

   Get-next PDUs

Number of get-next requests sent.

   Get-bulk PDUs

Number of get-bulk requests sent.

   Set-request PDUs

Number of set requests sent.

   Inform-request PDUs

Number of inform requests sent.

   Timeouts

Number of request timeouts.

   Drops

Number of requests dropped. Reasons for drops include no memory, a bad destination address, or an unreasonable destination address.

SNMP Manager-role input packets

Information related to packets received by the router as an SNMP manager.

   Inform response PDUs

Number of inform request responses received.

   Trap PDUs

Number of SNMP traps received.

   Response PDUs

Number of responses received.

   Responses with errors

Number of responses containing errors.

SNMP informs

Indicates whether SNMP informs are enabled.

   Informs in flight

Current and maximum possible number of informs waiting to be acknowledged.

   Logging to

Destination of the following informs.

   sent

Number of informs sent to this host.

   in-flight

Number of informs currently waiting to be acknowledged.

   retries

Number of inform retries sent.

   failed

Number of informs that were never acknowledged.

   dropped

Number of unacknowledged informs that were discarded to make room for new informs.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show snmp pending
show snmp sessions
snmp-server chassis-id
snmp-server manager
snmp-server manager session-timeout
snmp-server queue-length

show snmp pending

To display the current set of pending SNMP requests, use the show snmp pending EXEC command.

show snmp pending

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.3 T.

After the SNMP manager sends a request, the request is "pending" until the manager receives a response or the request timeout expires.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show snmp pending command:

Router# show snmp pending
req id: 47, dest: 171.69.58.33.161, V2C community: public, Expires in 5 secs
req id: 49, dest: 171.69.58.33.161, V2C community: public, Expires in 6 secs
req id: 51, dest: 171.69.58.33.161, V2C community: public, Expires in 6 secs
req id: 53, dest: 171.69.58.33.161, V2C community: public, Expires in 8 secs

Table 56 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 56: Show SNMP Pending Field Descriptions
Field Description

req id

ID number of the pending request.

dest

IP address of the intended receiver of the request.

V2C Community

SNMP version 2C community string sent with the request.

Expires in

Remaining time before request timeout expires.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show snmp
show snmp sessions
snmp-server manager
snmp-server manager session-timeout

show snmp sessions

To display the current SNMP sessions, use the show snmp sessions EXEC command.

show snmp sessions [brief]

Syntax Description

brief

(Optional) Displays a list of sessions only. Does not display session statistics.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.3 T.

Sessions are created when the SNMP manager in the router sends SNMP requests, such as inform requests, to a host or receives SNMP notifications from a host. One session is created for each destination host. If there is no further communication between the router and host within the session timeout period, the corresponding session will be deleted.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show snmp sessions command:

Router# show snmp sessions
Destination: 171.69.58.33.162, V2C community: public
  Round-trip-times: 0/0/0 (min/max/last)
  packets output
    0 Gets, 0 GetNexts, 0 GetBulks, 0 Sets, 4 Informs
    0 Timeouts, 0 Drops
    packets input
    0 Traps, 0 Informs, 0 Responses (0 errors)
Destination: 171.69.217.141.162, V2C community: public, Expires in 575 secs
  Round-trip-times: 1/1/1 (min/max/last)
  packets output
    0 Gets, 0 GetNexts, 0 GetBulks, 0 Sets, 4 Informs
    0 Timeouts, 0 Drops
    packets input
    0 Traps, 0 Informs, 4 Responses (0 errors)

The following is sample output from the show snmp sessions brief command:

Router# show snmp sessions brief
Destination: 171.69.58.33.161, V2C community: public, Expires in 55 secs

Table 57 describes the fields shown in these displays.


Table 57: Show SNMP Sessions Field Descriptions
Field Description

Destination

IP address of the remote agent.

V2C community

SNMP version 2C community string used to communicate with the remote agent.

Expires in

Remaining time before the session timeout expires.

Round-trip-times

Minimum, maximum, and the last round-trip time to the agent.

packets output

Packets sent by the router.

   Gets

Number of get requests sent.

