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Table of Contents

Terminal Operating Characteristics Commands

Terminal Operating Characteristics Commands

This chapter describes the commands used to control terminal operating characteristics.

For terminal operating characteristic task information and examples, refer to the "Configuring Operating Characteristics for Terminals" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide.

activation-character

To define the character you enter at a vacant terminal to begin a terminal session, use the activation-character line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to make any character activate a terminal.

activation-character ascii-number
no activation-character

Syntax Description

ascii-number

Decimal representation of the activation character.

Default

Return (decimal  13)

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

See the "ASCII Character Set" appendix for a list of ASCII characters.


Note If you are using the autoselect function, set the activation character to the default, Return, and exec-character-bits to 7. If you change these defaults, the application will not recognize the activation request.

Example

The following example sets the activation character for the console to Delete, which is Decimal 127:

line console
 activation-character 127

autobaud

To set the line for automatic baud detection, use the autobaud line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default.

autobaud
no autobaud

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No autobaud detection

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The autobaud detection supports a range from  300 to  19200 baud. A line set for autobaud cannot be used for outgoing connections, nor can you set autobaud capability on a line using 19200 baud when the parity bit is set (because of hardware limitations).

Example

The following example sets the auxiliary port for autobaud detection:

line 5
 autobaud

databits

To set the number of data bits per character that are interpreted and generated by the router hardware, use the databits line configuration command. Use the no form of the command to restore the default value.

ddatabits {5 | 6 | 7 | 8}
no databits

Syntax Description

5

Five data bits per character.

6

Six data bits per character.

7

Seven data bits per character.

8

Eight data bits per character. This is the default.

Default

Eight data bits per character

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The databits line configuration command can be used to mask the high bit on input from devices that generate 7 data bits with parity. If parity is being generated, specify 7  data bits per character. If no parity generation is in effect, specify 8 data bits per character. The other keywords are supplied for compatibility with older devices and generally are not used.

Example

The following example sets the number of data bits per character to seven on line 4:

line 4
 databits 7

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

data-character-bits
terminal databits
terminal data-character-bits

data-character-bits

To set the number of data bits per character that are interpreted and generated by the Cisco IOS software, use the data-character-bits line configuration command. Use the no form of the command to restore the default value.

data-character-bits {7 | 8}
no data-character-bits

Syntax Description

7

Seven data bits per character.

8

Eight data bits per character. This is the default.

Default

Eight data bits per character

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The data-character-bits line configuration command is used primarily to strip parity from X.25 connections on routers with the protocol translation software option. The data-character-bits line configuration command does not work on hard-wired lines.

Example

The following example sets the number of data bits per character to seven on virtual terminal line 1:

line vty 1
  data-character-bits 7

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

terminal data-character-bits

default-value exec-character-bits

To define the EXEC character width for either 7 bits or 8 bits, use the default-value exec-character-bits global configuration command. Use the no form of the command to restore the default value.

default-value exec-character-bits {7 | 8}
no default-value exec-character-bits

Syntax Description

7

Selects the 7-bit ASCII character set.

8

Selects the full 8-bit ASCII character set.

Default

7-bit ASCII character set

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Configuring the EXEC character width to 8 bits allows you to add graphical and international characters in banners, prompts, and so forth. However, setting the EXEC character width to 8 bits can also cause failures. If a user on a terminal that is sending parity enters the command help, an "unrecognized command" message appears because the system is reading all 8 bits, although the eighth bit is not needed for the help command.

Example

The following example selects the full 8-bit ASCII character set for EXEC banners and prompts:

default-value exec-character-bits 8

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

default-value special-character-bits
exec-character-bits
length
terminal exec-character-bits
terminal special-character-bits

default-value special-character-bits

To configure the flow control default value from a 7-bit width to an 8-bit width, use the default-value special-character-bits global configuration command. Use the no form of the command to restore the default value.

default-value special-character-bits {7 | 8}
no default-value special-character-bits

Syntax Description

7

Selects the 7-bit character set.

8

Selects the full 8-bit character set.

Default

7-bit character set

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Configuring the special character width to 8 bits allows you to add graphical and international characters in banners, prompts, and so forth.

Example

The following example selects the full 8-bit special character set:

default-value special-character-bits 8

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

default-value exec-character-bits
exec-character-bits
length
terminal exec-character-bits
terminal special-character-bits

disconnect-character

To define a character to disconnect a session, use the disconnect-character line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the disconnect character.

disconnect-character ascii-number
no disconnect-character

Syntax Description

ascii-number

Decimal representation of the session disconnect character.

Default

No disconnect character is defined.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Break character is represented by zero; NULL cannot be represented.

To use the session-disconnect character in normal communications, precede it with the escape character. See the "ASCII Character Set" appendix for a list of ASCII characters.

