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Table of Contents

Router Memory Commands

Router Memory Commands

This chapter provides detailed descriptions of the commands used to maintain router memory.

For configuration information and examples, refer to the "Maintaining Router Memory" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide.

Flash Memory File System Types

Cisco platforms use one of three different Flash memory file system types. Some commands are supported on only one or two file system types. This chapter notes commands that are not supported on all file system types.

Refer to Table 28 to determine which Flash memory file system type your platform uses.


Table 28: Flash Memory File System Types
Type Platforms

Class A

Cisco 7000 family, C12000, LS1010

Class B

Cisco 1003, Cisco 1004, Cisco 1005, Cisco 2500 series, Cisco 3600 series, Cisco 4000 series, Cisco  AS5200

Class C

Cisco MC3810, disk0 and disk1 of SC3640

Replaced Commands

Commands in this chapter that have been replaced by new commands continue to perform their normal functions in the current release but are no longer documented. Support for these commands will cease in a future release. Table 29 maps the old commands with their replacements.


Table 29: Mapping Old Commands to New Commands
Old Command New Command

configure network

copy source-url system:running-config

configure overwrite-network

copy source-url nvram:startup-config

write memory

copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config

write network

copy system:running config destination-url

configure network

The copy source-url system:running-config command replaces the configure network command. Refer to the description of the copy command for further details.

configure overwrite-network

The copy source-url nvram: startup-config command replaces the configure overwrite-network command. Refer to the copy command for further details.

copy

To copy any file from a source to a destination, use the copy EXEC command.

copy [/erase] source-url destination-url

Syntax Description

/erase

(Optional) Erases the destination file system before copying.

source-url

The location of the source file or directory to be copied.

destination-url

The destination of the copied file or directory.

The exact format of the source and destination URLs varies according to the file or directory location. You may enter either a keyword for a particular file or a prefix for a file system type (not a file within a type).

Table 30 specifies two keyword shortcuts to URLs.


Table 30: Copy Command Keywords
Keyword Source or Destination

running-config

(Optional) Keyword shortcut for system:running-config, the current running configuration file. This keyword does not work in more and show file command syntaxes.

startup-config

(Optional) Keyword shortcut for nvram:startup-config, the configuration file used for initialization. This file is contained in NVRAM for all platforms except the Cisco  7000 family, which uses the CONFIG_FILE environment variable to specify the startup configuration. The Cisco 4500 series cannot use the copy running-config startup-config command.This keyword does not work in more and show file command syntaxes.

The next tables list prefixes by file system type. If you do not specify a prefix, the router looks for a file in the current directory.

Table 31 lists URL prefixes for Special (opaque) file systems.Table 32 lists them for network file systems, and Table 33 lists them for local writable storage.


Table 31: URL Prefixes for Special File Systems
Prefix Source or Destination

flh:

Source URL for flash load helper log files.

modem:

Destination url for loading modem firmware on Cisco 5200 and 5300 Series routers.

nvram:

Router's NVRAM. You can copy the startup configuration into or from NVRAM. You can also display the size of a private configuration file.

null:

Null destination for copies or files. You can copy a remote file to null to determine its size.

system:

Source or destination URL for system memory, which includes the running configuration.

xmodem:

Source destination for the file from a network machine that uses the Xmodem protocol.

ymodem:

Source destination for the file from a network machine that uses the Xmodem protocol.


Table 32: URL Prefixes for Network File Systems
Prefix Source or Destination

ftp:

Source or destination URL for File Transfer Protocol (FTP) network server. The syntax for this prefix is
ftp:[[//username [:password]@] location]/directory]/filename

rcp:

Source or destination URL for a Remote Copy Protocol (rcp) network server. The syntax for this prefix is rcp:[[//username@]location]/directory]/filename

tftp:

Source or destination URL for a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) network server. The syntax for this prefix is tftp:[[//location]/directory]/filename


Table 33: URL Prefixes for Local Writable Storage File Systems

Prefix

Source or Destination

bootflash:

Source or destination URL for Boot Flash memory.

disk0: and disk1:

Source or destination URL of rotating media.

flash:

Source or destination URL for Flash memory. This prefix is available on all platforms. For platforms which lack a flash: device, note that flash: is aliased to slot0:, allowing you to refer to the main Flash memory storage area on all platforms.

slavebootflash:

Source or destination URL for internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a router configured for HSA.

slaveram:

NVRAM on a slave RSP card of a router configured for HSA.

slaveslot0:

Source or destination URL of first PCMCIA card on a slave RSP card of a router configured for HSA.

slaveslot1:

Source or destination URL of second PCMCIA slot on a slave RSP card of a router configured for HSA.

slot0:

Source or destination URL of first PCMCIA Flash memory card.

slot1:

Source or destination URL of second PCMCIA Flash memory card.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.3 T.

You can enter on the command line all necessary source- and destination- URL information and the username and password to use, or you can enter copy and have the router prompt you for any missing information.

If you enter information, choose one of the following three: running-config, startup-config, or a file system prefix (See tables above.) The location of a file system dictates the format of the source or destination URL.

The colon is required after the prefix. However, earlier commands, not requiring a colon, will remain supported, but unavailable in context-sensitive help.

The entire copying process may take several minutes and differs from protocol to protocol and from network to network.

In the prefix syntax for ftp:, rcp:, and tftp: the location is either an IP address or a host name. The filename is specified relative to the directory used for file transfers.

