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Dial-In Terminal Service Commands

Dial-In Terminal Service Commands

The commands described in this chapter are used to configure support for asynchronous character stream calls running the protocols Telnet, rlogin, LAT, XRemote, and TN3270.


Note Some commands previously documented in this chapter have been replaced by new commands. Although these commands continue to perform their normal functions in the current release, support for these commands will cease in future releases.

For configuration information and examples, refer to the chapter "Configuring Dial-In Terminal Services" in the Dial Solutions Configuration Guide.

This chapter provides command reference documentation for the following types of dial-in terminal service calls:

  • Telnet calls

  • LAT calls

  • TN3270 calls

  • XRemote calls

Telnet is a simple remote terminal protocol that is part of the Internet Protocol (IP) suite. Telnet allows a user at one site to establish a TCP connection to a login server at another site; then, Telnet passes the keystrokes from one system to the other. Telnet can accept either an IP address or a domain name as the remote system address.

The Digital Equipment Corporation (Digital) Local Area Transport (LAT) protocol is the protocol used most often to connect to Digital hosts. LAT is a Digital-proprietary protocol. Cisco provides LAT technology licensed from Digital.

TN3270 terminal emulation software allows any terminal to be used as an IBM 3270-type terminal. Users with non-3270 terminals can take advantage of the emulation capabilities to perform the functions of an IBM 3270-type terminal. Specifically, the Cisco IOS software supports emulation of an IBM 3278-2 terminal providing an 80-by-24 display.

XRemote is a protocol developed specifically to optimize support for the X Window System over a serial communications link. Its compression and decompression algorithms are designed to handle bit-mapped displays and windowing systems.

access-class

To define restrictions on incoming and outgoing connections, use the access-class line configuration command. To remove the access-list number, use the no form of this command.

access-class access-list-number {in | out}
no access-class number

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Specifies an integer between  1 and  199 that defines the access list.

in

Controls which nodes can make LAT connections into the server.

out

Defines the access checks made on outgoing connections. (A user who types a node name at the system prompt to initiate a LAT connection is making an outgoing connection.)

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command defines access list numbers that will then be used with the lat access-list command to specify the access conditions.

The value supplied for the access-list-number argument is used for all protocols supported by the Cisco IOS software. If you are already using an IP access list, you must define LAT (and possibly X.25) access lists permitting connections to everything, to emulate the behavior of previous software versions.

When both IP and LAT connections are allowed from a terminal line and an IP access list is applied to that line with the access-class line command, you must also create a LAT access list with the same number if you want to allow any LAT connections from that terminal. You can specify only one incoming and one outgoing access list number for each terminal line. When checking LAT access lists, if the specified list does not exist, the system denies all LAT connections.

Example

The following example configures an incoming access class on virtual terminal line 4:

line vty 4
 access-class 4 in

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

lat access-list

busy-message

To create a "host failed" message that displays when a connection fails, use the busy-message global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable the "host failed" message from displaying on the specified host.

busy-message hostname d message d
no busy-message hostname

Syntax Description

hostname

Name of the host that cannot be reached.

d

Delimiting character of your choice---a pound sign (#) for example. You cannot use the delimiting character in the message.

message

Message text.

Default

No message is displayed.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command applies only to Telnet connections.

Follow the busy-message command with one or more blank spaces and a delimiting character of your choice. Then enter one or more lines of text, terminating the message with the second occurrence of the delimiting character.

Defining a "host failed" message for a host prevents all Cisco IOS software-initiated user messages, including the initial message that indicates the connection is "Trying..." The busy-message command can be used in the autocommand command to suppress these messages.

Example

The following example sets a message that will be displayed on the terminal whenever an attempt to connect to the host named dross fails. The pound sign (#) is used as a delimiting character.

busy-message dross #
Cannot connect to host. Contact the computer center.
#

clear entry

To delete an entry from the list of queued host-initiated connections, enter the clear entry EXEC command at the system prompt.

clear entry number

Syntax Description

number

An entry number obtained from the show entry EXEC command.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example deletes pending entry number 3 from the queue:

router# clear entry 3

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show entry

connect

To log on to a host that supports Telnet, rlogin, or LAT, use the connect EXEC command.

connect host [port] [keyword]

Syntax Description

host

A host name or an IP address.

port

(Optional) A decimal TCP port number; the default is the Telnet router port (decimal  23) on the host.

keyword

(Optional) One of the options listed in Table 61.


Table 61: Telnet Connection Options
Option Description

/debug

Enables Telnet debugging mode.

/encrypt kerberos

Enables an encrypted Telnet session. This keyword is available only if you have the Kerberized Telnet subsystem.
If you authenticate using Kerberos Credentials, the use of this keyword initiates an encryption negotiation with the remote server. If the encryption negotiation fails, the Telnet connection will be reset. If the encryption negotiation is successful, the Telnet connection will be established, and the Telnet session will continue in encrypted mode (all Telnet traffic for the session will be encrypted).

/line

Enables Telnet line mode. In this mode, the Cisco IOS software sends no data to the host until you press Return. You can edit the line using the standard Cisco IOS software command editing characters. The /line keyword is a local switch; the remote router is not notified of the mode change.

/noecho

Disables local echo.

/route path

Specifies loose source routing. The path argument is a list of host names or IP addresses that specify network nodes and ends with the final destination.

/source-interface

Specifies the source interface.

/stream

Turns on stream processing, which enables a raw TCP stream with no Telnet control sequences. A stream connection does not process Telnet options and can be appropriate for connections to ports running UUCP and other non-Telnet protocols.

port-number

Port number.

bgp

Border Gateway Protocol.

chargen

Character generator.

cmd rcmd

Remote commands.

daytime

Daytime.

discard

Discard.

domain

Domain Naming Service.

echo

Echo.

exec

EXEC.

finger

Finger.

ftp

File Transfer Protocol.

ftp-data

FTP data connections (used infrequently).

gopher

Gopher.

hostname

Network Information Center (NIC) hostname server.

ident

Ident Protocol.

irc

Internet Relay Chat.

klogin

Kerberos login.

kshell

Kerberos shell.

login

Login (rlogin).

lpd

Printer service.

nntp

Network News Transport Protocol.

node

Connect to a specific LAT node.

pop2

Post Office Protocol v2.

pop3

Post Office Protocol v3.

port

Destination LAT port name.

smtp

Simple Mail Transport Protocol.

sunrpc

Sun Remote Procedure Call.

syslog

Syslog.

tacacs

Specify TACACS security.

talk

Talk.

telnet

Telnet.

time

Time.

uucp

Unix-to-Unix Copy Program.

whois

Nickname.

www

World Wide Web (HTTP).

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

With the Cisco IOS software implementation of TCP/IP, you are not required to enter the connect, telnet, lat, or rlogin commands to establish a terminal connection. You can just enter the learned host name---as long as the host name is different from a command word in the Cisco IOS software.

To display a list of the available hosts, enter the following command:

show hosts

To display the status of all TCP connections, enter the following command:

show tcp

The Cisco IOS software assigns a logical name to each connection, and several commands use these names to identify connections. The logical name is the same as the host name, unless that name is already in use, or you change the connection name with the EXEC command name-connection. If the name is already in use, the Cisco IOS software assigns a null name to the connection.

Examples

The following example establishes an encrypted Telnet session from a router to a remote host named host1:

router> connect host1 /encrypt kerberos

The following example routes packets from the source system host1 to kl.sri.com, then to 10.1.0.11, and finally back to host1:

router> connect host1 /route:kl.sri.com 10.1.0.11 host1

The following example connects to a host with logical name host1:

router> host1

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

lat
telnet

disconnect

To disconnect a line, use the disconnect EXEC command.

disconnect [connection]

Syntax Description

connection

(Optional) Number of the line or name of the active network connection to be disconnected.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Do not disconnect a line to end a session. Instead, log off the host, so that the Cisco IOS software can clear the connection. Then end the session. If you cannot log out of an active session, disconnect the line.

Example

In the following example, the user disconnects from the device Slab to return back to the router.

Slab% disconnect
    Connection closed by remote host
router#

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

login (EXEC)

ip alias

To assign an IP address to the service provided on a TCP port, use the ip alias interface configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the specified address for the router.

ip alias ip-address tcp-port
no ip alias ip-address

Syntax Description

ip-address

Specifies the IP address for the service.

tcp-port

Specifies the number of the TCP port.

Default

None

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

A user attempting to establish a connection is connected to the first free line in a rotary group using the Telnet protocol.

The IP address must be on the same network or subnet as the router's main address, and must not be used by another host on that network or subnet. Connecting to the IP address has the same effect as connecting to the router's main address, using tcp-port as the TCP port.

You can use the ip alias command to assign multiple IP addresses to the router. For example, in addition to the primary alias address, you can specify addresses that correspond to lines or rotary groups. Using the ip alias command in this way makes the process of connecting to a specific rotary group transparent to the user.

When asynchronous mode is implemented, the Cisco IOS software creates the appropriate IP aliases, which map the asynchronous addresses for the lines to which they are connect. This process is automatic and does not require configuration.

Example

The following example configures connections to IP address 172.30.42.42 to act identically to connections made to the server's primary IP address on TCP port 3001. In other words, a user is connected to the first free line on port 1 of the rotary group that uses the Telnet protocol.

ip alias 172.30.42.42 3001

ip tcp chunk-size

To enable a faster response to user interrupt characters, use the ip tcp chunk-size global configuration command.

ip tcp chunk-size number

Syntax Description

number

The number of characters output before the interrupt executes. The suggested value is 80, which will typically abort output within a line or two of where the user types the interrupt character. For efficiency reasons, values of less than 50 are not recommended.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When used with a correctly operating host, the Cisco IOS software implements the Telnet Synchronize and Abort Output signals, which can stop output within one packet's worth of data from the time the user types the interrupt character.

Changing the chunk size (the number of characters output before the interrupt executes) affects neither the size of the packet used nor the TCP window size, either of which would cause serious efficiency problems for the remote host as well as for the router. Instead, the Telnet status is checked after the number of characters specified, causing only a relatively minor performance loss.

Example

The following example allows a router to execute an interrupt after an output of 100 characters, when an interrupt character or sequence is entered (Ctrl-C, for example):

ip tcp chunk-size 100

keymap

To define specific characteristics of keyboard mappings, use the keymap global configuration command. To remove the named keymap from the current image of the configuration file, use the no form of this command.

keymap keymap-name keymap-entry
no keymap keymap-name

Syntax Description

keymap-name

Name of the file containing the keyboard mappings. The name can be up to 32 characters long and must be unique.

keymap-entry

Commands that define the keymap.

Default

VT100 keyboard emulation

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The keymap command maps individual keys on a non-3270 keyboard to perform the function defined for the 3270 keyboard. Use the EXEC command show keymap to test for the availability of a keymap.

The guidelines for creating a keymap file follow.

Do not name a ttycap entry filename default or the Cisco IOS software will adopt the newly defined entry as the default.

The Keymap Entry Structure

A keymap is a keyboard map file. A keymap consists of an entry for a keyboard. The first part of a keymap lists the names of the keyboards that use that entry. These names will often be the same as in the ttycaps (terminal emulation) file, and often the terminals from various ttycap entries will use the same keymap entry. For example, both 925 and 925vb (for 925 with visual bells) terminals would probably use the same keymap entry. There are other circumstances in which it is necessary to specify a keyboard name as the name of the entry (for example, if a user requires a custom key layout).

After the names, which are separated by vertical bars (|), comes a left brace ({), the text that forms the definitions, and a right brace (}), as follows:

ciscodefault{
clear = '^z';\
flinp = '^x';\
enter = '^m';\
delete = '^d' | '^?';\
synch = '^r';\
ebcdic_xx='string'
reshow = '^v';\
eeof = '^e';\
tab = '^i';\
btab = '^b';\
nl = '^n';\
left = '^h';\
right = '^l';\
up = '^k';\
down = '^j';\
einp = '^w';\
reset = '^t';\
ferase = '^u';\
insrt = '\E ';\
pa1 = '^p1'; pa2 = '^p2'; pa3 = '^p3';\
pfk1 = '\E1'; pfk2 = '\E2'; pfk3 = '\E3'; pfk4 = '\E4';\
pfk5 = '\E5'; pfk6 = '\E6'; pfk7 = '\E7'; pfk8 = '\E8';\
pfk9 = '\E9'; pfk10 = '\E0'; pfk11 = '\E-'; pfk12 = '\E=';\
pfk13 = '\E!'; pfk14 = '\E@'; pfk15 = '\E#'; pfk16 = '\E$';\
pfk17 = '\E%'; pfk18 = '\E'; pfk19 = '\E&'; pfk20 = '\E*';\
pfk21 = '\E('; pfk22 = '\E)'; pfk23 = '\E_'; pfk24 = '\E+';\
}

Each definition consists of a reserved keyword, which identifies the 3270 function, followed by an equal sign (=), followed by the various ways to generate this particular function, followed by a semicolon (;), as follows:

	pa1 = '^p1'; pa2 = '^p2'; pa3 = '^p3';\

Each alternative way to generate the function is a sequence of ASCII characters enclosed inside single quotes (`'); the alternatives are separated by vertical bars (|), as follows:

	delete = '^d' | '^?';\

Inside the single quotes, a few characters are special. A caret (^) specifies that the next character is a control (Ctrl) character. The two-character string caret-a (^a) represents Ctrl-a. The caret-A sequence (^A) generates the same code as caret-a (^a). To generate Delete (or DEL), enter the caret-question mark (^?) sequence.


Note The Ctrl-caret combination (Ctrl-^), used to generate a hexadecimal 1E, is represented as two caret symbols in sequence (^^)---not as a caret-backslash-caret combination (^\^).

In addition to the caret, a letter can be preceded by a backslash (\). Because this has little effect for most characters, its use is usually not recommended. In the case of a single quote ('), the backslash prevents that single quote from terminating the string. In the case of a caret (^), the backslash prevents the caret from having its special meaning. To include the backslash in the string, place two backslashes (\\) in the keymap. Table 62 lists other supported special characters.


Table 62: Special Characters Supported by TN3270 Keymap Capability
Character Description

\E

Escape character

\n

Newline

\t

Tab

\r

Carriage return

It is not necessary for each character in a string to be enclosed within single quotes. For example, \E\E\E means three escape characters.

To enter a keymap, provide a unique name for it and explicitly define all special keys you intend to include in it within curly brackets. Also, except for the last line, each line must be terminated with a backslash symbol (\). The last line ends with the closing curly brackets (}) symbol and an end-of-line character.

Keymap Restrictions

When emulating IBM-style 3270 terminals, a mapping must be performed between sequences of keys pressed at a user's (ASCII) keyboard and the keys available on a 3270-type keyboard. For example, a 3270-type keyboard has a key labeled EEOF that erases the contents of the current field from the location of the cursor to the end. To accomplish this function, the terminal user and a program emulating a 3270-type keyboard must agree on what keys will be typed to invoke the function. The requirements for these sequences follow:

  • The first character of the sequence must be outside of the standard ASCII printable
    characters.

  • No sequence can be a complete subset of another sequence (although sequences can share partial elements).

Following are examples of acceptable keymap entries:

pfk1 = '\E1';
pfk2 = '\E2';

Following are examples of unacceptable keymap entries:

pfk1 = '\E1';
pfk11 = '\E11';

In the acceptable example, the keymap entry for pfk1 is not completely included in the keymap entry for pfk2. By contrast, in the unacceptable, or conflicting keymap pair, the sequence used to represent pfk1 is a complete subset of the sequence used to represent pfk11. Refer to the keymap entry provided later in this section for an example of how various keys can be represented to avoid this kind of conflict.

Table 63 lists 3270 key names that are supported in this keymap. Note that some of the keys do not really exist on a 3270-type keyboard. An unsupported function will cause the Cisco IOS software to send a (possibly visual) bell sequence to the user's terminal.


Table 63: 3270 Key Names Supported by Default Keymap
3270 Key Name Functional Description

LPRT1

Local print

DP

Duplicate character

FM

Field mark character

CURSEL

Cursor select

CENTSIGN

EBCDIC cent sign

RESHOW

Redisplay the screen

EINP

Erase input

EEOF

Erase end of field

DELETE

Delete character

INSRT

Toggle insert mode

TAB

Field tab

BTAB

Field back tab

COLTAB

Column tab

COLBAK

Column back tab

INDENT

Indent one tab stop

UNDENT

Undent one tab stop

NL

New line

HOME

Home the cursor

UP

Up cursor

DOWN

Down cursor

RIGHT

Right cursor

LEFT

Left cursor

SETTAB

Set a column tab

DELTAB

Delete a column tab

SETMRG

Set left margin

SETHOM

Set home position

CLRTAB

Clear all column tabs

APLON1

Apl on

APLOFF1

Apl off

APLEND1

Treat input as ASCII

PCON1

Xon/xoff on

PCOFF1

Xon/xoff off

DISC

Disconnect (suspend)

INIT1

New terminal type

ALTK1

Alternate keyboard dvorak

FLINP

Flush input

ERASE

Erase last character

WERASE

Erase last word

FERASE

Erase field

SYNCH

We are in synch with the user

RESET

Reset key-unlock keyboard

MASTER_RESET

Reset, unlock and redisplay

XOFF1

Please hold output

XON1

Please give me output

WORDTAB

Tab to beginning of next word

WORDBACKTAB

Tab to beginning of current/last word

WORDEND

Tab to end of current/next word

FIELDEND

Tab to last nonblank of current/next unprotected (writable) field

PA1

Program attention 1

PA2

Program attention 2

PA3

Program attention 3

CLEAR

Local clear of the 3270 screen

TREQ

Test request

ENTER

Enter key

PFK1 to PFK30

Program function key 1 program function key 30

1Not supported by Cisco's TN3270 implementation.

