Полезная информация

cc/td/doc/product/software/ios112/112cg_cr
hometocprevnextglossaryfeedbacksearchhelp
PDF

Table of Contents

AppleTalk Commands

AppleTalk Commands

AppleTalk is a LAN system designed and developed by Apple Computer, Inc. It runs over Ethernet, Token Ring, Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) networks, and LocalTalk, Apple's proprietary twisted-pair media access system. AppleTalk specifies a protocol stack comprising several protocols that direct the flow of traffic over the network.

Apple Computer uses the name AppleTalk to refer to the Apple networking architecture. Apple refers to the actual transmission media used in an AppleTalk network as LocalTalk (Apple's proprietary twisted-pair transmission medium for AppleTalk), TokenTalk (AppleTalk over Token Ring), EtherTalk (AppleTalk over Ethernet), and FDDITalk (AppleTalk over FDDI).

Use the commands in this chapter to configure and monitor AppleTalk networks. For AppleTalk configuration information and examples, refer to the "Configuring AppleTalk" chapter in the Network Protocols Configuration Guide, Part 2.


Note One or more of the commands that previously appeared this chapter have been replaced by new commands. See the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference for command information. The old commands continue to perform their normal function in the current release, but support for them will cease in future releases.

access-list additional-zones

To define the default action to take for access checks that apply to zones, use the access-list additional-zones global configuration command.

access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} additional-zones
Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 600 to  699.

deny

Denies access if the conditions are matched.

permit

Permits access if the conditions are matched.

Default

No access lists are predefined.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The access-list  additional-zones command defines the action to take for access checks not explicitly defined with the access-list zone command. If you do not specify this command, the default action is to deny other access.

You apply access lists defined with the access-list additional-zones command to outgoing routing updates and GetZoneList (GZL) filters (using the appletalk distribute-list out, and appletalk getzonelist-filter commands). You cannot apply them to data-packet filters (using the appletalk access-group command) or to incoming routing update filters (using the appletalk distribute-list in command).

Example

The following example creates an access list based on AppleTalk zones:

access-list 610 deny zone Twilight
access-list 610 permit additional-zones
Related Commands

access-list cable-range
access-list includes
access-list nbp
access-list network
access-list other-access
access-list other-nbps
access-list within
access-list zone
appletalk access-group
appletalk distribute-list in
appletalk distribute-list out
appletalk getzonelist-filter
appletalk permit-partial-zones

access-list cable-range

To define an AppleTalk access list for a cable range (for extended networks only), use the access-list cable-range global configuration command. To remove an access list, use the no form of this command.

access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} cable-range cable-range
[broadcast-deny | broadcast-permit]
no access-list access-list-number [{deny | permit} cable-range cable-range
[broadcast-deny | broadcast-permit]]

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 600 to  699.

deny

Denies access if the conditions are matched.

permit

Permits access if the conditions are matched.

cable-range

Cable range value. The argument specifies the start and end of the cable range, separated by a hyphen. These values are decimal numbers from 1 to 65279. The starting network number must be less than or equal to the ending network number.

broadcast-deny

(Optional) Denies access to broadcast packets if the conditions are matched.

broadcast-permit

(Optional) Permits access to broadcast packets if the conditions are met.

Default

No access lists are predefined.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When used as a routing update filter, the access-list cable-range command affects matching on extended networks only. The conditions defined by this access list are used only when a cable range in a routing update exactly matches that specified in the access-list cable-range command. The conditions are never used to match a network number (for a nonextended network).

When used as a data-packet filter, the access-list cable-range command affects matching on any type of network number. The conditions defined by this access list are used only when the packet's source network lies in the range defined by the access list.

You apply access lists defined with the access-list cable-range command to data-packet and routing-update filters (using the appletalk access-group, appletalk distribute-list in, and appletalk distribute-list out). You cannot apply them to GZL filters (using the appletalk getzonelist-filter command).

To delete an access list, specify the minimum number of keywords and arguments needed to delete the proper access list. For example, to delete the entire access list, use the following command:

no access-list access-list-number

To delete the access list for a specific network, use the following command:

no access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} cable-range cable-range

Priority queuing for AppleTalk operates on the destination network number, not the source network number.

Example

The following access list forwards all packets except those from cable range 10 to 20:

access-list 600 deny cable-range 10-20
access-list 600 permit other-access
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

access-list additional-zones
access-list includes
access-list nbp
access-list network
access-list other-access
access-list other-nbps
access-list within
access-list zone
appletalk access-group
appletalk distribute-list in
appletalk distribute-list out
appletalk getzonelist-filter
priority-list protocol

access-list includes

To define an AppleTalk access list that overlaps any part of a range of network numbers or cable ranges (for both extended and nonextended networks), use the access-list includes global configuration command. To remove an access list, use the no form of this command.

access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} includes cable-range
[broadcast-deny | broadcast-permit]
no access-list access-list-number [{deny | permit} includes cable-range
[broadcast-deny | broadcast-permit]]

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 600 to  699.

deny

Denies access if the conditions are matched.

permit

Permits access if the conditions are matched.

cable-range

Cable range or network number. The argument specifies the start and end of the cable range, separated by a hyphen. These values are decimal numbers from 1 to 65279. The starting network number must be less than or equal to the ending network number. To specify a network number, set the starting and ending network numbers to the same value.

broadcast-deny

(Optional) Denies access to broadcast packets if the conditions are matched.

broadcast-permit

(Optional) Permits access to broadcast packets if the conditions are met.

Default

No access lists are predefined.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When used as a routing update filter, the access-list includes command affects matching on extended and nonextended AppleTalk networks. The conditions defined by this access list are used when a cable range or network number overlaps, either partially or completely, one (or more) of those specified in the access-list includes command.

When used as a data-packet filter, the conditions defined by this access list are used when the packet's source network lies in the range defined in the access-list includes command.

You apply access lists defined with the access-list includes command to data-packet and routing-update filters (using the appletalk access-group, appletalk distribute-list in, and appletalk distribute-list out). You cannot apply them to GZL filters (using the appletalk getzonelist-filter command).

To delete an access list, specify the minimum number of keywords and arguments needed to delete the proper access list. For example, to delete the entire access list, use the following command:

no access-list access-list-number

To delete the access list for a specific network, use the following command:

no access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} includes cable-range

Priority queuing for AppleTalk operates on the destination network number, not the source network number.

Example

The following example defines an access list that permits access to any network or cable range that overlaps any part of the range 10 to 20. This means, for example, that cable ranges 13 to 16 and 17 to 25 will be permitted. This access list also permits all other ranges.

access-list 600 permit includes 10-20
access-list 600 permit other-access
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

access-list additional-zones
access-list cable-range
access-list nbp
access-list network
access-list other-access
access-list other-nbps
access-list within
access-list zone
appletalk access-group
appletalk distribute-list in
appletalk distribute-list out
appletalk getzonelist-filter
priority-list protocol

access-list nbp

To define an AppleTalk access-list entry for a particular Name Binding Protocol named entity (object), class of NBP named entities (type), or NBP named entities belonging to a specific area (zone), use the access-list nbp global configuration command. To remove an NBP (NBP) access-list entry from the access list, use the no form of this command.

access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} nbp seq {type | object | zone} string
no access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} nbp seq {type | object | zone} string
Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 600 to  699.

deny

Denies access if conditions are matched.

permit

Permits access if conditions are matched.

seq

A number used to tie together two or three portions of an NBP name tuple and to keep track of the number of access-list nbp entries in an access list. Each command entry must have a sequence number.

type

Characterizes string as the portion of an NBP name that identifies a category or type of named entity.

object

Characterizes string as the portion of an NBP name that identifies a particular object or named entity.

zone

Characterizes string as the portion of an NBP name that identifies an AppleTalk zone.

string

A portion of an NBP name identifying the type, object, or zone of a named entity. The name string can be up to 32 characters long and it can include special characters from the Apple Macintosh character set. To include a special character, type a colon followed by two hexadecimal characters. For an NBP name with a leading space, enter the first character as the special sequence :20.

Default

No particular access-list entry for an NBP named entity is defined and the default filtering specified by the access-list other-nbps command takes effect.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

The access-list nbp command defines the action to take for filtering NBP packets from a particular type (class of named entities), object (particular named entity), or zone (AppleTalk zone in which named entities reside) superceding the default action for NBP packets from all named entities specified by the access-list other-nbps command. For each command that you enter, you must specify a sequence number. The sequence number serves two purposes. Its principal purpose is to allow you to associate two or three portions of an NBP three-part name, referred to as an NBP tuple. To do this, you enter two or three commands having the same sequence number but each specifying a different keyword and NBP name portion: type, object, or zone. The same sequence number binds them together. This provides you with the ability to restrict forwarding of NBP packets at any level, down to a single named entity.

The second purpose of the sequence number is to allow you to keep track of the number of access-list nbp entries you have made. You must enter a sequence number even if you do not use it to associate portions of an NBP name.

Examples

The following example adds entries to access-list number 607 to allow forwarding of NBP packets from specific sources and deny forwarding of NBP packets from all other sources. The first command adds an entry that allows NBP packets from all printers of type LaserWriter. The second command adds an entry that allows NBP packets from all AppleTalk file servers of type AFPServer. The third command adds an entry that allows NBP packets from all applications called HotShotPaint. For example, there might be an application with a zone name of Accounting and an application with a zone name of engineering, both having the object name of HotShotPaint. NBP packets forwarded from both applications will be allowed.

The final access-list other-nbps command denies forwarding of NBP packets from all other sources.

access-list 607 permit nbp 1 type LaserWriter
access-list 607 permit nbp 2 type AFPServer
access-list 607 permit nbp 3 object HotShotPaint access-list 607 deny other-nbps

The following example adds entries to access-list number 608 to deny forwarding of NBP packets from two specific servers whose fully qualified NBP names are specified. It permits forwarding of NBP packets from all other sources.

access-list 608 deny nbp 1 object ServerA
access-list 608 deny nbp 1 type AFPServer
access-list 608 deny nbp 1 zone Bld3
access-list 608 deny nbp 2 object ServerB
access-list 608 deny nbp 2 type AFPServer
access-list 608 deny nbp 2 zone Bld3
access-list 608 permit other-nbps
access-list 608 permit other-access
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

access-list additional-zones
access-list cable-range
access-list includes
access-list network
access-list other-access
access-list other-nbps
access-list within
access-list zone
appletalk access-group
appletalk distribute-list in
appletalk distribute-list out
appletalk getzonelist-filter
priority-list protocol

access-list network

To define an AppleTalk access list for a single network number (that is, for a nonextended network), use the access-list network global configuration command. To remove an access list, use the no form of this command.

access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} network network
[broadcast-deny | broadcast-permit]
no access-list access-list-number [{deny | permit} network network
[broadcast-deny | broadcast-permit]]

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 600 to  699.

deny

Denies access if the conditions are matched.

permit

Permits access if the conditions are matched.

network

AppleTalk network number.

broadcast-deny

(Optional) Denies access to broadcast packets if the conditions are matched.

broadcast-permit

(Optional) Permits access to broadcast packets if the conditions are met.