Example

The following example sets the disconnect character for virtual terminal line 4 to Escape, which is decimal character 27:

line vty 4
 disconnect-character 27

dispatch-character

To define a character that causes a packet to be sent, use the dispatch-character line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the definition of the specified dispatch character.

dispatch-character ascii-number1 [ascii-number2 . . . ascii-number]
no dispatch-character ascii-number1 [ascii-number2 . . . ascii-number]

Syntax Description

ascii-number

Decimal representation of the character, such as Return (decimal  13) for line-at-a-time transmissions.

Default

No dispatch character is defined.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The dispatch-character command defines a dispatch character that causes a packet to be sent even if the dispatch timer has not expired. It causes the Cisco IOS software to attempt to buffer characters into larger-sized packets for transmission to the remote host.

Enable the dispatch-character command from the session that initiates the connection, not from the incoming side of a streaming Telnet session.

This command can take multiple arguments, so you can define any number of characters as dispatch characters.

Example

The following example specifies the Return character (decimal  13) as the dispatch character:

line vty 4
 dispatch-character 13

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

dispatch-machine
dispatch-timeout
state-machine
terminal dispatch-character

dispatch-machine

To specify an identifier for a TCP packet dispatch state machine on a particular line, use the dispatch-machine line configuration command. Use the no form of the command to disable a state machine on a particular line.

dispatch-machine name
no dispatch-machine

Syntax Description

name

Name of the state machine that determines when to send packets on the asynchronous line.

Default

No dispatch state machine identifier is defined.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When the dispatch-timeout command is specified, a packet being built will be sent when the timer expires, and the state will be reset to zero.

Any dispatch characters specified using the dispatch-character command are ignored when a state machine is also specified.

If a packet becomes full, it will be sent regardless of the current state, but the state is not reset. The packet size depends on the traffic level on the asynchronous line and the dispatch-timeout value. There is always room for 60 data bytes. If the dispatch-timeout value is greater than or equal to 100  ms, a packet size of 536 (data bytes) is allocated.

Example

The following example specifies the name linefeed for the state machine:

state-machine linefeed 0 0 9 0 
state-machine linefeed 0 11 255 0
state-machine linefeed 0 10 10 transmit

line 1
 dispatch-machine linefeed

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

dispatch-character
dispatch-timeout
state-machine

dispatch-timeout

To set the character dispatch timer, use the dispatch-timeout line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the timeout definition.

dispatch-timeout milliseconds
no dispatch-timeout

Syntax Description

milliseconds

Integer that specifies the number of milliseconds that the Cisco  IOS software waits after putting the first character into a packet buffer before sending the packet. During this interval, more characters might be added to the packet, which increases the processing efficiency of the remote host.

Default

No dispatch timeout is defined.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The dispatch-timeout line configuration command causes the software to buffer characters into packets for transmission to the remote host. The Cisco IOS software sends a packet a specified amount of time after the first character is put into the buffer. You can use the dispatch-timeout and dispatch-character line configuration commands together. In this case, the software dispatches a packet each time the dispatch character is entered, or after the specified dispatch timeout interval, depending on which condition is met first.


Note The software's response might appear intermittent if the
timeout interval is greater than 100  ms and remote echoing is used. For lines with a reverse-Telnet connection, use a dispatch-timeout value less than 10  ms.

Example

The following example sets the dispatch timer to 80 ms:

line vty 0 4
 dispatch-timeout 80

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

dispatch-character
dispatch-machine
state-machine

escape-character

To define a system escape character, use the escape-character line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to set the escape character to Break.

escape-character {ascii-number | none}
no escape-character

Syntax Description

ascii-number

Either the decimal representation of the character or a control sequence (Ctrl-E, for example).

none

Disables escape entirely.

Default

Ctrl-^

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Break key cannot be used as an escape character on the console terminal because the Cisco IOS software interprets Break as an instruction to halt the system. To send the escape character to the other side, press Ctrl-^ twice.

See the "ASCII Character Set" appendix for a list of ASCII characters.

Example

The following example sets the escape character to Ctrl-P, which is decimal character 16:

line console
 escape-character 16

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

terminal escape-character

exec-character-bits

To configure the character widths of EXEC and configuration command characters, use the exec-character-bits line configuration command. Use the no form of the command to restore the default value.

exec-character-bits {7 | 8}
no exec-character-bits

Syntax Description

7

Selects the 7-bit character set.

8

Selects the full 8-bit character set for use of international and graphical characters in banner messages, prompts, and so forth.

Default

7-bit ASCII character set

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Setting the EXEC character width to 8 allows you to use special graphical and international characters in banners, prompts, and so forth. However, setting the EXEC character width to 8 bits can cause failures. If a user on a terminal that is sending parity enters the help command, an "unrecognized command" message appears because the system is reading all 8 bits, and the eighth bit is not needed for the help command.


Note If you are using the autoselect function, set the activation-character to the default, Return, and exec-character-bits to 7. If you change these defaults, the application will not recognize the activation request.