   GetNexts

Number of get-next requests sent.

   GetBulks

Number of get-bulk requests sent.

   Sets

Number of set requests sent.

   Informs

Number of inform requests sent.

   Timeouts

Number of request timeouts.

   Drops

Number of packets that could not be sent.

packets input

Packets received by the router.

   Traps

Number of traps received.

   Informs

Number of inform responses received.

   Responses

Number of request responses received.

   errors

Number of responses that contained an SNMP error code.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show snmp
show snmp pending
snmp-server manager
snmp-server manager session-timeout

snmp-server access-policy

This command is no longer valid. The functionality provided by this command has been removed from the Cisco  IOS software.

snmp-server chassis-id

To provide a message line identifying the SNMP server serial number, use the snmp-server chassis-id global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default value, if any.

snmp-server chassis-id text
no snmp-server chassis-id

Syntax Description

text

Message you want to enter to identify the chassis serial number.

Default

On hardware platforms where the serial number can be machine read, the default is the serial number. For example, a Cisco 7000 has a default value of its serial number.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Cisco MIB provides a chassis MIB variable that enables the SNMP manager to gather data on system card descriptions, chassis type, chassis hardware version, chassis ID string, software version of ROM monitor, software version of system image in ROM, bytes of processor RAM installed, bytes of NVRAM installed, bytes of NVRAM in use, current configuration register setting, and the value of the configuration register at the next reload. The following installed card information is provided: type of card, serial number, hardware version, software version, and chassis slot number.

The chassis ID message can be seen with the show snmp command.

Example

In the following example, the chassis serial number specified is 1234456:

snmp-server chassis-id 1234456

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show snmp

snmp-server community

To set up the community access string to permit access to the SNMP protocol, use the snmp-server community global configuration command. The no form of this command removes the specified community string.

snmp-server community string [view view-name] [ro | rw] [number]
no snmp-server community string

Syntax Description

string

Community string that acts like a password and permits access to the SNMP protocol.

view view-name

(Optional) Name of a previously defined view. The view defines the objects available to the community.

ro

(Optional) Specifies read-only access. Authorized management stations are only able to retrieve MIB objects.

rw

(Optional) Specifies read-write access. Authorized management stations are able to both retrieve and modify MIB objects.

number

(Optional) Integer from 1 to 99 that specifies an access list of IP addresses that are allowed to use the community string to gain access to the SNMP agent.

Default

By default, an SNMP community string permits read-only access to all objects.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The no snmp-server command disables both versions of SNMP (SNMPv1 and SNMPv2C).

The first snmp-server command that you enter enables both versions of SNMP.

Examples

The following example assigns the string comaccess to SNMP allowing read-only access and specifies that IP access list 4 can use the community string:

snmp-server community comaccess ro 4

The following example assigns the string mgr to SNMP allowing read-write access to the objects in the restricted view:

snmp-server community mgr view restricted rw

The following example removes the community comaccess.

no snmp-server community comaccess

The following example disables both versions of SNMP:

no snmp-server 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

access-list
snmp-server view

snmp-server contact

To set the system contact (sysContact) string, use the snmp-server contact global configuration command. Use the no form to remove the system contact information.

snmp-server contact text
no snmp-server contact

Syntax Description

text

String that describes the system contact information.

Default

No system contact string is set.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following is an example of a system contact string:

snmp-server contact Dial System Operator at beeper # 27345

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

snmp-server location

snmp-server context

This command is no longer valid. The functionality provided by this command has been removed from the Cisco  IOS software.

snmp-server enable traps

To enable the router to send SNMP traps and informs, use the snmp-server enable traps global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable SNMP notifications.

snmp-server enable traps [notification-type] [notification-option]
no snmp-server enable traps [notification-type] [notification-option]

Syntax Description

notification-type

(Optional) Type of notification to enable. If no type is specified, all notifications are sent (including the envmon and repeater notifications). The notification type can be one of the following keywords:

· bgp---Sends Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) state change notifications.

· config---Sends configuration notifications.

· entity---Sends Entity MIB modification notifications.