Default

No access lists are predefined.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0. The broadcast-deny and broadcast-permit keywords first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

When used as a routing-update filter, the access-list network command affects matching on nonextended networks only. The conditions defined by this access list are used only when the nonextended number in a routing update matches a network number specified in one of the access-list network commands. The conditions are never used to match a cable range (for an extended network) even if the cable range has the same starting and ending number.

When used as a data-packet filter, the conditions defined by this access list are used only when the packet's source network matches the network number specified in the access-list network command.

You apply access lists defined with the access-list network command to data-packet and routing-update filters (using the appletalk access-group, appletalk distribute-list in, and appletalk distribute-list out). You cannot apply access lists to GZL filters (using the appletalk getzonelist-filter command).

In software releases before 9.0, the syntax of this command was access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} network. The current version of the software is still able to interpret commands in this format if it finds them in a configuration or boot file. However, it is recommended that you update the commands in your configuration or boot files to match the current syntax.

Use the no access-list command with the access-list-number argument only to remove an entire access list from the configuration. Specify the optional arguments to remove a particular clause.

To delete an access list, specify the minimum number of keywords and arguments needed to delete the proper access list. For example, to delete the entire access list, use the following command:

no access-list access-list-number

To delete the access list for a specific network, use the following command:

no access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} network network

Priority queuing for AppleTalk operates on the destination network number, not the source network number.

Example

The following example defines an access list that forwards all packets except those destined for networks 1 and 2:

access-list 650 deny network 1
access-list 650 deny network 2
access-list 650 permit other-access
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

access-list additional-zones
access-list cable-range
access-list includes
access-list nbp
access-list other-access
access-list other-nbps
access-list within
access-list zone
appletalk access-group
appletalk distribute-list in
appletalk distribute-list out
appletalk getzonelist-filter
priority-list protocol

access-list other-access

To define the default action to take for access checks that apply to networks or cable ranges, use the access-list other-access global configuration command.

access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} other-access
Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 600 to  699.

deny

Denies access if the conditions are matched.

permit

Permits access if the conditions are matched.

Default

No access lists are predefined.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

The access-list  other-access command defines the action to take for access checks not explicitly defined with an access-list network, access-list cable-range, access-list includes, or access-list within command. If you do not specify this command, the default action is to deny other access.

You apply access lists defined with the access-list other-access command to data-packet and routing-update filters (using the appletalk access-group, appletalk distribute-list in, and appletalk distribute-list out). You cannot apply them to GZL filters (using the appletalk getzonelist-filter command).

In software releases before 9.0, the syntax of this command was access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} -1. The current version of the software is still able to interpret commands in this format if it finds them in a configuration or boot file. However, it is recommended that you update the commands in your configuration or boot files to match the current syntax.

Priority queuing for AppleTalk operates on the destination network number, not the source network number.

Example

The following example defines an access list that forwards all packets except those destined for networks 1 and 2:

access-list 650 deny network 1
access-list 650 deny network 2
access-list 650 permit other-access
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

access-list additional-zones
access-list cable-range
access-list includes
access-list nbp
access-list network
access-list other-nbps
access-list within
access-list zone
appletalk access-group
appletalk distribute-list in
appletalk distribute-list out
priority-list protocol

access-list other-nbps

To define the default action to take for access checks that apply to NBP packets from named entities not otherwise explicitly denied or permitted, use the access-list other-nbps global configuration command.

access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} other-nbps
no access-list
access-list-number {deny | permit} other-nbps
Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list for AppleTalk. This is a decimal number from 600 to 699.

deny

Denies access if conditions are matched.

permit

Permits access if conditions are matched.

Default

Access is denied.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

The access-list other-nbps command defines the action to take for filtering of NBP packets from named entities not explicitly defined by an access-list nbp command. It allows you to implement the default AppleTalk network security state at the named entity level. Any access-list nbp commands you enter affect a particular named entity object, class of named entities, or all named entities within a zone. This command sets the security state for all other NBP named entities. If you do not specify this command, the default action is to deny access.

You can use this command to create an entry in an access list before or after you issue access-list nbp commands. The order of the command in the access list is irrelevant.

Example

The following example permits forwarding of all NBP packets from all sources except AppleTalk file servers of type AFPServer:

access-list 607 deny nbp 2 type AFPServer
access-list 607 permit other-nbps
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

access-list additional-zones
access-list cable-range
access-list includes
access-list nbp
access-list network
access-list other-access
access-list within
access-list zone
appletalk access-group
appletalk distribute-list in
appletalk distribute-list out
appletalk getzonelist-filter
priority-list protocol

access-list within

To define an AppleTalk access list for an extended or a nonextended network whose network number or cable range is included entirely within the specified cable range, use the access-list within global configuration command. To remove this access list, use the no form of this command.

access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} within cable-range
no access-list access-list-number [{deny | permit} within cable-range]

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 600 to  699.

deny

Denies access if the conditions are matched.

permit

Permits access if the conditions are matched.

cable-range

Cable range or network number. The argument specifies the start and end of the cable range, separated by a hyphen. These values are decimal numbers from 1 to 65279. The starting network number must be less than or equal to the ending network number. To specify a network number, set the starting and ending network numbers to the same value.

Default

No access lists are predefined.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When used as a routing update filter, the access-list within command affects matching on extended and nonextended AppleTalk networks. The conditions defined by this access list are used when a cable range or network number overlaps, either partially or completely, one (or more) of those specified in the access-list within command.

When used as a data-packet filter, the conditions defined by this access list are used when the packet's source network lies in the range defined in the access-list within command.

You apply access lists defined with the access-list within command to data-packet and routing-update (using the appletalk access-group, appletalk distribute-list in, and appletalk distribute-list out). You cannot apply them to GZL filters (using the appletalk getzonelist-filter command).

To delete an access list, specify the minimum number of keywords and arguments needed to delete the proper access list. For example, to delete the entire access list, use the following command:

no access-list access-list-number

To delete the access list for a specific network, use the following command:

no access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} within cable-range

Priority queuing for AppleTalk operates on the destination network number, not the source network number.

Example

The following example defines an access list that permits access to any network or cable range that is completely included in the range 10 to 20. This means, for example, that cable range 13 to 16 will be permitted, but cable range 17 to 25 will not be. The second line of the access list permits all other packets.

access-list 600 permit within 10-20
access-list 600 permit other-access
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

access-list additional-zones
access-list cable-range
access-list includes
access-list nbp
access-list network
access-list other-access
access-list other-nbps
access-list zone
appletalk access-group
appletalk distribute-list in
appletalk distribute-list out
appletalk getzonelist-filter
priority-list protocol

access-list zone

To define an AppleTalk access list that applies to a zone, use the access-list zone global configuration command. To remove an access list, use the no form of this command.

access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} zone zone-name
no access-list access-list-number [{deny | permit} zone zone-name]

Syntax Description

access-list number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 600 to  699.

deny

Denies access if the conditions are matched.

permit

Permits access if the conditions are matched.

zone-name

Name of the zone. The name can include special characters from the Apple Macintosh character set. To include a special character, type a colon followed by two hexadecimal characters. For zone names with a leading space character, enter the first character as the special sequence :20.

Default

No access lists are predefined.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You apply access lists defined with the access-list zones command to outgoing routing update and GZL filters (using the appletalk distribute-list out and appletalk getzonelist-filter commands). You cannot apply them to data-packet filters (using the appletalk access-group command) or to incoming routing update filters (using the appletalk distribute-list in command).

To delete an access list, specify the minimum number of keywords and arguments needed to delete the proper access list. For example, to delete the entire access list, use the following command:

no access-list access-list-number

To delete the access list for a specific network, use the following command:

no access-list access-list-number {deny | permit} zone zone-name

Use the access-list additional-zones command to define the action to take for access checks not explicitly defined with the access-list zone command.


Note AppleTalk zone access lists on an Enhanced Internet Gateway Routing Protocol (Enhance IGRP) interface will not filter the distribution of Enhanced IGRP routes. When the appletalk distribute-list out command is applied to an Enhanced IGRP interface, any access-list zone commands in the specified access list will be ignored.
Example

The following example creates an access list based on AppleTalk zones:

access-list 610 deny zone Twilight
access-list 610 permit additional-zones
Related Commands

access-list additional-zones
access-list cable-range
access-list includes
access-list nbp
access-list network
access-list other-access
access-list other-nbps
access-list within
appletalk access-group
appletalk distribute-list in
appletalk distribute-list out
appletalk getzonelist-filter
appletalk permit-partial-zones

appletalk access-group

To assign an access list to an interface, use the appletalk access-group interface configuration command. To remove the access list use the no form of this command.

appletalk access-group access-list-number
no appletalk access-group
[access-list-number]
Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 600 to  699.

Default

No access lists are predefined.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The appletalk access-group command applies data-packets filter to an interface. These filters check data packets being sent out an interface. If the source network of the packets has access denied, these packets are not transmitted but rather are discarded.

Data-packet filters use access lists that define conditions for networks and cable ranges only. They ignore any zone information that may be in the access list.

When you apply a data-packet filter to an interface, you should ensure that all networks or cable ranges within a zone are governed by the same filters.

Example

The following example applies access list 601 to Ethernet interface 0:

access-list 601 deny cable-range 1-10
access-list 601 permit other-access
interface ethernet 0
appletalk access-group 601
Related Commands

access-list cable-range
access-list includes
access-list network
access-list other-access
access-list within
appletalk access-group
appletalk distribute-list in
appletalk distribute-list out

appletalk address

To enable nonextended AppleTalk routing on an interface, use the appletalk address interface configuration command. To disable nonextended AppleTalk routing, use the no form of this command.

appletalk address network.node
no appletalk address [network.node]

Syntax Description

network.node

AppleTalk network address assigned to the interface. The argument network is the 16-bit network number in the range 0 to 65279. The argument node is the 8-bit node number in the range 0 to 254. Both numbers are decimal.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You must enable routing on the interface before assigning zone names.

Specifying an address of 0.0, or 0.node places the interface into discovery mode. When in this mode, the Cisco IOS software attempts to determine network address information from another router on the network. You also can enable discovery mode with the appletalk discovery command. Discovery mode does not run over serial lines.

Example

The following example enables nonextended AppleTalk routing on Ethernet interface 0:

appletalk routing
interface ethernet 0
appletalk address 1.129
Related Commands

access-list cable-range
appletalk discovery
appletalk zone

appletalk alternate-addressing

To display network numbers in a two-octet format, use the appletalk alternate-addressing global configuration command. To return to displaying network numbers in the format network.node, use the no form of this command.

appletalk alternate-addressing
no appletalk alternate-addressing

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The appletalk alternate-addressing command displays cable ranges in the alternate format wherever applicable. This format consists of printing the upper and lower bytes of a network number as 8-bit decimal values separated by a decimal point. For example, the cable range 511-512 would be printed as 1.255-2.0.

Example

The following example enables the display of network numbers in a two-octet format:

appletalk alternate-addressing

appletalk arp interval

To specify the time interval between retransmissions of Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) packets, use the appletalk arp interval global configuration command. To restore both default intervals, use the no form of this command.

appletalk arp [probe | request] interval interval
no appletalk arp [probe | request] interval interval

Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Interval to be used with AppleTalk Address Resolution Protocol (AARP) requests that are trying to determine the address of the local router when the Cisco IOS software is being configured. If you omit probe and request, probe is the default.

request

(Optional) Indicates that the interval specified is to be used when AARP is attempting to determine the hardware address of another node so that AARP can deliver a packet.

interval

Interval, in milliseconds, between AARP transmissions. The minimum value is 33 ms. When used with the probe keyword, the default interval is 200 ms. When used with the request keyword, the default interval is 1,000  ms.

