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Configuring IBM Channel Attach

Configuring IBM Channel Attach

This chapter describes how to configure the Cisco 7000 series mainframe Channel Interface Processor (CIP), which supports the IBM channel attach feature.

For hardware technical descriptions and information about installing the router interfaces, refer to the hardware installation and maintenance publication for your product. For command descriptions and usage information, refer to the "IBM Channel Attach Commands" chapter of the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Cisco's Implementation of the IBM Channel Attach Interface

Support for IBM channel attach is provided on the Cisco 7000 series routers by the Channel Interface Processor (CIP) and an appropriate interface adapter card. With a CIP and the ESCON Channel Adapter (ECA) or bus-and-tag Parallel Channel Adapter (PCA), a Cisco 7000 series router can be directly connected to a mainframe, replacing the function of an IBM 3172 interconnect controller. This connectivity enables mainframe applications and peripheral access from LAN-based workstations.

A single CIP can support up to two channel adapter cards in any combination. Because of this flexibility, upgrading from parallel bus-and-tag to ESCON is simplified. The CIP can be configured for ESCON support by replacing a PCA with an ESCON adapter. Note that this upgrade procedure must be done by authorized service personnel.

The CIP provides support for the environments discussed in the following sections:

TCP/IP Environments Using CLAW

TCP/IP mainframe protocol environments for IBM operating systems Multiple Virtual Storage (MVS) and Virtual Machine (VM) are supported. This support includes TCP/IP-based applications such as terminal emulation (Telnet), the File Transfer Protocol (FTP), Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) and Network File System (NFS), a distributed file access system. In addition, Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) and User Datagram Protocol (UDP) are supported.

A CIP configured with 8 megabytes (MB) of memory can support up to 128 CLAW connections, or 256 devices. Because each CLAW connection requires two devices, that allows a maximum of 128  CLAW connections per interface adapter card.

TCP/IP Offload Environments

TCP/IP mainframe protocol environments for IBM operating systems MVS and VM are supported.

The CIP TCP/IP offload feature delivers the same function as the TCP/IP "offload" function on the 3172 Interconnect Controller (Model 3), but without the performance penalty. This feature implements the 3172 offload protocol for transporting application requests over the IBM ESCON or bus-and-tag channels.

All functionality provided in the CLAW environment is also supported in the TCP/IP offload environment because the function ships TCP/IP application calls over the mainframe channel using the CLAW channel protocol.

CIP SNA (CSNA) Environments

The CSNA feature provides support for SNA protocols over both ESCON and PCA interfaces to the IBM mainframe. As an IBM 3172 replacement, the CIP must support the External Communications Adapter (XCA) feature of VTAM, which allows VTAM to define Token Ring devices attached to the 3172 as switched devices.

In SNA environments, support for the XCA feature of VTAM allows the CIP to provide an alternative to front-end processors (FEPs) at sites where NCP is not required for SNA routing functions.

By providing CLS and the Logical Link Control, type 2 (LLC2) protocol stack on the CIP card, all frames destined to the CIP or from the CIP card can be fast switched by the router. The presentation of multiple "virtual" LAN media types allows the CSNA feature to take advantage of current source-route bridging (SRB), remote source-route bridging (RSRB), data-link switching plus (DLSw+), transparent bridging, SDLC-LLC2 translation (SDLLC), and Qualified Logical Link Control (QLLC) services.


Note In the implementation of CSNA, the multiple virtual LAN media types available are referred to as internal LAN types, because they exist as internal processes on the CIP card.

The CSNA feature supports the following communication through a Cisco 7000 series router:

The CSNA feature provides SNA connectivity through the use of MAC addresses configured for internal MAC adapters on the Cisco 7000 series router. These internal MAC adapters correspond to XCA major node definitions in VTAM, providing access points (LAN gateway) to VTAM for SNA network nodes. The internal MAC adapters are configured to exist on internal LANs located on a CIP card. Each CIP card can be configured with multiple internal LANs where an internal LAN can be a Token Ring, Ethernet, or FDDI LAN. Each internal Token Ring or FDDI LAN must be configured to participate in either source-route or transparent bridging and each internal Ethernet LAN must be configured for transparent bridging. Each internal Token Ring or FDDI LAN can be configured with up to 32 internal MAC adapters. An Ethernet internal LAN can support a single internal MAC adapter. The internal MAC adapter is an emulation of LAN adapters in an IBM 3172 interconnect controller.

TN3270 Server Environments under CSNA

The TN3270 server feature on a CIP card provides mapping between an SNA 3270 host and a TN3270 client connected to a TCP/IP network as shown in Figure 127. Functionally, it is useful to view the TN3270 server from two different perspectives: SNA functions and Telnet Server functions.

From the perspective of an SNA 3270 host connected to the CIP, the TN3270 server is an SNA device that supports multiple physical units (PUs), with each PU supporting up to 255 logical unites (LUs). The LU can be Type 1, 2, or 3. The SNA host is unaware of the existence of the TCP/IP extension on the implementation of these LUs.
The LUs implemented by TN3270 server are dependent LUs. To route these dependent LU sessions to multiple virtual telecommunications access method (VTAM) hosts connected to the server in the CIP card, rather than routing in the VTAM hosts, the TN3270 server implements a SNA session switch with end node dependent LU requester (DLUR) function. Using the DLUR is optional so that the TN3270 server can be used with VTAM versions prior to version 4.2, which provide no APPN support.
SNA session switch allows you to eliminate SNA subarea routing between hosts of TN3270 traffic by establishing APPN links with the primary LU hosts directly.
From the perspective of a TN3270 client, the TN3270 server is a Telnet server that can support approximately 8000 concurrent Telnet sessions. The server on the CIP card supports Telnet connection negotiation and data format as specified in RFC 1576 (referred to as "traditional TN3270") and RFC 1647 (referred to as "TN3270E").

Figure 127:
TN3270 Implementation

Because the TN3270 server configuration is performed after an interface is configured for CSNA support, TN3270 configuration issues and tasks are addressed separately from the interface configuration tasks. The description of TN3270 configuration issues and tasks begins in the section "Configuring TN3270 on a Channel Interface Processor," later in this chapter.


Note To enable the TN3270 server feature, you must have a CIP installed in a Cisco 7000 family router. The TN3270 server is very different from the TN3270 terminal emulation access feature described in the "Configuring TN3270" chapter of the Access Services Configuration Guide.

Interface Configuration Task List

You can perform the tasks in the following sections to configure and maintain IBM channel attach interfaces. In addition, several examples show how host configuration settings correlate to values used in the configuration commands.


Note After you select an interface to configure, you can configure that interface for the specific features you prefer: CLAW support, offload support, or CSNA support.

Not all tasks are required. Your CIP image may be preloaded. You must select an interface, after which you configure the features you want supported on that interface.

See the end of this chapter for "IBM Channel Attach Interface Configuration Examples."


Note You can configure a CIP interface for any or all of the supported modes. If you want only CSNA support, for example, you need not configure TCP/IP support.