This section contains usage guidelines for the following topics:

Understanding Invalid Combinations of Source and Destination

Some invalid combinations of source and destination exist. Specifically, you cannot copy:

Understanding Character Descriptions

Table 34 describes the characters that you may see during processing of the copy command.


Table 34: Character Descriptions in the Copy Command
Character Description

!

For net transfers an exclamation point indicates that the copy process is taking place. Each exclamation point indicates the successful transfer of ten packets (512 bytes each).

.

For net transfers a period indicates the copy process timed out. Many periods in a row typically mean that the copy process may fail.

O

For net transfers an uppercase O indicates a packet was received out of order and the copy process may fail.

e

For flash erasures, a lowercase e indicates a device is being erased.

E

An uppercase E indicates an error. The copy process may fail.

V

A series of uppercase Vs indicates the progress during the verification of the image checksum.

Understanding Partitions

You cannot copy an image or configuration file to a Flash partition from which you are currently running. For example, if partition 1 is running the current system image, copy the configuration file or image to partition 2. Otherwise, the copy operation will fail.

You can identify the available Flash partitions by entering the show file system command.

Using rcp

The rcp protocol requires a client to send a remote username upon each rcp request to a server. When you copy a configuration file or image between the router and a server using rcp, the Cisco  IOS software sends the first valid username in the following list:

    1. The remote username specified in the copy command, if one is specified.

    2. The username set by the ip rcmd remote-username command, if the command is configured.

    3. The remote username associated with the current tty (terminal) process. For example, if the user is connected to the router through Telnet and was authenticated through the username command, the router software sends the Telnet username as the remote username.

    4. The router host name.

For the rcp copy request to process successfully, an account must be defined on the network server for the remote username. If the network administrator of the destination server did not establish an account for the remote username, this command will not run successfully. If the server has a directory structure, the configuration file or image is written to or copied from the directory associated with the remote username on the server. For example, if the system image resides in the home directory of a user on the server, specify that user's name as the remote username.

If you are writing to the server, the rcp server must be properly configured to accept the rcp write request from the user on the router. For UNIX systems, add an entry to the .rhosts file for the remote user on the rcp server. Suppose the router contains the following configuration lines:

hostname Rtr1
ip rcmd remote-username User0

If the router's IP address translates to Router1.company.com, then the .rhosts file for User0 on the rcp server should contain the following line:

Router1.company.com Rtr1

Refer to the documentation for your rcp server for more details.

If you are using a personal computer as a file server, the computer must support rsh.

Using FTP

The FTP protocol requires a client to send a remote username and password upon each FTP request to a server. When you copy a configuration file from the router to a server using FTP, the Cisco  IOS software sends the first valid username in the following list:

    1. The username specified in the copy command, if a username is specified.

    2. The username set by the ip ftp username command, if the command is configured.

    3. Anonymous.

The router send the first valid password in the following list:

    1. The password specified in the copy command, if a password is specified.

    2. The password set by the ip ftp password command, if the command is configured.

    3. The router forms a password username@routername.domain. The variable username is the username associated with the current session, routername is the configured host name, and domain is the domain of the router.

The username and password must be associated with an account on the FTP server. If you are writing to the server, the FTP server must be properly configured to accept the FTP write request from the user on the router.

If the server has a directory structure, the configuration file or image is written to or copied from the directory associated with the username on the server. For example, if the system image resides in the home directory of a user on the server, specify that user's name as the remote username.

Refer to the documentation for your FTP server for more details.

Use the ip ftp username and ip ftp password commands to specify a username and password for all copies. Include the username in the copy command if you want to specify a username for that copy operation only.

Storing Images on Servers

Use the copy flash: destination-url command (for example, copy flash: tftp:) to copy a system image or boot image from Flash memory to a network server. Use the copy of the image as a backup copy. Also, use it to verify that the copy in Flash memory is the same as that in the original file.

Copying from a Server to Flash Memory

Use the copy destination-url flash: command (for example, copy tftp: flash:) to copy an image from a server to Flash memory.

On Class B file system platforms, the system provides an option to erase existing Flash memory before writing onto it.

Caution Verify the image in Flash memory before booting the image.
Verifying Images

Before booting from Flash memory, verify that the checksum of the image in Flash memory matches the checksum listed in the README file that was distributed with the image by using the verify command. The checksum of the image in Flash memory is displayed when the copy command completes. The README file was copied to the server automatically when you installed the image.

Caution If the checksum values do not match, do not reboot the router. Instead, reissue the copy command and compare the checksums again. If the checksum is repeatedly wrong, copy the original image back into Flash memory before you reboot the router from Flash memory. If you have a corrupted image in Flash memory and try to boot from Flash memory, the router will start the system image contained in ROM (assuming booting from a network server is not configured). If ROM does not contain a fully functional system image, the router might not function and will have to be reconfigured through a direct console port connection.
Copying a Configuration File from a Server to the Running Configuration

Use the copy {ftp: | rcp: | tftp:} system:running-config command to load a configuration file from a network server to the router's running configuration. The configuration will be added to the running configuration as if the commands were typed in the command line interface. Thus, the resulting configuration will be a combination of the previous running configuration and the loaded configuration file, with the loaded configuration file having precedence.

You can copy either a host configuration file or a network configuration file. Accept the default value of host to copy and load a host configuration file containing commands that apply to one network server in particular. Enter network to copy and load a network configuration file containing commands that apply to all network servers on a network.