Table 64 illustrates the proper keys used to emulate each 3270 function when using default key mappings.


Table 64: Keys Used to Emulate Each 3270 Function with Default Keymap
Key Types IBM 3270 Key Default Keys

Cursor Movement Keys

New Line

Tab

Back Tab

Back Tab

Cursor Left

Cursor Right

Cursor Up

Cursor Down

Ctrl-n or Home

Ctrl-i

Ctrl-b

Ctrl-b

Ctrl-h

Ctrl-l

Ctrl-k

Ctrl-j or LINE FEED

Edit Control Keys

Delete Char

Erase EOF

Erase Input

Insert Mode

End Insert

Ctrl-d or RUB

Ctrl-e

Ctrl-w

ESC-Space1

ESC-Space

Program Function Keys

PF1

PF2

...

PF10

PF11

PF12

PF13

PF14

...

PF24

ESC 1

ESC 2

...

ESC 0

ESC -

ESC =

ESC !

ESC @

...

ESC +

Program Attention Keys

PA1

PA2

PA3

Ctrl-p 1

Ctrl-p 2

Ctrl-p 3

Local Control Keys

Reset After Error

Purge Input Buffer

Keyboard Unlock

Redisplay Screen

Ctrl-r

Ctrl-x

Ctrl-t

Ctrl-v

Other Keys

Enter

Clear

Erase current field

Return

Ctrl-z

Ctrl-u

1ESC refers to the Escape key.

Example

The following example is the default entry used by the TN3270 emulation software when it is unable to locate a valid keymap in the active configuration image. Table 63 lists the key names supported by the default Cisco TN3270 keymap.

ciscodefault{
clear = '^z';\
flinp = '^x';\
enter = '^m';\
delete = '^d' | '^?';\
synch = '^r';\
reshow = '^v';\
ebcdic_xx='string'
eeof = '^e';\
tab = '^i';\
btab = '^b';\
nl = '^n';\
left = '^h';\
right = '^l';\
up = '^k';\
down = '^j';\
einp = '^w';\
reset = '^t';\
ferase = '^u';\
insrt = '\E ';\
pa1 = '^p1'; pa2 = '^p2'; pa3 = '^p3';\
pfk1 = '\E1'; pfk2 = '\E2'; pfk3 = '\E3'; pfk4 = '\E4';\
pfk5 = '\E5'; pfk6 = '\E6'; pfk7 = '\E7'; pfk8 = '\E8';\
pfk9 = '\E9'; pfk10 = '\E0'; pfk11 = '\E-'; pfk12 = '\E=';\
pfk13 = '\E!'; pfk14 = '\E@'; pfk15 = '\E#'; pfk16 = '\E$';\
pfk17 = '\E%'; pfk18 = '\E'; pfk19 = '\E&'; pfk20 = '\E*';\
pfk21 = '\E('; pfk22 = '\E)'; pfk23 = '\E_'; pfk24 = '\E+';\
}

The following keymap statement maps the "|" character to send EBCDIC 0x6A:

ebcdic_6f='|'

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

keymap-type
show keymap
terminal-type

keymap-type

To specify the keyboard map for a terminal connected to the line, use the keymap-type line configuration command. To reset the keyboard type for the line to the default, use the no form of this command.

keymap-type keymap-name
no keymap-type

Syntax Description

keymap-name

Name of a keymap defined within the configuration file of the router. The TN3270 terminal-type negotiations use the specified keymap type when setting up a connection with the remote host.

Default

VT100

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command must follow the corresponding keymap global configuration entry in the configuration file. The TN3270 terminal-type negotiations use the specified keymap type when setting up a connection with the remote host.

Setting the keyboard to a different keymap requires that a keymap be defined with the Cisco IOS software's configuration either by obtaining a configuration file over the network that includes the keymap definition or by defining the keyboard mapping using the global configuration command keymap.

Use the EXEC command show keymap to test for the availability of a keymap.

Example

The following example sets the keyboard mapping to a keymap named vt100map:

line 3
 keymap-type vt100map

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

keymap
show keymap
ttycap

lat

To connect to a LAT host, use the lat EXEC command.

lat name [node nodename | port portname | /debug]

Syntax Description

name

LAT-learned service name.

node nodename

(Optional) Specifies a connection to a particular LAT node that offers a service. If you do not include the node name option, the node with the highest rating offering the service is used. Use the show lat nodes EXEC command to display information about all known LAT nodes.

port portname

(Optional) Specifies a destination LAT port name. This keyword is ignored in most time-sharing systems, but is used by routers and network access servers offering reverse LAT services. Reverse LAT involves connecting to one router from another, so that the target router runs the host portion of the protocol. Enter the port name in the format of the remote system as the portname argument.

/debug

(Optional) Enables a switch to display parameter changes and other special messages.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

After entering the lat command, you can quit the connection by pressing Ctrl-C, or complete the connection by entering the password for a given service.

You can have several concurrent LAT sessions open and switch back and forth between them. To open a subsequent session, first enter the escape sequence (Ctrl-Shift-6 then x [Ctrl^x] by default) to suspend the current session. Then open a new session.

To list the available LAT services, use the show lat services EXEC command.

You can temporarily define the list of services to which you or another user can connect. To do so, use the terminal lat out-group command to define the group code lists used for connections from specific lines.

To exit a session, simply log off the remote system. Then terminate an active LAT session by entering exit.

If your preferred transport is set to lat, you can use the connect command in place of the lat command. Refer to the Dial Solutions Configuration Guide for more information about configuring a preferred transport type. When your preferred transport is set to none or to another protocol, you must use the lat command to connect to a LAT host.

Examples

The following example establishes a LAT connection from the router named Router_A to host  eng2:

Router_A> lat eng2
Trying ENG2...Open
         ENG2 - VAX/VMS V5.2
Username: JSmith
Password:
    Welcome to VAX/VMS version V5.2 on node ENG2
    Last interactive login on Friday,  1-APR-1994 19:46

The system informs you of its progress by displaying the messages "Trying <system>..." and then "Open." If the connection attempt is not successful, you receive a failure message.

The following example establishes a LAT connection from the router named Router_B to something named our-modems and specifies port 24, which is a special modem:

Router_B> lat our-modems port 24

The following example establishes a LAT connection from the router named Router_C to something named our-modems and specifies a node named eng:

Router_C> lat our-modems node eng

The following example uses the LAT session debugging capability:

Router_D> lat Eng2 /debug
Trying ENG2...Open
        ENG2 - VAX/VMS V5.2
 Username: JSmith
 Password:
    Welcome to VAX/VMS version V5.2 on node ENG2
    Last interactive login on Tuesday, 5-APR-1994 19:02
[Set Flow out off, Flow in on, Format 8:none, Speed 9600/9600]
[Set Flow out off, Flow in on, Format 8:none, Speed 9600/9600]
$ set ter/speed=2400
[Set Flow out off, Flow in on, Format 8:none, Speed 2400/2400]

A variety of LAT events are reported, including all requests by the remote system to set local line parameters. The messages within brackets ([ ]) are the messages produced by the remote system setting line characteristics to operating system defaults.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

connect
show lat services
terminal lat

lat access-list

To specify access conditions to nodes on the LAT network, use the lat access-list global configuration command. To remove a specified access list number, use the no form of this command.

lat access-list number {permit | deny} nodename
no lat access-list number

Syntax Description

number

Specifies a number between 1 and 199 assigned to the line using the access-class line configuration command.

permit

Allows any matching node name to access the line.

deny

Denies access to any matching node name.

nodename

Specifies the name of the LAT node, with or without regular expression pattern matching characters, with which to compare for access. The UNIX-style regular expression characters allow for pattern matching of characters and character strings in the node name.

Default

No access conditions defined

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Regular expressions are case sensitive. Because LAT node names are always in all capital letters, make sure you use only all capital-letter regular expressions.

Table 65 and Table 66 summarize pattern and character matching symbols and their use. A more complete description of the pattern matching characters is found in the "Regular Expressions" appendix later in this publication.


Table 65: Pattern Matching
Character Description

\0

Replaces the entire original address.

\1..9

Replaces the strings that match the first through ninth parenthesized part of X.121 address.

*

Matches 0 or more sequences of the regular expressions.

+

Matches 1 or more sequences of the regular expressions.

?

Matches the regular expression of the null string.


Table 66: Character Matching
Character Description

^

Matches the null string at the beginning of the input string.

$

Matches the null string at the end of the input string.

\char

Matches char.

.

Matches any single character.

Examples

The following example permits all packets destined for any LAT node named WHEEL:

lat access-list 1 permit WHEEL

The following example denies all packets destined for any LAT node name beginning with the BLDG1- prefix:

lat access-list 2 deny ^BLDG1-

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

access-class

lat enabled

To enable LAT, use the lat enabled interface configuration command. To disable LAT, use the no form of this command.

lat enabled
no lat enabled

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Examples

The following example enables LAT on Ethernet interface 0:

interface ethernet 0
  lat enabled

The following example disables LAT on the same Ethernet interface:

interface ethernet 0
  no lat enabled

lat group-list

Use the lat group-list global configuration command to allow a name to be assigned to the group list. A group list is any combination of group names, numbers, or ranges. To remove the specified group list, use the no form of this command.

lat group-list groupname {number | range | all} [enabled | disabled]
no lat group-list groupname {number | range | all} [enabled | disabled]

Syntax Description

groupname

Specifies a group code name.

number

Specifies a group code number. You can enter both a group code name and group code numbers.

range

Specifies a hyphenated range of numbers.

all

Specifies the range from 0 to 255.

enabled

(Optional) Allows incremental changes to the list; that is, you can add a group code without retyping the entire command.

disabled

(Optional) Allows selective removal of a group code from the list.

Default

No group names are assigned to the list.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Specifying a name for a group list simplifies the task of entering individual group codes. In other words, a name makes it easier to refer to a long list of group code numbers. The group list must already exist. Use the EXEC command show lat groups to see a list of existing groups.

Examples

The following example creates the new group named stockroom and defines it to include the group numbers 71 and 99:

lat group-list stockroom 71 99

The following example adds group code 101 to the group named stockroom:

lat group-list stockroom 101 enabled

The following example deletes the group named Bldg-2:

no lat group-list Bldg-2

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

lat out-group
lat service-group

lat host-buffers

To set the number of receive buffers that will be negotiated when the router is acting as a LAT host, use the lat host-buffers global configuration command. To return to the default of one receive buffer, use the no form of this command.

lat host-buffers receive-buffers
no lat host-buffers receive-buffers

Syntax Description

receive-buffers

An integer that specifies the number of receive buffers that will be negotiated. The argument can be any number between 1 and 128.

Default

One receive buffer

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Before LAT Version 5.2, LAT allowed only one outstanding message at a time on a virtual circuit. This could limit the performance of large routers. For example, only one Ethernet packet of data could be in transit at a time. With LAT Version 5.2, nodes can indicate that they are willing to receive more than one message at a time. During virtual circuit startup, each side communicates to the other how many outstanding messages it is willing to accept.

Example

The following example enables LAT and configures the LAT host to negotiate 100 receive buffers:

lat enabled
lat host-buffers 100

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

lat server-buffers

lat host-delay

To set the delayed acknowledgment for incoming LAT slave connections, use the lat host-delay global configuration command. To restore the default, use the no form of this command.

lat host-delay number
no host-delay

Syntax Description

number

The delay in milliseconds.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Example

The following example sets the acknowledgment for incoming LAT slave connections to 100  milliseconds:

lat host-delay 100

lat ka-timer

To set the rate of the keepalive timer, use the lat ka-timer global configuration command. To restore the default, use the no form of this command.

lat ka-timer seconds
no lat ka-timer

Syntax Description

seconds

The timer rate in seconds.

Default

20 seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The keepalive timer sets the rate that messages are sent in the absence of actual traffic between the router and the remote node. The server uses keepalive messages to detect when communication with a remote node is disrupted or when the remote node has crashed.

Example

The following example sets the keepalive timer rate to 5 seconds:

lat ka-timer 5

lat node

To change the LAT node name without changing the system host name, use the lat node global configuration command.

lat node node-name

Syntax Description

node-name

Name of the LAT node.

Default

No default LAT node name

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command allows you to give the server a node name that is different from the host name. Use the EXEC command show entry to determine which LAT hosts have queue entries for printers on the servers. Use the EXEC command clear entry to delete entries from the queue.

Example

The following example specifies the LAT node name as DEC2:

lat node DEC2

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

clear entry
hostname
show entry

lat out-group

To define a group list for a line's outgoing user-initiated connections, use the lat out-group line configuration command. Use the lat out-group 0 command to return to the default value.

lat out-group {groupname number range | all}

Syntax Description

groupname

Group code name.

number

Group code number. You can also enter both a group code name and group code numbers.

range

Hyphenated range of numbers.

all

Range from 0 to 255.

Default

The default group code number is 0.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can have values for one, two, or all three arguments. If the keyword all is specified, no arguments can be used. You can enter the arguments groupname, number, and range in any order.

Use the EXEC command show lat to display group numbers. If the host node and router do not share a common group number, the host's services will not be displayed.

Example

The following example defines the services for lines 1 through 7, 10 through 17, and 20 through 24. Access to systems on the first set of lines is limited to groups 12 and 18 through 23; the second set is limited to group 12; the third set is limited to group codes 12, 18 through 23, and 44. All other lines use the default of group zero.

line 1 7
  lat out-group 12 18-23
line 10 17
  lat out-group 12
line 20 24
  lat out-group 12 18-23 44

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

lat group-list
terminal lat out-group

lat remote-modification

To enable remote LAT modification of a line's characteristics (for example, baud rate), use the lat remote-modification line configuration command. To disable remote LAT modification of line characteristics, use the no form of this command.

lat remote-modification
no lat remote-modification

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Remote modification is disabled.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Enabling the line for remote modification allows the remote LAT node to change the line's characteristics (for example, baud rate, parity, and so forth).

Example

The following example enables remote LAT modification on line 4:

line 4
  lat remote-modification

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

terminal lat remote-modification

lat retransmit-limit

To set the number of times that LAT retransmits a message before declaring the remote system unreachable, use the lat retransmit-limit global configuration command. To restore the default retry value, use the no form of this command.

lat retransmit-limit number
no lat retransmit-limit

Syntax Description

number

Number of retries; any number between 4 and 255.

Default

8 retries

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Assigning larger values to the number of tries increases the robustness of the LAT service at the cost of longer delays when communications are disrupted. Because LAT generally retransmits messages once per second, the value is approximately the number of seconds that LAT connections will survive connection disruption.

If you bridge LAT, the retransmission limit should be set to at least 20 tries for LAT sessions to survive a worst-case spanning-tree reconfiguration, because bridging spanning-tree reconfiguration can take up to 15 seconds.

Example

The following example sets the retransmission limit to 30 tries, enough time to sustain the down time incurred when the system must reconfigure a spanning-tree topology:

lat retransmit-limit 30

lat server-buffers

To set the number of receive buffers that will be negotiated when the router is acting as a LAT server, use the lat server-buffers global configuration command. To return to the default of one receive buffer, use the no form of this command.

lat server-buffers receive-buffers
no lat server-buffers receive-buffers

Syntax Description

receive-buffers

Integer that specifies the number of receive buffers that will be negotiated. The argument can be any number between 1 and 128.

Default

1 receive buffer

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Before LAT Version 5.2, LAT allowed only one outstanding message on a virtual circuit at a time. This could limit the performance of large routers because only one Ethernet packet of data could be in transit at a time. With LAT Version 5.2, nodes can indicate that they are willing to receive more than one message at a time. During virtual circuit startup, each side communicates to the other how many outstanding messages it is willing to accept.

Example

The following example enables LAT and configures the server to negotiate 25 receive buffers:

lat enabled
lat server-buffers 25

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

lat host-buffers

lat service-announcements

To reenable LAT broadcast service announcements, use the lat service-announcements global configuration command. To disable the sending of LAT service announcements, use the no form of this command.

lat service-announcements
no lat service-announcements

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If this command is enabled, the LAT code will periodically broadcast service advertisements. If the command is disabled, the LAT code will not send service announcements, so solicit information messages will have to be used to look up node information.