Because the TN3270 server configuration is performed after an interface is configured for CSNA support, TN3270 configuration issues and tasks are addressed separately from the interface configuration tasks. The of TN3270 configuration task list begins in the section "TN3270 Configuration Task List," later in this chapter.

Load the CIP Image

Beginning with Cisco IOS Software Release 11.1, the CIP microcode (or CIP image) no longer is bundled with the Cisco IOS software. You must have Flash memory installed on the Route Processor (RP) card and 8 MB of RAM installed on your CIP card to use the IBM channel attach features in Cisco IOS Software Release 11.1 and later.

The CIP image is preloaded on Flash cards for all Cisco 7000 series routers ordered with the CIP option for Cisco IOS Software Release 11.1 and later. Perform the tasks in this section if you are upgrading the CIP image in your router.

To prepare the CIP, perform the following tasks beginning in privileged EXEC command mode:
Task Command

Copy the CIP image from a server to the Flash memory. Use the appropriate command for your system. You must be running Cisco IOS Release 11.1 or later prior to executing a copy tftp command.

copy tftp flash cipxxx-yy1 (embedded Flash)
copy tftp slot0: (Flash card)
copy tftp slotn: (Flash card on 7500 series router)
copy tftp bootflash: (onboard Flash on 7500 series router)

Configure your router to load the Flash image to
the CIP:

Step 1 Enter global configuration mode and specify that the CIP microcode load from a Flash card in router slot n or from embedded Flash.

Step 2 Load the image from Flash to the CIP card.


configure1
microcode cip flash slotn:cipxxx-yy1
or
microcode cip flash cipxxx-yy

microcode reload

Exit configuration mode and display images loaded on the CIP card.

show controllers cbus2

1These commands are documented in the "Image and Configuration File Load Commands" chapter of the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.
2
This command is documented in the "Interface Commands" chapter of the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.

Rather than as a single image (named cipxxx-yy), the CIP image appears as a directory (cipxxx-yy) that contains the various image segments to be loaded into the CIP.

The router configuration process takes longer than when using features, because the initial loading of a CIP configuration feature results in the loading of the applicable code and includes any necessary processing.

Select the Interface

Before you configure your channel attach interface, you must select the interface. Perform the following task in global configuration mode:
Task Command

Select the channel attach interface and enter interface configuration mode.

interface channel slot/port

You need not add a space between the interface type (channel) and the slot and port number. For example, you can specify interface channel 3/0 or interface channel3/0.

Use the show extended channel subchannel EXEC command to display current CIP status. This command provides a report for each physical interface configured to support IBM channel attach.

The following section describes how to configure your channel attach interface.

See the section "IBM Channel Attach Interface Configuration Examples" at the end of this chapter for example configuration commands.

Configure IBM Channel Attach for TCP/IP CLAW Support

The following sections describe how to configure the IBM channel attach interface for TCP/IP CLAW support. All tasks, except for configuring other interface support, are required:

See the section "Select Host System Parameters" for guidelines on matching interface configuration values with host system values.

Define the Routing Process

You must configure the routing process that will be used by the Cisco IOS software. We recommend using the Enhanced IGRP routing process to perform IP routing on the IBM channel attach interface. Perform the following steps beginning in global configuration mode:
Task Command

Step 1 Enter router configuration mode by selecting the routing process, preferably Enhanced IGRP, and the autonomous system the router belongs to.

router eigrp process-id1
or
router igrp process-id1

Step 2 Define the directly connected networks that are part of the autonomous system.

network network-number1

1These commands are documented in the "IP Routing Commands" chapter of the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.

Assign an IP Address

You must assign an IP address to the ECA or PCA interface so that it can communicate with other devices (or tasks) on the network. The IP address you assign to the interface must be in the same subnetwork as the hosts with which you wish to communicate. Perform the following task in interface configuration mode:
Task Command

Assign an IP address and network mask to the selected interface.

ip address address mask1

1This command is documented in the "IP Commands" chapter of the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.

Configure the IBM Channel Attach Interface

You must define the devices, or tasks, supported on the interface. Some information you need to perform this task is derived from the following host system configuration files: MVSIOCP, IOCP, and the TCPIP configuration. Refer to the section "Select Host System Parameters" for guidelines on matching interface configuration values with host system values.

Perform the following task in interface configuration mode:
Task Command

Define the CLAW parameters for this device.

claw path device-address ip-address host-name device-name host-app device-app [broadcast]

See the section "IBM Channel Attach Interface Configuration Examples" for samples of claw commands for different configurations.

Select a Data Rate for the Parallel Channel Adapter (PCA)

When you configure a channel attach interface that supports a PCA card, you must define a data rate of either 3 MB per second or 4.5 MB per second. Perform the following task in interface configuration mode:
Task Command

Define the PCA data transfer rate.

channel-protocol [s | s4]

Configure Other Interface Support

To enhance the usefulness of IBM channel attach support, you can further define how the interface and the router interoperate by performing any of the following tasks in interface configuration mode:
Task Command

Disable fast switching (IP route cache switching). Fast switching is on by default, but access lists can inhibit fast switching. Always include this command when configuring host-to-host communications through the same ECA interface.

no ip route-cache1

Use access lists to filter connections.

access-list access-list-number {permit | deny} source source-wildcard1

Enable autonomous switching through either the silicon switching engine (SSE) or the CxBus controller.

ip route-cache [cbus | sse]1
or
ip route-cache sse

Include autonomous switching support for multiple IP datagram applications running on the same CIP, as required. Always include this command when configuring host-to-host communications through the same ECA interface.

ip route-cache same-interface1

1These commands are documented in the "IP Commands" chapter of the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.

Configure IBM Channel Attach for TCP/IP Offload Support

The following sections describe how to configure the IBM channel attach interface for TCP/IP offload support. All tasks, except for configuring other interface support, are required:

See the section "Select Host System Parameters" for guidelines on matching interface configuration values with host system values.

Define the Routing Process

You must configure the routing process that will be used by the Cisco IOS software. We recommend using the Enhanced IGRP routing process to perform IP routing on the IBM channel attach interface. Perform the following steps beginning in global configuration mode:
Task Command

Step 1 Enter router configuration mode by selecting the routing process, preferably Enhanced IGRP, and the autonomous system the router belongs to.

router eigrp process-id1

Step 2 Define the directly connected networks that are part of the autonomous system.

network network-number1

1These commands are documented in the "IP Commands" chapter of the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.

Assign an IP Address

You must assign an IP address to the ECA or PCA interface so that it can communicate with other devices (or tasks) on the network. The IP address you assign to the interface must be in the same subnetwork as the hosts with which you wish to communicate. Perform the following task in interface configuration mode:
Task Command

Assign an IP address and network mask to the selected interface.

ip address address mask1

1This command is documented in the "IP Commands" chapter of the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.