Example

The following example enables full 8-bit international character sets, except for the console, which is an ASCII terminal. It illustrates use of the default-value exec-character-bits global configuration command and the exec-character-bits line configuration command.

default-value exec-character-bits 8
line 0
  exec-character-bits 7

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

default-value exec-character-bits
default-value special-character-bits
length
terminal exec-character-bits
terminal special-character-bits

hold-character

To define the local hold character used to pause output to the terminal screen, use the
hold-character line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default.

hold-character ascii-number
no hold-character

Syntax Description

ascii-number

Either the decimal representation of the hold character or a control sequence (for example, Ctrl-P).

Default

No hold character is defined.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Break character is represented by zero; NULL cannot be represented. To continue the output, enter any character after the hold character. To use the hold character in normal communications, precede it with the escape character. See the "ASCII Character Set" appendix for a list of ASCII characters.

Example

The following example sets the hold character to Ctrl-S, which is decimal 19:

line 8
 hold-character 19

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

terminal hold-character

insecure

To set the line as an insecure location, use the insecure line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

insecure
no insecure

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example sets up line 10 as a dial-up line that is used by the LAT software to report the line as available to remote hosts:

line 10
  insecure

length

To set the terminal screen length, use the length line configuration command. Use the no form of the command to restore the default value.

length screen-length
no length

Syntax Description

screen-length

Number of lines on the screen. A value of zero disables pausing between screens of output.

Default

24 lines

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Cisco IOS software uses the value of this command to determine when to pause during multiple-screen output. Not all commands recognize the configured screen length. For example, the show terminal command assumes a screen length of 24 lines or more.

Example

The following example disables the screen pause function on the terminal connected to line 6:

line 6
 terminal-type VT220
 length 0

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

terminal length

location

To record the location of a serial device, use the location line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the description.

location text
no location

Syntax Description

text

Location description.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The location command enters information about the device location and status. Use the show users all EXEC command to display the location information.

Example

The following example identifies the location of the console:

line console
 location Building 3, Basement

lockable

To enable the lock EXEC command, use the lockable global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to reinstate the default---the terminal cannot be locked.

lockable
no lockable

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Not lockable

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command activates a temporary password, which is set up with the lock EXEC command, so that a terminal is temporarily inaccessible.

Example

The following example sets the terminal to the lockable state:

lockable

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

lock

logout-warning

To warn users of an impending forced timeout, use the logout-warning line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default.

logout-warning [number]

Syntax Description

number

(Optional) Number of seconds that are counted down before session termination. If no number is specified, the default of 20 seconds is used.

Default

No warning is sent to the user.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

This command notifies the user of an impending forced timeout, set by using the absolute-timeout command, or another method such as ARAP.

Example

The following example sets a countdown value of 30 seconds:

line 5
  logout-warning 30

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

absolute-timeout
session-timeout

notify

To enable terminal notification about pending output from other Telnet connections, use the notify line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to end notification.

notify
no notify

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command sets a line to inform a user who has multiple, concurrent Telnet connections when output is pending on a connection other than the current one.

Example

The following example sets up notification of pending output from connections on virtual terminal lines 0 to 4:

line vty 0 4
 notify

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

terminal notify

padding

To set the padding on a specific output character, use the padding line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove padding for the specified output character.

padding ascii-number count
no padding ascii-number

Syntax Description

ascii-number

Decimal representation of the character.

count

Number of NULL bytes sent after that character, up to 255 padding characters in length.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command when the attached device is an old terminal that requires padding after certain characters (such as ones that scrolled or moved the carriage). See the "ASCII Character Set" appendix for a list of ASCII characters.

Example

The following example pads a Return (decimal 13) with 25 NULL bytes:

line console
  padding 13 25

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

terminal padding

parity

To define generation of a parity bit, use the parity line configuration command. Use the no form of the command to specify no parity.

parity {none | even | odd | space | mark}
no parity

Syntax Description

none

No parity.

even

Even parity.

odd

Odd parity.

space

Space parity.

mark

Mark parity.

Default

No parity

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Communication protocols provided by devices such as terminals and modems often require a specific parity bit setting.

Example

The following example changes the default of no parity to even parity:

line 34
 parity even

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

terminal parity


printer (LPD)

To configure a printer and assign a server TTY line (or lines) to it, use the printer global configuration command. Use the no form of the command to disable printing on a TTY line.

printer printer-name {line number | rotary number} [newline-convert | formfeed]
no printer

Syntax Description

printer-name

Printer name.

line number

Assigns a TTY line to the printer.

rotary number

Assigns a rotary group of TTY lines to the printer.

newline-convert

(Optional) Converts newline (linefeed) characters to a two-character sequence "carriage-return, linefeed."

formfeed

(Optional) Causes the Cisco IOS software to send a form-feed character (ASCII  0x0C) to the printer TTY line immediately following each print job received from the network.

Default

No printers are defined by default.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

This command enables you to configure a printer for operations and assign either a single TTY line or a group of TTY lines to it. To make multiple printers available through the same printer name, specify the number of a rotary group.

In addition to configuring the printer with the printer command, you must also modify the file /etc/printcap on your UNIX system to include the definition of the remote printer in the Cisco IOS software. Refer to the Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide for additional information.