Default

If you omit the keywords, probe is the default.

probe---200 ms
request---1000 ms

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The time interval you specify takes effect immediately.

Lengthening the interval between AARP transmissions permits responses from devices that respond slowly (such as printers and overloaded file servers) to be received.

AARP uses the appletalk arp probe interval value when obtaining the address of the local router. This is done when the Cisco IOS software is being configured. You should not change the default value of this interval unless absolutely necessary, because this value directly modifies the AppleTalk dynamic node assignment algorithm.

AARP uses the appletalk arp request interval value when attempting to determine the hardware address of another node so that it can deliver a packet. You can change this interval as desired, although the default value is optimal for most sites.

The no appletalk arp command restores both the probe and request intervals specified in the appletalk arp interval and appletalk arp retransmit-count commands to their default values.

Example

In the following example, the AppleTalk ARP retry interval is lengthened to 2,000 ms:

appletalk arp request interval 2000
Related Commands

appletalk arp retransmit-count
appletalk arp-timeout
appletalk glean-packets
show appletalk globals

appletalk arp retransmit-count

To specify the number of AARP probe or request transmissions, use the appletalk arp retransmit-count global configuration command. To restore both default values, use the no form of this command.

appletalk arp [probe | request] retransmit-count number
no appletalk arp [probe | request] retransmit-count number

Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Indicates that the number specified is to be used with AARP requests that are trying to determined the address of the local router when the Cisco IOS software is being configured. If you omit probe and request, probe is the default.

request

(Optional) Indicates that the number specified is to be used when AARP is attempting to determine the hardware address of another node so that AARP can deliver a packet.

number

Number of AARP retransmissions that will occur. The minimum number is 1. When used with the probe keyword, the default value is 10 retransmissions. When used with the request keyword, the default value is 5 retransmissions. Specifying 0 selects the default value.

Default

If you omit the keyword, probe is the default.

probe---10 transmissions
request---5 transmissions

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The value you specify takes effect immediately.

Increasing the number of retransmissions permits responses from devices that respond slowly (such as printers and overloaded file servers) to be received.

AARP uses the appletalk arp probe retransmit-count value when obtaining the address of the local router. This is done when the Cisco IOS software is being configured. You should not change the default value unless absolutely necessary, because this value directly modifies the AppleTalk dynamic node assignment algorithm.

AARP uses the appletalk arp request retransmit-count value when attempting to determine the hardware address of another node so that it can deliver a packet. You can change this interval as desired, although the default value is optimal for most sites.

The no appletalk arp command restores both the probe and request intervals specified in the appletalk arp interval and appletalk arp retransmit-count commands to their default values.

Example

The following example specifies an AARP retransmission count of 10 for AARP packets that are requesting the hardware address of another node on the network:

appletalk arp request retransmit-count 10
Related Commands

appletalk arp interval
appletalk arp-timeout
appletalk glean-packets
show appletalk globals

appletalk arp-timeout

To specify the interval at which entries are aged out of the ARP table, use the appletalk arp-timeout interface configuration command. To return to the default timeout, use the no form of this command.

appletalk arp-timeout interval
no appletalk arp-timeout [interval]

Syntax Description

interval

Time, in minutes, after which an entry is removed from the AppleTalk ARP table. The default is 240 minutes (4 hours).

Default

240 minutes (4 hours)

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidlines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example changes the ARP timeout interval on Ethernet interface 0 to 2 hours:

interface ethernet 0
appletalk cable-range 2-2
appletalk arp-timeout 120
Related Commands

appletalk arp interval
appletalk arp retransmit-count
appletalk glean-packets

appletalk aurp tickle-time

To set the Apple Update-Based Routing Protocol (AURP) last-heard-from timer value, use the appletalk aurp tickle-time interface configuration command. To return to the default last-heard-from timer value, use the no form of this command.

appletalk aurp tickle-time seconds
no appletalk aurp tickle-time [seconds]

Syntax Description

seconds

Time-out value, in seconds. This value can be a number in the range 30 to infinity. The default is 90 seconds.

Default

90 seconds

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

If the tunnel peer has not been heard from within the time specified by the least-heard-from timer value, the Cisco IOS software sends tickle packets to check that the tunnel peer is still up.

You can use this command only on tunnel interfaces.

Example

The following example changes the AURP last-heard-from timer value on tunnel interface 0 to 120  seconds:

interface tunnel 0
appletalk aurp tickle-time 120
Related Command

show appletalk interface tunnel

appletalk aurp update-interval

To set the minimum interval between AURP routing updates, use the appletalk aurp update-interval global configuration command. To return to the default interval, use the no form of this command.

appletalk aurp update-interval seconds
no appletalk aurp update-interval [seconds]

Syntax Description

seconds

AURP routing update interval, in seconds. This interval must be a multiple of 10. The default is 30  seconds.

Default

30 seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

The AURP routing update interval applies only to tunnel interfaces.

Example

The following example changes the AURP routing update interval on tunnel interface 0 to 40  seconds:

interface tunnel 0
appletalk aurp update-interval 40
Related Command

show appletalk globals

appletalk cable-range

To enable an extended AppleTalk network, use the appletalk cable-range interface configuration command. To disable an extended AppleTalk network, use the no form of this command.

appletalk cable-range cable-range [network.node]
no appletalk cable-range cable-range [network.node]

Syntax Description

cable-range

Cable range value. The argument specifies the start and end of the cable range, separated by a hyphen. These values are decimal number from 0 to 65279. The starting network number must be less than or equal to the ending network number.

network.node

(Optional) Suggested AppleTalk address for the interface. The argument network is the 16-bit network number, and the argument node is the 8-bit node number. Both numbers are decimal. The suggested network number must fall within the specified range of network numbers.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You must enable routing on the interface before assigning zone names.

Specifying a cable range value of 0-0 places the interface into discovery mode. When in this mode, the Cisco IOS software attempts to determine cable range information from another router on the network. You can also enable discovery mode with the appletalk discovery command. Discovery mode does not run over serial lines.

Example

The following example assigns a cable range of 3 to 3 to the interface:

interface ethernet 0
appletalk cable-range 3-3
Related Commands

appletalk address
appletalk discovery
appletalk zone

appletalk checksum

To enable the generation and verification of checksums for all AppleTalk packets (except routed packets), use the appletalk checksum global configuration command. To disable checksum generation and verification, use the no form of this command.

appletalk checksum
no appletalk checksum

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When the appletalk checksum command is enabled, the Cisco IOS software discards incoming Datagram Delivery Protocol (DDP) packets when the checksum is not zero and is incorrect, and when the router is the final destination for the packet.

You might want to disable checksum generation and verification if you have very early devices (such as LaserWriter printers) that cannot receive packets that contain checksums.

The Cisco IOS software does not check checksums on routed packets, thereby eliminating the need to disable checksum to allow operation of some networking applications.

Example

The following example disables the generation and verification of checksums:

no appletalk checksum
Related Command

show appletalk globals

appletalk client-mode

To allow users to access an AppleTalk zone when dialing into an asynchronous line (on Cisco routers, only via the auxiliary port) use the appletalk client-mode interface configuration command. To disable this function, use the no form of this command.

appletalk client-mode
no appletalk client-mode

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Client mode is disabled.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

The appletalk client-mode command allows a remote client to use an asynchronous interface to access AppleTalk zones, use networked peripherals, and share files with other Macintosh users.

This command works only an asynchronous interfaces on which Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) encapsulation is enabled. Also, you must first create an internal network for the Macintosh client using the appletalk virtual-net global configuration command.

An interface configured with the appletalk client-mode and appletalk virtual-net global commands does not support routing.

Example

The following example allows a user to access AppleTalk functionality on an asynchronous line using PPP:

interface asynchronous 1
appletalk client-mode
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

appletalk virtual-net
encapsulation

interface async

ppp

appletalk discovery

To place an interface into discovery mode, use the appletalk discovery interface configuration command. To disable discovery mode, use the no form of this command.

appletalk discovery
no appletalk discovery

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If an interface is connected to a network that has at least one other operational AppleTalk router, you can dynamically configure the interface using discovery mode. In discovery mode, an interface acquires network address information about the attached network from an operational router and then uses this information to configure itself.

If you enable discovery mode on an interface, when the Cisco router starts up, that interface must acquire information to configure itself from another operational router on the attached network. If no operational router is present on the connected network, the interface will not start.

If you do not enable discovery mode, the interface must acquire its configuration from memory when the router starts. If the stored configuration is not complete, the interface will not start. If there is another operational router on the connected network, the router will verify the interface's stored configuration with that router. If there is any discrepancy, the interface will not start. If there are no neighboring operational routers, the router will assume the interface's stored configuration is correct and will start.

Once an interface is operational, it can seed the configurations of other routers on the connected network regardless of whether you have enabled discovery mode on any of the routers.

If you enable appletalk discovery and the interface is restarted, another operational router must still be present on the directly connected network in order for the interface to start.

It is not advisable to have all routers on a network configured with discovery mode enabled. If all routers were to restart simultaneously (for instance, after a power failure), the network would become inaccessible until at least one router were restarted with discovery mode disabled.

You can also enable discovery mode by specifying an address of 0.0. in the appletalk address command or a cable range of 0-0 in the appletalk cable-range command.

Discovery mode is useful when you are changing a network configuration, or when you are adding a router to an existing network.

Discovery mode does not run over serial lines.

Use the no appletalk discovery command to disable discovery mode. If the interface is not operational when you issue this command (that is, if you have not issued an access-list zone command on the interface), you must configure the zone name next. If the interface is operational when you issue the no appletalk discovery command, you can save the current configuration (in running memory) in nonvolatile memory by issuing the copy running-config startup-config command. (The copy running-config startup-config command replaces the write memory command. Refer to the description of the copy running-config startup-config command for more information.)

Example

The following example enables discovery mode on Ethernet interface 0:

interface ethernet 0
appletalk discovery
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

appletalk address
appletalk cable-range
appletalk zone
copy running-config startup-config

show appletalk interface

appletalk distribute-list in

To filter routing updates received from other routers over a specified interface, use the appletalk distribute-list in interface configuration command. To remove the routing table update filter, use the no form of this command.

appletalk distribute-list access-list-number in
no appletalk distribute-list
[access-list-number in]

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 600 to  699.

Default

No routing filters are preconfigured.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The appletalk distribute-list in command controls which networks and cable ranges in routing updates will be entered into the local routing table.

Filters for incoming routing updates use access lists that define conditions for networks and cable ranges only. They cannot use access lists that define conditions for zones. All zone information in an access list assigned to the interface with the appletalk distribute-list in command is ignored.

An input distribution list filters network numbers received in an incoming routing update. When AppleTalk routing updates are received on the specified interface, each network number and cable range in the update is checked against the access list. Only network numbers and cable ranges that are permitted by the access list are inserted into the Cisco IOS software AppleTalk routing table.