Configure the IBM Channel Attach Interface

You must define the devices, or tasks supported on the interface. Some information you need to perform this task is derived from the following host system configuration files: MVSIOCP, IOCP, and the TCP/IP configuration. Refer to the section "Select Host System Parameters" for guidelines on matching interface configuration values with host system values.

Perform the following task in interface configuration mode:
Task Command

Define the offload parameters for this device.

offload path device-address ip-address host-name device-name host-app device-app host-link device-link [broadcast]

See the section "IBM Channel Attach Interface Configuration Examples" for samples of offload commands for different configurations.

Select a Data Rate for the Parallel Channel Adapter (PCA)

When you configure a channel attach interface that supports a PCA card, you must define a data rate of either 3 MB per second or 4.5 MB per second. Perform the following task in interface configuration mode:
Task Command

Define the PCA data transfer rate.

channel-protocol [s | s4]

Configure Other Interface Support

You can further define how the interface and the router interoperate. You can perform any of the following tasks in interface configuration mode to enhance the usefulness of IBM channel attach support:
Task Command

Disable fast switching (IP route cache switching). Fast switching is on by default, but access lists can inhibit fast switching. Always include this command when configuring host-to-host communications through the same ECA interface.

no ip route-cache1

Use access lists to filter connections.

access-list list {permit | deny} source source-wildcard1

Enable autonomous switching through either the silicon switching engine (SSE) or the CxBus controller.

ip route-cache [cbus]1
or
ip route-cache sse1

Include autonomous switching support for multiple IP datagram applications running on the same CIP, as required. Always include this command when configuring host-to-host communications through the same ECA interface.

ip route-cache same-interface1

1These commands are documented in the "IP Commands" chapter of the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.

Configure IBM Channel Attach for CSNA Support

The following sections describe how to configure the IBM channel attach interface for CSNA support. The last task, "Name the Internal Adapter," is optional. All other tasks are required.


Note Internal LAN interfaces can be configured only on port 2 of a CIP. Port 0 and port 1 represent physical interface ports; port 2 is always reserved for the internal interface.

Configure the Channel Information

To define the SNA channels supported by the CSNA feature, perform the following task in interface configuration mode:
Task Command

Define the CSNA interface.

csna path device [maxpiu value] [time-delay value] [length-delay value]


Note The CSNA interface is configured on port 0 or port 1, one of the physical interfaces.

Configure the Internal LAN Interfaces

To select an internal LAN interface, perform the following tasks beginning in global configuration mode:
Task Command

Step 1 Select the channel attach interface and enter interface configuration mode.

interface channel slot/2

Step 2 Select the maximum number of concurrent LLC2 sessions.

max-llc2-sessions number

Step 3 Select the LAN interface and enter internal LAN configuration mode.

lan type lan-id

Configure Bridging

Select the bridging characteristics for Token Ring and FDDI, or Ethernet. Perform either of the following tasks in internal LAN configuration mode:
Task Command

Select source-route bridging for Token Ring or FDDI.

source-bridge local-ring bridge-number target-ring1

Select transparent bridging for Ethernet.

bridge-group bridge-group2

1This command is documented in the "Source-Route Bridging Commands" chapter of the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.
2This command is documented in the "Source-Route Transparent Bridging Commands" chapter of the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Configure the Internal Adapter's Link Characteristics

To configure the link characteristics of the internal LAN adapter, perform the following tasks in internal LAN configuration mode:
Task Command

Step 1 Enter internal adapter configuration mode.

adapter adapter-number mac-address

Step 2 Configure the link characteristics.

llc2 ack-delay time milliseconds1
llc2 ack-max packet-count
llc2 idle-time milliseconds
llc2 local-window packet-count
llc2 n1 maximum-size
llc2 n2 retry-count
llc2 nw window-size
llc2 recv-window size
llc2 t1-time milliseconds
llc2 tbusy-time milliseconds
llc2 tpf-time milliseconds
llc2 trej-time milliseconds

1The LLC2 commands are documented in the "LLC2 and SDLC Commands" chapter of the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Name the Internal Adapter

Select a name for the internal adapter. Perform the following task in internal adapter configuration mode:
Task Command

Select a name for the internal adapter.

name name

Select Host System Parameters

This section describes how to correlate values found in the VM and MVS system I/O configuration program (IOCP) files with the fields in the claw interface configuration command and the offload interface configuration command. In addition, you will need configuration information from the host TCP/IP application configuration file. Refer to the following IBM operating system manuals for specific IOCP configuration statement details:

Values from the Host IOCP File

When you define CLAW or offload parameters, you must supply path information and device address information to support routing on an IBM channel. The path information can be simple, in the case of a channel directly attached to a router, or more challenging when the path includes an ESCON director switch or multiple image facility support.

The path argument is a concatenation of three hexadecimal numbers that represent the values listed in Table 3.


Table 3: CLAW Path Argument Values
CLAW Path Argument Breakdown Values Description

Path

01-FF

For a directly attached ESCON channel or any parallel channel, this value is 01 unless the system administrator has configured another value.

For a channel attached through an ESCON director switch, this value will be the path that, from the Cisco IOS software point of view, exits the switch and attaches to the host.

Channel logical address

0-F

For a parallel channel, this value is 0. For a directly attached ESCON channel, the value may be non-zero.

If the host is running in Logical Partition (LPAR) mode and the CHPID is defined as shared, this is the partition number associated with the devices configured in the IOCP.

The default for this part of the path argument is 0.

Otherwise, the channel logical address associated with the channel is defined in the IOCP.

Control unit logical address

0-F

For a parallel channel, this value is 0. For a directly attached ESCON channel, the value may be non-zero.

If this value is specified in the IOCP, match that value here.

Otherwise, the control unit logical address is specified in the IOCP CNTLUNIT statement for the host channel in the CUADD parameter.

In Figure 128, two host systems connect to the ESCON director switch, on paths 23 and 29. The channels both exit the switch on path 1B and attach to Router A.


Figure 128: System with an ESCON Director Switch and a Directly Attached Channel

Note that the path between Host A and Host B is dynamically switched within the ESCON director. A third host is attached directly to Router B through path 42. The IOCP control unit statements would look something like the following examples:

CNTLUNIT CUNUMBER=0001, PATH=(23), LINK=1B, UNITADD=((00,64)), UNIT=SCTC, CUADD=F
 
CNTLUNIT CUNUMBER=0002, PATH=(29), LINK=1B, UNITADD=((00,64)), UNIT=SCTC, CUADD=A
 
CNTLUNIT CUNUMBER=000A, PATH=(42), UNIT=SCTC, UNITADD=((00,64))
 

Note If you use the Hardware Configuration Definition (HCD) program to generate an IOCP and your release of HCD does not support the value RS6K, you might need to set the control unit and device value to SCTC for your ESCON channels. A device mismatch error message will be displayed, but the device will come online and operate correctly.