· envmon---Sends Cisco enterprise-specific environmental monitor notifications when an environmental threshold is exceeded. When the envmon keyword is used, you can specify a notification-option value.

· frame-relay---Sends Frame Relay notifications.

· isdn---Sends Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) notifications. When the isdn keyword is used on Cisco 1600 series routers, you can specify a notification-option value.

· repeater---Sends Ethernet hub repeater notifications. When the repeater keyword is selected, you can specify a notification-option value.

· rtr---Sends response time reporter (RTR) notifications.

· snmp---Sends Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) notifications. When the snmp keyword is used, you can specify a notification-option value.

· syslog---Sends error message notifications (Cisco Syslog MIB). Specify the level of messages to be sent with the logging history level command.

notification-option

(Optional) When the envmon keyword is used, you can enable a specific environmental notification type, or accept all notification types from the environmental monitor system. If no option is specified, all environmental notifications are enabled. The option can be one or more of the following keywords: voltage, shutdown, supply, fan, and temperature.

When the isdn keyword is used, you can specify the call-information keyword to enable an SNMP ISDN call information notification for the ISDN MIB subsystem, or you can specify the isdnu-interface keyword to enable an SNMP ISDN U interface notification for the ISDN U interface MIB subsystem.

When the repeater keyword is used, you can specify the repeater option. If no option is specified, all repeater notifications are enabled. The option can be one or more of the following keywords:

· health---Enables IETF Repeater Hub MIB (RFC 1516) health notification.

· reset---Enables IETF Repeater Hub MIB (RFC 1516) reset notification.

When the snmp keyword is used, you can specify the authentication option to enable SNMP Authentication Failure notifications. (The snmp-sever enable traps snmp authentication command replaces the snmp-server trap-authentication command.) If no option is specified, all SNMP notifications are enabled.

Defaults

This command is disabled by default. Most notification types are disabled. However, some notification types cannot be controlled with this command. For example, some notification types are always enabled. Other notification types are enabled by a different command. For example, the linkUpDown notifications are controlled by the snmp trap link-status command.

If you enter this command with no notification-type keywords, the default is to enable all notification types controlled by this command.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command is useful for disabling notifications that are generating a large amount of uninteresting or useless noise.

SNMP notifications can be sent as traps or inform requests. This command enables both traps and inform requests for the specified notification types.

If you do not enter an snmp-server enable traps command, no notifications controlled by this command are sent. In order to configure the router to send these SNMP notifications, you must enter at least one snmp-server enable traps command. If you enter the command with no keywords, all notification types are enabled. If you enter the command with a keyword, only the notification type related to that keyword is enabled. In order to enable multiple types of notifications, you must issue a separate snmp-server enable traps command for each notification type and notification option.

The snmp-server enable traps command is used in conjunction with the snmp-server host command. Use the snmp-server host command to specify which host or hosts receive SNMP notifications. In order to send notifications, you must configure at least one snmp-server host command.

For a host to receive a notification controlled by this command, both the snmp-server enable traps command and the snmp-server host command for that host must be enabled. If the notification type is not controlled by this command, just the appropriate snmp-server host command must be enabled.

The notification types used in this command all have an associated MIB object that allows them to be globally enabled or disabled. Not all of the notification types available in the snmp-server host command have notificationEnable MIB objects, so some of these cannot be controlled using the snmp-server enable command.

Examples

The following example enables the router to send all traps to the host myhost.cisco.com using the community string public:

snmp-server enable traps
snmp-server host myhost.cisco.com public

The following example enables the router to send Frame Relay and environmental monitor traps to the host myhost.cisco.com using the community string public:

snmp-server enable traps frame-relay
snmp-server enable traps envmon temperature
snmp-server host myhost.cisco.com public

The following example will not send traps to any host. The BGP traps are enabled for all hosts, but the only traps enabled to be sent to a host are ISDN traps.

snmp-server enable traps bgp
snmp-server host bob public isdn

The following example enables the router to send all inform requests to the host myhost.cisco.com using the community string public:

snmp-server enable traps
snmp-server host myhost.cisco.com informs version 2c public

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

snmp-server host
snmp-server informs
snmp-server trap-source
snmp trap illegal-address

snmp-server host

To specify the recipient of an SNMP notification operation, use the snmp-server host global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the specified host.

snmp-server host host [traps | informs] [version {1 | 2c}] community-string [udp-port port]
[notification-type]
no snmp-server host host [traps | informs]

Syntax Description

host

Name or Internet address of the host.

traps

(Optional) Send SNMP traps to this host. This is the default.

informs

(Optional) Send SNMP informs to this host.

version

(Optional) Version of the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) used to send the traps.