Note You should only disable service announcements if all of the nodes on the local-area network (LAN) support the service responder feature.

Example

The following example reenables the sending of broadcast service announcements:

lat service-announcements

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

lat service-responder

lat service autocommand

To associate a command with a service, use the lat service autocommand global configuration command. To remove the specified autocommand, use the no form of this command.

lat service service-name autocommand command
no lat service service-name autocommand command

Syntax Description

service-name

Name of the service.

command

Command to be associated with the service.

Default

No commands are automatically associated with a service.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When an inbound connection is received for the specified service, the command associated with the service is automatically executed instead of the user receiving a virtual terminal session.

Authentication is bypassed for these services; only the LAT password is checked.


Note Do not use this option with the rotary keyword.

Example

The following example associates the command telnet ramana to the service RAMANA:

lat service RAMANA autocommand telnet ramana

lat service enabled

To enable inbound connections to the specified service and enable the advertisement of this service to routers on the network, use the lat service enabled global configuration command. To delete the named service, use the no form of this command.

lat service service-name enabled
no lat service service-name enabled

Syntax Description

service-name

Name of the service.

Default

No services enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

In the simplest form, this command creates a service that gives connecting users access to a VTY port on the server.

Use the enabled keyword after commands that define a service so that users do not connect to a service before all the parameters are set.

Deleting a service does not disconnect existing connections.

Example

The following example enables inbound connections to the service WHEEL:

lat service WHEEL enabled

lat service-group

To specify a group code mask to use when advertising all services for this node and to control incoming services, use the lat service-group global configuration command. To remove the group code mask specified, use the no form of this command.

lat service-group {groupname | number | range | all} [enabled | disabled]
no lat service-group {groupname | number | range | all} [enabled | disabled]

Syntax Description

groupname

Specifies a group code name.

number

Specifies a group code number.

range

Specifies a hyphenated range of numbers between 0 and 255.

all

Specifies the range from 0 to 255.

enabled

(Optional) Allows incremental changes to the list; that is, you can add a group code without retyping the entire command.

disabled

(Optional) Allows selective removal of a group code from the list.

Default

If no service group is specified, the Cisco IOS software defaults to advertising to group 0.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When this command is written to nonvolatile memory (using the EXEC write memory command), the system looks for an exact match on a group code name. If it finds one, it uses that name in the command. Otherwise, it writes out a list of numbers, using the range syntax whenever possible.

Examples

The following example specifies groups 100 through 103, then defines engineering as the group code list to advertise:

lat group-list engineering 100-103
lat service-group engineering enabled

The following example specifies the groups 1, 5, 20 through 36, and 52:

lat service-group 1 5 20-36 52

You can enter the following command to add group 99:

lat service-group 99 enabled

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

lat group-list

lat service ident

To set the LAT service identification for a specified service, use the lat service ident global configuration command. To remove the identification, use the no form of this command.

lat service service-name ident identification
no lat service service-name ident

Syntax Description

service-name

Name of the service.

identification

Descriptive name (text only) that identifies the service.

Default

No LAT service identification is set for specific services.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The identification is advertised to other servers on the network and is displayed along with the list of name services on the LAN.

Example

The following example specifies the identification "Welcome to Gateway-A" on service STELLA:

lat service STELLA ident Welcome to Gateway-A

lat service password

To set up a LAT password for a service, use the lat service password global configuration command. To remove the password, use the no form of this command.

lat service service-name password password
no lat service service-name password

Syntax Description

service-name

Name of the service.

password

Password used to gain access to the service.

Default

No default LAT service passwords

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The connecting user will be required to enter the password to complete the connection.

The password is obtained through the LAT password mechanism.

Example

The following example specifies a service named BLUE and the password secret:

lat service BLUE password secret

lat service rating

To set a static service rating for the specified service, use the lat service rating global configuration command. To remove the service rating, use the no form of this command.

lat service service-name rating static-rating
no lat service service-name rating

Syntax Description

service-name

Name of the service.

static-rating

Static service rating. The rating must be in the range of 1 to 255.

Default

Dynamic rating

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If this command is not entered, the Cisco IOS software calculates a dynamic rating based on the number of free ports that can handle connections to the service. Setting a static rating overrides this calculation and causes the specified value to be used.

Example

The following example specifies a service rating of 84 on the service WHEEL:

lat service WHEEL rating 84

lat service-responder

To configure a node to act as proxy for other nodes when a solicit-information multicast message is received, use the lat service-responder global configuration command. To remove any proxy definition set up using the lat service-responder command, use the no form of this command.

lat service-responder
no lat service responder

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Cisco IOS software can be configured to support the service responder feature that is part of the latest LAT Version 5.2 specification.

Specifically, the DECserver90L+, which has less memory than other DECservers, does not maintain a cache of learned services. Instead, the DECserver90L+ solicits information about services as they are needed.

LAT Version 5.2 nodes can respond for themselves; LAT Version 5.1 nodes, for example VMS Version 5.4 or earlier nodes, cannot. Instead, a LAT Version 5.2 node configured as a service responder can respond in proxy for those LAT Version 5.1 nodes.

The Cisco IOS software can be configured as a LAT service responder. If all your nodes are LAT Version 5.2 nodes, you do not need to enable the service responder features.

Example

The following example configures a node to act as a proxy for a node when a solicit information multicast message is received. The node configured with this command will respond to solicit messages.

lat service-responder

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

lat service-announcements

lat service rotary

To associate a rotary group with a service, use the lat service rotary global configuration command. To remove the association, use the no form of this command.

lat service service-name rotary group
no lat service service-name rotary

Syntax Description

service-name

Name of the service.

group

Rotary group number.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Establish rotary groups using the rotary line configuration command.

When an inbound connection is received for this service, the router establishes a reverse LAT connection to a terminal in that rotary group.

If the rotary option is not set, the connection will be to a virtual terminal session on the router.

Example

The following example creates a service called MODEM to establish a rotary group:

lat services MODEM rotary 1

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

rotary

lat service-timer

To adjust the time between LAT service advertisements, use the lat service-timer global configuration command.

lat service-timer interval

Syntax Description

interval

Number of seconds between service announcements. Note that the granularity offered by this command is ten-second intervals, and the interval value is rounded up.

Default

20 seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command adjusts the time, in seconds, between LAT service announcements for services offered by the router. This is useful in large networks with many LAT services and limited bandwidth.

Example

The following example sets the interval between LAT service advertisements to 11, and illustrates the rough granularity of the lat service-timer command:

! The time between LAT service advertisements is set to 11. Because the 
! granularity is in ten-second intervals, the actual time between advertisement
! is 20 seconds.
lat service-timer 11
! 20 seconds between updates
lat service-timer 19
! 120 seconds between updates
lat service-timer 120

lat vc-sessions

To set the maximum number of sessions to be multiplexed onto a single LAT virtual circuit, use the lat vc-sessions global configuration command. To remove a prior session's definition, use the no form of this command.

lat vc-sessions number
no lat vc-sessions number

Syntax Description

number

Specifies the number of sessions that will be multiplexed onto a single LAT virtual circuit. This number cannot be greater than 255.

Default

255 sessions per virtual circuit

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Setting the number of sessions to a smaller number can increase throughput if there are many sessions on one host, especially with routers with many physical ports. It can also increase overhead if there is little traffic but a large number of sessions to the same host.

Example

The following example sets the maximum number of sessions to be multiplexed onto a single LAT virtual circuit at 100:

lat vc-sessions 100

lat vc-timer

To set the interval of time LAT waits before sending any traffic, use the lat vc-timer global configuration command. To remove a timer definition, use the no form of this command.

lat vc-timer milliseconds
no lat vc-timer milliseconds

Syntax Description

milliseconds

Timer value. Specifies the amount of time LAT will wait before sending traffic. Acceptable values are between 10 and 1000  milliseconds.

Default

80 milliseconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Smaller timer values increase the overhead on both the router and the host. However, you can use smaller values to correct buffer overflows, which happen when the router receives more data than it can buffer during a virtual circuit timer interval.

Larger values increase the need for buffering and can cause noticeable echoing delay. However, increased values can reduce traffic. In environments with slow bridging, retransmissions can be reduced if you increase the value to at least three times the worst-case, round-trip interval.

Example

The following example sets the time between transmitting messages to 500 milliseconds:

lat vc-timer 500

lock

To set up a temporary password on a line, use the lock EXEC command.

lock

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can prevent access to your session while keeping your connection open by setting up a temporary password. To lock access to the terminal, follow this procedure:

Step 1 Issue the lock command.

When you issue this command, the system prompts you for a password.

Step 2 Enter a password, which can be any arbitrary string.

The screen clears and displays the message "Locked."

Step 3 To regain access to your sessions, reenter the password.

The Cisco IOS software honors session timeouts on a locked lines. You must clear the line to remove this feature. The system administrator must set the line up to allow use of the temporary locking feature by using the lockable line configuration command.

Example

The following command locks access to the terminal line to which the user is connected. Only this user can access the session:

router(config-line)# lockable
router(config-line)# Ctrl-z
router# copy system:running-config nvram:startup-config
Building configuration...
OK
router# lock 
Password: 
Again:
                                              Locked
Password:
router#

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

lockable
login (EXEC)

login (EXEC)

To change a login username, use the login EXEC command.

login

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can change a login username if you must match outgoing access list requirements or other login prompt requirements.

When you enter this command, the Cisco IOS software prompts you for a username and password. Enter the new username and the original password. If the username does not match, but the password does, the Cisco IOS software updates the session to the new username with which the login command attempt was made.

If no username and password prompts appear when you enter this command, the network administrator did not specify that a username and password be required at login time. If both the username and password are entered correctly, the session becomes associated with the specified username.

When you access a system using TACACS security with this command, you can enter your login name or specify a TACACS server by using the following command when the "Username:" prompt appears:

user @tacacs-server

The TACACS server must be one of those defined in a Cisco IOS software configuration file. For more information, refer to the "Specify a TACACS Host" section in the Security Configuration Guide, or refer to the tacacs-server host command in the Security Command Reference book.

If you do not specify a host, the Cisco IOS software tries each of the TACACS servers in the list until it receives a response.

If you do specify a host that does not respond, no other TACACS server is queried. The Cisco IOS software will deny access or function according to the action specified by the tacacs-server last-resort command, if one is configured.

If you specified a TACACS server host with the user @tacacs-server argument, the TACACS server specified will be used for all subsequent authentication or notification queries, with the possible exception of SLIP address queries.

Example

The following example shows how login usernames and passwords can be changed. In this example, a user currently logged on under the username user1 attempts to change that login name to user2. After entering the login command, the user enters the new username, but enters an incorrect password. Because the password does not match the original password, the system rejects the attempt to change the username.

router> login
Username: user2
Password:
% Access denied
Still logged in as "user1"

Next, the user attempts the login change again, with the user name user2, but enters the correct (original) password. This time the password matches the current login information, the login username is changed to user2, and the user is allowed access to the EXEC at the user-level.

router> login
Username: user2
Password:
router>

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

lock
lockable

login (line)

To enable password checking at login, use the login line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable password checking and allow connections without a password.

login [local | tacacs]
no login

Syntax Description

local

(Optional) Selects local password checking. Authentication is based on the username specified with the username global configuration command.

tacacs

(Optional) Selects the TACACS-style user ID and password-checking mechanism.

Default

Virtual terminals require a password. If you do not set a password for a virtual terminal, it responds to attempted connections by displaying an error message and closing the connection.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If you specify the login command without the local or tacacs option, authentication is based on the password specified with the password line configuration command.


Note This command cannot be used with AAA/TACACS+. Use the login authentication command instead.

Examples

The following example sets the password letmein on virtual terminal line 4:

line vty 4
password letmein
login

The following example enables the TACACS-style user ID and password-checking mechanism:

line 0
password mypassword
login tacacs

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

enable password
password
username

login-string

To define a string of characters that the Cisco IOS software sends to a host after a successful Telnet connection, use the login-string global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the login string.

login-string hostname d message [%secp] [%secw] [%b] [%m] d
no login-string hostname

Syntax Description

hostname

Specifies the name of the host.

d

Sets a delimiting character of your choice---a pound sign (#) for example. You cannot use the delimiting character in the busy message.

message

Specifies the login string.

%secp

(Optional) Sets a pause in seconds. To insert pauses into the login string, embed a percent sign (%) followed by the number of seconds to pause and the letter "p."

%secw

(Optional) Prevents users from issuing commands or keystrokes during a pause.

%b

(Optional) Sends a Break character.

%m

(Optional) Supports TN3270 terminals. Sends only CR and no LINE FEED.

Default

No login strings are defined.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Follow this command with one or more blank spaces and a delimiting character of your choice. Then enter one or more lines of text, terminating the message with the second occurrence of the delimiting character. To use a percent sign in the login string, precede it with another percent sign; that is, type the characters "%%." The options can be used anywhere within the message string.

This command applies only to rlogin and Telnet sessions.

Example

In the following example, the value %5p causes a 5-second pause:

login-string office #ATDT 555-1234
%5p hello
#

notify

To enable terminal notification about pending output from other Telnet connections, use the notify line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to end notification.

notify
no notify

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command sets a line to inform a user who has multiple, concurrent Telnet connections when output is pending on a connection other than the current one.

Example

The following example sets up notification of pending output from connections on virtual terminal lines 0 to 4:

line vty 0 4
 notify

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

terminal notify

resume (switching sessions)

To switch to another open Telnet, rlogin, LAT, or PAD session, use the resume EXEC command.

resume [connection] [keyword] [/set parameter:value]

Syntax Description

connection

(Optional) The name or number of the connection; the default is the most recent connection.

keyword

(Optional) One of the options listed in Table 67.

/set parameter:value

(Optional) Sets PAD parameters for the Cisco IOS software (see Table 67).


Table 67: Telnet and rlogin Resume Options
Option Description

/debug

Displays parameter changes and messages. In the Cisco IOS software, this option displays informational messages whenever the remote host changes an X.3 parameter, or sends an X.29 control packet.

/echo

Performs local echo.

/line

Enables line-mode editing.

/nodebug

Cancels printing of parameter changes and messages.

/noecho

Disables local echo.

/noline1

Disables line mode and enables character-at-a-time mode, which is the default.

/nostream

Disables stream processing.

/set parameter:value

Sets X.3 connection options. Refer to the chapter "Configuring the Cisco PAD Facility to Make X.25 Connections" of the Dial Solutions Configuration Guide for a list of these connection options.

/stream

Enables stream processing.

1/noline is the default keyword.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can have several concurrent sessions open and switch back and forth between them. The number of sessions that can be open is defined by the session-limit command.

You can switch between sessions by escaping one session and resuming a previously opened session, as follows:

Step 1 Escape out of the current session by pressing the escape sequence (Ctrl-Shift-6 then x [Ctrl^x] by default) and return to the EXEC prompt.

Step 2 Enter the where command, to list the open sessions. All open sessions associated with the current terminal line are displayed.

Step 3 Enter the resume command and the session number to make the connection.

You also can resume the previous session by pressing the Return key.

The Ctrl^x, where, and resume commands are available with all supported connection protocols.

Examples

The following example shows how to escape out of a connection and to resume connection 2:

Swift% ^^X 
router> resume 2 

You can omit the command name and simply enter the connection number to resume that connection. The following example illustrates how to resume connection 3:

router> 3 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show sessions
where

rlogin

To log in to a UNIX host using rlogin, use the rlogin EXEC command:

rlogin host [-l username] [/user username] [debug]

Syntax Description

host

Specifies the host name or IP address.

-l username

(Optional) The BSD UNIX syntax which specifies a user name for the remote login. If you do not use this option, the remote user name is your local user name.

/user username

(Optional) The EXEC command syntax which specifies a remote user name in the initial exchange with the remote host. The rlogin protocol will not present you with the login prompt.

debug

(Optional) Enables debugging output from the rlogin protocol.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can have several concurrent rlogin connections open and switch back and forth between them. To open a new connection, suspend the current connection by pressing the escape sequence (Ctrl-Shift-6 then x [Ctrl^x] by default) to return to the EXEC prompt, then open a new connection. A user cannot automatically log in to a UNIX system from the router, but must provide a user ID and a password for each connection.

If your preferred transport is set to rlogin, you can use the connect command in place of the rlogin command. Refer to the Dial Solutions Configuration Guide for more information about configuring a preferred transport type. When your preferred transport is set to none or to another protocol, you must use the rlogin command to connect to a host.