Copying a Configuration File from a Server to the Startup Configuration

Use the copy {ftp: | rcp: | tftp:} nvram:startup-config command to copy a configuration file from a network server to the router's startup configuration. These commands replace the startup configuration file with the copied configuration file.

Storing the Running or Startup Configuration on a Server

Use the copy system:running-config {ftp: | rcp: | tftp:} command to copy the current configuration file to a network server using FTP, rcp, or TFTP. Use the copy nvram:startup-config {ftp: | rcp: | tftp:} command to copy the startup configuration file to a network server.

The configuration file copy can serve as a backup copy.

Saving the Running Configuration to the Startup Configuration

Use the copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config command to copy the running configuration to the startup configuration.

Caution Some specific commands might not get saved to NVRAM. You will have to enter these commands again if you reboot the machine. These commands are noted in the documentation. We recommend that you keep a listing of these settings so you can quickly reconfigure your router after rebooting.

If you issue the copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config command from a bootstrap system image, a warning will instruct you to indicate whether you want your previous NVRAM configuration to be overwritten and configuration commands to be lost. This warning does not appear if NVRAM contains an invalid configuration or if the previous configuration in NVRAM was generated by a bootstrap system image.

On all platforms except Class A file system platforms, the copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config command copies the currently running configuration to NVRAM.

On the Class A Flash file system platforms, the copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config command copies the currently running configuration to the location specified by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable. This variable specifies the device and configuration file used for initialization. When the CONFIG_FILE environment variable points to NVRAM or when this variable does not exist (such as at first-time startup), the software writes the current configuration to NVRAM. If the current configuration is too large for NVRAM, the software displays a message and stops executing the command.

When the CONFIG_FILE environment variable specifies a valid device other than nvram: (that is, flash:, bootflash:, slot0:, or slot1:), the software writes the current configuration to the specified device and filename and stores a distilled version of the configuration in NVRAM. A distilled version is one that does not contain access list information. If NVRAM already contains a copy of a complete configuration, the router prompts you to confirm the copy.

Using CONFIG_FILE, BOOT, and BOOTLDR Environment Variables

For the Class A Flash file system platforms:

To view the contents of environment variables, use the show bootvar command. To modify the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the boot config command. To modify the BOOTLDR environment variable use the boot bootldr command. To modify the BOOT environment variable, use the boot system command. To save your modifications, use the copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config command.

When the destination of a copy command is specified by the CONFIG_FILE or BOOTLDR environment variable, the router prompts you for confirmation before proceeding with the copy. When the destination is the only valid image in the BOOT environment variable, the router also prompts you for confirmation before proceeding with the copy.

Understanding High System Availability

High System Availability (HSA) refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

On a Cisco 7507 or Cisco  7513 configured for HSA, if you copy a file to nvram:startup-configuration with automatic synchronization disabled, the system asks you if you also want to copy the file to the slave's startup configuration. The default answer is yes. If automatic synchronization is enabled, the system automatically copies the file to the slave's startup configuration each time you use a copy command with nvram:startup-configuration as the destination.

Examples

The following examples illustrate uses of the copy command. Depending on your platform, the output might be different from that shown in the examples.

Copy an Image from a Server to Flash Memory Examples

The following three examples use a copy rcp:, copy tftp:, or copy ftp: command to copy an image from a server to Flash memory.

This example copies a system image named file1 from the remote rcp server with an IP address of 172.16.101.101 to Flash memory. On Class B file system platforms, the Cisco IOS software allows you to erase the contents of Flash memory first to ensure that enough Flash memory is available to accommodate the system image.
Router# copy rcp://netadmin@172.16.101.101/file1 flash:file1 
Destination file name [file1]?
Accessing file  'file1' on 172.16.101.101...
Loading file1 from 172.16.101.101 (via Ethernet0):  ! [OK]
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure you want to erase? [confirm]
Copy  'file1' from server
    as  'file1' into Flash WITH erase? [yes/no] yes
Erasing device... eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee...erased
Loading file1 from 172.16.101.101 (via Ethernet0):  !
[OK - 984/8388608 bytes]
Verifying checksum... OK (0x14B3)
Flash copy took 0:00:01 [hh:mm:ss]
The following example copies a system image into a partition of Flash memory. The system will prompt for a partition number only if there are two or more read/write partitions or one read-only and one read/write partition and dual Flash bank support in boot ROMs. If the partition entered is not valid, the process terminates. You can enter a partition number, a question mark (?) for a directory display of all partitions, or a question mark and a number (?number) for directory display of a particular partition. The default is the first read/write partition. In this case, the partition is read-only and has dual Flash bank support in boot ROM, so the system uses Flash Load Helper.
Router# copy tftp: flash:
System flash partition information:
Partition   Size     Used    Free    Bank-Size   State       Copy-Mode
        1       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read Only   RXBOOT-FLH
        2       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read/Write    Direct
[Type  ?<no> for partition directory;  ? for full directory; q to abort]
Which partition? [default = 2]
                                                              **** NOTICE ****
Flash load helper v1.0
This process will accept the copy options and then terminate
the current system image to use the ROM based image for the copy.
Routing functionality will not be available during that time.
If you are logged in via telnet, this connection will terminate.
Users with console access can see the results of the copy operation.
                                                              ---- ******** ----
Proceed? [confirm]
System flash directory, partition 1:
File    Length   Name/status
    1   3459720    master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
[3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
Address or name of remote host [255.255.255.255]? 172.16.1.1
Source file name? master/igs-bfpx-100.4.3
Destination file name [default = source name]?
Loading master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3 from 172.16.1.111:  !
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure? [confirm]
Copy  'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' from TFTP server
as  'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' into Flash WITH erase? [yes/no] yes