· 1---SNMPv1. This option is not available with informs.

· 2c ---SNMPv2C.

community-string

Password-like community string sent with the notification operation.

udp-port port

UDP port of the host to use. The default is 162.

notification-type

(Optional) Type of notification to be sent to the host. If no type is specified, all notifications are sent. The notification type can be one or more of the following keywords:

· bgp---Sends Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) state change notifications.

· config---Sends configuration notifications.

· dspu---Sends downstream physical unit (DSPU) notifications.

· entity---Sends Entity MIB modification notifications.

· envmon---Sends Cisco enterprise-specific environmental monitor notifications when an environmental threshold is exceeded.

· frame-relay---Sends Frame Relay notifications.

· isdn---Sends Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) notifications.

· llc2---Sends Logical Link Control, type 2 (LLC2) notifications.

· rptr---Sends standard repeater (hub) notifications.

· rsrb---Sends remote source-route bridging (RSRB) notifications.

· rtr---Sends response time reporter (RTR) notifications.

· sdlc---Sends Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) notifications.

· sdllc---Sends SDLLC notifications.

· snmp---Sends Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) notifications defined in RFC 1157.

· stun---Sends serial tunnel (STUN) notifications.

· syslog---Sends error message notifications (Cisco Syslog MIB). Specify the level of messages to be sent with the logging history level command.

· tty---Sends Cisco enterprise-specific notifications when a Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) connection closes.

· x25---Sends X.25 event notifications.

Defaults

This command is disabled by default. No notifications are sent.

If you enter this command with no keywords, the default is to send all trap types to the host. No informs will be sent to this host.

If no version keyword is present, the default is version 1. If no traps or informs keyword is present, traps are enabled.

The no snmp-server host command with no keywords will disable traps, but not informs, to the host. In order to disable informs, use the no snmp-server host informs command.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

SNMP notifications can be sent as traps or inform requests. Traps are unreliable because the receiver does not send acknowledgments when it receives traps. The sender cannot determine if the traps were received. However, an SNMP entity that receives an inform request acknowledges the message with an SNMP response PDU. If the sender never receives the response, the inform request can be sent again. Thus, informs are more likely to reach their intended destination.

However, informs consume more resources in the agent and in the network. Unlike a trap, which is discarded as soon as it is sent, an inform request must be held in memory until a response is received or the request times out. Also, traps are sent only once, while an inform may be retried several times. The retries increase traffic and contribute to a higher overhead on the network.

If you do not enter an snmp-server host command, no notifications are sent. In order to configure the router to send SNMP notifications, you must enter at least one snmp-server host command. If you enter the command with no keywords, all trap types are enabled for the host. In order to enable multiple hosts, you must issue a separate snmp-server host command for each host. You can specify multiple notification types in the command for each host.

When multiple snmp-server host commands are given for the same host and kind of notification (trap or inform), each succeeding command overwrites the previous command. Only the last snmp-server host command will be in effect. For example, if you enter an snmp-server host inform command for a host and then enter another snmp-server host inform command for the same host, the second command will replace the first.

The snmp-server host command is used in conjunction with the snmp-server enable command. Use the snmp-server enable command to specify which SNMP notifications are sent globally. For a host to receive most notifications, at least one snmp-server enable command and the snmp-server host command for that host must be enabled.

However, some notification types cannot be controlled with the snmp-server enable command. For example, some notification types are always enabled. Other notification types are enabled by a different command. For example, the linkUpDown notifications are controlled by the snmp trap link-status command. These notification types do not require an snmp-server enable command.