To terminate an active rlogin session, issue the appropriate command from the following list at the UNIX prompt of the device to which you are connecting:

Examples

The following example illustrates how the user, Joe Smith, can use rlogin ? (help) to make and debug a remote connection to the host Alviso:

4500> rlogin ?
  WORD  IP address or hostname of a remote system
4500> rlogin Alviso ?
  -l     Specify remote username
  /user  Specify remote username
  debug  Enable rlogin debugging output
  <cr>
4500> rlogin Alviso -l ?
  WORD  Remote user name
4500> rlogin Alviso -l jsmith?
 debug Enable rlogin debugging output
  <cr>
4500> rlogin Alviso -l jsmith debug 

The following example illustrates debug return on the host, zipper, by the user, staff:

yak# rlogin zipper.cisco.com -l staff debug
Trying zipper.cisco.com (171.69.63.31)... Open
RLOGIN: local username is: ciscoTS
RLOGIN: remote username is: staff
Password: 
Last login: Wed Jun 24 06:15:36 from itech-view3.cisc
1 zipper> uptime
  1:40pm  up 42 day(s), 20:53,  80 users,  load average: 1.44, 2.67, 3.39
2 zipper> logout
[Connection to zipper.cisco.com closed by foreign host]
yak#

The following example makes an rlogin connection to a host at address 108.33.21.2 for a user named supervisor and enables the message mode for debugging:

router> rlogin 108.33.21.2 -l supervisor debug

The following example makes an rlogin connection to a host named headquarters for the user named admin:

router> rlogin headquarters -l admin

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

connect
telnet

rlogin trusted-localuser-source

To choose an authentication method for determining the local username to send to the remote rlogin server, use the rlogin trusted-localuser-source global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default rlogin behavior.

rlogin trusted-localuser-source [local | radius | tacacs]
no rlogin trusted-localuser-source [local | radius | tacacs]

Syntax Description

local

(Optional) Use local username from any authentication method.

radius

(Optional) Use local username from RADIUS authentication.

tacacs

(Optional) Use local username from TACACS authentication.

Default

The user must enter their rlogin username and password when connecting to the rlogin server.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1

Use this command to define which of the sources of local usernames are valid. You can define more than one.

Example

The following example uses the local username from RADIUS authentication.

router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
router(config)# rlogin trusted-localuser-source ?
  local   Use local username from any authentication method
  radius  Use local username from radius authentication
  tacacs  Use local username from tacacs authentication
router(config)# rlogin trusted-localuser-source radius 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

connect
rlogin
rlogin trusted-remoteuser-source-local
telnet

rlogin trusted-remoteuser-source local

To determine the remote username to send to the remote rlogin server, use the rlogin trusted-remoteuser-source local global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default rlogin behavior, which is to prompt the user for the remote username.

rlogin trusted-remoteuser-source local
no rlogin trusted-remoteuser-source local

Syntax Description

This command has no additional options.

Default

The user must enter their rlogin username and password when connecting to the rlogin server.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1

The current username is used only if the rlogin host /user username command is not enabled. If the current username is not known, rlogin falls back to providing the "login:" prompt to discover a remote username.

Configuring the remote host to consider the Cisco router a "trusted" host should be considered a security hole.

Examples

After you issue the rlogin trusted-remoteuser-source local command, you will not be prompted for a username. The first response you see is the password prompt from the remote system. For example, when this command is not enabled, you must enter your username twice (once at initial system login and once for the rlogin command).

User Access Verification
Username: gmcmilla
Password: xxxxx
router> rlogin puli
Trying puli.cisco.com (170.69.3.154)... Open
login: gmcmilla
Password: xxxxx

After you issue the rlogin trusted-remoteuser-source local command, you no longer have to specify the username after the rlogin command. The username is automatically copied from the router's user ID.

router> enable
Password: xxxxx
router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
router(config)# rlogin ?
  trusted-localuser-source   Allowed authentication types for local username
  trusted-remoteuser-source  Method used to get remote username
router(config)# rlogin trusted-remoteuser-source local 
router(config)# ^Z
router# rlogin puli
Trying puli.cisco.com (170.69.3.154)... Open
Password: xxxxx

The following example uses the /user root option as an override.

router# rlogin puli /user root
Trying puli.cisco.com (170.69.3.154)... Open
Password: xxxxx
login: 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

connect
rlogin
rlogin trusted-localuser-source
telnet

show entry

To display the list of queued host-initiated connections to a router, use the show entry EXEC command. You can also use this command to determine which LAT hosts have queue entries for printers on routers.

show entry

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show entry command. The display shows that two LAT connections are waiting for access to port 5. The list is ordered so that the lower numbered entry has been waiting longer, and will get to use the line next.

sloth# show entry
1 waiting 0:02:22 for port 5 from LAT node BLUE
2 waiting 0:00:32 for port 5 from LAT node STELLA

Table 68 describes the fields in the first line of output shown in the display.


Table 68: Show Entry Field Descriptions
Field Description

1

Number assigned to the queued connection attempt.

waiting 0:02:22

Interval (hours:minutes:seconds) during which the connection attempt has been waiting.

for port 5

Port for which the connection attempt is waiting.

from LAT node BLUE

Name of the user (BLUE) attempting to make the connection.

show keymap

Use the show keymap EXEC command to test for the availability of a keymap after a connection on a router takes place.

show keymap [keymap-name | all]

Syntax Description

keymap-name

(Optional) Name of the keymap.

all

(Optional) Lists the names of all defined keymaps. The name of the default keymap is not listed.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Cisco IOS software searches for the specified keymap in its active configuration image and lists the complete entry if found. If the keymap is not found, an appropriate "not found" message appears.

If you do not use any arguments with the show keymap command, then the keymap currently used for the terminal is displayed.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show keymap command:

router# show keymap
ciscodefault { clear = '^z'; flinp = '^x'; enter = '^m';\ 
      delete = '^d' | '^?';\
      synch = '^r'; reshow = '^v'; eeof = '^e'; tab = '^i';\
      btab = '^b'; nl = '^n'; left = '^h'; right = '^l';\
      up = '^k'; down = '^j'; einp = '^w'; reset = '^t';\
      xoff = '^s'; xon = '^q'; escape = '^c'; ferase = '^u';\
      insrt = '\E ';\
      pa1 = '^p1'; pa2 = '^p2'; pa3 = '^p3';\
            	pfk1 = '\E1'; pfk2 = '\E2'; pfk3 = '\E3'; pfk4 = '\E4';\
      pfk5 = '\E5'; pfk6 = '\E6'; pfk7 = '\E7'; pfk8 = '\E8';\
      pfk9 = '\E9'; pfk10 = '\E0'; pfk11 = '\E-'; pfk12 = '\E=';\
      pfk13 = '\E!'; pfk14 = '\E@'; pfk15 = '\E#'; pfk16 = '\E$';\
      pfk17 = '\E%'; pfk18 = '\E\^'; pfk19 = '\E&'; pfk20 = '\E*';\ 
      pfk21 = '\E('; pfk22 = '\E)'; pfk23 = '\E_'; pfk24 = '\E+';\
}

show lat advertised

To display the LAT services a router offers to other systems running LAT on the network, use the show lat advertised EXEC command.

show lat advertised

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Advertised services are created with the lat service commands. The display includes the service rating, rotary group, if present, and whether or not the service is enabled for incoming connections.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show lat advertised command:

router# show lat advertised
Service Name         Rating     Rotary  Flags
BEAR-CAT            4(Dynamic)   None  Enabled
    	Autocommand: telnet bear-cat
MODEMS              0(Dynamic)     12  Enabled
    	Ident: SpaceBlazer modem services
RECLUSE             4(Dynamic)   None  Enabled
    	Ident: white recluse... 

The display shows output from a router, sloth, which has three services defined: BEAR-CAT, MODEMS, and RECLUSE:

Table 69 describes significant fields shown in the display.


Table 69: Show LAT Advertised Field Descriptions
Field Description

Service Name

Lists the LAT service name.

Rating

Lists the static service rating set, if any.

Rotary

Lists the associated rotary service.

Flags

Lists whether or not a service is enabled.

Autocommand

Defines the autocommand associated with the service.

Ident

Lists the advertised identification for the service.

show lat groups

To display the groups that were defined in the Cisco IOS software with the lat group-list command, use the show lat groups EXEC command.

show lat groups

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show lat groups command:

sloth# show lat groups
Group Name          Len   Groups
cafeteria           3      13  15  23
engineering         7      55
manufacturing       10     70  71  72

Table 70 describes only the significant fields shown in the previous display.


Table 70: Show LAT Groups Field Descriptions
Field Description

Group Name

Assigned group name.

Len

Size of internal data structure used to contain the group code map.

Groups

Group codes associated with the learned group.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

lat group-list

show lat nodes

To display information about all known LAT nodes, use the show lat nodes EXEC command.

show lat nodes

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show lat nodes command:

router# show lat nodes
Node "CHAOS", usage -1, Interface Ethernet0, Address 0000.0c01.0509 Timer 89, sequence 188, changes 131, flags 0x0, protocol 5.1 Facility 0, Product code 0, Product version 0 Recv 0/0/0, Xmit 0/0/0, 0 Dups, 0 ReXmit Bad messages: 0, Bad slots: 0, Solicits accepted: 0 Solicits rejected: 0, Multiple nodes: 0 Groups: 0 Service classes: 1 Node "CONFUSED", usage -1, Local Timer 99, sequence 4, changes 151, flags 0x0, protocol 5.2 Facility 0, Product code 0, Product version 0 Recv 0/0/0, Xmit 0/0/0, 0 Dups, 0 ReXmit Bad messages: 0, Bad slots: 0, Solicits accepted: 0 Solicits rejected: 0, Multiple nodes: 0 Groups: 0 Service classes: 1 Node "EMAN-cs", usage -1, Interface Ethernet0, Address 0000.0cff.c9ed Timer 99, sequence 9, changes 159, flags 0x0, protocol 5.1 Facility 0, Product code 0, Product version 0 Recv 0/0/0, Xmit 0/0/0, 0 Dups, 0 ReXmit Bad messages: 0, Bad slots: 0, Solicits accepted: 0 Solicits rejected: 0, Multiple nodes: 0 Groups: 0 Service classes: 1 Node "TARMAC", usage -1, Interface Ethernet0, Address 0000.0c02.c7c1 Timer -10351, sequence 1, changes 131, flags 0x40, protocol 5.2 Facility 0, Product code 0, Product version 0 Recv 0/0/0, Xmit 0/0/0, 0 Dups, 0 ReXmit Bad messages: 0, Bad slots: 0, Solicits accepted: 0 Solicits rejected: 0, Multiple nodes: 0 Groups: 0 Service classes: 1

Table 71 describes significant fields shown in the display.


Table 71: Show LAT Nodes Field Descriptions
Field Description

Node

The node name as reported by the host computer.

usage

The number of virtual circuits currently active to this node.

Interface

Node interface type and number.

Address

The MAC address of the node's Ethernet interface.

Timer

The number of seconds remaining until this node's service advertisement message will time out; this value is set to three times the nodes multicast timer value whenever a new service advertisement message is received.

sequence

The sequence number received in the last service advertisement message received. Nodes increment their sequence number when the contents of the service advertisement change.

changes

The internal representation of what changed in the multicast message the last time the sequence number changed.

flags

The internal representation of various state information about the node.

protocol

The LAT protocol version used by the node.

Facility

The remote facility number.

Product code

The remote product code.

Product version

The remote product version.

Recv and Xmit

The number of messages, slots, and bytes received or transmitted to the node. The number of messages is the number of LAT virtual circuit messages. Each virtual circuit message contains some number of slots, which contain actual terminal data or control information. Bytes is the number of data bytes (input or output characters) exchanged.

Dups

The number of duplicate virtual circuit messages received.

ReXmit

The number of virtual circuit messages retransmitted.

Bad messages

The number of bad messages received.

Bad slots

The number of bad slots received.

Solicits accepted

The number of solicit-information requests accepted.

Solicits rejected

The number of solicit-information requests rejected.

Multiple nodes

The total of multiple nodes seen.

Groups

The list of group codes advertised by the node's service advertisement message.

Service classes

The number of service classes.

show lat services

To display information about learned LAT services in the Cisco IOS software, use the show lat services user EXEC command.

show lat services [service-name]

Syntax Description

service-name

(Optional) Name of a specific LAT service.

Command Mode

User EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show lat services command:

router# show lat services
Service Name     Rating   Interface  Node (Address)
ABCDEFGHIJ            5   Ethernet0  CONFUSED (0000.0c00.391f)
GLAD                 84   Ethernet0  BLUE (aa00.0400.9205)
  Ident: Welcome to Big Blue Gateway
WHEEL                83   Ethernet0  WHEEL (aa00.0400.9005)
ZXYW                  5   Ethernet0  CONFUSED (0000.0c00.391f) 

Table 72 describes significant fields shown in this display.


Table 72: Show LAT Services Field Descriptions
Field Description

Service Name

LAT service name.

Rating

Rating of the service. If a single service is provided by more than one host, the Cisco IOS software connects to the one with the highest rating.

Interface

Interface type.

Node

Connection address.

(Address)

Advertised identification for the service.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show lat sessions
show service

show lat sessions

To display active LAT sessions, use the show lat sessions user EXEC command.

show lat sessions [line-number]

Syntax Description

line-number

(Optional) Shows an active LAT session on a specific line.

Command Mode

User EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show lat sessions command. In this example, information about all active LAT sessions is displayed. The output is divided into three sections for each session (in this case two sessions): TTY data, session data, and remote node data.

router> show lat sessions 
tty0, connection 1 to service TERM1
TTY data:
  Name "0", Local usage 1/0, Remote usage disabled
  Flags: Local Connects, Enabled
  Type flags: none
  Config flags: -FlowOut, -FlowIn, Parameter Info
  Flow control ^S/^Q in ^S/^Q out,  Mode Normal, Parity None, databits 8
  Groups:   0
Session data:
  Name TERM1, Remote Id 1, Local Id 1
  Remote credits 2, Local credits 0, Advertised Credits 2
  Flags: none
  Max Data Slot 255, Max Attn Slot 255, Stop Reason 0
Remote Node data:
Node "TERM1", Address 0000.0C00.291F, usage 1
  Timer 59,  sequence 5,  changes 159,  flags 0x0, protocol 5.1
  Recv 56/22/83,  Xmit 41/23/14,  0 Dups, 0 ReXmit
  Groups:   0
tty10, connection 1 to service ENG2
TTY data:
  Name "10", Local usage 1/0, Remote usage disabled
  Flags: Local Connects, Enabled
  Type flags: none
  Config flags: -FlowOut, +FlowIn, Set Parameters, 0x40000000
  Flow control ^S/^Q in ^S/^Q out,  Mode Normal, Parity None, databits 8
  Groups:   0
Session data:
  Name ENG2, Remote Id 1, Local Id 1
  Remote credits 1, Local credits 0, Advertised Credits 2
  Flags: none
  Max Data Slot 255, Max Attn Slot 255, Stop Reason 0
Remote Node data:
Node "ENG2", Address AA00.0400.34DC, usage 1
  Timer 179,  sequence 60,  changes 255,  flags 0x0, protocol 5.1
  Recv 58/29/186,  Xmit 50/36/21,  0 Dups, 0 ReXmit
  Groups:   0 

The following sample output displays information about active LAT sessions on one line (line 10). The output is divided into three sections: TTY data, session data, and remote node data.

router# show lat sessions 10 
tty10, connection 1 to service ENG2
TTY data:
  Name "10", Local usage 1/0, Remote usage disabled
  Flags: Local Connects, Enabled
  Type flags: none
  Config flags: -FlowOut, +FlowIn, Set Parameters, 0x40000000
  Flow control ^S/^Q in ^S/^Q out,  Mode Normal, Parity None, databits 8
  Groups:   0
Session data:
  Name ENG2, Remote Id 1, Local Id 1
  Remote credits 1, Local credits 0, Advertised Credits 2
  Flags: none
  Max Data Slot 255, Max Attn Slot 255, Stop Reason 0
Remote Node data:
Node "ENG2", Address AA00.0400.34DC, usage 1
  Timer 189,  sequence 61,  changes 247,  flags 0x0, protocol 5.1
  Recv 60/29/186,  Xmit 52/36/21,  0 Dups, 0 ReXmit
  Groups:   0

Table 73 describes the screen output for the preceding two examples.


Table 73: Show LAT Sessions Status Display Field Descriptions
Field Description
TTY data

Summary of the LAT-oriented terminal-line-specific data.

Name

Name used for this port as a port identification string. The name is reported to remote systems, which can display it in some operating-system dependent manner. This value is also used for targets of host-initiated connections. Currently, this value is hard-wired to be the line number of the associated terminal line.

Local/Remote usage

Current status of the terminal. The number is reported as current/maximum, where current is the current number of sessions of a given type, and maximum is the maximum number of sessions allowed (or zero if there is no maximum). If a terminal is being used for outgoing sessions, the local usage is equal to the number of current LAT sessions. If the terminal is being used for incoming sessions, local usage is disabled, and the remote count and maximum is one.

Flags

Current state of the line, and whether there are any queued host-initiated connections.

Type flags

Report flags not used in the current software release.

Config flags

Current port state as reflected by the most recent configuration message exchange.

Flow control

Lists set flow control characters.

Groups

Group code list currently in use for the line.

Session data

Reports various parameters about the connection.

Name

For the outbound connection, the name of the remote service to which it is connected. For inbound connections, this field is currently unused.