Example

The following example prevents the router from accepting routing table updates received from network 10 and on Ethernet interface 3:

access-list 601 deny network 10
access-list 601 permit other-access
interface ethernet 3
appletalk distribute-list 601 in
Related Commands

access-list cable-range
access-list includes
access-list network
access-list other-access
access-list within
appletalk distribute-list out

appletalk distribute-list out

To filter routing updates transmitted to other routers, use the appletalk distribute-list out interface configuration command. To remove the routing table update filter, use the no form of this command.

appletalk distribute-list access-list-number out
no appletalk distribute-list
[access-list-number out]

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 600  to  699.

Default

No routing filters are preconfigured.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The appletalk distribute-list out command controls which network numbers and cable ranges are included in routing updates and which zones the local router includes in its GetZoneList (GZL) replies.

When an AppleTalk routing update is generated on the specified interface, each network number and cable range in the routing table is checked against the access list. If an undefined access list is used, all network numbers and cable ranges are added to the routing update. Otherwise, if an access list is defined, only network numbers and cable ranges that satisfy the following conditions are added to the routing update:

A zone is considered partially obscured when one or more network numbers or cable ranges that are members of the zone is explicitly or implicitly denied.

When a Zone Information Protocol (ZIP) GZL reply is generated, only zones that satisfy the following conditions are included:


Note AppleTalk zone access lists on an Enhanced IGRP interface will not filter the distribution of Enhanced IGRP routes. When the appletalk distribute-list out command is applied to an Enhanced IGRP interface, any access-list zone commands in the specified access list will be ignored.
Example

The following example prevents routing updates sent on Ethernet 0 from mentioning any networks in zone Admin:

access-list 601 deny zone Admin
access-list 601 permit other-access
interface Ethernet 0
appletalk distribute-list 601 out
Related Commands

access-list additional-zones
access-list zone
appletalk distribute-list in
appletalk getzonelist-filter
appletalk permit-partial-zones

appletalk domain-group

To assign a predefined domain number to an interface, use the appletalk domain-group interface configuration command. To remove an interface from a domain, use the no form of this command.

appletalk domain-group domain-number
no appletalk domain-group [domain-number]

Syntax Description

domain-number

Number of an AppleTalk domain. It can be a decimal integer from 1 to 1000000.

Default

No domain number is assigned to the interface.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Before you can assign a domain number to an interface, you must create a domain with that domain number using the appletalk domain name global configuration command.

One or more interfaces on a router can be members of the same domain. However, a given interface can be in only one domain.

After you assign AppleTalk interenterprise features to an AppleTalk domain, you can attribute those features to a tunnel interface configured for AURP by assigning the AppleTalk domain-group number to the tunnel interface.

Examples

The following example assigns domain group 1 to Ethernet interface 0:

interface ethernet 0
appletalk domain-group 1

The following example assigns domain group 1 to tunnel interface 2. Assuming that domain group  1 is configured for AppleTalk interenterprise and that tunnel interface 2 is configured for AURP, any features configured for domain group 1 are ascribed to AURP on tunnel interface 2.

interface tunnel 2
appletalk domain-group 1
Related Commands

appletalk domain name
show appletalk domain

appletalk domain hop-reduction

To reduce the hop-count value in packets traveling between segments of a domains, use the appletalk domain hop-reduction global configuration command. To disable the reduction of hop-count values, use the no form of this command.

appletalk domain domain-number hop-reduction
no appletalk domain
domain-number hop-reduction

Syntax Description

domain-number

Number of an AppleTalk domain. It can be a decimal integer from 1 through 1,000,000.

Default

Reduction of hop-count values is disabled.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Before you can specify the appletalk domain hop-reduction global configuration command, you must have created a domain with that domain number using the appletalk domain name global configuration command.

DDP and Routing Table Maintenance Protocol (RTMP) both impose a 15-hop limit when forwarding packets. A packet ages out and is no longer forwarded when its hop count reaches 16. To overcome RTMP's 15-hop limit, the domain router represents all networks accessible to routers on its local network as one hop away. This allows routers to maintain and send routing information about networks beyond the 15-hop limit and achieve full connectivity.

When you enable hop-count reduction, delivery of packets from networks that are farther than
15 hops apart is guaranteed.

When you enable hop-count reduction, the hop count in a packet is set to 1 as it passes from one domain to another. For example, if the hop count was 8 when the packet left one domain, its hop count is 1 when it enters the next segment of the domain.

Example

The following example enables hop-count reduction for domain number 1:

appletalk domain 1 name Delta
appletalk domain 1 hop-reduction
Related Commands

appletalk domain name
show appletalk domain

appletalk domain name

To create a domain and assign it a name and number, use the appletalk domain name global configuration command. To remove a domain, use the no form of this command.

appletalk domain domain-number name domain-name
no appletalk domain domain-number name domain-name

Syntax Description

domain-number

Number of an AppleTalk domain. It can be a decimal integer from 1 to 1000000.

domain-name

Name of an AppleTalk domain. The name must be unique across the AppleTalk internetwork. It can be up to 32 characters long and can include special characters from the Apple Macintosh character set. To include a special character, type a colon followed by two hexadecimal characters. For zone names with a leading space character, enter the first character as the special sequence :20.

Default

No domain is created.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Example

The following example creates domain number 1 and assigns it the name Delta:

appletalk domain 1 name Delta
Related Commands

appletalk routing
show appletalk domain

appletalk domain remap-range

To remap ranges of AppleTalk network numbers or cable ranges between two segments of a domain, use the appletalk domain remap-range global configuration command. To disable remapping, use the no form of this command.

appletalk domain domain-number remap-range {in | out} cable-range
no appletalk domain domain-number remap-range {in | out} [cable-range]

Syntax Description

domain-number

Number of an AppleTalk domain. It can be a decimal integer from 1 to 1000000.

in

Specifies that the remapping is performed on inbound packets (that is, on packets arriving into the local interenterprise network). All network numbers or cable ranges coming from the domain are remapped into the specified range.

out

Specifies that the remapping is performed on outbound packets (that is, on packets exiting from the local interenterprise network). All network numbers or cable ranges going to the domain are remapped into the specified range.

cable-range

The argument specifies the start and end of the cable range, separated by a hyphen. The starting network must be the first AppleTalk network number or the beginning of the cable range to remap. The number must be immediately followed by a hyphen. The ending network must be the last AppleTalk network number or the end of the cable range to remap.

Default

No remapping is performed.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Before you can specify the appletalk domain remap-range command, you must create a domain with that domain number using the appletalk domain name global configuration command.

Inbound and outbound packets are relative to the domain router.

Ensure that the domain range you specify does not overlap any network addresses or cable ranges that already exist in the AppleTalk interenterprise network.

Each domain can have two domain mapping ranges to which to remap all incoming or outgoing network numbers or cable ranges. Incoming remapping ranges cannot overlap. However, outbound remapping ranges can overlap.

When an AppleTalk network in a domain becomes inactive, its remapped entry is removed from the remapping table. This frees the space for another network to be remapped.

If there are more remote domains than available remapping range numbers, the Cisco IOS software displays an error message and shuts down domains.

Example

The following example remaps all network addresses and cable ranges for packets inbound from domain 1 into the address range 1000 to 1999. It also remaps packets inbound from domain 2.

appletalk domain 1 name Delta
appletalk domain 2 name Echo
appletalk domain 1 remap-range in 10000-10999 
appletalk domain 2 remap-range in 20000-20999 
Related Commands

appletalk domain name
show appletalk remap

appletalk eigrp active-time

To specify the length of time that Enhanced IGRP routes can be active, use the appletalk eigrp active-time global configuration command. To return to the default value of one minute, use the no form of the command.

appletalk eigrp active-time {minutes | disabled}
no appletalk eigrp active-time
Syntax Description

minutes

Enhanced IGRP active state time (in minutes). Valid values are from 1 to 4294967295 minutes.

disabled

Disables the Enhanced IGRP active state time limit. Routes remain active indefinitely.

Default

1 minute

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

The command allows you to configure the length of time that Enhanced IGRP routes can remain active. When a route reaches the active state time limit, the Cisco IOS software logs an error and removes the route from the routing table. You can view the current setting of the Enhance IGRP active state time by using the show appletalk globals command.

Examples

The following example shows the current setting of the Enhanced IGRP active state time using the show appletalk globals command, changes the setting using the appletalk eigrp active-time command, and then displays the changed setting (using the show appletalk globals command again):

Router#show appletalk globals 
AppleTalk global information:
  Internet is incompatible with older, AT Phase1, routers.
  There are 4 routes in the internet.
  There are 7 zones defined.
  Logging of significant AppleTalk events is disabled.
  ZIP resends queries every 10 seconds.
  RTMP updates are sent every 10 seconds.
  RTMP entries are considered BAD after 20 seconds.
  RTMP entries are discarded after 60 seconds.
  AARP probe retransmit count: 10, interval: 200 msec.
  AARP request retransmit count: 5, interval: 1000 msec.
  DDP datagrams will be checksummed.
  RTMP datagrams will be strictly checked.
  RTMP routes may not be propagated without zones.
  Routes will be distributed between routing protocols.
  Routing between local devices on an interface will not be performed.
  EIGRP router id is: 1
  EIGRP maximum active time is 1 minutes
  IPTalk uses the udp base port of 768 (Default).
  Alternate node address format will not be displayed.
  Access control of any networks of a zone hides the zone.
Router#
Router#conf t
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#app
Router(config)#appletalk eigrp active-time 5
Router(config)#end
Router#
Router#show appletalk globals 
AppleTalk global information:
  Internet is incompatible with older, AT Phase1, routers.
  There are 4 routes in the internet.
  There are 7 zones defined.
  Logging of significant AppleTalk events is disabled.
  ZIP resends queries every 10 seconds.
  RTMP updates are sent every 10 seconds.
  RTMP entries are considered BAD after 20 seconds.
  RTMP entries are discarded after 60 seconds.
  AARP probe retransmit count: 10, interval: 200 msec.
  AARP request retransmit count: 5, interval: 1000 msec.
  DDP datagrams will be checksummed.
  RTMP datagrams will be strictly checked.
  RTMP routes may not be propagated without zones.
  Routes will be distributed between routing protocols.
  Routing between local devices on an interface will not be performed.
  EIGRP router id is: 1
  EIGRP maximum active time is 5 minutes
  IPTalk uses the udp base port of 768 (Default).
  Alternate node address format will not be displayed.
  Access control of any networks of a zone hides the zone.
Related Command

show appletalk globals

appletalk eigrp-bandwidth-percent

To configure the percentage of bandwidth that may be used by Enhanced IGRP on an interface, use the appletalk eigrp-bandwidth-percent interface configuration command. To restore the default value, use the no form of this command.

appletalk eigrp-bandwidth-percent percent
no appletalk eigrp-bandwidth-percent

Syntax Description

percent

Percentage of bandwidth that Enhanced IGRP may use.

Default

50 percent

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Enhanced IGRP will use up to 50 percent of the bandwidth of a link, as defined by the bandwidth interface configuration command. This command may be used if some other fraction of the bandwidth is desired. Note that values greater than 100 percent may be configured; this may be useful if the bandwidth is set artificially low for other reasons.