Use the optional newline-convert keyword in UNIX environments that cannot handle single-character line terminators. This converts newline characters to a carriage-return, linefeed sequence. Use the formfeed keyword when using the line printer daemon (lpd) protocol to print and your system is unable to separate individual output jobs with a form feed (page eject). You can enter the newline-convert and formfeed keywords together and in any order.

Example

The following example configures a printer named printer1 and assigns its output to the single TTY line 4:

printer printer1 line 4

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clear line
show printer

private

To save user EXEC command changes between terminal sessions, use the private line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default condition.

private
no private

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

User-set configuration options are cleared with the EXEC command exit or when the interval set with the exec-timeout line configuration command has passed.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command ensures that the terminal parameters set by the user remain in effect between terminal sessions. This behavior is desirable for terminals in private offices.

Example

The following example sets up virtual terminal line 1 to keep all user-supplied settings at system restarts:

line 15
 private

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

exec-timeout
exit

show whoami

To display information about the current user's terminal line, including host name, line number, line speed, and location, use the show whoami EXEC command.

show whoami [text]

Syntax Description

text

(Optional) Additional data to print to the screen.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If text is included as an argument in the command, that text is displayed as part of the additional data about the line.

To prevent the information from being lost if the menu display clears the screen, this command always displays a More prompt before returning. Press the space bar to return to the prompt.

Sample Display

The following example is sample output from the show whoami command:

Router> show whoami
Comm Server "Router", Line 0 at 0bps.  Location "Second floor, West"
--More--
Router>

special-character-bits

To configure the number of data bits per character for special characters such as software flow control characters and escape characters, use the special-character-bits line configuration command. Use the no form of the command to restore the default value.

special-character-bits {7 | 8}
no special-character-bits

Syntax Description

7

Selects the 7-bit ASCII character set. This is the default.

8

Selects the full 8-bit character set for special characters.

Default

7-bit ASCII character set

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Setting the special character bits to 8 allows you to use twice as many special characters as with the 7-bit ASCII character set. The special characters affected by this setting are the escape, hold, stop, start, disconnect, and activation characters.

Example

The following example allows the full 8-bit international character set for special characters on line  5:

line 5
  special-character-bits 8

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

default-value exec-character-bits
default-value special-character-bits
exec-character-bits
terminal exec-character-bits
terminal special-character-bits

state-machine

To specify the transition criteria for the state of a particular state machine, use the state-machine global configuration command. Use the no form of the command to delete a particular state machine.

state-machine name state firstchar lastchar [nextstate | transmit]
no state-machine name

Syntax Description

name

Specifies the name for the state machine (used in the dispatch-machine line command). The user can specify any number of state machines, but each line can have only one state machine associated with it.

state

Defines which state is being modified. There are a maximum of eight states per state machine. Lines are initialized to state 0 and return to state 0 after a packet is transmitted.

firstchar lastchar

Specify a range of characters. If the state machine is in the indicated state, and the next character input is within this range, the process goes to the specified next state. Full 8-bit character comparisons are done, so the maximum value is 255. Take care that the line is configured to strip parity bits (or not generate them), or duplicate the low characters in the upper half of the space.

nextstate

(Optional) Defines the state to enter if the character is in the specified range.

transmit

(Optional) Causes the packet to be transmitted and the state machine to be reset to state 0. Recurring characters that have not been explicitly defined to have a particular action return the state machine to state 0.

Default

No transition criteria are specified.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command is paired with the dispatch-machine line configuration command, which defines the line on which the state machine is effective.

Example

The following example uses a dispatch machine named function to ensure that the function key characters on an ANSI terminal are lumped together in one packet. Because the default in the example is to remain in state 0 without transmitting anything, normal key signals are transmitted immediately.

line 1 20
  dispatch-machine function
!
state-machine function 0 0 255 transmit

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

dispatch-character
dispatch-machine
dispatch-timeout

stopbits

To set the number of the stop bits transmitted per byte, use the stopbits line configuration command. Use the no form of the command to restore the default value.

stopbits {1 | 1.5 | 2}
no stopbits

Syntax Description

1

One stop bit.

1.5

One and one-half stop bits.

2

Two stop bits.

Default

Two  stop bits

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Communication protocols provided by devices such as terminals and modems often require a specific stop-bit setting.

Example

The following example changes the default from two stop bits to one as a performance enhancement:

line 4
 stopbits 1

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

terminal stopbits

terminal databits

To change the number of data bits per character for the current terminal line for this session, use the terminal databits EXEC command.

terminal databits {5 | 6 | 7 | 8}

Syntax Description

5

Five data bits per character.

6

Six data bits per character.

7

Seven data bits per character.

8

Eight data bits per character. This is the default.

Default

Eight data bits per character

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Communication protocols provided by devices such as terminals and modems often require a specific data bit setting. The terminal databits command can be used to mask the high bit on input from devices that generate 7 data bits with parity. If parity is being generated, specify 7  data bits per character. If no parity generation is in effect, specify 8  data bits per character. The other keywords (5 and 6) are supplied for compatibility with older devices and are generally not used.