Remote/Local ID

Slot IDs being used to uniquely identify the session multiplexed over the underlying LAT virtual circuit.

Remote/Local/
Advertised Credits

Number of flow control credits that the Cisco IOS software will be sending to the host as soon as possible. The advertised credits are the number of credits that have already been sent.

Flags

Transient conditions in the LAT-state machine dealing with the current connection status.

Max Data Slot

Maximum number of characters that can be sent in a single data slot.

Max Attn Slot

Maximum amount of data that can be sent in an attention message. Current LAT implementations only sends 1-byte attention messages (attention messages are used to flush buffered output). A nonzero value means that remote data flushing can be used; a zero means that it cannot.

Stop Reason

Reason the session was stopped, if it was stopped but not deleted. This value is usually zero, indicating that the session has not yet been stopped. If a session persists for a long time with a nonzero stop reason, there is probably a problem in the local LAT software.

Remote Node data

Reports information about the remote node. The data includes the same fields as those from the show lat nodes output.

Node

Node name as reported by the host computer.

Address

MAC address of the node's Ethernet interface.

usage

Number of virtual circuits currently active to the node.

Timer

Number of seconds remaining until the node's service advertisement message will time out; this value is set to three times greater than the node's multicast timer value whenever a new service advertisement message is received.

sequence

Sequence number received in the last service advertisement message. Nodes increment their sequence number when the contents of the service advertisement change.

changes

Internal representation of what changed in the multicast message the last time the sequence number changed.

flags

Internal representation of various state information about the node.

protocol

LAT protocol version used by the node.

Recv and Xmit

Number of messages, slots, and bytes received or transmitted to the node. The number of messages is the number of LAT virtual circuit messages. Each virtual circuit message contains some number of slots, which contain actual terminal data or control information.

Dups

Number of duplicate virtual circuit messages received.

ReXmit

Number of virtual circuit messages retransmitted.

Groups

Group codes advertised by the node's service advertisement message.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show lat services
show service

show lat traffic

Use the show lat traffic EXEC command to display information about traffic and resource utilization statistics on all active lines.

show lat traffic

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show lat traffic command:

router# show lat traffic
Local host statistics:
  0/100 circuits, 0/500 sessions, 1/500 services
  100 sessions/circuit, circuit timer 80, keep-alive timer 5
Recv:   335535 messages (2478 duplicates),  161722 slots,  1950146 bytes
        0 bad circuit messages,  3458 service messages (52 used)
Xmit:   182376 messages (2761 retransmit),  146490 slots,  36085 bytes
        1 circuit timeouts
Total:  23 circuits created,  38 sessions

Table 74 describes significant fields shown in the display.


Table 74: Show LAT Traffic Field Descriptions
Field Description
Local host statistics

Information about the router.

circuits

Current number and maximum support number of virtual circuits.

sessions

Current and maximum number of sessions.

services

Current number of known remote services, and the maximum supported.

sessions/circuit

Number of sessions per virtual circuit supported by the software.

circuit timer

Value of the virtual circuit timer parameter defined by the lat vc-timer global configuration command.

keep-alive timer

Value defined by the lat ka-timer global configuration command.

Recv

Statistics about local node receive totals.

messages

Total count of virtual circuit messages received.

duplicates

Number of duplicate virtual circuit messages received.

slots

Number of slots received.

bytes

Number of data bytes received.

bad circuit messages

Count of invalid messages received.

service messages

Number of service advertisement multicast messages received.

used

Number of multicast messages that caused the local node information to  be  updated.

Xmit

Various transmission totals.

messages

Total number of virtual circuit messages transmitted.

retransmit

Number of virtual circuit messages retransmitted due to the lack of an acknowledgment.

slots

Number of data and control slots transmitted.

bytes

Count of user data bytes transmitted.

circuit timeouts

Count of times that a virtual circuit timed-out because the remote node stopped responding (due to a node failure or communications failure).

Total

Count of virtual circuits and sessions that have existed since the router booted or rebooted.

show node

To display information about LAT nodes, use the show node EXEC command. The show node command with no further parameters shows a one-line summary of all known nodes. The show node command displays three different sets of information about a node: the node counters, the node status, or a one-line summary of the node status.

show node [all | node-name] [counters | status | summary]

Syntax Description

all

(Optional) Specifies all nodes.

node-name

(Optional) Indicates the name of the node for which status is required.

counters

(Optional) Specifies the various node counters.

status

(Optional) Specifies detailed node status. This is the default if a node name is specified.

summary

(Optional) Specifies a status summary for the node. This is the default if no node name is specified.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Entering the show node command with no arguments is the same as entering show node all summary.

You can enter the show node command with either a specific node name or the keyword all, but not both.

You can enter the show node command with only one of the keywords counters, status, or summary. If you enter show node and two of these keywords without specifying a node name, the first keyword is treated as a node name, causing an error. If you enter show node node-name and two of these keywords, the second keyword will be treated as ambiguous.

The show node command with a node-name argument but no counters, status, or summary keyword defaults to show node node-name status.

Sample Display with No Keywords

The following is sample output from the show node command with no further parameters (the same as show node all summary):

router> show node
Node Name         Status            	Identification
CHAOS                 Reachable
MUDDY-RIVER       Reachable
TARMAC               Reachable
WHEEL                 Reachable     Welcome to VAX/VMS V5.4-2

Table 75 describes significant fields shown in the display.


Table 75: Show Node Field Descriptions
Field Description

Node Name

Lists the names of the nodes.

Status

Indicates whether the node is reachable or not.

Identification

Identification string for the node.

Sample Display with a Node Name

The following is sample output from the show node output that defaults to show node chaos status. It results in a display of the detailed status of node chaos.

router> show node chaos
Node: CHAOS Address: 00-00-0C-01-05-09 LAT Protocol: V5.1 Data Link Frame Size: 1500 Identification: Node Groups: 0 Service Name Status         Rating    Identification CHAOS            Available  80

Table 76 describes significant fields shown in the display.


Table 76: Show Node Field Descriptions
Field Description

Node

Lists the node name as reported by the host computer.

Address

Identifies the MAC address of the node's Ethernet interface.

LAT protocol

Lists the version of the LAT protocol used by the node.

Data Link Frame Size

Lists the size of the largest packet that can be sent to the LAT host.

Identification

Lists the identification string for the node.

Node Groups

Lists the group code list that is advertised by the remote node, which comes from the remote node's service advertisement.

Service Name

Lists the LAT service name.

Status

Indicates whether or not the node is currently available on the network.

Rating

Indicates the rating of the service: An integer from 0 to 255, with the highest number being the preferred service. Used for load balancing.

Sample Display with the Counters Keyword

The following is sample output for the counter information for a specific node:

router> show node tarmac counters
Node: tarmac
Seconds Since Zeroed: 100 Multiple Node Addresses: 0
Messages Received: 0 Duplicates Received: 0
Messages Transmitted: 0 Messages Re-transmitted: 0
Slots Received: 0 Illegal Messages Received: 0
Slots Transmitted: 0 Illegal Slots Received: 0
Bytes Received: 0 Solicitations Accepted: 0
Bytes Transmitted: 0 Solicitations Rejected: 0

Additional Sample Displays

In the following example, the keyword status is treated as the node name:

router> show node status counters
Local -710- Node STATUS not known

In the following example, the second keyword counters is treated as ambiguous:

router> show node lager status counters
Local -702- Keyword "COUNTERS" not known or ambiguous

show service

Use the show service EXEC command to display specific LAT learned services.

show service [service-name]

Syntax Description

service-name

(Optional) The name of a specific LAT service.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The show service command without a service name displays a list of known LAT learned services. When entered with the service-name argument, it displays a more-detailed status of the named service. If no LAT learned service by the specified name is known, then a lookup is done for an IP host of that name.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show service command:

router> show service
Service Name Status        Identification BLUE               Available    Welcome to VAX/VMS V5.4 CHAOS            Available MRL12            Available MUDDY-RIVER  Available STELLA-BLUE  Available    Welcome to VAX/VMS V5.4

The following display shows sample show service output for a specific service:

router> show service blue
Service BLUE - Available Node Name Status      Rating      Identification BLUE          reachable 84               Welcome to VAX/VMS V5.4

Table 77 describes significant fields shown in the two previous displays.


Table 77: Show Service Field Descriptions
Field Description

Service

Name of the service.

Node Name

Name of the nodes advertising the service.

Status

Status of the service: Available or Unknown when command is entered without a service name. Available, Unknown, Initializing, or Unreachable when command is entered with a service name.

Rating

Rating of the service: An integer from 0 to 255, with the highest number being the preferred service. Used for load balancing.

Identification

Identification string.

show sessions

To display information about open LAT, Telnet, or rlogin connections, use the show sessions user EXEC command.

show sessions

Command Mode

User EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command display the host name, address, number of unread bytes for the user to receive, idle time, and connection name.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show sessions command:

sloth# show sessions
Conn Host                 Address          Byte    Idle  Conn Name
   1 MATHOM               192.31.7.21         0       0  MATHOM
*  2 CHAFF                131.108.12.19       0       0  CHAFF 

The asterisk (*) indicates the current terminal session.

Table 78 describes significant fields shown in the display.


Table 78: Show Sessions Field Descriptions
Field Description

Conn

Name or address of the remote host to which the connection is made.

Host

Remote host to which the router is connected through a Telnet session.

Address

IP address of the remote host.

Byte

Number of unread bytes displayed for the user to receive.

Idle

Interval (in minutes) since data was last sent on the line.

Conn Name

Assigned name of the connection.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

resume
where

show tcp

To display the status of a TCP connection, use the show tcp user EXEC command.

show tcp [line-number]

Syntax Description

line-number

(Optional) Displays (in octal) the status of the TCP connections for a particular line.

Command Mode

User EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show tcp command:

router# show tcp
tty0, connection 1 to host cider
Connection state is ESTAB, I/O status: 1, unread input bytes: 0
Local host: 171.69.232.17, Local port: 11184
Foreign host: 171.69.1.137, Foreign port: 23
Enqueued packets for retransmit: 0, input: 0, saved: 0
Event Timers (current time is 67341276):
Timer:       Retrans   TimeWait    AckHold    SendWnd  KeepAlive
Starts:           30          0         32          0          0
Wakeups:           1          0         14          0          0
Next:              0          0          0          0          0
iss:   67317172  snduna:   67317228  sndnxt:   67317228     sndwnd:   4096
irs: 1064896000  rcvnxt: 1064897597  rcvwnd:       2144  delrcvwnd:      0
SRTT: 317 ms, RTTO: 900 ms, RTV: 133 ms, KRTT: 0 ms
minRTT: 4 ms, maxRTT: 300 ms, ACK hold: 300 ms
Flags: idle user, retransmission timeout
Datagrams (max data segment is 536 bytes):
Rcvd: 41 (out of order: 0), with data: 34, total data bytes: 1596
Sent: 57 (retransmit: 1), with data: 35, total data bytes: 55

Table 79 describes the following lines of output shown in the display:


Table 79: Show TCP Field Descriptions---First Section of Output
Field Description

tty0

Line number.

connection 1

Number identifying the TCP connection.

to host cider

Name of the remote host to which the connection is made.

Connection state is ESTAB

A connection progresses through a series of states. The states include the following:

  • LISTEN---Waiting for a connection request from any remote TCP  port.

  • SYNSENT---Waiting for a matching connection request after having sent a connection request.

  • SYNRCVD---Waiting for a confirming connection request acknowledgment after having both received and sent a connection request.

  • ESTAB---Indicates an open connection; data received can be delivered to the user. This is the normal state for the data transfer phase.

  • FINWAIT1---Waiting for a connection termination request from the remote TCP host or an acknowledgment of the connection termination request previously sent.

  • FINWAIT2---Received an acknowledgment of the connection termination request that was sent.

  • CLOSEWAIT---Received a connection request.

  • CLOSING---Sent and received a connection termination request acknowledgment from the remote TCP host.

  • LASTACK---Received a connection termination request from the remote TCP host and the local user.

  • TIMEWAIT---Waiting for enough time to pass to be certain the remote TCP host has received the acknowledgment of its connection termination request.

  • CLOSED---Indicates no connection state at all.

For more information about connection states, see RFC 793, Transmission Control Protocol Functional Specification.

I/O status: 1

Number describing the internal status of the connection.

unread input bytes: 0

Number of bytes that the lower-level TCP processes have read, but the higher-level TCP processes have not yet processed.

Local host: 171.69.232.17

IP address of the network router.

Local port: 11184

Local port number derived from the following equation:
line-number + (512 * random-number).
The line number uses the lower nine bits; the other bits are random.

Foreign host: 171.69.1.137

IP address of the remote host to which the TCP connection was made.

Foreign port: 23

Port number for the remote host.

Enqueued packets for retransmit: 0

Number of packets waiting on the retransmit queue. These are packets on this TCP connection that have been sent but not yet acknowledged by the remote TCP host.

input: 0

Number of packets waiting on the input queue to be read by the user.

saved: 0

Number of received out-of-order packets waiting for all packets comprising the message to be received before they enter the input queue. For example, if packets 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 have been received, packets 1 and 2 would enter the input queue, and packets 4, 5, and 6 would enter the saved queue.

The following line of output shows the current time according to the system clock of the local host.

Event Timers (current time is 67341276):

The following lines of output display the number of times that various local TCP timeout values were reached during a connection. In this example, the Cisco IOS software retransmitted once because it received no response from the remote host, and it transmitted an ACK-only segment 14 times because there was no data segment on which to piggyback. Table 80 describes the fields in the following lines of output:

Timer:       Retrans   TimeWait    AckHold    SendWnd  KeepAlive
Starts:           30          0         32          0          0
Wakeups:           1          0         14          0          0
Next:              0          0          0          0          0


Table 80: Show TCP Field Descriptions---Second Section of Output
Field Description

Timer

Names of the timers in the display.

Retrans

Determines how long a transmitted frame can remain unacknowledged before the Cisco  IOS software polls for an acknowledgment.

TimeWait

Determines how long the local TCP connection waits to be sure that the remote TCP host has received the acknowledgment of its connection termination request.

AckHold

Number of times the system failed to piggyback data required on a TCP acknowledgment. Such piggybacking can significantly reduce network traffic.

SendWnd

Timers for sending "zero window probes." Essentially, this field reflects how often users overload the remote host with data and how long it takes users to send it. For most normal Cisco IOS software applications, this value should be zero.

KeepAlive

Determines the frequency (in seconds) at which the Cisco IOS software sends messages to itself (Ethernet and Token Ring) or to the other end (serial) to ensure that a network interface is alive. The keepalive interface configuration command is used to set this timer.

Starts

Number of times the timer was started during this connection.

Wakeups

Number of times the timer has expired.

Next

Time that the timer expires.

The following lines of output display the sequence numbers that TCP uses to ensure sequenced, reliable transport of data. The router and remote host each use these sequence numbers for flow control and to acknowledge receipt of datagrams. Table 81 describes the fields in this output.

iss:   67317172  snduna:   67317228  sndnxt:   67317228     sndwnd:   4096
irs: 1064896000  rcvnxt: 1064897597  rcvwnd:       2144  delrcvwnd:      0


Table 81: Show TCP Field Descriptions---Sequence Numbers
Field Description

iss: 67317172

Initial send sequence number.

snduna: 67317228

Last send sequence number that the Cisco IOS software has sent but for which it has not received an acknowledgment.

sndnxt: 67317228

Sequence number that the Cisco IOS software will send next.

sndwnd: 4096

TCP window size of the remote host.

irs: 1064896000

Initial receive sequence number.

rcvnxt: 1064897597

Last receive sequence number that the Cisco IOS software has acknowledged.

rcvwnd: 2144

The Cisco IOS software's TCP window size.

delrcvwnd: 0

Delayed receive window---data that the Cisco IOS software has read from the connection, but has not yet subtracted from the receive window advertised to the remote host. The value in this field gradually increases until it is larger than a full-sized packet, at which point it is cleared and applied to the rcvwnd field.

The following lines of output show the values that the Cisco IOS uses to keep track of transmission times so that TCP can adjust to the network it is using. Table 82 describes the fields in this output.

SRTT: 317 ms, RTTO: 900 ms, RTV: 133 ms, KRTT: 0 ms
minRTT: 4 ms, maxRTT: 300 ms, ACK hold: 300 ms
Flags: higher precedence, idle user, retransmission timeout


Table 82: Show TCP Field Descriptions---Line Beginning with RTTO
Field Descriptions

SRTT: 317 ms

Round-trip time estimate.

RTTO: 900 ms

Round-trip timeout.

RTV: 133 ms

Variance of the round-trip time.

KRTT: 0 ms

New round-trip timeout (using the Karn algorithm). This field separately tracks the round-trip time of packets that have been retransmitted.

minRTT: 4 ms

Smallest recorded round-trip timeout (hard wire value used for calculation).

maxRTT: 300 ms

Largest recorded round-trip timeout.