The system administrator can provide you with the values, for example 15 and 19, for the return channel attachment from the switch to each host. Given these values, the claw command path argument for the two channel attachments to Router A becomes:

claw 150F
claw 190A

The offload command path argument for the two channel attachments to Router A becomes:

offload 150F
offload 190A

The claw command path argument for the directly attached channel to Router B is easy to determine:

claw 0100 
 

Similarly, the offload command path argument for the directly attached channel to Router B is as follows:

offload 0100 
 

Next, determine the claw or offload command device-address argument value, which is shown as 00 in the UNITADD parameter for all three devices. This value can be any even value between 00 and 3E, as long as it matches an allowed UNITADD value in IOCP. The claw (or offload) commands now become:

claw 150F 00
claw 190A 00
 
offload 150F 00
offload 190A 00
 
claw 0100 02
 
offload 0100 02

Values from the Host TCP/IP File

The remainder of the claw and offload command arguments are derived from the DEVICE, LINK, and HOME statements in the host TCP/IP configuration files. The statements will be similar to the following:

DEVICE EVAL CLAW 500 VMSYSTEM C7000 NONE  20  20 4096 4096
LINK EVAL1 IP 0 EVAL
HOME 198.92.2.12   EVAL1    
 
DEVICE EVAL CLAW 600 STSYSTEM C7000 NONE  20  20 4096 4096
LINK EVAL1 IP 0 EVAL
HOME 198.92.2.13   EVAL1    
 
DEVICE EVAL CLAW 700 RDUSYSTM C7000 NONE  20  20 4096 4096
LINK EVAL1 IP 0 EVAL
HOME 198.92.2.14   EVAL1    
 

The DEVICE statement lists the host-name and device-name values to use, which follows the CLAW  500 entry in the DEVICE statement.

The LINK statement links the device name, EVAL, to EVAL1. The IP address for EVAL1 appears in the HOME statement.

Based on this example, you can supply the remainder of the arguments for the sample claw commands:

claw 150F 00 198.92.2.12 VMSYSTEM C7000 TCPIP TCPIP
claw 190A 00 198.92.2.13 STSYSTEM C7000 TCPIP TCPIP
 
claw 0100 02 198.92.2.14 RDUSYSTM C7000 TCPIP TCPIP
 

Similarly, the sample offload commands are as follows:

offload 150F 00 198.92.2.12 VMSYSTEM C7000 TCPIP API
offload 190A 00 198.92.2.13 STSYSTEM C7000 TCPIP API
 
offload 0100 02 198.92.2.14 RDUSYSTM C7000 TCPIP API

Example of a Derived Value

When you have a directly attached channel, the system administrator may provide you with a system IODEVICE ADDRESS that you can use. In this case, you must work backwards through the IOCP file to locate the proper device-address argument value for the claw command.

In this first example, the IODEVICE ADDRESS value is 800. Using this number, you locate the IODEVICE ADDRESS statement in the IOCP file, which points you to the CNTLUNIT statement that contains the device-address argument value for the claw or offload command:

IODEVICE ADDRESS=(0800,256),CUNUMBR=(0012),UNIT=SCTC
**** Address 800 points to CUNUMBR 0012 in the following statement
 
CNTLUNIT CUNUMBR=0012,PATH=(28),UNIT=SCTC,UNITADD=((00,256))
**** The device-address is the UNITADD value of 00
 

From this example, the claw or offload command would be similar to the following:

claw 0100 00 197.91.2.12 CISCOVM EVAL TCPIP TCPIP
 

In the next example, the system administrator has given you an IODEVICE ADDRESS of 350, which does not correspond exactly to a value in the IOCP file. In this instance you must calculate an offset device-address argument value for the claw or offload command:

IODEVICE ADDRESS=(0340,64),CUNUMBR=(0008),UNIT=SCTC 
IODEVICE ADDRESS=(0380,64),CUNUMBR=(0009),UNIT=SCTC 
**** Address 350 (340 + 10) is in the range covered by CUNUMBER 0008
 
CNTLUNIT CUNUMBR=0008,PATH=(24),UNIT=SCTC,UNITADD=((40,64)),SHARED=N, X 
**** The device-address is the UNITADD value of 40, offset by 10
**** The device-address to use is 50
 

From this example, the claw or offload command would be similar to the following:

claw 0100 50 197.91.2.12 CISCOVM EVAL TCPIP TCPIP

Note In the IOCP examples for the IODEVICE and CNTLUNIT statements, UNIT=SCTC is the usual value for ESCON channels. Parallel channels will have UNIT=3088 in the CNTLUNIT statement and UNIT=CTC in the IODEVICE statement.
Caution When you are running MVS, you must disable the missing interrupt handler (MIH) to avoid introducing errors into the CLAW algorithm. Refer to the IBM publication Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol TCP/IP Version 2 Release 2.1 for MVS: Planning and Customization (publication SC31-6085 or later) for information on disabling the MIH.

Monitor and Maintain the Interface

You can perform the tasks in the following sections to monitor and maintain the interfaces:

Monitor Interface Status

The software allows you to display information about the interface, including the version of the software and the hardware, the controller status, and statistics about the interfaces. The following table lists some of the interface monitoring tasks. To display the full list of show commands, enter show ? at the EXEC prompt.

Perform the following commands in privileged EXEC mode:
Task Command

Display information about the CIP interfaces on the Cisco 7000 series. These commands display information that is specific to the interface hardware.

show extended channel slot/port connection-map llc2

show extended channel slot/port csna [admin | oper | stats] [path [device-address]]

show extended channel slot/port icmp-stack [ip-address]

show extended channel slot/port ip-stack [ip-address]

show extended channel slot/port llc2 [admin | oper | stats] [lmac [lsap [rmac [rsap]]]]

show extended channel slot/port max-llc2-sessions

show extended channel slot/port statistics [path [device-address]]

show extended channel slot/port subchannel

show extended channel slot/port tcp-stack [ip-address]

show extended channel slot/port udp-listeners [ip-address]

show extended channel slot/port udp-stack [ip-address]

show interfaces channel slot/port [accounting]

Display current internal status information for the interface controller cards in the Cisco 7000 series.

show controllers {cxbus | fddi | serial | t1 | token}1

Display the number of packets for each protocol type that has been sent through the interface for the Cisco 7000 series.

show interfaces channel slot/port

Display the hardware configuration, software version, names and sources of configuration files, and boot images.

show version2

1This command is documented in the "Interface Commands" chapter of the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.
2This command is documented in the "Image and Configuration File Load Commands" chapter of the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.

Clear and Reset an Interface

To clear the interface counters shown with the show interfaces command, enter the following command in EXEC mode:
Task Command

Clear interface counters for the Cisco 7000.

clear counters [type slot/port]1

1This command is documented in the "Interface Commands" chapter of the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.


Note This command will not clear counters retrieved using Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), but only those seen with the EXEC show interfaces command.

Complete the following task in EXEC mode to clear and reset interfaces. Under normal circumstances, you do not need to clear the hardware logic on interfaces.
Task Command

Reset the hardware logic on an interface.

clear interface type number1

1This command is documented in the "Interface Commands" chapter of the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.