Example

The following example allows Enhanced IGRP to use up to 75 percent (42 kbps) of a 56 kbps serial link.

interface serial 0
bandwidth 56
appletalk eigrp-bandwidth-percent 75
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

bandwidth
appletalk routing

appletalk eigrp log-neighbor-changes

To enable the logging of changes in Enhanced IGRP neighbor adjacencies, use the appletalk eigrp log-neighbor-change global configuration command.

appletalk eigrp log-neighbor-changes
no appletalk eigrp log-neighbor-changes

Default

No adjacency changes are logged.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Enables the logging of neighbor adjacency changes to monitor the stability of the routing system and to help detect problems. Log messages are of the form:

%DUAL-5-NBRCHANGE: AT/EIGRP 1: Neighbor address (interface) is state: reason

address

Neighbor address.

state

Up or down.

reason

Reason for change.

Example

The following configuration will log neighbor changes for Appletalk Enhanced IGRP.

appletalk eigrp log-neighbor-changes
Related Command

appletalk routing

appletalk eigrp-splithorizon

To configure split horizon, use the appletalk eigrp-splithorizon interface configuration command. To disable split horizon, use the no form of this command.

appletalk eigrp-splithorizon
no appletalk eigrp-splithorizon

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

If you enable split horizon on an interface, AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP update and query packets are not sent if this interface is the next hop to that destination. This reduces the number of Enhanced IGRP packets of the network.

Split horizon blocks information about routes from being advertised by a router out any interface from which that information originated. This behavior usually optimizes communication among multiple routers, particularly when links are broken. However, with nonbroadcast networks, such as Frame Relay and Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS), situations can arise for which this behavior is less than ideal. For these situations, you may wish to disable split horizon.

Example

The following example disables split horizon on serial interface 0:

interface serial 0
no appletalk eigrp-splithorizon

appletalk eigrp-timers

To configure the AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP hello packet interval and the route hold time, use the appletalk eigrp-timers interface configuration command. To return to the default values for these timers, use the no form of this command.

appletalk eigrp-timers hello-interval hold-time
no appletalk eigrp-timers
hello-interval hold-time

Syntax Description

hello-interval

Interval between hello packets, in seconds. The default interval is 5 seconds. It can be a maximum of 30 seconds.

hold-time

Hold time, in seconds. The hold time is advertised in hello packets and indicates to neighbors the length of time they should consider the sender valid. The hold time can be in the range 15 to 90 seconds.

Default

hello-interval:
For low-speed NBMA networks: 60 seconds
For all other networks: 5 seconds

hold-time
:
For low-speed NBMA networks: 180 seconds
For all other networks: 15 seconds

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

If the current value for the hold time is less than two times the hello interval, the hold time is reset to three times the hello interval.

If the Cisco IOS software does not receive a hello packet within the specified hold time, routes through this device are considered available.

Increasing the hold time delays route convergence across the network.


Note Do not adjust the hold time without advising technical support.

The default of 180 seconds for hold-time applies only to low-speed, nonbroadcast, multiaccess (NBMA) media. Low speed is considered to be a rate of T1 or slower, as specified with the bandwidth interface configuration command.

The default of 60 seconds for hello-interval applies only to low-speed NBMA media. Low speed is considered to be a rate of T1 or slower, as specified with the bandwidth interface configuration command. Note that for purposes of Enhanced IGRP, Frame Relay and SMDS networks may or may not be considered to be NBMA. These networks are considered NBMA if the interface has not been configured to use physical multicasting; otherwise they are considered not to be NBMA.

Example

The following example changes the hello interval to 10 seconds:

interface ethernet 0
appletalk eigrp-timers 10 45

appletalk event-logging

To log significant network events, use the appletalk event-logging global configuration command. To disable this function, use the no form of this command.

appletalk event-logging
no appletalk event-logging

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The appletalk  event-logging command logs a subset of messages produced by debug appletalk command. These messages include routing changes, zone creation, port status, and address.

Example

The following example enables logging of AppleTalk events:

appletalk routing
appletalk event-logging
Related Command

show appletalk globals

appletalk free-trade-zone

To establish a free-trade zone, use the appletalk free-trade-zone interface configuration command. To disable a free-trade zone, use the no form of this command.

appletalk free-trade-zone
no appletalk free-trade-zone

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

A free-trade zone is a part of an AppleTalk internetwork that is accessible by two other parts of the internetwork, neither of which can access the other. You might want to create a free-trade zone to allow the exchange of information between two organizations that otherwise want to keep their internetworks isolated from each other or that do not have physical connectivity with one another.

You apply the appletalk free-trade-zone command to each interface attached to the common-access network. This command has the following effect on the interface:

The GZL for free-trade zone nodes will be empty.

Example

The following example establishes a free-trade zone on Ethernet interface 0:

interface ethernet 0
appletalk cable-range 5-5
appletalk zone FreeAccessZone
appletalk free-trade-zone

appletalk getzonelist-filter

To filter GZL replies, use the appletalk getzonelist-filter interface configuration command. To remove a filter, use the no form of this command.

appletalk getzonelist-filter access-list-number
no appletalk getzonelist-filter [access-list-number]

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 600 to  699.

Default

No filters are preconfigured.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

GZL filters define conditions for zones only. They cannot use access lists that define conditions for network numbers or cable ranges. All network number and cable range information in the access list assigned to an interface with the appletalk getzonelist-filter command is ignored.

Using a GZL filter is not a complete replacement for anonymous network numbers. In order to prevent users from seeing a zone, all routers must implement the GZL filter. If there are any routers from other vendors on the network, the GZL filter will not have a consistent effect.

The Macintosh Chooser uses ZIP GZL requests to compile a list of zones from which the user can select services. Any router on the same network as the Macintosh can respond to these requests with a GZL reply. You can create a GZL filter on the router to control which zones the router mentions in its GZL replies. This has the effect of controlling the list of zones that are displayed by the Chooser.

When defining GZL filters, you should ensure that all routers on the same internetwork filter GZL reply identically. Otherwise, the Chooser will list different zones depending upon which router responded to the request. Also, inconsistent filters can result in zones appearing and disappearing every few seconds when the user remains in the Chooser. Because of these inconsistencies, you should normally use the appletalk  getzonelist-filter command only when all routers in the internetwork are our routers, unless the routers from other vendors have a similar feature.

Replies to GZL requests are also filtered by anyappletalk distribute-list out filter that has been applied to the same interface. You must specify an appletalk getzonelist-filter command only if you want additional filtering to be applied to GZL replies. This filter is rarely needed except to eliminate zones that do not contain user services.

Example

The following example does not include the zone Engineering in GZL replies sent out Ethernet interface 0:

access-list 600 deny zone Engineering
interface ethernet 0
appletalk getzonelist-filter 600
Related Commands

access-list additional-zones
access-list zone
appletalk distribute-list out
appletalk permit-partial-zones

appletalk glean-packets

To derive AARP table entries from incoming packets, use the appletalk glean-packets interface configuration command. To disable this function, use the no form of this command.

appletalk glean-packets
no appletalk glean-packets

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Cisco IOS software automatically derives AARP table entries from incoming packets. This process is referred to as gleaning, which speeds up the process of populating the AARP table.

Our implementation of AppleTalk does not forward packets with local source and destination network addresses. This behavior does not conform with the definition of AppleTalk in Apple Computer's Inside AppleTalk publication. However, this behavior is designed to prevent any possible corruption of the AARP table in any AppleTalk node that is performing MAC-address gleaning.

Example

The following example disables the building of the AARP table using information derived from incoming packets:

interface ethernet 0
appletalk address 33
no appletalk glean-packets

appletalk ignore-verify-errors

To allow the Cisco IOS software to start functioning even if the network is misconfigured, use the appletalk ignore-verify-errors global configuration command. To disable this function, use the no form of this command.

appletalk ignore-verify-errors
no appletalk ignore-verify-errors

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command only under the guidance of a customer engineer or other service representative. A router that starts routing in a misconfigured network will serve only to make a bad situation worse; it will not correct other misconfigured routers.

Example

The following example allows a router to start functioning without verifying network misconfiguration:

no appletalk ignore-verify-errors 0

appletalk iptalk

To enable IPTalk encapsulation on a tunnel interface, use the appletalk iptalk interface configuration command. To disable IPTalk encapsulation, use the no form of this command.

appletalk iptalk network zone
no appletalk iptalk
[network zone]
Syntax Description

network

AppleTalk network address assigned to the interface. The argument network is the 16-bit network number in decimal.

zone

Name of the zone for the connected AppleTalk network.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use the appletalk iptalk command to enable IPTalk encapsulation on a tunnel interface. This command encapsulates AppleTalk in IP packets in a manner compatible with the Columbia AppleTalk Package (CAP) IPTalk and the Kinetics IPTalk implementations. IPTalk is configured on a tunnel interface.

This command allows AppleTalk communication with UNIX hosts running older versions of CAP that do not support native AppleTalk EtherTalk encapsulations. Typically, Apple Macintosh users wishing to communicate with these servers would have their connections routed through a Kinetics FastPath router running Kinetics IPTalk software.

This command is provided as a migration command; newer versions of CAP provide native AppleTalk EtherTalk encapsulations, and the IPTalk encapsulation is no longer required. Our implementation of IPTalk assumes that AppleTalk is already being routed on the backbone; there is currently no LocalTalk hardware interface for our routers.

Our implementation of IPTalk does not support manually configured AppleTalk-to-IP address mapping (atab). The address mapping provided is the same as the Kinetics IPTalk implementation when the atab facility is not enabled. This address mapping functions as follows: The IP subnet mask used on the Ethernet interface on which IPTalk is enabled is inverted (ones complement). This result is then masked against 255 (0xFF hexadecimal). This is then masked against the low-order 8  bits of the IP address to obtain the AppleTalk node number.

Example

The following example configuration illustrates how to configure IPTalk:

interface Ethernet0
ip address 131.108.1.118 255.255.255.0
interface Tunnel0
tunnel source Ethernet0
tunnel mode iptalk
appletalk iptalk 30 UDPZone

In this configuration, the IP subnet mask would be inverted:

255.255.255.0 inverted yields: 0.0.0.255

Masked with 255 it yields 255, and masked with the low-order 8 bits of the interface IP address it yields 118.

This means that the AppleTalk address of the Ethernet 0 interface seen in the UDPZone zone is 30.118. This caveat should be noted, however: Should the host field of an IP subnet mask for an interface be more than 8 bits wide, it will be possible to obtain conflicting AppleTalk node numbers. For instance, consider a situation where the subnet mask for the Ethernet 0 interface above is 255.255.240.0, meaning that the host field is 12 bits wide.

Related Commands

appletalk iptalk-baseport
tunnel mode
tunnel source

appletalk iptalk-baseport

To specify the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) port number when configuring IPTalk, use the appletalk iptalk-baseport global configuration command. To return to the default UDP port number, use the no form of this command.

appletalk iptalk-baseport port-number
no appletalk iptalk-baseport
[port-number]

Syntax Description

port-number

First UDP port number in the range of UDP ports used in mapping AppleTalk well-known DDP socket numbers to UDP ports.

Default

768

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Implementations of IPTalk prior to April 1988 mapped well-known DDP socket numbers to privileged UDP ports starting at port number 768. In April 1988, the Network Information Center (NIC) assigned a range of UDP ports for the defined DDP well-known sockets starting at UDP port number 200 and assigned these ports the names at-nbp, at-rtmp, at-echo, and at-zis. Release 6 and later of the CAP program dynamically decides which port mapping to use. If there are no AppleTalk service entries in the UNIX system's /etc/services file, CAP uses the older mapping starting at UDP port number 768.