A notification-type option's availability depends on the router type and Cisco IOS software features supported on the router. For example, the envmon notification-type is available only if the environmental monitor is part of the system.

Examples

The following example sends the SNMP traps defined in RFC 1157 to the host specified by the name myhost.cisco.com. The community string is defined as comaccess.

snmp-server enable traps
snmp-server host myhost.cisco.com comaccess snmp

The following example sends the SNMP and Cisco environmental monitor enterprise-specific traps to address 172.30.2.160:

snmp-server enable traps
snmp-server host 172.30.2.160 public snmp envmon

The following example enables the router to send all traps to the host myhost.cisco.com using the community string public:

snmp-server enable traps
snmp-server host myhost.cisco.com public

The following example will not send traps to any host. The BGP traps are enabled for all hosts, but only the ISDN traps are enabled to be sent to a host.

snmp-server enable traps bgp
snmp-server host bob public isdn

The following example enables the router to send all inform requests to the host myhost.cisco.com using the community string public:

snmp-server enable traps
snmp-server host myhost.cisco.com informs version 2c public

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

snmp-server host
snmp-server informs
snmp-server trap-source
snmp-server trap-timeout

snmp-server informs

To specify inform request options, use the snmp-server informs global configuration command. The no form of this command returns the settings to the defaults.

snmp-server informs [retries retries] [timeout seconds] [pending pending]
no snmp-server informs [retries retries] [timeout seconds] [pending pending]

Syntax Description

retries retries

(Optional) Maximum number of times to resend an inform request. The default is 3.

timeout second

(Optional) Number of seconds to wait for an acknowledgment before resending. The default is 30 seconds.

pending pending

(Optional) Maximum number of informs waiting for acknowledgments at any one time. When the maximum is reached, older pending informs are discarded. The default is 25.

Default

Inform requests are resent three times. Informs are resent after 30 seconds if no response is received. The maximum number of informs waiting for acknowledgments at any one time is 25.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.3 T.

Examples

If you are seeing a large number of inform drops, you may want to increase the pending queue size.

snmp-server informs pending 50

If you are sending informs over slow network links, you may want to increase the default timeout. Since informs will be sitting in the queue for a longer period of time, you may also need to increase the pending queue size.

snmp-server informs timeout 60 pending 40

If you are sending informs over very fast links, you may want to decrease the default timeout.

snmp-server informs timeout 5

If you are sending informs over unreliable links, it may be desirable to increase the retry count. Since informs will be sitting in the queue for a longer period of time, you may need to increase the pending queue size.

snmp-server informs retries 10 pending 45

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

snmp-server enable traps

snmp-server location

To set the system location string, use the snmp-server location global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the location string.

snmp-server location text
no snmp-server location

Syntax Description

text

String that describes the system location information.

Default

No system location string is set.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example illustrates a system location string:

snmp-server location Building 3/Room 214

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

snmp-server contact

snmp-server manager

To start the SNMP manager process, use the snmp-server manager global configuration command. The no form of this command stops the SNMP manager process.

snmp-server manager
no snmp-server manager

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.3 T.

The SNMP manager process sends SNMP requests to agents and receives SNMP responses and notifications from agents. When the SNMP manager process is enabled, the router can query other SNMP agents and process incoming SNMP traps.

Most network security policies assume that routers will be accepting SNMP requests, sending SNMP responses, and sending SNMP notifications. With the SNMP manager functionality enabled, the router may also be sending SNMP requests, receiving SNMP responses, and receiving SNMP notifications. The security policy implementation may need to be updated prior to enabling this functionality.

SNMP requests are typically sent to UDP port 161. SNMP responses are typically sent from UDP port 161. SNMP notifications are typically sent to UDP port 162.

Example

The following example enables the SNMP manager process:

snmp-server manager

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show snmp
show snmp pending
show snmp sessions
snmp-server manager session-timeout

snmp-server manager session-timeout

To set the amount of time before a non-active session is destroyed, use the snmp-server manager session-timeout global configuration command. The no form of this command returns the value to its default.

snmp-server manager session-timeout seconds
no snmp-server manager session-timeout

Syntax Description

seconds

Number of seconds before an idle session is timed out. The default is 600 seconds.