Shut Down and Restart an Interface

You can disable an interface. Doing so disables all functions on the specified interface and marks the interface as unavailable on all monitoring command displays. This information is communicated to other network servers through all dynamic routing protocols. The interface will not be mentioned in any routing updates. On the CIP with an ECA interface adapter, a command is sent to the host to inform it of the impending shutdown. On the CIP with a PCA interface adapter, the shutdown command disables the adapter card's transceivers and the PCA stops responding to all commands. A select-out bypass relay must be manually set at the cable connecting to the PCA.

One reason to shut down an interface is if you want to change the interface type of a Cisco 7000 port online. To ensure that the system recognizes the new interface type, shut down the interface, then reenable it after changing the interface. Refer to your hardware documentation for more details.

To shut down an interface and then restart it, perform the following tasks in interface configuration mode:
Task Command

Shut down an interface.

shutdown1

Reenable an interface.

no shutdown1

1These commands are documented in the "Interface Commands" chapter of the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.

To check whether an interface is disabled, use the EXEC command show interfaces. An interface that has been shut down is shown as administratively down in the show interfaces command display.

Run CIP Interface Loopback Diagnostics

The CIP does not provide software loopback support. You can use special loopback wrap plugs to perform hardware loopback with the ECA and PCA interface cards. Hardware loopback information is included in the hardware installation notes for the CIP.

Configuring TN3270 on a Channel Interface Processor

The following sections describe additional features of TN3270 server support on the CIP. The features discussed include the following:

You will also need to understand the following information before proceeding with TN3270 configuration tasks:

Dynamic LU Allocation

This will be the most common form of request from TN3270 clients emulating a TN3270 terminal. The user typically wants to specify emulating a particular terminal type and normally is not interested in what LOCADDR or LU name is allocated by the host, as long as a network solicitor logon menu is presented. The server will perform the following on such a session request:

When VTAM receives the NMVT, it will use the EBCDIC model type and number string to look up an LU template under the LUGROUP. For example, the string "327802E" will find a match in the sample configuration shown in Figure 129. An ACTLU will be sent and a terminal session with the model and type requested by the client can be established.

Formation of LU Model Type and Number

VTAM requires a model type and number from the Reply PSID NMVT to use as a key to look up in the LU group to find an LU template. The model type is a four character string; the model number is a two or three character string. The server will accept the following formats of terminal type string from the client:


Note The "E" in the model string refers to 3270 Extended Datastream. It has no connection with the "E" in "TN3270E".

A complication arises with TN3270E clients that request a copy of the Bind Image. Such clients require SCS datastream on the SSCP-LU flow. All other clients require 3270 datastream on that flow. Therefore, these two kinds of client must be directed to different LUGROUP entries at the host. To make this as easy as possible, the SCS requirement is also encoded into the model string sent to the host. Following the previously described terminal type string formats accepted by the server, this additional condition is applied:


Table 4: Examples of Model String Mapping
String from Client (ASCII) BIND-IMAGE Requested? String to Host (EBCDIC)

IBM-3278-4

No

327804

IBM-3279-5E

No

327905E

IBM-3279-3-E

Yes

3279S5E

IBM-DYNAMIC

Yes

DYNASIC

ABC

Yes

ABCS

ABCDEFGH

Yes

ABCDSFG

Specific LU Allocation

A TN3270E client can request a specific LU name by using the TN3270E command CONNECT as documented in RFC 1647. The name requested must match the name by which the TN3270 server knows the LU (see the section "LU Names in the TN3270 Server"), and the host must have activated the LU (with ACTLU).

LU Names in the TN3270 Server

Where SNA session switching is configured (that is, on DLUR PUs) the TN3270 server learns the LU names from the ACTLUs.

For direct PUs, a "seed" name can be configured on the PU. TN3270 server uses this name in conjunction with the LOCADDRS to generate names for the LUs. It is best to use the same naming convention as the host.

SNA Switching---End Node DLUR

An end node DLUR function is implemented as part of the TN3270 server. The purpose of the DLUR is to allow the routing of TN3270 LUs to multiple VTAM hosts to be performed in the CIP card rather than on the VTAM hosts. The need for this feature will increase with the introduction of the new multi-CPU CMOS mainframe which comprises up to 16 CPUs that appear as separate VTAMs.

The implementation of TN3270 server LUs under DLUR also allows the server to learn about the LU names on the ACTLU, which greatly simplifies the configuration to support specifically requestable LUs such as printers.

Multiple Hosts Support

The TN3270 server supports access to multiple hosts via the configuration on a PU basis (Table 5). PUs connected to different hosts/applications can be configured with different IP address.


Table 5: Direct PU Configuration in Router
Command PU
Name
Idblk Ip-address Type Adapter
number
Lsap RMAC Rmac Lu-seed Lu-name

PU

X1

05D30001

192.195.80.40

tok

1

4

RMAC

4100.cafe.0001

lu-seed

TN3X1###

PU

X2

05D30002

171.69.176.43

tok

1

8

RMAC

4100.cafe.0002

lu-seed

TN3X2###

From the pu (direct) TN3270 configuration command values shown in Table 5, PU X2 establishes a link to a host at SAP 4 (the default) on MAC address 4100.cafe.0002. A client connecting to IP address 171.69.176.43 is allocated an LU from that PU and is routed to that host.

Note that by using the DLUR function, all the LUs in the server can be defined and owned by a controlling VTAM. When a client requests an application residing on a different VTAM host, the controlling VTAM will issue the request to the target host which will send a BIND directly to the client. All LU-LU data will then flow directly between the target host and the client without needing to go through the controlling VTAM.

VTAM Host Configuration Considerations for Dynamic LU Allocation

Other non-Cisco implementations of TN3270 support depend on predefined, static pools of LUs to support different terminal types requested by the TN3270 clients. The CIP TN3270 server implementation removes the static nature of these configurations by using a VTAM release 3.4 feature, dynamic definition of dependent LU (DDDLU). (Refer to the VTAM operating sysetm manuals for your host system, under the descriptions for LUGROUP for additional information.) DDDLU dynamically requests LUs using the terminal type provided by TN3270 clients. The dynamic request eliminates the need to define any LU configuration in the server to support TN3270 clients emulating a generic TN3270 terminal.

To support DDDLU, the PUs used by the TN3270 server have to be defined in VTAM with LUSEED and LUGROUP parameters as shown in Figure 129.