Example

The following example changes the databits per character to seven:

Router> terminal databits 7

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

databits

terminal data-character-bits

To set the number of data bits per character that are interpreted and generated by the Cisco IOS software for the current line and session, use the terminal data-character-bits EXEC command.

terminal data-character-bits {7 | 8}

Syntax Description

7

Seven data bits per charcter.

8

Eight data bits. This is the default.

Default

8 data bits per character

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command is used primarily to strip parity from X.25 connections on routers with the protocol translation software option. The terminal data-character-bits command does not work on hard-wired lines.

Example

The following example sets the data bits per character to seven on the current line :

terminal data-character-bits 7

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

data-character-bits

terminal dispatch-character

To define a character that causes a packet to be sent for the current session, use the terminal dispatch-character EXEC command.

terminal dispatch-character ascii-number1 [ascii-number2 . . . ascii-number]

Syntax Description

ascii-number

The ASCII decimal representation of the character, such as Return (ASCII character  13) for line-at-a-time transmissions. The command can take multiple arguments, so you can define any number of characters as the dispatch character.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

At times, you might want to queue up a string of characters until they fill a complete packet and then transmit the packet to a remote host. This can make more efficient use of a line, because the access server or router normally dispatches each character as it is entered.

Example

The following example defines the characters Ctrl-D (ASCII decimal character  4) and Ctrl-Y (ASCII decimal character  25) as the dispatch characters:

terminal dispatch-character 4 25

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

dispatch-character

terminal dispatch-timeout

To set the character dispatch timer for the current terminal line for the current session, use the terminal dispatch-timeout EXEC command.

terminal dispatch-timeout milliseconds

Syntax Description

milliseconds

An integer that specifies the number of milliseconds that the router waits after it puts the first character into a packet buffer before sending the packet. During this interval, more characters can be added to the packet, which increases processing efficiency of the remote host.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command to increase the processing efficiency of the remote host.


Note The router's response might appear intermittent if the timeout interval is greater than 100  milliseconds and remote echoing is used.

Example

The following example sets the dispatch timer to 80 milliseconds:

terminal dispatch-timeout 80

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

dispatch-timeout

terminal download

To temporarily set the ability of a line to act as a transparent pipe for file transfers for the current session, use the terminal download EXEC command.

terminal download

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can use this feature to run a program such as KERMIT, XMODEM, or CrossTalk that downloads a file across an access server or router line. This command sets up the terminal line to transmit data and is equivalent to entering all the following commands:

Example

The following example configures a line to act as a transparent pipe:

terminal download

terminal escape-character

To set the escape character for the current terminal line for the current session, use the terminal escape-character EXEC command.

terminal escape-character ascii-number

Syntax Description

ascii-number

Either the ASCII decimal representation of the escape character or a control sequence (Ctrl-P, for example). Entering the escape character followed by X returns you to the EXEC when you are connected to another computer. See the "ASCII Character Set" appendix in this document for a list of ASCII characters.

Default

Ctrl-^ (which is Ctrl-Shift-6)

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command is useful, for example, if you have the default escape character defined for a different purpose in your keyboard file. Entering the escape character followed by the X key returns you to EXEC mode when you are connected to another computer.


Note The Break key cannot be used as an escape character on the console terminal because the operating software interprets BREAK as an instruction to halt the system.

Example

The following example sets the escape character to Ctrl-P (ASCII decimal 16):

terminal escape-character 16 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

escape-character

terminal exec-character-bits

To locally change the ASCII character set used in EXEC and configuration command characters for the current session, use the terminal exec-character-bits EXEC command.

terminal exec-character-bits {7 | 8}

Syntax Description

7

Selects the 7-bit ASCII character set.

8

Selects the full 8-bit character set.

Default

7-bit ASCII character set (unless set otherwise in global configuration mode)

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This EXEC command overrides the default-value exec-character-bits global configuration command. Configuring the EXEC character width to 8 bits enables you to add special graphical and international characters in banners, prompts, and so forth.

When the user exits the session, the character width is reset to the default value established by the default value EXEC-character-bits global configuration command. However, setting the EXEC character width to 8 bits can also cause failures. If a user on a terminal that is sending parity enters the help command, an "unrecognized command" message appears because the system is reading all 8 bits, and the eighth bit is not needed for the help command.

Example

The following example temporarily configures a router to use a full 8-bit user interface for system banners and prompts, allowing the use of additional graphical and international characters.

terminal exec-character-bits 8

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

exec-character-bits

terminal flowcontrol

To set flow control for the current terminal line for the current session, use the terminal flowcontrol EXEC command.

terminal flowcontrol {none | software [in | out] | hardware}

Syntax Description

none

Prevents flow control.

software

Sets software flow control.

in  |  out

(Optional) Specifies the direction: in causes the router to listen to flow control from the attached device, and out causes the router to send flow control information to the attached device. If you do not specify a direction, both directions are assumed.

hardware

Sets hardware flow control. For information about setting up the EIA/TIA-232 line, see the manual that was shipped with your product.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Flow control enables you to regulate the rate at which data can be transmitted from one point so that it is equal to the rate at which it can be received at another point. Flow control protects against loss of data because the terminal is not capable of receiving data at the rate it is being sent. You can set up data flow control for the current terminal line in one of two ways: software flow control, which you do with control key sequences, and hardware flow control, which you do at the device level.