The following example copies the file c3600-i-mz from the rcp server at IP address 172.23.1.129 to the Flash memory card in slot 0 of a Cisco  3600 series router, which has only one partition. As the operation progresses, the Cisco  IOS software asks you to erase the files on the Flash memory PC card to accommodate the incoming file. This entire operation takes 18 seconds to perform, as indicated at the end of the example.
Router# copy rcp: slot0:
PCMCIA Slot0 flash
Partition   Size    Used      Free      Bank-Size  State          Copy Mode
  1         4096K   3068K     1027K     4096K      Read/Write     Direct
  2         4096K   1671K     2424K     4096K      Read/Write     Direct
  3         4096K      0K     4095K     4096K      Read/Write     Direct
  4         4096K   3825K      270K     4096K      Read/Write     Direct
[Type ?<no> for partition directory; ? for full directory; q to abort]
Which partition? [default = 1] 
PCMCIA Slot0 flash directory, partition 1:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   3142288  c3600-j-mz.test  
[3142352 bytes used, 1051952 available, 4194304 total]
Address or name of remote host [172.23.1.129]? 
Source file name? /tftpboot/images/c3600-i-mz
Destination file name [/tftpboot/images/c3600-i-mz]? 
Accessing file '/tftpboot/images/c3600-i-mz' on 172.23.1.129...
Connected to 172.23.1.129
Loading 1711088 byte file c3600-i-mz: ! [OK]
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure you want to erase? [confirm]
Copy '/tftpboot/images/c3600-i-mz' from server
  as '/tftpboot/images/c3600-i-mz' into Flash WITH erase? [yes/no] yes
Erasing device... eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee ...erased
Connected to 172.23.1.129
Loading 1711088 byte file c3600-i-mz: 
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
Verifying checksum...  OK (0xF89A)
Flash device copy took 00:00:18 [hh:mm:ss]
Save a Copy of an Image on a Server Examples

The following four examples use copy commands to copy images to a server for storage.

The following example copies a system image from Flash Memory to an rcp server using the default remote username. Because the rcp server address and filename are not included in the command, the router prompts for it.
Router# copy flash: rcp:
IP address of remote host [255.255.255.255]? 172.16.13.110
Name of file to copy? gsxx
writing gsxx - copy complete
The following example copies an image from a particular partition of Flash memory to an rcp server using a remote username of netadmin1.
The system will prompt if there are two or more partitions. If the partition entered is not valid, the process terminates. You have the option to enter a partition number, a question mark (?) for a directory display of all partitions, or a question mark and a number (?number) for a directory display of a particular partition. The default is the first partition.
Router# configure terminal
Router# ip rcmd remote-username netadmin1
Router# end
Router# copy flash: rcp:
System flash partition information:
Partition   Size     Used    Free    Bank-Size   State       Copy-Mode
        1       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read Only   RXBOOT-FLH
        2       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read/Write    Direct
[Type  ?<number> for partition directory;  ? for full directory; q to abort]
Which partition? [1] 2
System flash directory, partition 2:
File    Length   Name/status
    1   3459720    master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
[3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
Address or name of remote host [ABC.CISCO.COM]?
Source file name? master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
Destination file name [master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3]?
Verifying checksum for  'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' (file # 1)... OK
Copy  'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' from Flash to server
as  'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3'? [yes/no] yes
!!!!...
Upload to server done
Flash copy took 0:00:00 [hh:mm:ss]
The following example copies the file c3600-i-mz from partition 1 of the Flash memory card in slot 0 to an FTP server at IP address 172.23.1.129.
Router# show slot0: partition 1
PCMCIA Slot0 flash directory, partition 1:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   1711088 c3600-i-mz 
[1711152 bytes used, 2483152 available, 4194304 total]
Router# copy slot0:1:c3600-i-mz ftp://myuser:mypass@172.23.1.129/c3600-i-mz
Verifying checksum for '/tftpboot/cisco_rules/c3600-i-mz' (file # 1)...  OK
Copy '/tftpboot/cisco_rules/c3600-i-mz' from Flash to server
  as 'c3700-i-mz'? [yes/no] yes
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Upload to server done
Flash device copy took 00:00:23 [hh:mm:ss]
The following example copies an image from boot Flash memory to a TFTP Server:
Router# copy bootflash:file1 tftp://192.168.117.23/file1
Verifying checksum for  'file1' (file # 1)... OK
Copy  'file1' from Flash to server
    as  'file1'? [yes/no]y
!!!!...
Upload to server done
Flash copy took 0:00:00 [hh:mm:ss]
Copy from a Server to the Running Configuration Example

The following example copies and runs a configuration filename host1-confg from the netadmin1 directory on the remote server with an IP address of 172.16.101.101.

Router# copy rcp://netadmin1@172.16.101.101/host1-confg system:running-config 
Configure using host1-confg from 172.16.101.101? [confirm]
Connected to 172.16.101.101
Loading 1112 byte file host1-confg:![OK]
Router#
%SYS-5-CONFIG: Configured from host1-config by rcp from 172.16.101.101
Copy from a Server to the Startup Configuration Example

The following example copies a configuration file host2-confg from a remote FTP server to the startup configuration. The IP address is172.16.101.101; the remote username is netadmin1; and the remote password is ftppass.