The default UDP port mapping supported by our implementation of IPTalk is 768. If there are AppleTalk service entries in the UNIX system's /etc/services file, you should specify the beginning of the UDP port mapping range with the appletalk  iptalk-baseport command.

Example

The following example sets the base UDP port number to 200, which is the official NIC port number, and configures IPTalk on Ethernet interface 0:

appletalk routing
appletalk iptalk-baseport 200
!
interface Ethernet 0
ip address 131.108.1.118 255.255.255.0
appletalk address 20.129
appletalk zone Native AppleTalk
appletalk iptalk 30.0 UDPZone
Related Command

appletalk iptalk

appletalk  lookup-type

To specify which NBP service types are retained in the name cache, use the appletalk lookup-type global configuration command. To disable the caching of services, use the no form of this command.

appletalk  lookup-type service-type
no appletalk  lookup-type service-type

Syntax Description

service-type

AppleTalk service types. The name of a service type can include special characters from the Apple Macintosh character set. To include a special character, type a colon followed by two hexadecimal numbers. For zone names with a leading space character, enter the first character as the special sequence :20. For a list of possible types, see Table 1 in the "Usage Guidelines" section.

Default

The ciscoRouter entries are retained in the name cache.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can issue multiple appletalk  lookup-type commands. The Cisco IOS software does not query the entire zone, but instead polls only the connected networks. This reduces network overhead and means that the name cache contains entries only for selected services that are in a directly connected network or zone, not for all the selected services in a network or zone.

Table 1 lists some AppleTalk service types.


Table 1: AppleTalk Service Types
Service Type1 Description
Services for Cisco Routers

ciscoRouter

Active adjacent Cisco routers. This service type is initially enabled by default.

IPADDRESS

Addresses of active MacIP server.

IPGATEWAY

Names of active MacIP server.

SNMP Agent

Active SNMP agents in Cisco routers.

Services for Other Vendors' Routers

AppleRouter

Apple internetwork router.

FastPath

Shiva LocalTalk gateway.

GatorBox

Cayman LocalTalk gateway.

systemRouter

Cisco's OEM router name.

Workstation

Macintosh running System 7. The machine type also is defined, so it is possible to easily identify all user nodes.

1Type all service names exactly as shown. Spaces are valid. Do not use leading or trailing spaces when entering service names.

If you omit the service-type argument from the no  appletalk  lookup-type command, no service types except those relating to our devices are cached.

To display information that is stored in the name cache about the services being used by our routers and other vendors' routers, use the show appletalk name-cache command.

If a neighboring router is not our device or is running our software that is earlier than Release 9.0, it is possible our device will be unable to determine the name of the neighbor. This is normal behavior, and there is no workaround.

If AppleTalk routing is enabled, enabling Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) will automatically enable SNMP over DDP.

Name cache entries are deleted after several interval periods expire without being refreshed. (You set the interval with the appletalk name-lookup-interval command.) At each interval, a single request is sent via each interface that has valid addresses.

Example

The following example caches information about GatorBox services, Apple internetwork routers, MacIP services, and workstations. Information about our devices is automatically cached.

appletalk  lookup-type GatorBox
appletalk  lookup-type AppleRouter
appletalk  lookup-type IPGATEWAY
appletalk  lookup-type Workstation
Related Commands

appletalk name-lookup-interval
show appletalk name-cache
show appletalk nbp

appletalk macip dynamic

To allocate IP addresses to dynamic MacIP clients, use the appletalk macip dynamic global configuration command. To delete a MacIP dynamic address assignment, use the no form of this command.

appletalk macip dynamic ip-address [ip-address] zone server-zone
no appletalk macip [dynamic ip-address [ip-address] zone server-zone]

Syntax Description

ip-address

IP address, in four-part, dotted decimal notation. To specify a range, enter two IP addresses, which represent the first and last addresses in the range.

zone server-zone

Zone in which the MacIP server resides. The argument server-zone can include special characters from the Apple Macintosh character set. To include a special character, specify a colon followed by two hexadecimal characters. For zone names with a leading space character, enter the first character as the special sequence :20. For a list of Macintosh characters, refer to Apple Computer's Inside AppleTalk publication.

Default

No IP addresses are allocated.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use the appletalk macip dynamic command when configuring MacIP.

Dynamic clients are those that accept any IP address assignment within the dynamic range specified.

In general, it is recommended that you do not use fragmented address ranges in configuring ranges for MacIP. However, if this is unavoidable, use the appletalk  macip  dynamic command to specify as many addresses or ranges as required and use the appletalk macip static command to assign a specific address or address range.

To shut down all running MacIP services, use the following command:

no appletalk macip

To delete a particular dynamic address assignment from the configuration, use the following command:

no appletalk macip dynamic ip-address [ip-address] zone server-zone
Example

The following example illustrates MacIP support for dynamically addressed MacIP clients with IP addresses in the range 131.108.1.28 to 131.108.1.44:

!This global statement specifies the MacIP server address and zone:
appletalk macip server 131.108.1.27 zone Engineering
!
!This global statement identifies the dynamically addressed clients:
appletalk macip dynamic 131.108.1.28 131.108.1.44 zone Engineering
!
!These statements assign the IP address and subnet mask for Ethernet interface 0:
interface ethernet 0
ip address 131.108.1.27 255.255.255.0
!
!This global statement enables AppleTalk routing on the router.
appletalk routing
!
!These statements enable AppleTalk routing on the interface and 
!set the zone name for the interface 
interface ethernet 0
appletalk cable-range 69-69 69.128
appletalk zone Engineering
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

appletalk macip server
appletalk macip static
ip address
show appletalk macip-servers

appletalk macip server

To establish a MacIP server for a zone, use the appletalk macip server global configuration command. To shut down a MacIP server, use the no form of this command.

appletalk macip server ip-address zone server-zone
no appletalk macip [server ip-address zone server-zone]

Syntax Description

ip-address

IP address, in four-part dotted decimal notation. It is suggested that this address match the address of an existing IP interface.

zone server-zone

Zone in which the MacIP server resides. The argument server-zone can include special characters from the Apple Macintosh character set. To include a special character, specify a colon followed by two hexadecimal characters. For zone names with a leading space character, enter the first character as the special sequence :20. For a list of Macintosh characters, refer to Apple Computer's Inside AppleTalk publication.

Default

No MacIP server is established.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use the appletalk macip server command when configuring MacIP.

You can configure only one MacIP server per AppleTalk zone, and the server must reside in the default zone. A server is not registered via NBP until at least one MacIP resource is configured.

You can configure multiple MacIP servers for a router, but you can assign only one MacIP server to a particular zone and only one IP interface to each MacIP server. In general, you must be able to establish an alias between the IP address you assign with the appletalk macip server command and an existing IP interface. For implementation simplicity, it is suggested that the address specified in this command match an existing IP interface address.

To shut down all active MacIP servers, use the following command:

no appletalk macip

To delete a specific MacIP server from the MacIP configuration, use the following command:

no appletalk macip server ip-address zone server-zone
Example

The following example establishes a MacIP server on Ethernet interface 0 in AppleTalk zone Engineering. It then assigns an IP address to the Ethernet interface and enables AppleTalk routing on a router and its Ethernet interface.

appletalk macip server 131.108.1.27 zone Engineering
ip address 131.108.1.27 255.255.255.0
appletalk routing
interface ethernet 0
appletalk cable-range 69-69 69.128
appletalk zone Engineering
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

appletalk macip dynamic
appletalk macip static
ip address

show appletalk macip-servers

appletalk macip static

To allocate an IP address to be used by a MacIP client that has reserved a static IP address, use the appletalk macip static global configuration command. To delete a MacIP static address assignment, use the no form of this command.

appletalk macip static ip-address [ip-address] zone server-zone
no appletalk macip [static ip-address [ip-address] zone server-zone]

Syntax Description

ip-address

IP address, in four-part, dotted decimal format. To specify a range, enter two IP addresses, which represent the first and last addresses in the range.

zone server-zone

Zone in which the MacIP server resides. The argument server-zone can include special characters from the Apple Macintosh character set. To include a special character, specify a colon followed by two hexadecimal characters. For zone names with a leading space character, enter the first character as the special sequence :20. For a list of Macintosh characters, refer to Apple Computer's Inside AppleTalk publication.

Default

No IP address is allocated.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use the appletalk macip static command when configuring MacIP.

Static addresses are for users who require fixed addresses for IP name domain name service and for administrators who do want addresses to change so they can always know who has what IP address.

In general, it is recommended that you do not use fragmented address ranges in configuring ranges for MacIP. However, if this is unavoidable, use the appletalk  macip  dynamic command to specify as many addresses or ranges as required, and then use the appletalk  macip  static command to assign a specific address or address range.

To shut down all running MacIP services, use the following command:

no appletalk macip

To delete a particular static address assignment from the configuration, use the following command:

no appletalk macip static ip-address [ip-address] zone server-zone
Example

The following example illustrates MacIP support for MacIP clients with statically allocated IP addresses. The IP addresses range is from 131.108.1.50 to 131.108.1.66. The three nodes that have the specific addresses are 131.108.1.81, 131.108.1.92, and 131.108.1.101.

!This global statement specifies the MacIP server address and zone:
appletalk macip server 131.108.1.27 zone Engineering
!
!These global statements identify the statically addressed clients:
appletalk macip static 131.108.1.50 131.108.1.66 zone Engineering
appletalk macip static 131.108.1.81 zone Engineering
appletalk macip static 131.108.1.92 zone Engineering
appletalk macip static 131.108.1.101 zone Engineering
!
!These statements assign the IP address and subnet mask for Ethernet interface 0:
interface ethernet 0
ip address 131.108.1.27 255.255.255.0
!
!This global statement enables AppleTalk routing on the router.
appletalk routing
!
!These statements enable AppleTalk routing on the interface and 
!set the zone name for the interface 
interface ethernet 0
appletalk cable-range 69-69 69.128
appletalk zone Engineering
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

appletalk macip dynamic
appletalk macip server
ip address

show appletalk macip-servers

appletalk maximum-paths

To define the maximum number of equal-cost paths the router should use when balancing the traffic load, use the appletalk maximum-paths global configuration command. To restore the defaul value, use the no form of this command.

appletalk maximum-paths [paths]
no appletalk maximum-paths [paths]

Syntax Description

paths

Maximum number of equal-cost paths to be used for balancing the traffic load. The paths argument is a decimal number in the range of 1 to 16.

Default

The default value is 1.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the appletalk maximum-paths command when configuring AppleTalk load balancing.

The appletalk maximum-paths command increases throughput by allowing the software to choose among several equal-cost, parallel paths. (Note that when paths have differing costs, the software chooses lower-cost routes in preference to higher-cost routes.)

When the value of paths is greater than 1, packets are distributed over the multiple equal-cost paths in round-robin fasion on a packet-by-packet basis.