ACK hold: 300 ms

Time the Cisco IOS software will delay an acknowledgment so that it can piggyback data on it.

Flags

The following is a list of possible flags that describe your type of connection.

  • Idle user---The connection is idle because the user has suspended the connection.

  • Retransmission timeout---The connection will be dropped if retransmission continues to be unsuccessful.

  • Passive open---The connection was accepted by the router that issued the show tcp command.

  • Active---The connection was initiated by the router.

  • Keepalive running---TCP is searching for inactive clients.

  • Alias---The connection was made to an alias.

  • Timing out---The connection will soon be suspended due to excessive retransmissions.

  • Nagle---The local router is using the Nagle algorithm to maximize packet size
    (see RFC  896).

  • Net output pending---The Nagle algorithm is holding small packets from the TCP output queue and waiting to put them in to the network once the packet size is optimized.

  • Always push---The router sets the push bit when sending data  packets.

  • Sync listen---The connection to the router is synchronized with the application.

  • Path mtu discovery---The connection is using path mtu discovery to determine its  MSS.

For more information about these fields, refer to the article "Round Trip Time Estimation," by P.  Karn and C. Partridge, ACM SIGCOMM-87, August 1987.

Table 83 describes the fields in the following lines of output from the show tcp command:

Datagrams (max data segment is 536 bytes):
Rcvd: 41 (out of order: 0), with data: 34, total data bytes: 1596
Sent: 57 (retransmit: 1), with data: 35, total data bytes: 55


Table 83: Show TCP Field Descriptions---Last Section of Output
Field Description

Datagrams

Datagrams sent and received on the line.

Rcvd: 41(out of order: 0)

Number of datagrams the local host has received during this connection (and the number of these datagrams that were out of order).

with data: 34

Number of datagrams that contained data.

total data bytes: 1596

Total number of bytes of data in the transmitted datagrams.

Sent: 57(and retransmitted: 1)

Number of datagrams the local host sent during this connection (and the number of these datagrams that had to be retransmitted).

with data: 35

Number of transmitted datagrams that contained data.

total data bytes: 55

Total number of bytes of data in the transmitted datagrams.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show tcp brief

show tcp brief

To view a summary of the TCP connection end points in the system, use the show tcp brief user EXEC command.

show tcp brief [all]

Syntax Description

all

(Optional) Shows the status for all end points. End points in the LISTEN state are usually not shown.

Command Mode

User EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Sample Display

The following example is the output from the show tcp brief command after a user has connected to the router using Telnet:

router# show tcp brief
TCB       Local Address           Foreign Address        (state)
609789AC  Router.cisco.com.23     cider.cisco.com.3733   ESTAB

Table 84 describes the fields shown in the example.


Table 84: Show TCP Brief Fields Descriptions
Field Description

TCB: 609789AC

An internal identifier for the end point.

Local Address: Router.cisco.com.23

The local IP address and port.

Foreign Address: cider.cisco.com.3733

The foreign IP address and port.

(state): ESTAB

The state of the connection. (See Table 83 for a description of connection states.)

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show tcp

show tn3270 ascii-hexval

To determine ASCII-hexadecimal character mappings, use the show tn3270 ascii-hexval EXEC command.

show tn3270 ascii-hexval

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Use the show tn3270 ascii-hexval command to display the hexadecimal value of a character on your keyboard. After entering the show tn3270 ascii-hexval command, you are prompted to press a key. The hexadecimal value of the ASCII character is displayed. This command is useful for users who do not know the ASCII codes associated with various keys or do not have manuals for their terminals.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show tn3270 ascii-hexval command:

router> show tn3270 ascii-hexval
Press key> 7 - hexadecimal value is 0x37.
chaff> show tn3270 ascii-hexval
Press key> f - hexadecimal value is 0x66.
tarmac> show tn3270 ascii-hexval
Press key> not printable - hexadecimal value is 0xD.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show tn3270 character-map
tn3270 character-map

show tn3270 character-map

To display character mappings between ASCII and EBCDIC, use the show tn3270 character-map EXEC command.

show tn3270 character-map {all | ebcdic-in-hex}

Syntax Description

all

Displays all nonstandard character mappings.

ebcdic-in-hex

Displays the ASCII mapping for a specific EBCDIC character.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show  tn3270  character-map command:

router# show tn3270 character-map all
EBCDIC 0x81 <=> 0x78 ASCII
EBCDIC 0x82 <=> 0x79 ASCII
EBCDIC 0x83 <=> 0x7A ASCII

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show tn3270 ascii-hexval
tn3270 character-map

show ttycap

To test for the availability of a ttycap after a connection on a router takes place, use the show ttycap EXEC command.

show ttycap [ttycap-name | all]

Syntax Description

ttycap-name

(Optional) Name of a ttycap.

all

(Optional) Lists the names of all defined ttycaps. The name of the default ttycap is not listed.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Cisco IOS software searches for the specified ttycap in its active configuration image, and lists the complete entry if found. If it is not found, an appropriate "not found" message appear.

If you do not include any arguments with the show ttycap command, then the current keymap used for the terminal is displayed.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show ttycap command:

router# show ttycap
	d0|vt100|vt100-am|vt100am|dec vt100:do=^J:co#80:li#24:\
	cl=50^[[;H^[[2J:bs:am:cm=5^[[%i%d;%dH:nd=2^[[C:up=2^[[A:\
	ce=3^[[K:so=2^[[7m:se=2^[[m:us=2^[[4m:ue=2^[[m:md=2^[[1m:\
	me=2^[[m:ho=^[[H:xn:sc=^[7:rc=^[8:cs=^[[%i%d;%dr:
router# show ttycap all
ttycap3    d0|vt100|vt100-am|vt100am|dec vt100
ttycap2    dl|vt200|vt220|vt200-js|vt220-js|dec vt200 series with jump scroll
ttycap1    ku|h19-u|h19u|heathkit with underscore cursor
router# show ttycap ttycap1
ttycap1  ku|h19-u|h19u|heathkit with underscore cursor:\:vs@:ve@:tc=h19-b:\
                	:al=1*\EL:am:le=^H:bs:cd=\EJ:ce=\EK:cl=\EE:cm=\EY%+ %+\
                	:co#80:dc=\EN:\:dl=1*\EM:do=\EB:ei=\EO:ho=\EH\
                	:im=\E@:li#24:mi:nd=\EC:as=\EF:ae=\EG:\
                	:ms:pt:sr=\EI:se=\Eq:so=\Ep:up=\EA:vs=\Ex4:ve=\Ey4:\
                	:kb=^h:ku=\EA:kd=\EB:kl=\ED:kr=\EC:kh=\EH:kn#8:ke=\E>:ks=\E=:\
                	:k1=\ES:k2=\ET:k3=\EU:k4=\EV:k5=\EW:\
                	:l6=blue:l7=red:l8=white:k6=\EP:k7=\EQ:k8=\ER:\
        :es:hs:ts=\Ej\Ex5\Ex1\EY8%+ \Eo:fs=\Ek\Ey5:ds=\Ey1:

show xremote

To display XRemote connections and monitor XRemote traffic through the router, use the show xremote EXEC command.

show xremote

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The show xremote command displays XRemote parameters applied to the entire system, as well as statistics that are pulled for all active XRemote connections.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show xremote command when XRemote is enabled and XRemote sessions are active:

router# show xremote
XRemote server-wide parameters:
  Font buffersize:     72000              Font retries: 3
  Font memory errors:  0
TFTP font load statistics for host 172.16.1.111:
  Bytes read:          2697239            Files read: 258
  Network errors:      4                  File errors: 0
LAT font load statistics for service WHEEL, incarnation 5:
 Bytes read                        182401                          Files read: 14
 Protocol errors:            0                                    Insufficient memory: 0
XRemote statistics for tty2:
  Current clients:     9                  Total clients: 17
  Requesting client:   5                  Current request size: 0
  Replying client:     6                  Current reply size: 0
  XDM state:           10                 Next timeout: 172460
  Retransmit counter:  0                  Local UDP port: 53616
  Keepalive dormancy:  180                Session id: 94
  Unread input:        0                  Unwritten output: 0
  Input buffer size:   1024               Output buffer size: 108
  Protocol version:    2                  Line state: Connected
  Transmit packets:    50768              Receive packets: 49444
  Transmit errors:     0                  Receive errors: 37
  Retransmissions:     403                Receive out of sequence: 76
  Round trip time:     383                Retransmit interval: 766
  Transmit window:     7                  Receive window: 7
  Transmit next:       6                  Receive next: 3
  Transmit unacked:    6                  Receive unacked: 0
  Connection 0 - TCP connection from 172.16.1.55  [Display Manager]
    Client state:       CS_ACTIVE         Byte order: MSBfirst
    Unread input:       0                 Unwritten output: 0
    Input buffer size:  1024              Output buffer size: 1024

 Connection 1 - LAT connection from WHEEL
       Client  state:              CS_ACTIVE                  Byte  order:  LSBfirst
       Unread  input:              0                                  Unwritten  output:  0
       Input buffer size:    1024                            Output buffer size: 1024


Table 85 describes the significant fields shown in the display.


Table 85: Show XRemote Field Descriptions
Field Description
XRemote server-wide parameters

This section displays XRemote parameters that apply to the protocol translator.

Font buffer size

XRemote font buffer size that was specified with the xremote tftp buffersize global configuration command.

Font retries

Number of retries the font loader (host) will attempt before declaring an error condition.

Font memory errors

Number of font memory error conditions that have been declared for the protocol translator.

TFTP font load statistics for host 172.16.1.111

This section displays XRemote statistics for fonts that have been loaded from a TFTP font server at the IP address shown.

Bytes read

Number of bytes the host read in order to load the fonts.

Files read

Number of files the host read in order to load the fonts.

XRemote statistics for tty2

This section displays XRemote for the specified line.

Current clients

Number of clients using this line for active XRemote sessions.

Total clients

Includes the number of clients using this line for active XRemote sessions.

Requesting client

Number of clients requesting XRemote service.

Retransmit counter

Number of times that XRemote connection requests were retransmitted.

Local UDP port

Number assigned to the local UDP port.

Keepalive dormancy

Amount of time between keepalive messages.

show xremote line

To list XRemote connections and monitor XRemote traffic, use the show xremote line EXEC command.

show xremote line number

Syntax Description

number

A decimal value representing the number of virtual terminal lines about which to display information.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show xremote line command (line 3 is specified) when XRemote is enabled and XRemote sessions are active. Only information specific to an individual terminal line is provided.

router# show xremote line 3
Xremote statistics for tty3:
  Current clients:     11                 Total clients: 19
  Requesting client:   10                 Current request size: 0
  Replying client:     10                 Current reply size: 0
  XDM state:           10                 Next timeout: 173304
  Retransmit counter:  0                  Local UDP port: 28384
  Keepalive dormancy:  180                Session id: 29
  Unread input:        0                  Unwritten output: 0
  Input buffer size:   1024               Output buffer size: 108
  Protocol version:    2                  Line state: Connected
  Transmit packets:    28875              Receive packets: 18644
  Transmit errors:     0                  Receive errors: 13
  Retransmissions:     53                 Receive out of sequence: 41
  Round trip time:     384                Retransmit interval: 768
  Transmit window:     7                  Receive window: 7
  Transmit next:       2                  Receive next: 7
  Transmit unacked:    2                  Receive unacked: 0
  Connection 0 - TCP connection from 172.16.1.27  [Display Manager]
    Client state:       CS_ACTIVE         Byte order: MSBfirst
    Unread input:       0                 Unwritten output: 0
    Input buffer size:  1024              Output buffer size: 1024
  Connection 1 - TCP connection from 172.16.1.27
    Client state:       CS_ACTIVE         Byte order: MSBfirst
    Unread input:       0                 Unwritten output: 0
    Input buffer size:  1024              Output buffer size: 1024
  Connection 2 - TCP connection from 172.16.1.27
    Client state:       CS_ACTIVE         Byte order: MSBfirst
    Unread input:       0                 Unwritten output: 0
    Input buffer size:  1024              Output buffer size: 1024

See Table 85 in the show xremote command description earlier in this chapter for show xremote line output field descriptions.

telnet

To log on to a host that supports Telnet, use the telnet EXEC command.

telnet host [port] [keyword] 

Syntax Description

host

A host name or an IP address.

port

(Optional) A decimal TCP port number; the default is the Telnet router port (decimal  23) on the host.

keyword

(Optional) One of the options listed in Table 86.


Table 86: Telnet Connection Options
Option Description

/debug

Enables Telnet debugging mode.

/encrypt kerberos

Enables an encrypted Telnet session. This keyword is available only if you have the Kerberized Telnet subsystem.
If you authenticate using Kerberos Credentials, the use of this keyword initiates an encryption negotiation with the remote server. If the encryption negotiation fails, the Telnet connection will be reset. If the encryption negotiation is successful, the Telnet connection will be established, and the Telnet session will continue in encrypted mode (all Telnet traffic for the session will be encrypted).

/line

Enables Telnet line mode. In this mode, the Cisco IOS software sends no data to the host until you press Return. You can edit the line using the standard Cisco IOS software command-editing characters. The /line keyword is a local switch; the remote router is not notified of the mode change.

/noecho

Disables local echo.

/route path

Specifies loose source routing. The path argument is a list of host names or IP addresses that specify network nodes and ends with the final destination.

/source-interface

Specifies the source interface.

/stream

Turns on stream processing, which enables a raw TCP stream with no Telnet control sequences. A stream connection does not process Telnet options and can be appropriate for connections to ports running UUCP and other non-Telnet protocols.

port-number

Port number.

bgp

Border Gateway Protocol.

chargen

Character generator.

cmd rcmd

Remote commands.

daytime

Daytime.

discard

Discard.

domain

Domain Name Service.

echo

Echo.

exec

EXEC.

finger

Finger

ftp

File Transfer Protocol.

ftp-data

FTP data connections (used infrequently).

gopher

Gopher.

hostname

NIC hostname server.

ident

Ident Protocol.

irc

Internet Relay Chat

klogin

Kerberos login.

kshell

Kerberos shell.

login

Login (rlogin).

lpd

Printer service.

nntp

Network News Transport Protocol.

node

Connect to a specific LAT node

pop2

Post Office Protocol v2.

pop3

Post Office Protocol v3.

port

Destination LAT port name.

smtp

Simple Mail Transport Protocol.

sunrpc

Sun Remote Procedure Call.

syslog

Syslog.

tacacs

Specify TACACS security.

talk

Talk.

telnet

Telnet.

time

Time.

uucp

Unix-to-Unix Copy Program.

whois

Nickname.

www

World Wide Web (HTTP).

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

With the Cisco IOS implementation of TCP/IP, you are not required to enter the connect or telnet commands to establish a Telnet connection. You can just enter the learned host name---as long as the following conditions are met:

  • The host name is different from a command word for the router

  • The preferred transport protocol is set to telnet

To display a list of the available hosts, use the show hosts command. To display the status of all TCP connections, use the show tcp command.

The Cisco IOS software assigns a logical name to each connection, and several commands use these names to identify connections. The logical name is the same as the host name, unless that name is already in use, or you change the connection name with the name-connection EXEC command. If the name is already in use, the Cisco IOS software assigns a null name to the connection.

The Telnet software supports special Telnet commands in the form of Telnet sequences that map generic terminal control functions to operating system-specific functions. To issue a special Telnet command, enter the escape sequence and then a command character. The default escape sequence is Ctrl-^ (press and hold the Control and Shift keys and the 6 key). You can enter the command character as you hold down Ctrl or with Ctrl released; you can use either uppercase or lowercase letters. Table 87 lists the special Telnet escape sequences.


Table 87: Special Telnet Escape Sequences
Escape Sequence1 Purpose

Ctrl-^  b

Break

Ctrl-^  c

Interrupt Process (IP)

Ctrl-^  h

Erase Character (EC)

Ctrl-^  o

Abort Output (AO)

Ctrl-^  t

Are You There? (AYT)

Ctrl-^  u

Erase Line (EL)

1The caret (^) symbol refers to Shift-6 on your keyboard.

At any time during an active Telnet session, you can list the Telnet commands by pressing the escape sequence keys followed by a question mark at the system prompt:

Ctrl-^  ?

A sample of this list follows. In this sample output, the first caret (^) symbol represents the Control key, while the second caret represents Shift-6 on your keyboard:

router> ^^?
[Special telnet escape help]
^^B  sends telnet BREAK
^^C  sends telnet IP
^^H  sends telnet EC
^^O  sends telnet AO
^^T  sends telnet AYT
^^U  sends telnet EL 

You can have several concurrent Telnet sessions open and switch back and forth between them. To open a subsequent session, first suspend the current connection by pressing the escape sequence (Ctrl-Shift-6 then x [Ctrl^x] by default) to return to the system command prompt. Then open a new connection with the telnet command.