Figure 129: VTAM Host Values Defining LUSEED and LUGROUP
Example VTAM host values defining LUSEED and LUGROUP name parameters:

TN3270PU

PU

.
IDBLK=05D,

IDNUM=30001,

*

define other PU parameters



LUSEED=TN3X1###,
*
define the seed component of the LU names created by DDDLU (e.g. LOCADDR 42 will have the name TN3X1042)


LUGROUP=AGROUP
*
define the LU group name
*




TN3X1100 
LU
LOCADDR=100,
MODETAB=AMODETAB
*
define a terminal which requires a specific LU name
*




TN3X1101
LU
LOCADDR=101,
DLOGMODE=M3287CS
*
define a printer which requires a specific LU name





Example VTAM host values defining LUGROUPname, AGROUP:
AGROUP
LUGROUP

*
define LU group to support various terminal types
327802E
LU
USSTAB=USSXXX,
LOGAPPL=TPXP001,
DLOGMOD=SNX32702,
SSCPFM=USS3270
*
define template to support IBM 3278 terminal model 2 with Extended Data Stream. Note that the USS messages in USSXXX should be in 3270 datastream.
3278S2E
LU
USSTAB=USSYYY,
LOGAPPL=TPXP001,
DLOGMOD=SNX32702,
SSCPFM=USSSCS
*
define template to support IBM 3278 terminal model 2 with Extended Data Stream, for TN3270E clients requesting BIND-IMAGE.
327805
LU
USSTAB=USSXXX,
LOGAPPL=TPXP001,
DLOGMOD=D4C32785,
SSCPFM=USS3270
*
define template to support IBM 3279 terminal model 5
@
LU
USSTAB=USSXXX,
LOGAPPL=TPXP001,
DLOGMOD=D4A32772,
SSCPFM=USS3270

this is the default template to match any other terminal types

With the configuration shown inFigure 129 defined in the host, the ACTPU sent by VTAM for the PU TN3270PU will have the "Unsolicited NMVT Support" set in the system services control point (SSCP) capabilities control vector. This allows the PU to dynamically allocate LUs by sending network management vector transport (NMVT) with a "Reply Product Set ID" control vector.

After the TN3270 server sends a positive response to the ACTPU, it will wait for VTAM to send ACTLUs for all specifically defined LUs. In the sample configuration shown in Figure 129, ACTLUs will be sent for TN3X1100 and TN3X1101. The server sends a positive response and sets SLU DISABLED. The LOCADDR of these LUs are put into the specific LU cache and reserved for specific LU name requests only.

To allow sufficient time for the VTAM host to send all the ACTLUs, a 30-second timer is started and restarted when an ACTLU is received. When the time expires, it is assumed all ACTLUs defined in VTAM for the PU have been sent. All LUs that have not been activated are available in a generic LU pool to be used for DDDLU unless they have been reserved by the configuration using the generic-pool deny TN3270 configuration command.

After the VTAM activation, the server can support session requests from clients using dynamic or specific LU allocation.

TN3270 Configuration Modes

The TN3270 configuration modes and router command prompts are described in the following sections and displayed in Figure 130. The TN3270 server can be configured only on Port 2, the internal LAN port, of a CIP card.

Some configuration commands create entities on the CIP. For most of these, the command changes to the mode associated with that entity (for example, a PU). In general, the parameters provided to create the entity come in two sets: those which identify the specific instance of the entity (for example, a PU name) and those that merely set operating parameters. To return to the mode later, the same command is used but with only the first set of parameters. The following example tasks clarify how to return to a command mode without necessarily creating a new entity:

To create a DLUR LSAP and enter DLUR LSAP configuration mode, perform the following task beginning in TN3270 DLUR configuration mode:
Task Command

Create a DLUR LSAP and enter DLUR LSAP configuration mode.

lsap token-adapter 1 84

To return later to the DLUR LSAP configuration mode on the same entity, perform the following task beginning in TN3270 DLUR configuration mode:
Task Command

Enter DLUR LSAP configuration mode on the same LSAP.

lsap token-adapter 1

To remove an entity, the same identification parameters are needed. Perform the following task beginning in TN3270 DLUR configuration mode:
Task Command

Remove a previously defined DLUR LSAP entity.

no lsap token-adapter 1

TN3270 configuration modes described in this section include the following:


Figure 130: TN3270 Configuration Modes


TN3270 Server Configuration Mode

From interface configuration mode, tn3270-server command puts you in TN3270 server configuration mode.

Prompt:

tn3270-server>
 

DLUR Configuration Mode

From TN3270 server configuration mode, the dlur command puts you in DLUR configuration mode.

Prompt:

tn3270-dlur>
 

DLUR SAP Configuration Mode

From DLUR server configuration mode, lsap command puts you in DLUR SAP configuration mode.

Prompt:

tn3270-dlur-lsap>
 

PU Configuration Mode

There are two paths to PU configuration mode: from the TN3270 server configuration mode, or from the DLUR configuration mode. In either mode, the pu command puts you in PU configuration mode.

From TN3270 configuration mode, the pu command to create a new PU is:

pu pu-name idblk-idnum ip-address type adapno lsap [rmac rmac] [rsap rsap] [lu-seed lu-name-stem]

From DLUR configuration mode, the pu command to create a new PU is:

pu pu-name idblk-idnum ip-address

From either mode, to return to PU configuration mode on PU pu-name the command is:

pu pu-name

Prompts:

tn3270-pu>
tn3270-dlur-pu>

Commands Allowed in Multiple Modes

The following commands are valid in TN3270 configuration mode, or in either variation of PU configuration mode:

[no] tcp-port port-number
[no] idle-time seconds
[no] keepalive seconds
[no] unbind-action {keep | disconnect}
[no] generic-pool {permit | deny}
[no] shutdown

Values entered in PU configuration mode override settings made in TN3270 configuration mode. In addition, the no form of these commands entered in PU configuration mode will restore the command value entered in TN3270 command mode.

TN3270 Configuration Task List

The following sections describe how to configure TN3270 server support on the CIP. Not all tasks are required. Refer to "TN3270 Configuration Example" for configuration examples.


Note The TN3270 server is configured on an internal LAN interface in the CIP, which is port 2 of a CIP. Port 0 and port 1 represent physical interface ports; port 2 is a "virtual" port and always reserved for the internal LAN interface.

Task List for Multiple APPN Hosts

When the host site uses APPN and the TN3270 server can reach multiple hosts, we recommend you use DLUR and configure your PUs under DLUR. In this instance, perform the following tasks:


Note You can also use DLUR to reach a mix of APPN and non-APPN hosts. The host owning the PUs must be an APPN network node that also supports the subarea (that is, an interchange node). When an SLU starts a session with any of the APPN hosts, it can use session switching to reach that host directly. When it starts a session with a non-APPN host, the traffic will be routed through the owning host.

Task List for non-APPN Hosts

When the host site does not use APPN, you configure your PU parameters for a directly-connected host. In this instance, perform the following tasks:

Configure SNA Support

CIP SNA support (CSNA) must be configured prior to configuring TN3270 support. Refer to the section "Configure IBM Channel Attach for CSNA Support," earlier in this chapter.

After you have configured CSNA support, you proceed with TN3270 configuration.