Default

Idle sessions time out after 600 seconds (10 minutes).

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.3 T.

Sessions are created when the SNMP manager in the router sends SNMP requests, such as inform requests, to a host or receives SNMP notifications from a host. One session is created for each destination host. If there is no further communication between the router and host within the session timeout period, the session will be deleted.

The router tracks statistics, such as the average round-trip time required to reach the host, for each session. Using the statistics for a session, the SNMP manager in the router can set reasonable timeout periods for future requests, such as informs, for that host. If the session is deleted, all statistics are lost. If another session with the same host is later created, the request timeout value for replies will return to the default value.

However, sessions consume memory. A reasonable session timeout value should be large enough such that regularly used sessions are not prematurely deleted, yet small enough such that irregularly used, or one-shot sessions, are purged expeditiously.

Example

The following example sets the session timeout to a larger value than the default:

snmp-server manager
snmp-server manager session-timeout 1000

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show snmp pending
show snmp sessions
snmp-server manager

snmp-server packetsize

To establish control over the largest SNMP packet size permitted when the SNMP server is receiving a request or generating a reply, use the snmp-server packetsize global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default value.

snmp-server packetsize byte-count
no snmp-server packetsize

Syntax Description

byte-count

Integer byte count from 484 to 8192. The default is 1500 bytes.

Default

1500 bytes

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example establishes a packet filtering of a maximum size of 1024 bytes:

snmp-server packetsize 1024

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

snmp-server queue-length

snmp-server party

This command is no longer valid. The functionality provided by this command has been removed from the Cisco  IOS software.

snmp-server queue-length

To establish the message queue length for each trap host, use the snmp-server queue-length global configuration command.

snmp-server queue-length length

Syntax Description

length

Integer that specifies the number of trap events that can be held before the queue must be emptied.

Default

10 events

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command defines the length of the message queue for each trap host. Once a trap message is successfully transmitted, software will continue to empty the queue, but never faster than at a rate of four trap messages per second.

Example

The following example establishes a message queue that traps four events before it must be emptied:

snmp-server queue-length 4

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

snmp-server packetsize

snmp-server system-shutdown

To use the SNMP message reload feature, the router configuration must include the snmp-server system-shutdown global configuration command. The no form of this command prevents an SNMP system-shutdown request (from an SNMP manager) from resetting the Cisco agent.

snmp-server system-shutdown
no snmp-server system-shutdown

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

This command is not included in the configuration file.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example enables the SNMP message reload feature:

snmp-server system-shutdown

snmp-server tftp-server-list

To limit the TFTP servers used via SNMP-controlled TFTP operations (saving and loading configuration files) to the servers specified in an access list, use the snmp-server tftp-server-list global configuration command. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

snmp-server tftp-server-list number
no snmp-server tftp-server-list

Syntax Description

number

Standard IP access list number from 1 to 99.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.2.

Example

The following example limits the TFTP servers that can be used for configuration file copies via SNMP to the servers in access list 44.

snmp-server tftp-server-list 44

snmp-server trap-authentication

The snmp-server enable traps snmp authentication command replaces this command. Refer to the description of snmp-server host for more information.

snmp-server trap-source

To specify the interface (and hence the corresponding IP address) that an SNMP trap should originate from, use the snmp-server trap-source global configuration command. Use the no form of the command to remove the source designation.

snmp-server trap-source interface
no snmp-server trap-source

Syntax Description

interface

Interface from which the SNMP trap originates. The argument includes the interface type and number in platform-specific syntax.

Default

No interface is specified.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When an SNMP trap is sent from a Cisco SNMP server, it has a trap address of whatever interface it happened to go out of at that time. Use this command if you want to use the trap address to trace particular needs.

Examples

The following example specifies that the IP address for interface Ethernet 0 is the source for all traps:

snmp-server trap-source ethernet 0

The following example specifies that the IP address for interface Ethernet 2/1 on a Cisco 7000 is the source for all traps:

snmp-server trap-source ethernet 2/1

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

snmp-server enable traps
snmp-server host

snmp-server trap-timeout

To define how often to try resending trap messages on the retransmission queue, use the snmp-server trap-timeout global configuration command.

snmp-server trap-timeout seconds

Syntax Description

seconds

Integer that sets the interval, in seconds, for resending the messages.