Examples

The following example illustrates defining four equal-cost paths:

!Set the maximum number of equal-cost paths to 4
appletalk maximum-paths 4

The following example illustrates restoring the default value:

!Restore the default value
no appletalk maximum-paths 4

appletalk name-lookup-interval

To set the interval between service pollings by the router on its AppleTalk interfaces, use the appletalk name-lookup-interval global configuration command. To purge the name cache and return to the default polling interval, use the no form of this command.

appletalk  name-lookup-interval seconds
no appletalk  name-lookup-interval
[seconds]

Syntax Description

seconds

Interval, in seconds, between NBP lookup pollings. This can be any positive integer; there is no upper limit. It is recommended that you use an interval between 300 seconds (5 minutes) and 1,200 seconds (20 minutes). The smaller the interval, the more packets are generated to handle the names. Specifying an interval of 0 purges all entries from the name cache and disables the caching of service type information that is controlled by the appletalk lookup-type command, including the caching of information about our routers.

Default

The default is 0, which purges all entries from the name cache and disables the caching of service type information.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Cisco IOS software collects name information only for entities on connected AppleTalk networks. This reduces overhead.

If you enter an interval of 0, all polling for services (except ciscoRouter) is disabled. If you reenter a nonzero value, the configuration specified by the appletalk lookup-type command is reinstated. You cannot disable the lookup of ciscoRouter.

Example

The following example sets the lookup interval to 20 minutes:

appletalk  name-lookup-interval 1200
Related Commands

appletalk lookup-type
show appletalk name-cache

appletalk permit-partial-zones

To permit access to the other networks in a zone when access to one of those networks is denied, use the appletalk permit-partial-zones global configuration command. To deny access to all networks in a zone if access to one of those networks is denied, use the no form of this command.

appletalk permit-partial-zones
no appletalk permit-partial-zones

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Access denied.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The permitting of partial zones provides IP-style access control.

When you enable the use of partial zones, the NBP protocol cannot ensure the consistency and uniqueness of name bindings.

If you enable the use of partial zones, access control behavior is compatible with that of Cisco  IOS software Release 8.3.

Example

The following example allows partial zones:

appletalk permit-partial-zones
Related Commands

access-list additional-zones
access-list zone
appletalk distribute-list out
appletalk getzonelist-filter

appletalk pre-fdditalk

To enable the recognition of pre-FDDITalk packets, use the appletalk pre-fdditalk global configuration command. To disable this function, use the no form of this command.

appletalk pre-fdditalk
no appletalk pre-fdditalk

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command to have the Cisco IOS software recognize AppleTalk packets sent on the FDDI ring from routers running Cisco software releases prior to Release 9.0(3) or Release 9.1(2).

Example

The following example disables the recognition of pre-FDDITalk packets:

no appletalk pre-fdditalk 

appletalk protocol

To specify the routing protocol to use on an interface, use the appletalk protocol interface configuration command. To disable a routing protocol, use the no form of this command.

appletalk protocol {aurp | eigrp | rtmp}
no appletalk protocol {aurp | eigrp
| rtmp}

Syntax Description

aurp

Specifies that the routing protocol to use is AURP. You can enable AURP only on tunnel interfaces.

eigrp

Specifies that the routing protocol to use is Enhanced IGRP.

rtmp

Specifies that the routing protocol to use is RTMP, which is enabled by default.

Default

RTMP

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

You can configure an interface to use both RTMP and Enhanced IGRP. If you do so, route information learned from Enhanced IGRP will take precedence over information learned from RTMP. The Cisco IOS software will, however, continue to send out RTMP routing updates.

You cannot disable RTMP without first enabling AURP or Enhanced IGRP.

Enabling AURP automatically disables RTMP.

You can enable AURP only on tunnel interfaces.

Examples

The following example enables AURP on tunnel interface 1:

interface tunnel 1
appletalk protocol aurp

The following example enables AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP on serial interface 0:

interface serial 0
appletalk protocol eigrp

The following example disables RTMP on serial interface 0:

interface serial 0
no appletalk protocol rtmp
Related Command

appletalk routing

appletalk  proxy-nbp

To assign a proxy network number for each zone in which there is a router that supports only nonextended AppleTalk, use the appletalk proxy-nbp global configuration command. To delete the proxy, use the no form of this command.

appletalk proxy-nbp network-number zone-name
no appletalk proxy-nbp [network-number zone-name]

Syntax Description

network-number

Network number of the proxy. It is a 16-bit decimal number and must be unique on the network. This is the network number that will be advertised by the Cisco IOS software as if it were a real network number.

zone-name

Name of the zone that contains the devices that support only nonextended AppleTalk. The name can include special characters from the Apple Macintosh character set. To include a special character, type a colon followed by two hexadecimal characters. For zone names with a leading space character, enter the first character as the special sequence :20.

Default

No proxy network number is assigned.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The appletalk proxy-nbp command provides compatibility between AppleTalk Phase 1 and AppleTalk Phase 2 networks.

Proxy routes are included in outgoing RTMP updates as if they were directly connected routes, although they are not really directly connected, since they are not associated with any interface. Whenever an NBQ BrRq for the zone in question is generated by anyone anywhere in the internetwork, an NBP FwdReq is directed to any router connected to the proxy route. The Phase 2 router, which is the only router directly connected, converts the FwdReq to LkUps, which are understood by Phase 1 routers, and sends them to every network in the zone.

In an environment in which there are Phase 1 and Phase 2 networks, you must specify at least one appletalk proxy-nbp command for each zone that has a nonextended-only AppleTalk router.

The proxy network number you assign with the appletalk proxy-nbp command cannot also be assigned to a router, nor can it also be associated with a physical network.

You must assign only one proxy network number for each zone. However, you can define additional proxies with different network numbers to provide redundancy. Each proxy generates one or more packets for each forward request it receives. All other packets sent to the proxy network address are discarded. Defining redundant proxy network numbers increases the NBP traffic linearly.

Example

The following example defines network number 60 as an NBP proxy for the zone Twilight:

appletalk proxy-nbp 60 Twilight
Related Command
show appletalk route

appletalk require-route-zones

To prevent the advertisement of routes (network numbers or cable ranges) that have no assigned zone, use the appletalk require-route-zones global configuration command. To disable this option and allow the Cisco IOS software to advertise to its neighbors routes that have no network-zone association, use the no form of this command.

appletalk require-route-zones
no appletalk require-route-zones

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The appletalk require-route-zones command ensures that all networks have zone names prior to advertisement to neighbors.

The no appletalk require-route-zones command enables behavior compatible with Cisco  IOS software Release  8.3.

Using this command helps prevent ZIP protocol storms. ZIP protocol storms can arise when corrupt routes are propagated and routers broadcast ZIP requests to determine the network/zone associations.

When the appletalk require-route-zones command is enabled, the Cisco IOS software will not advertise a route to its neighboring routers until it has obtained the network-zone associations. This effectively limits the storms to a single network rather than the entire internet.

As an alternative to disabling this option, use the appletalk getzonelist-filter interface configuration command to filter empty zones from the list presented to users.

You can configure different zone lists on different interfaces. However, you are discouraged from doing this because AppleTalk users expect to have the same user zone lists at any end node in the internet.

The filtering provided by the appletalk require-route-zones command does not prevent explicit access via programmatic methods, but should be considered a user optimization to suppress unused zones. You should use other forms of AppleTalk access control lists to actually secure a zone or network.

Example

The following example configures a router to prevent the advertisement of routes that have no assigned zone:

appletalk require-route-zones

appletalk route-cache

To enable fast-switching on all supported interfaces, use the appletalk route-cache interface configuration command. To disable fast-switching, use the no form of this command.

appletalk route-cache
no appletalk route-cache

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled on all interfaces that support fast-switching

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Fast switching allows higher throughput by switching a packet using a cache created by previous packets. Fast-switching is enabled by default on all interfaces that support fast switching, including Token Ring, Frame Relay, PPP, High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC), SMDS, and ATM. Note that fast switching is not supported over X.25 and Link Access Procedure Balance (LAPB), encapsulations, or on the CSC-R16, CSC-1R, or CSC-2R STR Token Ring adapters.

Packet transfer performance is generally better when fast switching is enabled. However, you may want to disable fast switching in order to save memory space on interface cards and to help avoid congestion when high-bandwidth interfaces are writing large amounts of information to low-bandwidth interfaces.

Fast switching of extended AppleTalk is supported on serial lines with several encapsulation types (for example, SMDS and HDLC). Fast switching of nonextended AppleTalk is not supported on serial lines.

Example

The following example disables fast switching on an interface:

interface ethernet 0
appletalk cable-range 10-20
appletalk zone Twilight
no appletalk route-cache
Related Command

show appletalk cache

appletalk route-redistribution

To redistribute RTMP routes into AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP and vice versa, use the appletalk route-redistribution global configuration command. To keep Enhanced IGRP and RTMP routes separate, use the no form of this command.

appletalk route-redistribution
no appletalk route-redistribution

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled when Enhanced IGRP is enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Redistribution allows routing information generated by one protocol to be advertised in another.

In the automatic redistribution of routes between Enhanced IGRP and RTMP, an RTMP hop is treated as having a slightly worse metric than an equivalent Enhanced IGRP hop on a 9.6-Kb link. This allows Enhanced IGRP to be preferred over RTMP except in the most extreme of circumstances. Typically, you will see this only when using tunnels. If you want an Enhanced IGRP path in a tunnel to be preferred over an alternate RTMP path, you should set the interface delay and bandwidth parameters on the tunnel to bring the metric of the tunnel down to being better than a 9.6-Kb link.

Example

In the following example, RTMP routing information is not redistributed:

appletalk routing eigrp 23
no appletalk route-redistribution

appletalk routing

To enable AppleTalk routing, use the appletalk routing global configuration command. To disable AppleTalk routing, use the no form of this command.

appletalk routing [eigrp router-number]
no appletalk routing
[eigrp router-number]

Syntax Description

eigrp router-number

(Optional) Specifies the Enhanced IGRP routing protocol. The argument router-number is the router ID. It can be a decimal integer from 1 to 65535. It must be unique in your AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP internetwork.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0. The eigrp keyword first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

If you do not specify the optional keyword and argument, this command enables AppleTalk routing using the RTMP routing protocol.

You can configure multiple AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP processes on a router. To do so, assign each a different router ID number. (Note that IP and IPX Enhanced IGRP use an autonomous system number to enable Enhanced IGRP, while AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP uses a router ID.)

If you configure a device with a router number that is the same as that of a neighboring router, the Cisco IOS software will refuse to start AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP on interfaces that connect with that neighboring router.

Caution When disabling Enhanced IGRP routing with the no appletalk routing eigrp command, all interfaces enabled for only Enhanced IGRP (and not also RTMP) lose their AppleTalk configuration. If you want to disable Enhanced IGRP and use RTMP instead on specific interfaces, first enable RTMP on each interface using the appletalk protocol rtmp interface configuration command. Then, disable Enhanced IGRP routing using the no appletalk routing eigrp command. This process ensures that you do not lose AppleTalk configurations on interfaces for which you want to use RTMP.
Examples

The following example enables AppleTalk protocol processing:

appletalk routing

The following example enables AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP routing on router number 22:

appletalk routing eigrp 22
Related Commands

appletalk address
appletalk cable-range
appletalk protocol
appletalk zone

appletalk rtmp-stub

To enable AppleTalk RTMP stub mode, use the appletalk rtmp-stub interface configuration command. To disable this mode, use the no form of the command.

appletalk rtmp-stub
no appletalk rtmp-stub

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command enables routers running Enhanced IGRP and RTMP to reduce the amount of CPU processing that RTMP modules use. RTMP modules send "stub" packets instead of full RTMP packets when you enable stub mode.