To terminate an active Telnet session, issue any of the following commands at the prompt of the device to which you are connecting:

close
disconnect
exit
logout

quit

Examples

The following example establishes an encrypted Telnet session from a router to a remote host named host1:

router> telnet host1 /encrypt kerberos

The following example routes packets from the source system host1 to kl.sri.com, then to 10.1.0.11, and finally back to host1:

router> telnet host1 /route:kl.sri.com 10.1.0.11 host1

The following example connects to a host with logical name host1:

router> host1

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

connect
rlogin

telnet break-on-ip

To cause the system to generate a hardware BREAK signal on the RS-232 line that is associated with a reverse Telnet connection when a Telnet Interrupt-Process command is received on that connection, use the telnet break-on-ip line configuration command.

telnet break-on-ip

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No hardware Break signal is generated when an Interrupt-Process command is received.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command causes the system to generate a hardware BREAK signal on the RS-232 line that is associated with a reverse Telnet connection. It is useful when a Telnet Interrupt-Process command is received on that connection because it can control the translation of Telnet Interrupt-Process commands into X.25 BREAK indications. It is also a useful workaround in the following situations:

  • Several user Telnet programs send an Interrupt-Process command, but cannot send a Telnet BREAK signal.

  • Some Telnet programs implement a BREAK signal that sends an Interrupt-Process command.

  • Some RS-232 hardware devices use a hardware BREAK signal for various purposes.

A hardware BREAK signal is generated when a Telnet BREAK command is received.

Example

In the following example, line 5 is configured with the telnet break-on-ip command. The location text notes that this refers to the high-speed modem. The telnet transparent command sets end-of-line handling.

line 5
  location high-speed modem
  telnet transparent
  telnet break-on-ip

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

connect
telnet
(EXEC)
telnet transparent
terminal telnet break-on-ip

telnet refuse-negotiations

To set a line using Telnet to refuse to negotiate full duplex, remote echo requests on incoming connections, use the telnet refuse-negotiations line configuration command.

telnet refuse-negotiations

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command on reverse Telnet connections to allow the Cisco IOS software to refuse full-duplex, remote echo option connection requests from the other end. This command suppresses negotiation of the Telnet Remote Echo and Suppress Go Ahead options.

This command does not apply to protocol translation configurations. It is intended for applications wherein the router is functioning as a terminal server to allow terminal connections to remote devices through the asynchronous terminal ports of the router. Terminal server connections are those where the user types a command similar to the following to access network resources:

telnet access-server 2005

where access-server is the host name of the Cisco router functioning as a terminal server, and 2005 is the port number on the router to which the remote terminal is connected.

Example

The following example shows how to set line 5 to refuse full-duplex, remote echo requests:

line 5
  telnet refuse-negotiations

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

connect
telnet
(EXEC)
terminal telnet refuse-negotiations

telnet speed

To allow the Cisco IOS software to negotiate transmission speed of the line to a connected device, use the telnet  speed line configuration command.

telnet speed default-speed maximum-speed

Syntax Description

default-speed

Line speed (in bps) that the Cisco IOS software will use if the device on the other end of the connection has not specified a speed.

maximum-speed

Maximum speed (in bps) that the device on the port will use.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Negotiates speeds on reverse Telnet lines. You can match line speeds on remote systems in reverse Telnet, on host machines hooked up to a router used to access the network, or on a group of console lines hooked up to the router, when disparate line speeds are in use at the local and remote ends of the connection. Line speed negotiation adheres to the Remote Flow Control option, defined in RFC  1080.

Example

The following example allows a router to negotiate a bit rate on the line using the Telnet option. If no speed is negotiated, the line will run at 2400 bits per second. If the remote host requests a speed of greater than 9600 bps, then 9600 will be used.

line 5
  telnet speed 2400 9600

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

connect
telnet
(EXEC)
terminal telnet speed

telnet sync-on-break

To configure the Cisco IOS software to cause an incoming connection to send a Telnet Synchronize signal when it receives a Telnet BREAK signal, use the telnet sync-on-break line configuration command.

telnet sync-on-break

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command causes a reverse Telnet line to send a Telnet Synchronize signal when it receives a Telnet BREAK signal. This option is used very rarely to ensure the ordering of BREAK reception with respect to data characters sent after the BREAK.

Example

In the following example, line 8 is configured with the telnet sync-on-break command:

line aux 0
  telnet sync-on-break

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

connect
telnet
(EXEC)
terminal telnet sync-on-break

telnet transparent

To configure the Cisco IOS software to send a CARRIAGE RETURN (CR) as a CR followed by a NULL instead of a CR followed by a LINE FEED (LF), use the telnet transparent line configuration command.

telnet transparent

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

CARRIAGE RETURN followed by a LINE FEED.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command is useful for coping with different interpretations of end-of-line handling in the Telnet protocol specification.

Example

The following example causes the Cisco IOS software, when sending a CR, to send a CR followed by a NULL character:

line 7
  telnet transparent

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

connect
telnet
(EXEC)
terminal telnet transparent

terminal lat

To temporarily define the list of services to which you or another user can connect, use the terminal lat EXEC command.

terminal lat remote-modification
terminal lat out-group group_number [start-end] {disabled | enabled}

Syntax Description

remote-modification

Sets the line to be remotely modifiable.

out-group

Defines a group list for outgoing user-initiated connections.

group_number [start-end]

Number of the group that has access to the system through the specified line. This number is identified by the system administrator. You also can specify a range of group numbers. Separate the beginning and end of the range with a hyphen.

disabled

Incrementally removes specified groups from list.

enabled

Incrementally adds specified groups to list.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

To temporarily define the list of services to which you or another user can connect, you define the group code lists used for connections from specific lines. You limit the connection choices for an individual line by defining the group code lists for an outgoing connection. When a user initiates a connection with a LAT host, the user's line must share a common group number with the remote LAT host before a connection can be made.

The group code range entered in this command must fall within the group code range already configured for the line.

Example

The following example defines a group code list for the outgoing group 4:

router> terminal lat out-group 4, 6-189 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

connect
lat

terminal transport preferred

To specify the preferred protocol to use for the current session when a command does not specify one, use the terminal transport preferred EXEC command.

terminal transport preferred {all | lat | mop | nasi | none | pad | rlogin | telnet}

Syntax Description

all

Specifies all recognized protocols.

lat

Specifies the LAT protocol.

mop

Specifies the Maintenance Operation Protocol (MOP).

nasi

Specifies the NetWare Asynchronous Services Interface (NASI) protocol.

none

Prevents any protocol selection on the line. The router default is that any unrecognized command is a host name. If the preferred protocol is set to none, the router will not attempt any connections if the command is not recognized.

pad

Specifies X.3 PAD, which is used most often to connect a server product to X.25 hosts.

rlogin

Specifies UNIX rlogin.

telnet

Specifies the TCP/IP Telnet protocol.

Default

lat (if lat is not supported, telnet)

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

The terminal transport [none | telnet] command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0. The entire command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Example

The following example configures the console so that it does not connect when an unrecognized command is entered:

router> terminal transport preferred none

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

transport preferred

tn3270

To begin a TN3270 session, use the tn3270 EXEC command.

tn3270 host

Syntax Description

host

Name or IP address of a specific host on a network that can be reached by the router. The default terminal emulation mode allows access using a VT100 emulation.

Default

None

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Unlike Telnet and LAT connections, you must enter the command tn3270 to make a connection to an IBM TN3278 host.

To terminate an active TN3270 session, enter the escape sequence (Ctrl-Shift-6 then x [Ctrl^x] by default) and enter the disconnect command at the EXEC prompt. Or log off the remote system by issuing the command specific to that system (such as exit, logout, quit, close, or disconnect).

Example

The following example establishes a terminal session with an IBM TN3270 host named finance:

router> tn3270 finance 

tn3270 8bit display

To configure the Cisco IOS software to use the mask set by the data-character-bits {7 | 8} line configuration command or the terminal data-character bits {7 | 8} EXEC command, use the tn3270 8bit display line configuration command. To restore the default 7-bit mask used for TN3270 connections, use the no form of this command.

tn3270 8bit display
no tn3270 8bit display

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use the tn3270-character-map command to map between extended EBCDIC or extended ASCII characters.

Example

The following example configures the Cisco IOS software to use the mask set by the data-character-bits line configuration and EXEC commands on line 5:

line 5
  tn3270 8bit display

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

data-character-bits
terminal data-character-bits

tn3270 8bit transparent-mode

To configure the Cisco IOS software to use the mask set by the data-character-bits {7 | 8} line configuration command or the terminal data-character bits {7 | 8} EXEC command, use the tn3270 8bit display line configuration command. To restore the default 7-bit mask used for TN3270 connections, use the no form of this command.

tn3270 8bit transparent-mode
no tn3270 8bit transparent-mode

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command is needed if you are using a file transfer protocol such as Kermit in 8-bit mode or you are using 8-bit graphics, both of which rely on transparent mode.

Example

The following example configures the software to use the mask set by the data-character-bits line configuration and EXEC commands on line 5:

line 5
  tn3270 8bit transparent-mode

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

data-character-bits
terminal data-character-bits

tn3270 character-map

To convert incoming EBCDIC characters into ASCII characters, use the tn3270 character-map global configuration command. To restore default character mappings, use the no form of this command.

tn3270 character-map ebcdic-in-hex ascii-in-hex
no tn3270 character-map {all | ebcdic-in-hex} [ascii-in-hex]

Syntax Description

ebcdic-in-hex

Hexadecimal value of an EBCDIC character.

ascii-in-hex

Hexadecimal value of an ASCII character.

all

Indicates all character mappings.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command to print international characters that are EBCDIC characters not normally printed, including umlauts (¨) and tildes (~). The command first restores default mapping for both EBCDIC and ASCII characters. In the no form of the command, the all keyword resets all character mappings to Cisco defaults.

Table 88 shows the default character mappings between ASCII and EBCDIC in decimal and hexadecimal format.

To convert outgoing ASCII characters into EBCDIC characters, use the keymap command to modify the keymap structure with the tag ebcdic_xx=string, where xx is a hexadecimal value and string is the sequence of characters that send the ESCDIC character.


Table 88: Default ASCII, EBCDIC Character Mappings
Character ASCII Decimal ASCII Hexadecimal EBCDIC Decimal EBCDIC Hexadecimal

!

33

0x21

90

0x5a

"

34

0x22

127

0x7f

#

35

0x23

123

0x7b

$

36

0x24

91

0x5b

%

37

0x25

108

0x6c

&

38

0x26

80

0x50

'

39

0x27

125

0x7d

(

40

0x28

77

0x4d

)

41

0x29

93

0x5d

*

42

0x2a

92

0x5c

+

43

0x2b

78

0x4e

,

44

0x2c

107

0x6b

-

45

0x2d

96

0x60

.

46

0x2e

75

0x4b

/

47

0x2f

97

0x61

0

48

0x30

240

0xf0

1

49

0x31

241

0xf1

2

50

0x32

242

0xf2

3

51

0x33

243

0xf3

4

52

0x34

244

0xf4

5

53

0x35

245

0xf5

6

54

0x36

246

0xf6

7

55

0x37

247

0xf7

8

56

0x38

248

0xf8

9

57

0x39

249

0xf9

:

58

0x3a

122

0x7a

;

59

0x3b

94

0x5e

<

60

0x3c

76

0x4c

=

61

0x3d

126

0x7e

>

62

0x3e

110

0x6e

?

63

0x3f

111

0x6f

@

64

0x40

124

0x7c

A

65

0x41

193

0xc1

B

66

0x42

194

0xc2

C

67

0x43

195

0xc3

D

68

0x44

196

0xc4

E

69

0x45

197

0xc5

F

70

0x46

198

0xc6

G

71

0x47

199

0xc7

H

72

0x48

200

0xc8

I

73

0x49

201

0xc9

J

74

0x4a

209

0xd1

K

75

0x4b

210

0xd2

L

76

0x4c

211

0xd3

M

77

0x4d

212

0xd4

N

78

0x4e

213

0xd5

O

79

0x4f

214

0xd6

P

80

0x50

215

0xd7

Q

81

0x51

216

0xd8

R

82

0x52

217

0xd9

S

83

0x53

226

0xe2

T

84

0x54

227

0xe3

U

85

0x55

228

0xe4

V

86

0x56

229

0xe5

W

87

0x57

230

0xe6

X

88

0x58

231

0xe7

Y

89

0x59

232

0xe8

Z

90

0x5a

233

0xe9

[

91

0x5b

173

0xad

\

92

0x5c

224

0xe0

]

93

0x5d

189

0xbd

^

94

0x5e

95

0x5f

_

95

0x5f

109

0x6d

\Q

96

0x60

121

0x79

a

97

0x61

129

0x81

b

98

0x62

130

0x82

c

99

0x63

131

0x83

d

100

0x64

132

0x84

e

101

0x65

133

0x85

f

102

0x66

134

0x86

g

103

0x67

135

0x87

h

104

0x68

136

0x88

i

105

0x69

137

0x89

j

106

0x6a

145

0x91

k

107

0x6b

146

0x92

l

108

0x6c

147

0x93

m

109

0x6d

148

0x94

n

110

0x6e

149

0x95

o

111

0x6f

150

0x96

p

112

0x70

151

0x97

q

113

0x71

152

0x98

r

114

0x72

153

0x99

s

115

0x73

162

0xa2

t

116

0x74

163

0xa3

u

117

0x75

164

0xa4

v

118

0x76

165

0xa5

w

119

0x77

166

0xa6

x

120

0x78

167

0xa7

y

121

0x79

168

0xa8

z

122

0x7a

169

0xa9

{

123

0x7b

192

0xc0

|

124

0x7c

79

0x4f

}

125

0x7d

208

0xd0

~

126

0x7e

161

0xa1

Example

The following example creates a two-way binding between an EBCDIC character and an ASCII character:

tn3270 character-map 0x81 0x78

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show tn3270 ascii-hexval
show tn3270 character-map

tn3270 datastream

Use the tn3270 datastream extended global configuration command to enable the TN3270 extended datastream. Use the no form of this command to return to the normal TN3270 datastream.

tn3270 datastream {extended | normal}
no tn3270 datastream

Syntax Description

extended

Extended datastream.

normal

Normal datastream.

Default

Normal datastream

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

This command causes an "-E" to be appended to the terminal type string sent to the IBM host. This allows you to use the extended TN3270 features.

Example

The following example shows the supported tn3270 datastream options:

router(config)# tn3270 datastream ?
  extended  Use extended TN3270 datastream
  normal    Use normal TN3270 datastream

tn3270 null-processing

Use the tn3270 null-processing global configuration command to specify how NULLs are handled. Use the no form of the command to return to 7171 NULL processing.

tn3270 null-processing [3270 | 7171]
no tn3270 null-processing [3270 | 7171]

Syntax Description

3270

(Optional) NULLs are compressed out of the string, as on a 3278-x terminal.

7171

(Optional) NULLs are converted to spaces, as on a 7171 controller.

Default

7171 NULL processing

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

If a user enters data, uses an arrow key to move the cursor to the right on the screen, and then enters more data, the intervening spaces are filled with NULLs. To specify how NULLs are handled, enter the command tn3270 null-processing either with the argument 3270, where NULLs are compressed out of the string (as on a real 3278-x terminal) or the argument 7171, where NULLs are converted to spaces as on a 7171 controller. Enter this command in global configuration.

Example

This example shows the two available null processing methods:

router(config)# tn3270 null-processing ?
  3270  Use 3270-style null processing
  7171  Use 7171-style null processing

tn3270 optimize-cursor-move

To increase performance between a remote user and a TN3270 host by limiting cursor movement information that is sent to user terminals, issue the tn3270 optimize-cursor-move global configuration command. To ensure that all cursor movement information is sent between the user's terminal and the TN3270 host, use the no form of the command.

tn3270 optimize-cursor-move
no tn3270 optimize-cursor-move

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Cursor movement escape strings are sent to the terminal.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Issuing this command increases the speed of information transfer between users and TN3270 hosts through an access server.

If you do not issue this command, virtually every byte of information between the user's terminal and the TN3270 host is prepended and trailed by cursor-movement strings.

Example

The following example disables status messages to users who are connected to 3278 terminals:

router(config)# tn3270 optimize-cursor-move

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

tn3270 status-message

tn3270 reset-required

To lock a terminal after input error until the user resets the terminal, use the tn3270 reset-required global configuration command. Use the no form of the command to return to the default of no reset required.

tn3270 reset-required
no tn3270 reset-required

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No reset is required

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

On a 3278-x terminal, the keyboard is locked and further input is not permitted after input error (due to field overflow, invalid entry, and so on), until the user presses the RESET key. Most TN3270 implementations leave the keyboard unlocked and remove any error message on the next key input after the error. Use this command to lock the keyboard until the user performs a reset.

tn3270 status-message

To reenable the display of status messages after they have been disabled, use the tn3270 status-message global configuration command. To save bandwidth on asynchronous lines by not displaying status messages, use the no form of this command.

tn3270 status-message
no tn3270 status-message

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Status messages appear.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Status messages appear on the user's console by default. These messages include "System Locked," "Field error," and "System UnLocked" messages, among others. These messages are sent back to the user's terminal via the TTY line on the access server.