Default

30  seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Before the Cisco IOS software tries to send a trap, it looks for a route to the destination address. If there is no known route, the trap is saved in a retransmission queue. The server trap-timeout command determines the number of seconds between retransmission attempts.

Example

The following example sets an interval of 20 seconds to try resending trap messages on the retransmission queue:

snmp-server trap-timeout 20

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

snmp-server host
snmp-server queue-length

snmp-server view

To create or update a view entry, use the snmp-server view global configuration command. To remove the specified SNMP server view entry, use the no form of this command.

snmp-server view view-name oid-tree {included | excluded}
no snmp-server view view-name

Syntax Description

view-name

Label for the view record that you are updating or creating. The name is used to reference the record.

oid-tree

Object identifier of the ASN.1 subtree to be included or excluded from the view. To identify the subtree, specify a text string consisting of numbers, such as 1.3.6.2.4, or a word, such as system. Replace a single subidentifier with the asterisk (*) wildcard to specify a subtree family; for example 1.3.*.4.

included | excluded

Type of view. You must specify either included or excluded.

Default

No view entry exists.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Other SNMP commands require a view as an argument. You use this command to create a view to be used as arguments for other commands that create records including a view.

Two standard predefined views can be used when a view is required, instead of defining a view. One is everything, which indicates that the user can see all objects. The other is restricted, which indicates that the user can see three groups: system, snmpStats, and snmpParties. The predefined views are described in RFC 1447.

The first snmp-server command that you enter enables both versions of SNMP.

Examples

The following example creates a view that includes all objects in the MIB-II subtree:

snmp-server view mib2 mib-2 included

The following example creates a view that includes all objects in the MIB-II system group and all objects in the Cisco enterprise MIB:

snmp-server view phred system included
snmp-server view phred cisco included

The following example creates a view that includes all objects in the MIB-II system group except for sysServices (System 7) and all objects for interface 1 in the MIB-II interfaces group:

snmp-server view agon system included
snmp-server view agon system.7 excluded
snmp-server view agon ifEntry.*.1 included

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

snmp-server community

snmp trap link-status

To enable SNMP link trap generation, use the snmp trap link-status interface configuration command. To disable SNMP link traps, use the no form of this command.

snmp trap link-status
no snmp trap link-status

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

SNMP link traps are sent when an interface goes up or down.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command appeared before Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

By default, SNMP link traps are sent when an interface goes up or down. For interfaces expected to go up and down during normal usage, such as ISDN interfaces, the output generated by these traps may not be useful. The no form of this command disables these traps.

Example

This example disables the sending of SNMP link traps related to the ISDN BRI 0 interface.

interface bri 0
  no snmp trap link-status

statistics-distribution-interval

To set the time interval for each statistics distribution kept for the response time reporter, use the statistics-distribution-interval response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

statistics-distribution-interval milliseconds
no statistics-distribution-interval

Syntax Description

milliseconds

Number of milliseconds used for each statistics distribution kept. The default is 20 ms.

Default

20 ms

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

In most situations, you do not need to change the statistical distribution interval or size. Only change the interval or size when distributions are needed, for example, when performing statistical modeling of your network. To set the statistical distributions size, use the distributions-of-statistics-kept response time reporter configuration command.

Example

In the following example, the distribution is set to five and the distribution interval is set to 10 ms. This means that the first distribution will contain statistics from 0 to 9 ms, the second distribution will contain statistics from 10 to 19 ms, the third distribution will contain statistics from 20 to 29 ms, the fourth distribution will contain statistics from 30 to 39 ms, and the fifth distribution will contain statistics from 40 ms to infinity.