Router# copy ftp://netadmin1:ftppass@172.16.101.101/host2-confg 
nvram:startup-config 
Configure using rtr2-confg from 172.16.101.101?[confirm]
Connected to 172.16.101.101
Loading 1112 byte file rtr2-confg:![OK]
[OK]
Router#
%SYS-5-CONFIG_NV:Non-volatile store configured from rtr2-config by 
FTP from 172.16.101.101
Copy the Running Configuration to a Server Example

The following example specifies a remote username of netadmin1. Then it copies the running configuration file, named Rtr2-confg, to the netadmin1 directory on the remote host with an IP address of 172.16.101.101.

Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# ip rcmd remote-username netadmin1
Router(config)# end
Router# copy system:running-config rcp:
Remote host[]? 172.16.101.101
Name of configuration file to write [Rtr2-confg]?
Write file rtr2-confg on host 172.16.101.101?[confirm]
Building configuration...[OK]
Connected to 172.16.101.101
Copy the Startup Configuration to a Server Example

The following example copies the startup configuration to a TFTP server:

Router# copy nvram:startup-config tftp:
Remote host[]? 172.16.101.101
Name of configuration file to write [rtr2-confg]? <cr>
Write file rtr2-confg on host 172.16.101.101?[confirm] <cr>
![OK]
Save the Current Running Configuration Example

The following example copies the running configuration to the startup configuration. On a Class A Flash file system platform, this command copies the running configuration to the startup configuration specified by the CONFIG_FILE variable:

copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config

The following example shows the warning the system provides if you try to save configuration information from bootstrap into the system:

Router(boot)# copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config 
Warning: Attempting to overwrite an NVRAM configuration written
by a full system image. This bootstrap software does not support
the full configuration command set. If you perform this command now,
some configuration commands may be lost.
Overwrite the previous NVRAM configuration?[confirm]

Enter no to escape writing the configuration information to memory.

Move Configuration Files to Other Locations Examples

On some routers, you can store copies of configuration files on a Flash memory device. Five examples follow:

The following example copies the startup configuration file (specified by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable) to a Flash memory card inserted in slot 0:
copy nvram:startup-config slot0:router-confg
The following example copies the running configuration from the router to the Flash memory PC card in slot 0:
Router# copy system:running-config slot0:karen2
Building configuration...
 
5267 bytes copied in 0.720 secs
The following example copies the file ios-upgrade-1 from the Flash memory card in slot 0 to the running configuration:
Router# copy slot0:4:ios-upgrade-1 system:running-config
Copy 'ios-upgrade-1' from flash device
  as 'running-config' ? [yes/no] yes


The following example copies the router-image file from the Flash memory to the startup configuration:
copy flash:router-image nvram:startup-config
This example copies the file running-config from the first partition in internal Flash memory to the Flash memory PC card in slot 1. The file's checksum is verified, and its copying time of 30 seconds is displayed.
Router# copy flash: slot1:
System flash
Partition   Size    Used      Free      Bank-Size  State          Copy Mode
  1         4096K   3070K     1025K     4096K      Read/Write     Direct
  2        16384K   1671K    14712K     8192K      Read/Write     Direct
[Type ?<no> for partition directory; ? for full directory; q to abort]
Which partition? [default = 1] 
System flash directory, partition 1: 
File  Length   Name/status
  1   3142748  dirt/images/mars-test/c3600-j-mz.latest 
  2   850      running-config 
[3143728 bytes used, 1050576 available, 4194304 total]
PCMCIA Slot1 flash directory:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   1711088  dirt/images/c3600-i-mz 
  2   850      running-config 
[1712068 bytes used, 2482236 available, 4194304 total]
Source file name? running-config 
Destination file name [running-config]? 
Verifying checksum for 'running-config' (file # 2)...  OK
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm] 
Flash contains files. Are you sure you want to erase? [confirm] 
Copy 'running-config' from flash: device
  as 'running-config' into slot1: device WITH erase? [yes/no] yes
Erasing device... eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee ...erased
!
 [OK - 850/4194304 bytes]
Flash device copy took 00:00:30 [hh:mm:ss]
Verifying checksum...  OK (0x16)
Copy an Image from the Master RSP Card to the Slave RSP Card Example

The following example copies the router-image file from the Flash memory card inserted in slot 1 of the master RSP card to slot 0 of the slave RSP card in the same router:

copy slot1:router-image slaveslot0:

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

boot config
boot system
cd
copy xmodem: flash:
copy ymodem: flash:
delete
dir
erase
ip rcmd remote-username
reload
show bootvar
show (Flash file system)
slave auto-sync config
verify bootflash:

erase bootflash

The erase bootflash: and erase bootflash commands have identical function. Refer to the erase command for details.

erase flash

The erase flash: and erase flash commands have identical function. Refer to the erase command for details.

memory-size iomem

To reallocate the percentage of DRAM memory to use for I/O memory and processor memory on Cisco  3600 series routers, use the memory-size iomem global configuration command. The no form of this command reverts to the default allocation of 25 percent I/O memory and 75 percent processor memory.

memory-size iomem i/o-memory-percentage
no memory-size iomem i/o-memory-percentage

Syntax Description

i/o-memory-percentage

The percentage of DRAM allocated to I/O memory. The values permitted are 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, and 50 percent. A minimum of 4 MB of memory is required for I/O memory.