For software flow control, the default stop and start characters are Ctrl-S and Ctrl-Q (XOFF and XON). You can change them with the terminal stop-character and terminal start-character commands.

Example

The following example sets incoming software flow control:

terminal flowcontrol software in 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

flowcontrol

terminal hold-character

To set or change the hold character for the current session, use the terminal hold-character EXEC command. Use the terminal no hold-character command to delete the hold character.

terminal hold-character ascii-number
terminal no hold-character

Syntax Description

ascii-number

Either the ASCII decimal representation of the hold character or a control sequence (for example, Ctrl-P). By default, no local hold character is set. The Break character is represented by zero; NULL cannot be represented.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can define a local hold character that temporarily suspends the flow of output on the terminal. When information is scrolling too quickly, you can enter the hold character to pause the screen output, then enter any other character to resume the flow of output.

You cannot suspend output on the console terminal. To send the hold character to the host, precede it with the escape character.

Example

The following example removes the previously set hold character:

terminal no hold-character

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

hold-character

terminal keymap-type

To specify the current keyboard type for the current session, use the terminal keymap-type EXEC command.

terminal keymap-type keymap-name

Syntax Description

keymap-name

Name defining the current keyboard type.

Default

VT100

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

You must use this command when you are using a keyboard other than the default of VT100. The system administrator can define other keyboard types and give you their names.

Example

The following example specifies a VT220 keyboard as the current keyboard type:

terminal keymap-type vt220

terminal length

To set the number of lines on the current terminal screen for the current session, use the terminal  length EXEC command.

terminal length screen-length

Syntax Description

screen-length

Your desired number of lines on the screen. The router uses this value to determine when to pause during multiple-screen output. A value of zero prevents the router from pausing between screens of output. When the output exceeds the screen length, it scrolls past.

Default

24 lines

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Some types of terminal sessions do not require you to specify the screen length because the screen length specified can be learned by some remote hosts. For example, the rlogin protocol uses the screen length to set up terminal parameters on a remote UNIX host.

Example

The following example prevents the router from pausing between multiple screens of output:

terminal length 0 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

length

terminal monitor

To display debug command output and system error messages for the current terminal and session, use the terminal monitor EXEC command.

terminal monitor

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Remember that all terminal parameter-setting commands are set locally and do not remain in effect after a session is ended. You must perform this task at the privileged-level EXEC prompt at each session to see the debugging messages.

For more information about privileged-level EXEC mode, refer to the chapter "Using the Command Line Interface" in the Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide.

Example

The following example displays debug command output and error messages during the current terminal session:

terminal monitor

terminal notify

To configure a line to inform a user who has multiple concurrent Telnet connections when output is pending on a connection other than the current one, use the terminal notify EXEC command.

terminal notify

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You might want to know, for example, when another connection receives mail or a message.

Example

The following example configures a line to inform a user with multiple connections when output is pending on a non-current connection:

terminal notify

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

notify

terminal padding

To change the character padding on a specific output character for the current session, use the terminal padding EXEC command.

terminal padding ascii-number count

Syntax Description

ascii-number

The ASCII decimal representation of the character.

count

The number of NULL bytes sent after that character, up to 255 padding characters in length.

Default

No padding

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Character padding adds a number of null bytes to the end of the string and can be used to make a string an expected length for conformity.

Example

The following example pads Ctrl-D (ASCII decimal character  4) with 164 NULL bytes:

terminal padding 4 164 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

padding

terminal parity

To define the generation of the parity bit for the current terminal line for the current session, use the terminal parity EXEC command.

terminal parity {none | even | odd | space | mark}

Syntax Description

none

No parity. This is the default.

even

Even parity.

odd

Odd parity.

space

Space.

mark

Mark.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Communication protocols provided by devices such as terminals and modems often require a specific parity bit setting.

Example

The following example sets the parity bit to odd:

terminal parity odd

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

parity

terminal-queue entry-retry-interval

To change the retry interval for a terminal port queue, use the terminal-queue global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default terminal port queue interval.

terminal-queue entry-retry-interval interval
no terminal-queue

Syntax Description

interval

Number of seconds between terminal port retries.

Default

60 seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

If a remote device (such as a printer) is busy, the connection attempt is placed in a terminal port queue. If you want to decrease the waiting period between subsequent connection attempts, decrease the default of 60 to an interval of 10 seconds. Decrease the time between subsequent connection attempts when, for example, a printer queue stalls for long periods.