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.28.161.21
  distribution-of-statistics-kept 5
  statistics-distribution-interval 10

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

distributions-of-statistics-kept
hops-of-statistics-kept
hours-of-statistics-kept
paths-of-statistics-kept
rtr

tag

To create a user-specified identifier for a response time reporter probe, use the tag response time reporter configuration command. It is normally used to logically link probes in a group. Use the no form of this command to remove a tag from a probe.

tag text
no tag

Syntax Description

text

Name of a group that this probe belongs to. From 0 to 16 ASCII characters.

Default

No probes are tagged.

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Tags can be used to support automation (for example, by using the same tag for two different probes on two different routers echoing the same target).

Example

In the following example, probe 1 is tagged with the label bluebell:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.176
  tag bluebell

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rtr

threshold

To set the rising threshold (hysteresis) that generates a reaction event and stores history information for the response time reporter probe, use the threshold response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

threshold millisecond
no threshold

Syntax Description

millisecond

Number of milliseconds required for a rising threshold to be declared. The default value is 5000 ms.

Default

5000 ms

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The value specified for the threshold command must not exceed the value specified for the timeout response time reporter configuration command.

The threshold value is used by the rtr reaction-configuration and filter-for-history commands.

Example

In the following example, probe 1's threshold is set to 2500 ms:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.176
  threshold 2500

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

filter-for-history
rtr
rtr reaction-configuration

timeout

To set the amount of time the response time reporter probe waits for a response from its request packet, use the timeout response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

timeout millisecond
no timeout

Syntax Description

millisecond

Number of milliseconds the probe waits to receive a response from its request packet. The default is 5000 ms.

Default

5000 ms

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the timeout command to set how long the probe waits to receive a response, and use the frequency command to set the rate at which the probe starts a response time report operation.

The value specified for the timeout command cannot be greater than the value specified for the frequency response time reporter configuration command.

Example

In the following example, the timeout is set for 2500 ms:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.176
  timeout 2500

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

frequency
rtr

type

To configure the type of response time reporter probe, use the type response time reporter configuration command. You must configure the probe's type before you can configure any of the other characteristics of the probe. Use the no form of this command to remove the type configuration for the probe.

type {echo | pathEcho} protocol type type-target
no type {echo | pathEcho} protocol type type-target

Syntax Description

echo

Perform end-to-end response time reporter operations only.

pathEcho

Perform response time reporter operations by using a route discovery algorithm to find a path to the destination and echo each device on the path.

protocol type type-target

Protocol used by the probe. Type can be one of the following keywords (whether the keyword is available depends on the Cisco IOS software features installed on your router) followed by the required type parameter:

· ipIcmpEcho {ip-address | ip-host-name}---IP/ICMP Echo that requires a destination IP address or IP host name.

· snaRUEcho sna-host-name---SNA's SSCP Native Echo that requires the host name defined for the SNA's Physical Unit connection to VTAM.

· snaLU0EchoAppl sna-host-name [sna-application] [sna-mode]---An SNA LU Type 0 connection to Cisco's NSPECHO host application that requires the host name defined for the SNA's Physical Unit connection to VTAM. Optionally specify the host application name (the default is NSPECHO) and SNA mode to access the application.

· snaLU2EchoAppl sna-host-name [sna-application] [sna-mode]---An SNA LU Type 2 connection to Cisco's NSPECHO host application that requires the host name defined for the SNA's Physical Unit connection to VTAM. Optionally specify the host application name (the default is NSPECHO), and SNA mode to access the application.

Default

No probe types are configured.

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Support of echo to a protocol and pathEcho to a protocol is dependent on the protocol type and implementation. In general most protocols support echo and few protocols support pathEcho.


Note Keywords are not case sensitive and are shown in mixed case for readability only.

Example

In the following example, probe 10 is created and configured as echo using the IP/ICMP Echo protocol and the destination IP address 172.16.1.175:

rtr 10
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.175

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rtr

verify-data

To cause the response time reporter probe to check each response for corruption, use the verify-data response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

verify-data
no verify-data

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Only use the verify-data command when corruption may be an issue.

Caution Do not enable this feature during normal operation because it causes unnecessary overhead.

Example

In the following example, probe 5 is configured to verify the data for each response:

rtr 5
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.174
  response-data-size 2
  verify-data

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rtr


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