Default

The default allocation is 25 percent I/O memory and 75 percent processor memory.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2 P.

When you specify the percentage of I/O memory in the command line, processor memory automatically acquires the remaining percentage of DRAM memory.

Example

The following example allocates 40 percent of the DRAM memory to I/O memory and the remaining 60 percent to processor memory.

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# memory-size iomem 40
Router(config)# exit
Router# copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config
Building configuration...
[OK]
Router# reload
rommon 1 > boot
program load complete, entry point: 0x80008000, size: 0x32ea24
Self decompressing the image : 
#######################################################################################
#######################################################################################
######################################################################## [OK]

partition

To separate Flash memory into partitions on Class B file system platforms, use the partition global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to undo partitioning and to restore Flash memory to one partition.

partition flash-filesystem: [number-of-partitions][partition-size] (Cisco  1600 series and
Cisco  3600 series)
no partition flash-filesystem:

partition flash partitions [size1 size2] (all other Class B platforms)
no partition flash

Syntax Description

flash-filesystem

One of the following Flash file systems, which must be followed by a colon (:). The Cisco  1600 series can only use the flash: keyword.

· flash:---Internal Flash memory

· slot0:---Flash memory card in PCMCIA slot 0

· slot1:---Flash memory card in PCMCIA slot 1

number-of-partitions

(Optional) Number of partitions in Flash memory.

partition-size

(Optional) Size of each partition. The number of partition size entries must be equal to the number of specified partitions.

partitions

Number of partitions in Flash memory. Can be 1 or 2.

size1

(Optional) Size of the first partition in megabytes.

size2

(Optional) Size of the second partition in megabytes.

Default

Flash memory consists of one partition.

If the partition size is not specified, partitions of equal size are created.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

For the Cisco  1600 series and Cisco  3600 series, to undo partitioning, use the partition flash-filesystem:1 or no partition flash-filesystem: command. For other Class B platforms, use either the partition flash 1 or no partition flash command. If there are files in a partition other than the first, you must use the command erase  flash-filesystem:partition-number to erase the partition before reverting to a single partition.

When creating two partitions, you must not truncate a file or cause a file to spill over into the second partition.

Examples

The following example creates two partitions of 4 MB each in Flash memory:

partition flash 2 4 4

The following example divides the Flash memory card in slot 0 into two partitions, each 8 MB in size on the Cisco  3600:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# partition slot0: 2 8 8

The following example creates four partitions of equal size in the card on a Cisco  1600 series:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# partition flash: 4

show (Flash file system)

To display the layout and contents of a Flash memory file system, use the show EXEC command:

show flash-filesystem: [all | chips | filesys] (Class A Flash file systems)
show flash-filesystem: [partition number] [all | chips | detailed | err | summary] (Class B Flash file systems)
show flash-filesystem: (Class C Flash file systems)

Syntax Description

flash-filesystem

Flash memory file system (bootflash:, flash:, slot0:, slot1:, slavebootflash:, slaveslot0:, or slaveslot1:).

all

(Optional) On Class B Flash file systems, all shows complete information about Flash memory, including information about the individual ROM devices in Flash memory and the names and sizes of all system image files stored in Flash memory, including those that are invalid.

On Class A Flash file systems, all shows the following information:

· The information displayed when no keywords are used.

· The information displayed by the filesys keyword.

· The information displayed by the chips keyword.

chips

(Optional) Shows information per partition and per chip, including which bank the chip is in plus its code, size, and name.

filesys

(Optional) Shows the Device Info Block, the Status Info, and the Usage Info.

detailed

(Optional) Shows detailed file directory information per partition, including file length, address, name, Flash memory checksum, computer checksum, bytes used, bytes available, total bytes, and bytes of system Flash memory.

err

(Optional) Shows write or erase failures in the form of number of retries.

partition number

(Optional) Shows output for the specified partition number. If you do not specify a partition in the command, the router displays output for all partitions. You can use this keyword only when Flash memory has multiple partitions.

summary

(Optional) Shows summary information per partition, including the partition size, bank size, state, and method by which files can be copied into a particular partition. You can use this keyword only when Flash memory has multiple partitions.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.3 AA.

If Flash memory is partitioned, the command displays the requested output for each partition, unless you use the partition keyword.

The command also specifies the location of the current image.

To display the contents of boot Flash memory, use the show bootflash: command as follows:

show bootflash: [all | chips | filesys] for Class A Flash file systems
show bootflash: [partition number] [all | chips | detailed | err] for Class B Flash file systems

To display the contents of internal Flash memory, use the show flash: command as follows:

show flash:
[all | chips | filesys] for Class A Flash file systems
show flash: [partition number][all | chips | detailed | err | summary] for Class B Flash file systems

The show (Flash file system) command replaces the show flash devices command.

Sample Displays

The output of the show command depends on the type of Flash file system you select. Types include flash:, bootflash:, slot0:, slot1:, slavebootflash:, slaveslot0:, and slaveslot1:.

This section contains examples of output from show flash:.

Although the examples below use flash: as the Flash file system, you may also use the other Flash file systems listed above.

Class A Flash File System Examples

The following three examples show sample output for Class A Flash file systems. Table 35 describes the fields shown in the output.