Disabling status messages saves bandwidth on asynchronous lines, which have very low bandwidth.

Example

The following example disables status messages to users who are connected to 3270 terminals:

router(config)# no tn3270 status-message 

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

tn3270 optimize-cursor-move

tn3270 typeahead

To buffer keyboard data when a 3278 server is in locked mode, use the tn3270 typeahead global configuration command. To disable the typeahead function, use the no form of this command.

tn3270 typeahead
no tn3270 typeahead

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No typeahead

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

When typeahead is enabled, the TN3270 client implementation in the Cisco IOS software permits you (the user) to continue typing while the system is trying to obtain a response from the TN3270 server. Information you type while a "System Locked" message appears on the terminal is stored in a buffer. After the "System Locked" message disappears, the information is then used as though it were just typed.

Example

The following example saves user information when "System Locked" messages appear on the screen:

router(config)# tn3270 typeahead

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

tn3270 reset-required

ttycap

To define characteristics of a terminal emulation file, use the ttycap global configuration command. To delete any named ttycap entry from the configuration file, use the no form of this command.

ttycap ttycap-name termcap-entry
no ttycap ttycap-name

Syntax Description

ttycap-name

Name of a file. It can be up to 32 characters long and must be unique.

termcap-entry

Commands that define the ttycap. Consists of two parts (see the "Usage Guidelines" section for details).

Default

VT100 terminal emulation

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Use the EXEC command show ttycap to test for the availability of a ttycap.


Note Do not type a ttycap entry filename "default" or the Cisco IOS software will adopt the newly defined entry as the default.

The termcap-entry consists of two parts: a name portion and a capabilities portion:

  • The name portion is a series of names that can be used to refer to a specific terminal type. Generally, these names should represent commonly recognized terminal names (such as VT100 and VT200). Multiple names can be used. Each name is separated by a vertical bar symbol (|). The series is terminated by a colon symbol (:).

The following example illustrates a name specification for a VT100 termcap.
d0|vt100|vt100-am|vt100am|dec vt100:

  • The capabilities portion of the termcap-entry consists of a sequence of termcap capabilities. These capabilities can include boolean flags, string sequences, or numeric sequences. Each individual capability is terminated using a colon symbol (:).

A Boolean flag can be set to true by including the two-character capability name in the termcap entry. The absence of any supported flag results in the flag being set to false.
The following is an example of a backspace Boolean flag:
bs:

A string sequence is a two-character capability name followed by an equal sign (=) and the character sequence.

The following example illustrates the capability for homing the cursor:

ho=\E[H:

The sequence \E represents the ESC character.

Control characters can be represented in string sequences by entering a two-character sequence starting with a caret symbol (^), followed by the character to be used as a control character.

The following example illustrates the definition of a control character.

bc=^h:

In this example, the backspace is entered into the termcap-entry as the string sequence as the characters "^h."

A numeric sequence is a two-character capability name followed by a number symbol (#) and the number.

The following example represents the number of columns on a screen.

co#80:

Use the backslash symbol ( \ ) to extend the definition to multiple lines. The end of the ttycap termcap-entry is specified by a colon terminating a line followed by an end-of-line character and no backslash.

For the definitions of supported Boolean-flag ttycap capabilities, see Table 89. For the definitions of supported string-sequence ttycap capabilities, see Table 90. For the definitions of supported number-sequence ttycap capabilities, see Table 91. For the definitions of supported color-sequence ttycap capabilities, see Table 92.


Table 89: Definitions of ttycap Capabilities: Boolean Flags
Boolean Flag Description

am

Automatic margin

bs

Terminal can backspace with bs

ms

Safe to move in standout modes

nc

No currently working carriage return

xn

NEWLINE ignored after 80 columns (Concept)

xs

Standout not erased by overwriting (Hewlett-Packard)


Table 90: Definitions of ttycap Capabilities: String Sequences
String Sequence Description

AL

Add line below with cursor sequence

bc

Backspace if not ^h

bt

Backtab sequence

ce

Clear to end of line

cl

Clear screen, cursor to upper left

cm

Move cursor to row # and col #

cr

Carriage return sequence

cs

Change scrolling region

DL

Delete the line the cursor is on

ei

End insert mode

ho

Home, move cursor to upper left

ic

Character insert

im

Begin insert mode

is

Initialization string (typically tab stop initialization)

ll

Move cursor to lower left corner

md

Turn on bold (extra bright) character attribute

me

Turn off all character attributes

nd

Nondestructive space

nl

Newline sequence

pc

Pad character if not NULL

rc

Restore cursor position

rs

Resets terminal to known starting state

sc

Save cursor position

se

End standout mode (highlight)

so

Start standout mode (highlight)

ta

Tab

te

End programs that use cursor motion

ti

Initialization for programs that use cursor motion

uc

Underline character at cursor

ue

End underline mode

up

Move cursor up

us

Begin underline mode

vb

Visual bell

vs

Visual cursor

ve

Normal cursor


Table 91: Definitions of ttycap Capabilities: Number Sequences
Number Sequence Description

li

Lines on the screen

co

Columns on the screen

sg

Standout glitch, number of spaces printed when entering or leaving standout display mode

ug

Underline glitch, number of spaces printed when entering or leaving underline mode


Table 92: Definitions of ttycap Capabilities: Color Sequences
Color Sequence Description

x0

Black

x1

Blue

x2

Red or orange

x3

Pink or purple

x4

Green, which is the default color.

x5

Turquoise

x6

Yellow

x7

Gray or white

The ttycap database uses these color sequences to translate IBM directives into screen drawing commands. These color sequences control only foreground terminal colors. They do not control background color, which is configured to black by default.

Example

The following is an example of a ttycap file. Refer to the chapter "Configuring Dial-In Terminal Services" in the Dial Solutions Configuration Guide and the tn3270.examples file in the Cisco ftp@cisco.com directory for more examples.

ttycap ttycap1\
d0|vt100|vt100-am|vt100am|dec vt100:do=^J:co#80:li#24:\
cl=50^[[;H^[[2J:bs:am:cm=5^[[%i%d;%dH:nd=2^[[C:up=2^[[A:\
ce=3^[[K:so=2^[[7m:se=2^[[m:us=2^[[4m:ue=2^[[m:md=2^[[1m:\
me=2^[[m:ho=^[[H:xn:sc=^[7:rc=^[8:cs=^[[%i%d;%dr:

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

keymap-type
terminal-type

tunnel

To set up a network layer connection to a router, use the tunnel user EXEC command.

tunnel host

Syntax Description

host

Name or IP address of a specific host on a network that can be reached by the router.

Command Mode

User EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If you are a mobile user, it is often impractical to dial in to your "home" router from a remote site. The asynchronous mobility feature allows you to dial in to different routers elsewhere on the internetwork while experiencing the same server environment that you would if you were connecting directly to your home router.

This asynchronous host mobility is accomplished by packet tunneling, a technique by which raw data from the dial-in user is encapsulated and transported directly to the host site where your home router performs the actual protocol processing.

You enable asynchronous mobility by entering the tunnel command to set up a network layer connection to a specified host. From a router other than a Cisco router, however, you need to use the Telnet protocol.

After a connection is established, you receive an authentication dialog or prompt from your home router and can proceed as if you are connected directly to it. When communications are complete, the network connection can be closed and terminated from either end of the connection.

Example

The following example establishes a network layer connection with an IBM host named mktg:

router> tunnel mktg

where

To list the open sessions, use the where EXEC command.

where

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in a release prior to Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The where command displays all open sessions associated with the current terminal line.

The Ctrl^x, where, and resume commands are available with all supported connection protocols.

Example

The following is sample output from the where command:

router# where
Conn Host                 Address          Byte    Idle  Conn Name
   1 MATHOM               192.31.7.21         0       0  MATHOM
*  2 CHAFF                131.108.12.19       0       0  CHAFF 

The asterisk (*) indicates the current terminal session.

Table 93 describes significant fields shown in the display.


Table 93: Where Field Descriptions
Field Description

Conn

Name or address of the remote host to which the connection is made.

Host

Remote host to which the router is connected through a Telnet session.

Address

IP address of the remote host.

Byte

Number of unread bytes for the user to see on the connection.

Idle

Interval (in minutes) since data was last sent on the line.

Conn Name

Assigned name of the connection.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

resume
show sessions

xremote

To prepare the router for manual startup and initiate an XRemote connection, use the xremote EXEC command. This command begins the instructions that prompt you through the connection.

xremote

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

If you do not use a host computer that supports XDMCP or LAT, you must use manual session startup. Manual session startup involves the following steps:

    1. Enable XRemote manually on the router's port.

    2. Connect to the host computer by using a telnet, lat, or rlogin command, then log on as usual.

    3. Set the location of the X display.

    4. Start client applications.

    5. Return to the EXEC prompt.

    6. Enter the xremote command to enable XRemote manually again on the server port.


Note In manual operation, the server and X terminal remain in XRemote mode until all clients disconnect or the access server receives a reset request from the X terminal. A session might terminate
during startup because you invoked transient X clients that set some parameters (such as xset or xmodmap) and then disconnected. There must always be one session open or the connection resets.

See the Dial Solutions Configuration Guide for more information about how to establish XRemote sessions between servers.

Examples

The following example starts a manual XRemote session:

dialup> xremote
XRemote enabled; your display is dialup:2006
Start your clients and type XRemote again

The router replies with a message informing you of your X display location. Use this information to tell the XRemote host the location of your X display server. If no clients are found, you see the following message:

No X clients waiting - check that your display is darkstar:2006

The following example shows a connection from an X display terminal through a router to a host running client programs:

    dialup> xremote

XRemote enabled; your display is dialup:2006
Start your clients and type XRemote again
dialup> telnet eureka
Trying EUREKA.NOWHERE.COM (252.122.1.55)... Open SunOS UNIX (eureka) login: deal
Password:
Last login: Fri Apr 1 17:17:46 from dialup.nowhere.com
SunOS Release (SERVER+FDDI+DBE.patched) #14: Fri Apr 8 10:37:29 PDT 1994
eureka% setenv DISPLAY dialup:2006
eureka% xterm &
[1] 15439
eureka% logout
[Connection to EUREKA closed by foreign host]
dialup> xremote
Entering XRemote

The following example shows how an XRemote connection is established for a configuration like the one shown in Figure 3. This example assumes that the administrator has set the user's display environment variable to identify the user's X display terminal.

    1. From the PCX, MacX, or UNIX machine in Figure 3, the user connects to port 9003 on AccessServer1. If your administrator has configured a rotary number 7, the user connects to port 10007. For more information about rotary groups, refer to the Dial Solutions Configuration Guide.

    2. AccessServer1 connects the user to a modem.

    3. The modem calls AccessServer2.

    4. The user enters xremote at the AccessServer2 prompt.

    5. The user connects to the host from AccessServer2 using the telnet command.

    6. The user starts the X client program that will run on the host and display on the X  display server (PCX, MacX, or UNIX host).

    7. The user escapes from the host back to the AccessServer2, or logs out if clients were run in the background, and enters xremote command at the AccessServer2 prompt.

    8. You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.


Figure 3:
XRemote Session Between Servers


The following example shows how to make an XRemote connection between servers. The number 9016 in the first line of the display indicates a connection to individual line 16. If the administrator had configured a rotary connection, the user enters 10000 plus the number of the rotary instead of 9016.

router% telnet golden-road 9016
Trying 192.31.7.84 ...
Connected to golden-road.cisco.com.
Escape character is '^]'.
User Access Verification
Password:
Password OK
 --- Outbound XRemote service ---
Enter X server name or IP address: innerspace
Enter display number [0]:
 Connecting to tty16... please start up XRemote on the remote system 
atdt 13125554141
DIALING
RING
CONNECT 14400
User Access Verification
Username: deal
Password:
  Welcome to the cisco dial-up access server.
dialup> xremote
XRemote enabled; your display is dialup:2006
Start your clients and type XRemote again
dialup> telnet sparks
Trying SPARKS.NOWHERE.COM (252.122.1.55)... Open
SunOS UNIX (sparks)
login: deal
Password:
Last login: Fri Apr 1 17:17:46 from dialup.nowhere.com
SunOS Release (SERVER+FDDI+DBE.patched) #14: Fri Apr 8 10:37:29 PDT 1994
sparks% setenv DISPLAY dialup:2006
sparks% xterm &
[1] 15439
sparks% logout
[Connection to SPARKS closed by foreign host]
dialup> xremote
Entering XRemote

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

xremote lat
xremote xdm

xremote lat

To initiate a DECwindow session over a LAT connection, use the xremote lat EXEC command.

xremote lat service

Syntax Description

service

Name of the desired LAT service.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

If your host computer supports DECwindows login sessions, you can use automatic session startup to make an XRemote session connection. Once the system administrator at the remote host configures support for DECwindows over LAT, use the xremote lat EXEC command to initiate the connection. After you issue this command, the following events occur:

  • The XRemote font server down-line loads several initial fonts for the DECwindows login display.

  • The terminal displays the DIGITAL logo and DECwindows login box.

Log on to the host. Upon completion of login, more fonts are loaded, and the remote session  begins.


Note Because of heavy font usage, DECwindows applications can take longer than expected to start when using XRemote. Once the application starts, performance and access times should be as expected.

To exit XRemote sessions, you must quit all active X connections, usually with a command supported by your X client system. Usually, when you quit the last connection (when all client processes are stopped), XRemote closes and you return to the EXEC prompt. However, your X client system determines how the session closes.

Example

The following example begins connection with a LAT service named service1:

router> xremote lat service1

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

xremote
xremote xdm

xremote tftp buffersize

To change the buffer size used for loading font files, use the xremote tftp buffersize global configuration command. To restore the buffer size to the default value, use the no form of this command.

xremote tftp buffersize buffersize
no xremote tftp buffersize

Syntax Description

buffersize

(Optional) Buffer size in bytes. This is a decimal number in the range from 4096 to 70000 bytes. The default is 70000.

Default

70000 bytes

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When the X terminal requests that a font file be loaded, the Cisco IOS software must first load the font file into an internal buffer before passing it to the X terminal. The default value of 70000 bytes is adequate for most font files, but the size can be increased as necessary for nonstandard font files.

The buffer size can be set as low as 4096 bytes and as large as the available memory on the router will allow. If you are using LAT font access, you should not lower the buffer size below the default, because the font directory for all of the LAT fonts (created internally) requires 70000 bytes.

This command applies to both TFTP and LAT font access.

Example

The following example sets the buffer size to 20000 bytes:

xremote tftp buffersize 20000

xremote tftp host

To add a specific TFTP font server as a source of fonts for the terminal, use the xremote tftp host global configuration command. To remove a font server from the list, use the no form of this command.

xremote tftp host hostname
no xremote tftp host hostname

Syntax Description

hostname

IP address or name of the host containing fonts.

Default

No TFTP font server is specified.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Each time a new host name is entered, the list in the Cisco IOS software is updated. Font servers are queried in the order of their definition when the X terminal requests a font.

Examples

The following example sets the host IBM-1 as an XRemote TFTP font server:

xremote tftp host IBM-1

The following example sets the host with IP address 10.0.0.7 as an XRemote TFTP font server:

xremote tftp host 10.0.0.7

xremote tftp retries

To specify the number of retries the font loader will attempt before declaring an error condition, use the xremote tftp retries global configuration command. To restore the default retries number, use the no form of this command.

xremote tftp retries retries
no xremote tftp retries

Syntax Description

retries

(Optional) Number of retries. Acceptable values are decimal numbers in the range from 1 to 15.

Default

3 retries

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Under certain conditions, you might need to increase the number of retries, particularly if the font servers are known to be heavily loaded.

Example

The following example sets the font loader retries to 5:

xremote tftp retries 5

xremote xdm

To activate automatic session startup for an XRemote connection, use the xremote xdm EXEC command.

xremote xdm [hostname]

Syntax Description

hostname

(Optional) Host computer name or IP address.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

If your host computer supports a server running XDMCP (such as the xdm program included in X11R4 or later), you can use automatic session startup to make an XRemote session connection. To do so, use the xremote xdm EXEC command.

This command sends an X Display Manager Control Protocol (XDMCP) session startup request to the host computer. If you do not specify a host name or IP address, a broadcast message is sent to all hosts. The first host to respond by starting up a session is used.

The XRemote (the host) server and X terminal stay in XRemote mode until either the display manager terminates the session or the XRemote server receives a reset request from the X terminal.

To exit XRemote sessions, you must quit all active X connections, usually with a command supported by your X client system. Usually, when you quit the last connection (all client processes are stopped), XRemote closes and you return to the EXEC prompt. However, your remote X client system determines how the session closes.

To terminate a session, disconnect from the device on the network using the command specific to that device. Then, exit from the EXEC by using the exit command.

Example

The following example starts a session with a remote host named host1:

router> xremote xdm host1

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

xremote
xremote lat


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