Example

The following example changes the terminal port queue retry interval from the default of 60  seconds to 10  seconds:

terminal-queue entry-retry-interval 10

terminal rxspeed

To set the terminal receive speed (how fast information is sent to the terminal) for the current line and session, use the terminal rxspeed EXEC command.

terminal rxspeed bps

Syntax Description

bps

Baud rate in bits per second (bps).

Default

9600 bps

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example sets the current auxiliary line receive speed to 115200 bps:

terminal rxspeed 115200

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rxspeed

terminal special-character-bits

To change the ASCII character widths to accept special characters for the current terminal line and session, use the terminal special-character-bits EXEC command.

terminal special-character-bits {7 | 8}

Syntax Description

7

Selects the 7-bit ASCII character set. This is the default.

8

Selects the full 8-bit ASCII character set. Configuring the width to 8 bits enables you to use twice as many special characters as with the 7-bit setting. This selection enables you to add special graphical and international characters in banners, prompts, and so forth.

Default

7-bit ASCII character set

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command is useful, for example, if you want the router to provide temporary support for international character sets. It overrides the default-value special-character-bits global configuration command and is used to compare character sets typed by the user with the special character available during a data connection, which includes software flow control and escape characters.

When you exit the session, the character width is reset to the default value established by the global configuration command. However, setting the EXEC character width to eight bits can cause failures. If a user on a terminal that is sending parity enters the help command, an "unrecognized command" message appears because the Cisco IOS software is reading all eight bits, and the eighth bit is not needed for the help command.

Example

The following example temporarily configures a router to use a full 8-bit user interface for system banners and prompts. When you exit the system, character width is reset to the width established by the default-value exec-character-bits global configuration command.

erminal special-character-bits 8

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

special-character-bits

terminal speed

To set the transmit and receive speeds of the current terminal line for the current session, use the terminal speed EXEC command.

terminal speed bps

Syntax Description

bps

The baud rate in bits per second (bps). The default is 9600 bps.

Default

9600 bps

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Set the speed to match the transmission rate of whatever device you have connected to the port. Some baud rates available on devices connected to the port might not be supported on the router. The router indicates whether the speed you selected is not supported.

Example

The following example restores the transmit and receive speed on the current line to 9600 bps.

terminal speed 9600 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

speed

terminal start-character

To change the flow control start character for the current session, use the terminal start-character EXEC command.

terminal start-character ascii-number

Syntax Description

ascii-number

The ASCII decimal representation of the start character.

Default

Ctrl-Q (ASCII decimal character  17)

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The flow control start character signals the start of data transmission when software flow control is in effect.

Example

The following example changes the start character to Ctrl-O (ASCII decimal character 15):

terminal start-character 15

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

start-character

terminal stopbits

To change the number of stop bits transmitted per byte by the current terminal line during an active session, use the terminal stopbits EXEC command.

terminal stopbits {1 | 1.5 | 2}

Syntax Description

1

One stop bit.

1.5

One and a half stop bits.

2

Two stop bits. This is the default.

Default

Two stop bits

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Communication protocols provided by devices such as terminals and modems often require a specific stop-bit setting.

Example

The following example change sthe stop bits to one:

terminal stopbits 1 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

stopbits

terminal stop-character

To change the flow control stop character for the current session, use the terminal stop-character EXEC command.

terminal stop-character ascii-number

Syntax Description

ascii-number

The ASCII decimal representation of the stop character.

Default

Ctrl-S (ASCII character  19)

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The flow control stop character signals the end of data transmission when software flow control is in effect.

Example

The following example changes the stop character to Ctrl-E (ASCII character 5):

terminal stop-character 5

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

stop-character

terminal telnet break-on-ip

To cause the access server to generate a hardware Break signal on the EIA/TIA-232 line, which is associated with a reverse Telnet connection, for the current line and sessions, use the terminal telnet break-on-ip EXEC command.

terminal telnet break-on-ip

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The hardware Break signal occurs when a Telnet Interrupt-Process (IP) command is received on that connection. The terminal telnet break-on-ip command can be used to control the translation of Telnet IP commands into X.25 Break indications.

This command is also a useful workaround in the following situations:

Some EIA/TIA-232 hardware devices use a hardware Break signal for various purposes. A hardware Break signal is generated when a Telnet Break command is received.


Note This command applies only to access servers. It is not supported on stand-alone routers.

Example

The following example generates a Break signal on the asynchronous TTY line 4:

line tty 4
    terminal telnet break-on-ip

terminal telnet refuse-negotiations

To set the current line to refuse to negotiate full-duplex, remote echo options on incoming connections for current sessions, use the terminal telnet refuse-negotiations EXEC command.

terminal telnet refuse-negotiations

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can set the line to allow the access server to refuse full-duplex, remote echo connection requests from the other end. This task suppresses negotiation of the Telnet Remote Echo and Suppress Go Ahead options.


Note This command applies only to access servers. It is not supported on stand-alone routers.