Table 35: Show (Class A Flash File System) Field Descriptions
Field Description

#

File's index number.

ED

Whether the file contains an error (E) or is deleted (D).

type

File's type (1 = configuration file, 2 = image file). The software displays these values only when the file's type is certain. When the file's type is unknown, the system displays unknown in this field.

crc

File's cyclic redundant check.

seek

Offset into the file system of the next file.

nlen

Length of the file's name.

length

Length of the file itself.

date/time

Date and time the file was created.

name

File's name.

The following is sample output from the show flash: command.

    RouterA# show flash:

    -#- ED --type-- --crc--- -seek-- nlen -length- -----date/time------ name

    1 .. unknown 317FBA1B 4A0694 24 4720148 Aug 29 1997 17:49:36 hampton/nitro/c7200-j-mz

    2 .. unknown 9237F3FF 92C574 11 4767328 Oct 01 1997 18:42:53 c7200-js-mz

    3 .D unknown 71AB01F1 10C94E0 10 7982828 Oct 01 1997 18:48:14 rsp-jsv-mz

    4 .D unknown 96DACD45 10C97E0 8 639 Oct 02 1997 12:09:17 the_time

    5 .. unknown 96DACD45 10C9AE0 3 639 Oct 02 1997 12:09:32 the_time

    6 .D unknown 96DACD45 10C9DE0 8 639 Oct 02 1997 12:37:01 the_time

    7 .. unknown 96DACD45 10CA0E0 8 639 Oct 02 1997 12:37:13 the_time

    3104544 bytes available (17473760 bytes used)

The following is sample output from the show flash: chips command:

RouterA# show flash: chips
******** Intel Series 2+ Status/Register Dump ********
ATTRIBUTE MEMORY REGISTERS:
  Config Option Reg (4000): 2
  Config Status Reg (4002): 0
  Card Status   Reg (4100): 1
  Write Protect Reg (4104): 4
  Voltage Cntrl Reg (410C): 0
  Rdy/Busy Mode Reg (4140): 2
COMMON MEMORY REGISTERS: Bank 0
  Intelligent ID Code  : 8989A0A0
  Compatible Status Reg: 8080
  Global     Status Reg: B0B0
  Block Status Regs:
    0  :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    8  :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    16 :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    24 :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
COMMON MEMORY REGISTERS: Bank 1
  Intelligent ID Code  : 8989A0A0
  Compatible Status Reg: 8080
  Global     Status Reg: B0B0
  Block Status Regs:
    0  :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    8  :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    16 :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    24 :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
COMMON MEMORY REGISTERS: Bank 2
  Intelligent ID Code  : 8989A0A0
  Compatible Status Reg: 8080
  Global     Status Reg: B0B0
  Block Status Regs:
    0  :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    8  :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    16 :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    24 :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
COMMON MEMORY REGISTERS: Bank 3
  Intelligent ID Code  : 8989A0A0
  Compatible Status Reg: 8080
  Global     Status Reg: B0B0
  Block Status Regs:
    0  :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    8  :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    16 :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    24 :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
COMMON MEMORY REGISTERS: Bank 4
  Intelligent ID Code  : 8989A0A0
  Compatible Status Reg: 8080
  Global     Status Reg: B0B0
  Block Status Regs:
    0  :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    8  :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    16 :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0
    24 :  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0  B0B0

The following is sample output from the show flash: filesys command:

RouterA# show flash: filesys
-------- F I L E   S Y S T E M   S T A T U S --------
  Device Number = 0
DEVICE INFO BLOCK:
  Magic Number          = 6887635   File System Vers = 10000    (1.0)
  Length                = 1400000   Sector Size      = 20000
  Programming Algorithm = 4         Erased State     = FFFFFFFF
  File System Offset    = 20000     Length = 13A0000
  MONLIB Offset         = 100       Length = C730
  Bad Sector Map Offset = 1FFEC     Length = 14
  Squeeze Log Offset    = 13C0000   Length = 20000
  Squeeze Buffer Offset = 13E0000   Length = 20000
  Num Spare Sectors     = 0
    Spares:
STATUS INFO:
  Writable
  NO File Open for Write
  Complete Stats
  No Unrecovered Errors
  No Squeeze in progress
USAGE INFO:
  Bytes Used     = 10AA0E0  Bytes Available = 2F5F20
  Bad Sectors    = 0       Spared Sectors  = 0
  OK Files       = 4       Bytes = 90C974
  Deleted Files  = 3       Bytes = 79D3EC
  Files w/Errors = 0       Bytes = 0

Class B Flash File Systems Examples

Table 36 describes fields in the sample output for Class B Flash file systems.


Table 36: Show (Class B Flash File System) All Fields
Field Description

addr

Address of the file in Flash memory.

available

Total number of bytes available in Flash memory.

Bank

Bank number.

Bank-Size

Size of bank in bytes.

bytes used

Total number of bytes used in Flash memory.

ccksum

Computed checksum.

Chip

Chip number.

Code

Code number.

Copy-Mode

Method by which the partition can be copied to:

  • RXBOOT-MANUAL indicates a user can copy manually by reloading to the boot ROM image.

  • RXBOOT-FLH indicates user can copy via Flash load helper.

  • Direct indicates user can copy directly into Flash memory.

  • None indicates that it is not possible to copy into that partition.

fcksum

Checksum recorded in Flash memory.