Configure TN3270 Server

This task is required. To establish a TN3270 server on the internal LAN interface on the CIP, perform the following tasks beginning in global configuration mode:
Task Command

Select the channel attach internal LAN interface and enter interface configuration mode.

interface channel slot/2

Specify a TN3270 server on the internal LAN interface and enter TN3270 configuration mode.

tn3270-server

(Optional) Configure maximum number of LUs allowed.

maximum-lus max-number-of-lu-allocated

(Optional) Configure transmission of a WILL TIMING-MARK.

timing-mark

(Optional) Assign a TCP port other than the default of 23. This command is also available in PU configuration mode.

tcp-port port-nbr

(Optional) Specify the idle time for server disconnect. This command is also available in PU configuration mode.

idle-time num-of-seconds

(Optional) Specify the maximum time allowed between keepalive marks before the server disconnects. This command is also available in PU configuration mode. Note: To enable sending of power-off Reply product set identification (PSID) network management vector transport (NMVT) to the host, the value should be set to 50000 more than the desired value. If the configured value is greater than 50000, the value used for the keepalive function will be 50000 less than the configured value.

keepalive num-of-seconds

(Optional) Specify whether the TN3270 session will disconnect when an UNBIND command is received. This command is also available in PU configuration mode.

unbind-action {keep | disconnect}

(Optional) Select whether "left-over" LUs can be used from a generic LU pool. This command is also available in PU configuration mode.

generic-pool {permit | deny}

When you use the tn3270-server command, you enter TN3270 configuration mode and can use all other commands in the task list. You can later override many configuration values you enter in TN3270 configuration mode from PU configuration mode. On IBM host systems, these types of commands are often referred to as "sift down" commands because their values can sift down through several levels of configuration and can be optionally altered at each configuration level.

Configure PU Parameters on the TN3270 Server

This task is required when configuring PUs that do not use DLUR. To configure PU parameters for the TN3270 server, perform the following tasks beginning in TN3270 configuration mode:  
Task Command

Enter PU configuration mode and create or delete PUs with direct host links.

pu pu-name idblk-idnum ip-address type adapno lsap [rmac rmac] [rsap rsap] [lu-seed lu-name-stem]

(Optional) Assign a TCP port other than the default of 23. This command is also available in TN3270 configuration mode.

tcp-port port-nbr

(Optional) Specify the idle time for server disconnect. This command is also available in TN3270 configuration mode.

idle-time num-of-seconds

(Optional) Specify the maximum time allowed between keepalive marks before the server disconnects. This command is also available in TN3270 configuration mode.

keepalive num-of-seconds

(Optional) Specify whether the TN3270 session will disconnect when an UNBIND command is received. This command is also available in TN3270 configuration mode.

unbind-action {keep | disconnect}

(Optional) Select whether "left-over" LUs can be used from a generic LU pool. This command is also available in TN3270 configuration mode.

generic-pool {permit | deny}

When you use the pu command, you enter PU configuration mode and can use all other commands in this task list. Configuration values you enter in PU configuration mode will override other values entered while in TN3270 configuration mode. In addition, you can enter PU configuration mode from DLUR configuration mode when configuring PUs that are connected by means of DLUR.

If you are configuring PUs for directly connected hosts, you need not perform any additional configuration tasks.

Configure DLUR

This task is required when configuring DLUR connected hosts. To configure DLUR parameters for the TN3270 server, perform the following tasks beginning in TN3270 configuration mode:  
Task Command

Create a DLUR function in the TN3270 server and enter DLUR configuration mode.

dlur fq-cpname fq-dlusname

(Optional) Specify the fallback choice for the DLUR DLUS.

dlus-backup dlusname2

(Optional) Specify the preferred network node (NN) server.

preferred-nnserver NNserver

Configure SAPs under DLUR

To configure SAPs under the DLUR function, perform the following tasks beginning in DLUR configuration mode:  
Task Command

Create a SAP function under DLUR and enter DLUR SAP configuration mode.

lsap type adapno [lsap]

(Optional) Identify an APPN virtual routing node (VRN).

vrn vrn-name

(Optional) Create named links to hosts. A link should be configured to each potential NN server. (The alternative is to configure the NN servers to connect to DLUR.) If VRN is used it is not necessary to configure links to other hosts. Do not configure multiple links to the same host.

link name [rmac rmac] [rsap rsap]

Configure PUs under DLUR

This task is required when configuring DLUR connected hosts. To configure PUs under the DLUR function, perform the following tasks beginning in DLUR configuration mode:  
Task Command

Create a PU function under DLUR and enter PU configuration mode.

pu pu-name idblk-idnum ip-address

Assign a TCP port other than the default of 23.

tcp-port port-nbr

Specify the idle time for server disconnect.

idle-time num-of-seconds

Specify the maximum time allowed between keepalive marks before the server disconnects.

keepalive num-of-seconds

Specify whether the TN3270 session will disconnect when an UNBIND command is received.

unbind-action {keep | disconnect}

Select whether "left-over" LUs can be used from a generic LU pool.

generic-pool {permit | deny}

The pu command entered in DLUR configuration mode has different parameters than when it is entered from TN3270 configuration mode.

Monitor the TN3270 Server

The following table lists some of the monitoring tasks specific to the TN3270 server. To display the full list of show commands, enter show ? at the EXEC prompt.

Use the following commands in privileged EXEC mode:
Task Command

Display the current server configuration parameters and the status of the PUs defined in each server.

show extended channel tn3270-server

Display the PU configuration parameters, statistics and all the LUs currently attached to the PU.

show extended channel tn3270-server pu-name

Display the status of the LU.

show extended channel tn3270-server pu-name lu lu-number [history]

Display the information about LUs that are defined under an IP address.

show extended channel tn3270-server client-ip-address ip-address

Display information about the DLUR components.

show extended channel tn3270-server dlur

IBM Channel Attach Interface Configuration Examples

The following sections include examples to help you understand some aspects of interface configuration:

Routing Process Configuration Example

The following example configures an Enhanced IGRP routing process in autonomous system 127 and defines two networks to be advertised as originating within that autonomous system:

router eigrp 127
 network 197.91.2.0
 network 197.91.0.0

IP Address and Network Mask Configuration Example

The following example assigns an IP address and network mask to the IBM channel attach interface on the router:

ip address 197.91.2.5 255.255.255.0
 

CLAW Configuration Example

The following example configures the IBM channel attach interface to support a directly connected device:

claw 0100 00 197.91.0.21 VMSYSTEM C7000 TCPIP TCPIP
 

Offload Configuration Example

The following example consists of the mainframe host profile statements, buffer poolsize recommendations, and router configuration statements for the network shown in Figure 131.

Host Profile Statements
; Device statement
DEVICE OFF CLAW 762 CISCOVM CIP1 NONE 20 20 4096 4096
 
; Link Statements (both needed)
LINK OFFL OFFLOADLINK1 1 OFF
LINK MEMD OFFLOADAPIBROAD 162.18.4.59 OFF OFFL
 
; Home Statement
; (No additional home statements are added for offload)
 
 
; Routing information (if you are not using the ROUTED SERVER)
GATEWAY
; NETWORK FIRST HOP  DRIVER    PCKT_SZ    SUBN_MSK       SUBN_VALUE
162.18         =      MEMD     4096       0.0.255.248      0.0.4.56
DEFAULTNET     =      MEMD     1500       0
 
;START statements
START OFF
 
Buffer Poolsize Recommendations

See the IBM TCP/IP Performance Tuning Guide (SC31-7188-00) for buffer size adjustments.