Example

The following example set san asynchronous interface to refuse full-duplex, remote echo requests:

line async 1
    terminal telnet refuse-negotiations

terminal telnet speed

To allow the access server to negotiate transmission speed for the current line and session, use the terminal telnet speed EXEC command.

terminal telnet speed default-speed maximum-speed

Syntax Description

default-speed

Line speed (in bps) that the access server will use if the device on the other end of the connection has not specified a speed.

maximum-speed

Maximum line speed (in bps) that the device on the other end of the connection can use.

Default

9600  bps (unless otherwise set using the speed, txspeed or rxspeed line configuration commands)

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can match line speeds on remote systems in reverse Telnet, on host machines hooked up to an access server to access the network, or on a group of console lines hooked up to the access server, when disparate line speeds are in use at the local and remote ends of the connection. Line speed negotiation adheres to the Remote Flow Control option, defined in RFC 1080.


Note This command applies only to access servers. It is not supported on stand-alone routers.

Example

The following example enables the access server to negotiate a bit rate on the line using the Telnet option. If no speed is negotiated, the line will run at 2400 bps. If the remote host requests a speed greater than 9600 bps, then 9600 bps will be used.

line async 7
    terminal telnet speed 2400 9600

terminal telnet sync-on-break

To cause the access server to send a Telnet Synchronize signal when it receives a Telnet Break signal on the current line and session, use the terminal telnet sync-on-break EXEC command.

terminal telnet sync-on-break

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can set the line to cause a reverse Telnet line to send a Telnet Synchronize signal when it receives a Telnet Break signal. The TCP Synchronize signal clears the data path, but still interprets incoming commands.


Note This command applies only to access servers. It is not supported on stand-alone routers.

Example

The following example sets an asynchronous line to cause the access server to send a Telnet Synchronize signal:

line async 15
    terminal telnet sync-on-break

terminal telnet transparent

To cause the current terminal line to send a Return character (CR) as a CR followed by a NULL instead of a CR followed by a Line Feed (LF) for the current session, use the terminal telnet transparent EXEC command.

terminal telnet transparent

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

CR followed by an LF

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The end of each line typed at the terminal is ended with a Return (CR). This command permits interoperability with different interpretations of end-of-line demarcation in the Telnet protocol specification.


Note This command applies only to access server products. It is not supported on stand-alone routers.

Example

The following example configures a line to send a CR as a CR followed by a NULL:

terminal telnet transparent

terminal terminal-type

To specify the type of terminal connected to the current line for the current session, use the terminal terminal-type EXEC command.

terminal terminal-type terminal-type

Syntax Description

terminal-type

Defines the terminal name and type and permits terminal negotiation by hosts that provide that type of service.

Default

VT100

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Indicate the terminal type if it is different from the default of VT100. The terminal type name is used by TN3270 for display management and by Telnet and rlogin to inform the remote host of the terminal type.

Example

The following example defines the terminal on line 7 as a VT220:

terminal terminal-type VT220 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

terminal keymap-type
terminal-type

terminal txspeed

To set the terminal transmit speed (how fast the terminal can send information) on the current line and session, use the terminal txspeed EXEC command.

terminal txspeed bps

Syntax Description

bps

Baud rate in bits per second (bps). The default is 9600 bps.

Default

9600 bps

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example sets the current auxiliary line transmit speed to 2400 bps:

terminal txspeed 2400

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

terminal keymap-type
terminal terminal-type
txspeed

terminal-type

To specify the type of terminal connected to a line, use the terminal-type line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove any information about the type of terminal and reset the line to the default terminal emulation.

terminal-type {terminal-name | terminal-type}
no terminal-type

Syntax Description

terminal-name

Terminal name.

terminal-type

Terminal type.

Default

VT100

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command records the type of terminal connected to the line. The argument terminal-name provides a record of the terminal type and allows terminal negotiation of display management by hosts that provide that type of service.

For TN3270 applications, this command must follow the corresponding ttycap entry in the configuration file.

Example

The following example defines the terminal on line 7 as a VT220:

line 7 
 terminal-type VT220

terminal width

To set the number of character columns on the terminal screen for the current line for a session, use the terminal width EXEC command.

terminal width characters

Syntax Description

characters

Number of character columns displayed on the terminal. The default is 80.

Default

80 characters

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

By default, the route provides a screen display width of 80 characters. You can reset this value if it does not meet the needs of your terminal. The width specified can be learned by remote hosts.

Example

The following example sets the terminal character columns to 132:

terminal width 132

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

width

width

To set the terminal screen width, use the width line configuration command. This command sets the number of character columns displayed on the attached terminal. Use the no form of this command to return to the default screen width.

width characters
no width

Syntax Description

characters

Number of character columns displayed on the terminal. The default is 80.

Default

80  character columns

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The rlogin protocol uses the characters argument to set up terminal parameters on a remote host.

Some hosts can learn the values for both length and width specified with the line and width commands.

Example

The following example changes the character columns to 132 for the terminal on line 7:

line 7
 location console terminal
 width 132

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

terminal width


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