File

Number of the system image file. If no filename is specified in the boot system flash command, the router boots the system image file with the lowest file number.

Free

Number of bytes free in partition.

Length

Size of the system image file (in bytes).

Name

Name of chip manufacturer and chip type.

Name/status

Filename and status of a system image file. The status [invalidated] appears when a file has been rewritten (recopied) into Flash memory. The first (now invalidated) copy of the file is still present within Flash memory, but it is rendered unusable in favor of the newest version. The [invalidated] status can also indicate an incomplete file that results from the user abnormally terminating the copy process, a network timeout, or a Flash memory overflow.

Partition

Partition number in Flash memory.

Size

Size of partition in bytes or size of chip.

State

State of the partition. It can be one of the following values:

  • Read-Only indicates the partition that is being executed from.

  • Read/Write is a partition that can be copied to.

System flash directory

Flash directory and its contents.

total

Total size of Flash memory, in bytes.

Used

Number of bytes used in partition.

The following is sample output from the show flash: command:

RouterB> show flash:
 
System flash directory:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   4137888  c3640-c2is-mz.Feb24
[4137952 bytes used, 12639264 available, 16777216 total]
16384K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)\

The following example shows detailed information about the second partition in internal Flash memory:

RouterB# show flash: partition 2
System flash directory, partition 2:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   1711088  dirt/images/c3600-i-mz 
[1711152 bytes used, 15066064 available, 16777216 total]
16384K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)

The following is sample output from the show flash: all command:

RouterB> show flash: all
Partition   Size    Used      Free      Bank-Size  State          Copy Mode
  1        16384K   4040K    12343K     4096K      Read/Write     Direct
 
System flash directory:
File  Length   Name/status
        addr      fcksum  ccksum
  1   4137888  c3640-c2is-mz.Feb24
        0x40      0xED65  0xED65
[4137952 bytes used, 12639264 available, 16777216 total]
16384K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)
 
   Chip    Bank    Code      Size      Name
    1      1       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    2      1       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    3      1       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    4      1       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    1      2       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    2      2       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    3      2       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    4      2       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    1      3       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    2      3       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    3      3       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    4      3       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    1      4       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    2      4       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    3      4       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    4      4       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080

The following is sample output from the show flash: all command on a router with Flash memory partitioned:

Router# show flash: all
System flash partition information:
Partition      Size        Used              Free          Bank-Size          State                  Copy-Mode
        1              4096K        3459K          637K          4096K                  Read Only          RXBOOT-FLH
        2              4096K        3224K          872K          4096K                  Read/Write        Direct
System flash directory, partition 1:
File          Length          Name/status
                addr          fcksum          ccksum
    1          3459720          master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
                0x40          0x3DE1          0x3DE1
[3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read ONLY)
      Chip    Bank     Code      Size      Name
        1      1        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
        2      1        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
        3      1        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
        4      1        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
Executing current image from System flash [partition 1]
 
 System flash directory, partition2:
File          Length          Name/status
                addr          fcksum          ccksum
    1          3224008          igs-kf.100
                0x40          0xEE91          0xEE91
[3224072 bytes used, 970232 available, 4194304 total]
4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)
      Chip    Bank     Code      Size      Name
        1      2        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
        2      2        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
        3      2        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
        4      2        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA

The following is sample output from the show flash: chips command:

RouterB> show flash: chips
16384K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)
 
   Chip    Bank    Code      Size      Name
    1      1       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    2      1       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    3      1       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    4      1       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    1      2       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    2      2       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    3      2       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    4      2       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    1      3       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    2      3       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    3      3       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    4      3       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    1      4       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    2      4       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    3      4       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080
    4      4       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080

The following is sample output from the show flash: detailed command:

RouterB> show flash: detailed
 
System flash directory:
File  Length   Name/status
        addr      fcksum  ccksum
  1   4137888  c3640-c2is-mz.Feb24
        0x40      0xED65  0xED65
[4137952 bytes used, 12639264 available, 16777216 total]
16384K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)

The following is sample output from the show flash: err command:

RouterB> show flash: err
 
System flash directory:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   4137888  c3640-c2is-mz.Feb24
[4137952 bytes used, 12639264 available, 16777216 total]
16384K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)
 
   Chip    Bank    Code      Size      Name                erase  write
    1      1       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    2      1       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    3      1       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    4      1       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    1      2       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    2      2       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    3      2       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    4      2       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    1      3       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    2      3       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    3      3       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    4      3       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    1      4       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    2      4       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    3      4       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
    4      4       01D5      1024KB    AMD   29F080      0      0
Refer to Table 36 for a description of the fields. The show flash: err command also displays two extra fields: erase and write. The erase field indications the number of erase errors. The write field indicates the number of write errors.
The following is sample output from the show flash summary command on a router with Flash memory partitioned. The partition in the Read Only state is the partition from which the Cisco  IOS image is being executed.
Router# show flash summary
System flash partition information:
Partition   Size     Used      Free    Bank-Size   State       Copy-Mode
        1       4096K    2048K     2048K   2048K       Read Only   RXBOOT-FLH
        2       4096K    2048K     2048K   2048K       Read/Write    Direct

Related Commands

show flash
show flash ?
show flash all
show flash chips
show flash filesys

write memory

The copy system:running-config nvram: startup-config command replaces the write memory command. Refer to the copy command for further details.

write network

The copy system:running-config destination-url command replaces the write network command. Refer to the copy command for further details.


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