Router Configuration Statements

The following statements configure the offload feature in the router. When you configure an host-to-host communication through the same ECA adapter, include the no ip redirects and ip  route-cache same-interface commands:

interface Channel0/0 
 ip address 162.18.4.57 255.255.255.248 
 no ip redirects 
 ip route-cache same-interface 
 ip route-cache cbus 
 no keepalive 
 offload C300 62 162.18.4.59 CISCOVM CIP1 TCPIP TCPIP TCPIP API 
 

     


Figure 131: Offload Network Configuration Block Diagram

CSNA Configuration Example

The following configuration shows how to configure CSNA in a Cisco 7000 channel-attached router. This configuration example accommodates the router configuration illustrated in Figure 132.

source-bridge ring-group 2
source-bridge remote-peer tcp 198.92.0.122
source-bridge remote-peer tcp 198.92.0.123
 
interface serial 1/0
 ip address 198.92.0.122 255.255.255.0
 clockrate 56000
 
interface tokenring 2/0 
 mac-address 400070000411
 no ip address
 ring-speed 16
 source-bridge active 101 1 2
 source-bridge spanning
 
interface ethernet 3/0
 mac-address 020070000412
 no ip address
 bridge-group 1
 
interface fddi 4/0
 mac-address 400070000413
 no ip address
 source-bridge 102 1 2
 
interface channel 0/0
 csna 0100 80
 csna 0100 81
 
interface channel 0/1
 csna 0100 40
 csna 0100 41 time-delay 30 length-delay 4096
 
interface channel 0/2
 
max-llc2-sessions 2048
 
lan tokenring 0
 source-bridge 1000 1 2
 adapter 0 4000.0000.0401
 adapter 1 4000.0000.0402
 llc2 N2 3
 llc2 t1-time 2000
 
lan tokenring 1
 source-bridge 1001 1 2
 adapter 2 4000.0000.0401
 adapter 3 4000.0000.0403
 llc2 N2 3
 llc2 t1-time 2000
 
lan ethernet 0
 bridge-group 1
 adapter 0 4000.0000.0C01
 
lan fddi 0
 source-bridge 1002 1 2
 adapter 0 4000.0000.0D01
 
bridge 1 protocol ieee

Figure 132: CSNA Internal LAN Network Diagram


Interface Shutdown and Startup Example

The following example turns off the CIP interface in slot 2 at port 0:

interface channel 2/0
shutdown
 

The following example enables the CIP interface in slot 3 at port 0 that had been previously shut down:

interface channel 3/0
no shutdown

TN3270 Configuration Example

The following configuration has three PUs using DLUR and two more with direct connections.

The initial CIP configuration is as follows:

interface Channel2/2
 ip address 10.10.20.126 255.255.255.128
 no ip redirects
 no ip directed-broadcast
 ip pim query-interval 0
 ip igmp query-interval 0
 no ip route-cache
 no keepalive
 no clns checksum
 clns congestion-threshold 0
 clns erpdu-interval 0
 clns rdpdu-interval 0
 no clns route-cache
 no clns send-erpdu
 no clns send-rdpdu
 lan TokenRing 0
  source-bridge 223 1 2099
  adapter 0 4100.cafe.0001
   llc2 N1 2057
  adapter 1 4100.cafe.0002
   llc2 N1 2057
 

Configuration dialog to configure the TN3270 function follows:

! HOSTA is channel-attached and will open SAP 8 on adapter 0.
! HOSTB is reached via token-ring
! HOSTC is channel-attached non-APPN and will open SAP 4 on adapter 0.
 
! enter interface configuration mode for the virtual interface in slot 2
router(config)#int channel 2/2
 
! create TN3270 Server entity
router(config-if)#tn3270-server
 
! set server-wide defaults for PU parameters
router(cfg-tn3270)#keepalive 0
router(cfg-tn3270)#unbind-action disconnect
router(cfg-tn3270)#generic-pool permit
 
! define DLUR parameters and enter DLUR configuration mode
router(cfg-tn3270)#dlur SYD.TN3020 SYD.VMG
 
! create PUs under DLUR
! Note that the first two share an IP address
router(tn3270-dlur)#pu pu0 05d99001 10.10.20.1
router(tn3270-dlur-pu)#pu pu1 05d99002 10.10.20.1
router(tn3270-dlur-pu)#pu pu2 05d99003 10.10.20.2
 
! create a DLUR LSAP and enter DLUR LSAP configuration mode
router(tn3270-dlur-pu)#lsap token-adapter 1
 
! specify the VRN name of the network containing this lsap
router(tn3270-dlur-lsap)#vrn syd.lan4
 
! create a link from this lsap
router(tn3270-dlur-lsap)#link hosta rmac 4100.cafe.0001 rsap 8
router(tn3270-dlur-lsap)#link hostb rmac 4000.7470.0009 rsap 4
router(tn3270-dlur-lsap)#exit
router(tn3270-dlur)#exit
 
! create direct pus for the non-APPN Host
! note that they must use different lsaps because they go to the same Host
router(cfg-tn3270)#pu pu3 05d00001 10.10.20.5 tok 1 24 rmac 4100.cafe.0001 lu-seed pu3###
router(tn3270-pu)#pu pu4 05d00002 10.10.20.5 tok 1 28 rmac 4100.cafe.0001 lu-seed pu4###
router(tn3270-pu)#end

The resulting configuration from the initial configuration and the configuration dialog follows:

interface Channel2/2
 ip address 10.10.20.126 255.255.255.128
 no ip redirects
 no ip directed-broadcast
 ip pim query-interval 0
 ip igmp query-interval 0
 no ip route-cache
 no keepalive
 no clns checksum
 clns congestion-threshold 0
 clns erpdu-interval 0
 clns rdpdu-interval 0
 no clns route-cache
 no clns send-erpdu
 no clns send-rdpdu
 lan TokenRing 0
  source-bridge 223 1 2099
  adapter 0 4100.cafe.0001
   llc2 N1 2057
  adapter 1 4100.cafe.0002
   llc2 N1 2057
tn3270-server
   pu PU3      05D00001 10.10.20.5    token-adapter 1  24 rmac 4100.cafe.0001 lu-seed PU3###
   pu PU4      05D00002 10.10.20.5    token-adapter 1  28 rmac 4100.cafe.0001 lu-seed PU4###
    dlur SYD.TN3020 SYD.VMG
      lsap token-adapter 1 
         vrn SYD.LAN4 
         link HOSTB    rmac 4000.7470.0009
         link HOSTA    rmac 4100.cafe.0001 rsap 08
      pu PU0      05D99001 10.10.20.1
      pu PU1      05D99002 10.10.20.1
      pu PU2      05D99003 10.10.20.2
 


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