A stub packet is only the first tuple of an RTMP packet. The first tuple indicates the network number range assigned to that network. End nodes use stub packets to determine if their node number is in the right network range.

Upon startup, an end node on an extended network uses stub packets to verify that its previous node number is still within the segment's network number range. If it is, the end node reuses the previous node number and stores the network number range information. If an end node learns upon startup that its previous node number does not fall within the segment's new network number range, the end node picks a new node number based on the new network number range and stores the new network number range information.

After startup, end nodes use subsequent stub packets to verify that the network number range sent in the stub packets precisely matches its stored network number range. In this way, stub packets keep end nodes alive.

When routers that have stub mode enabled receive full RTMP packets, they discard these packets because Enhanced IGRP (not RTMP) is expected to deliver routes. Discarding full RTMP packets when stub mode is enabled saves the overhead processing of RTMP routes.

You can also use stub mode on "end" networks. End networks are those to which no other routers attach. Because no other routers are listening for routes on these end segments, there is no need for the end router to send full RTMP packets to these end segments. The end router can send stub packet to keep end nodes alive.

Example

The following example turns on AppleTalk RTMP stub mode:

appletalk rtmp-stub
Related Command

show appletalk interface

appletalk send-rtmps

To allow the Cisco IOS software to send routing updates to its neighbors, use the appletalk send-rtmps interface configuration command. To block updates from being sent, use the no form of this command.

appletalk send-rtmps
no appletalk send-rtmps

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Send routing updates.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If you block the sending of routing updates, an interface on the network that has AppleTalk enabled is not "visible" to other routers on the network.

Example

The following example prevents a router from sending routing updates to its neighbors:

no appletalk send-rtmps
Related Commands

appletalk require-route-zones
appletalk strict-rtmp-checking
appletalk timers

appletalk static cable-range

To define a static route or a floating static route on an extended network, use the appletalk static cable-range global configuration command. To remove a static route, use the no form of this command.

appletalk static cable-range cable-range to network.node [floating] zone zone-name
no appletalk static cable-range cable-range to network.node [floating] [zone zone-name]

Syntax Description

cable-range

Cable range value. The argument specifies the start and end of the cable range, separated by a hyphen. These values are decimal number from 0 to 65279. The starting network number must be less than or equal to the ending network number.

to network.node

AppleTalk network address of the remote router. The argument network is the 16-bit network number in the range 0 to 65279. The argument node is the 8-bit node number in the range 0 to 254. Both numbers are decimal.

floating

(Optional) Specifies that this route is a floating static route, which is a static route that can be overridden by a dynamically learned route.

zone zone-name

Name of the zone on the remote network. The name can include special characters from the Apple Macintosh character set. To include a special character, type a colon followed by two hexadecimal characters. For zone names with a leading space character, enter the first character as the special sequence :20.

Default

No static routes are defined.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You cannot delete a particular zone from the zone list without first deleting the static route.

When links associated with static routes are lost, traffic may stop being forwarded even though alternative paths might be available. For this reason, you should be careful when assigning static routes.

Floating static routes are a kind of static route that can be overridden by dynamically learned routes. Floating static routes allow you to switch to another path whenever routing information for a destination is lost. One application of floating static routes is to provide back-up routes in topologies where dial-on-demand routing is used.

If you configure a floating static route, the Cisco IOS software checks to see if an entry for the route already exists in its routing table. If a dynamic route already exists, the floating static route is placed in reserve as part of a floating static route table. When the software detects that the dynamic route is no longer available, it replaces the dynamic route with the floating static route for that destination. If the route is later relearned dynamically, the dynamic route replaces the floating static route and the floating static route is again placed in reserve.

To avoid the possibility of a routing loop occurring, by default floating static routes are not redistributed into other dynamic protocols.

Examples

The following example creates a static route to the remote router whose address is 1.2 on the remote network 100-110 that is in the remote zone Remote:

appletalk static cable 100-110 to 1.2 zone Remote

The following example creates a floating static route to the remote router whose address is 1.3 on the remote network 100-110 that is in the remote zone Remote:

appletalk static cable 100-110 to 1.3 floating zone Remote
Related Commands

appletalk static network
show appletalk route
show appletalk static

appletalk static network

To define a static route or a floating static route on a nonextended network, use the appletalk static network global configuration command. To remove a static route, use the no form of this command.

appletalk static network network-number to network.node [floating] zone zone-name
no appletalk static network network-number to network.node [floating] [zone zone-name]

Syntax Description

network-number

AppleTalk network number assigned to the interface. It is a 16-bit decimal number and must be unique on the network. This is the network number that will be advertised by the Cisco IOS software as if it were a real network number.

to network.node

AppleTalk network address of the remote router. The argument network is the 16-bit network number in the range 0 to 65279. The argument node is the 8-bit node number in the range 0 to 254. Both numbers are decimal.

floating

(Optional) Specifies that this route is a floating static route, which is a static route that can be overridden by a dynamically learned route.

zone zone-name

Name of the zone on the remote network. The name can include special characters from the Apple Macintosh character set. To include a special character, type a colon followed by two hexadecimal characters. For zone names with a leading space character, enter the first character as the special sequence :20.

Default

No static routes are defined.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You cannot delete a particular zone from the zone list without first deleting the static route.

When links associated with static routes are lost, traffic may stop being forwarded even though alternative paths might be available. For this reason, you should be careful when assigning static routes.

Floating static routes are a kind of static route that can be overridden by dynamically learned routes. Floating static routes allow you to switch to another path whenever routing information for a destination is lost. One application of floating static routes is to provide back-up routes in topologies where dial-on-demand routing is used.

If you configure a floating static route, the Cisco IOS software checks to see if an entry for the route already exists in its routing table. If a dynamic route already exists, the floating static route is placed in reserve as part of a floating static route table. When the Cisco IOS software detects that the dynamic route is no longer available, it replaces the dynamic route with the floating static route for that destination. If the route is later relearned dynamically, the dynamic route replaces the floating static route and the floating static route is again placed in reserve.

To avoid the possibility of a routing loop occurring, by default floating static routes are not redistributed into other dynamic protocols.

Examples

The following example creates a static route to the remote router whose address is 1.2 on the remote network 200 that is in the remote zone Remote:

appletalk static network 200 to 1.2 zone Remote

The following example creates a floating static route to the remote router whose address is 1.3 on the remote network 200 that is in the remote zone Remote:

appletalk static network 200 to 1.3 floating zone Remote
Related Commands

appletalk static cable-range
show appletalk route
show appletalk static

appletalk strict-rtmp-checking

To perform maximum checking of routing updates to ensure their validity, use the appletalk strict-rtmp-checking global configuration command. To disable the maximum checking, use the no form of this command.

appletalk strict-rtmp-checking
no appletalk strict-rtmp-checking

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Provide maximum checking

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Strict RTMP checking discards any RTMP packets arriving from routers that are not directly connected to the local router. This means that the local router does not accept any routed RTMP packets. Note that RTMP packets that need to be forwarded are not discarded.

Example

The following example disables strict checking of RTMP routing updates:

no appletalk strict-rtmp-checking
Related Commands

appletalk require-route-zones
appletalk send-rtmps
appletalk timers

appletalk timers

To change the routing update timers, use the appletalk timers global configuration command. To return to the default routing update timers, use the no form of this command.

appletalk timers update-interval valid-interval invalid-interval
no appletalk timers [update-interval valid-interval invalid-interval]

Syntax Description

update-interval

Time, in seconds, between routing updates sent to other routers on the network. The default is 10 seconds.

valid-interval

Time, in seconds, that the Cisco IOS software will consider a route valid without having heard a routing update for that route. The default is 20 seconds (two times the update interval).

invalid-interval

Time, in seconds, that the route is retained after the last update. The default is 60 seconds (three times the valid interval).

Default

update-interval: 10 seconds
valid-interval: 20 seconds
invalid-interval: 60 seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Routes older than the time specified by update-interval are considered suspect. Once the period of time specified by valid-interval has elapsed without having heard a routing update for a route, the route becomes bad and is eligible for replacement by a path with a higher (less favorable) metric. During the invalid-interval period, routing updates include this route with a special "notify neighbor" metric. If this timer expires, the route is deleted from the routing table.

Note that you should not attempt to modify the routing timers without fully understanding the ramifications of doing so. Many other AppleTalk router vendors provide no facility for modifying their routing timers; should you adjust the Cisco IOS software AppleTalk timers such that routing updates do not arrive at these other routers within the normal interval, it is possible to degrade or destroy AppleTalk network connectivity.

If you change the routing update interval, be sure to do so for all routers on the network.

In rare instances, you might want to change this interval, such as when a device is busy and cannot send routing updates every 10 seconds or when slower routers are incapable of processing received routing updates in a large network.

Example

The following example increases the update interval to 20 seconds and the route-valid interval to 40  seconds:

appletalk timers 20 40 60

appletalk virtual-net

To add AppleTalk users logging in on an asynchronous line and using PPP encapsulation to an internal network, use the appletalk virtual-net global configuration command. To remove an internal network, use the no form of this command.

appletalk virtual-net network-number zone-name
no appletalk virtual-net network-number zone-name
Syntax Description

network-number

AppleTalk network address assigned to the interface. This is a 16-bit decimal network number in the range 0 to 65279. The network address must be unique across your AppleTalk internetwork.

zone-name

Name of a new or existing zone to which the AppleTalk user will belong.

Default

No virtual networks are predefined.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

A virtual network is a logical network that exists only within the Cisco IOS software. It enables you---and by extension anyone who dials into the router---to add an asynchronous interface to either a new or an existing AppleTalk zone.

Virtual networks work with both extended and nonextended AppleTalk networks. On Cisco routers, you can only set a virtual network on an asynchronous line on the auxiliary port.

If you issue the appletalk virtual-net command and specify a new AppleTalk zone name, the network number you specify is the only one associated with this zone. If you issue this command and specify an existing AppleTalk zone, the network number you specify is added to the existing zone.

The selected AppleTalk zone (either new or existing) is highlighted when you open the Macintosh Chooser window. From this window, you can access all available zones.

Example

The following example adds a user to the virtual network number 3 and specifies the zone name renegade:

apple virtual-net 3 renegade
Related Commands

appletalk address
appletalk cable-range
appletalk client-mode
appletalk zone
show appletalk zone

appletalk zip-query-interval

To specify the interval at which the Cisco IOS software sends ZIP queries, use the appletalk zip-query-interval global configuration command. To return to the default interval, use the no form of this command.

appletalk zip-query-interval interval
no zip-query-interval [interval]

Syntax Description

interval

Interval, in seconds, at which the software sends ZIP queries. It can be any positive integer. The default is 10 seconds.

Default

10 seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The software uses the information received in response to its ZIP queries to update its zone table.

Example

The following example changes the ZIP query interval to 40 seconds:

appletalk zip-query-interval 40

appletalk zip-reply-filter

To configure a ZIP reply filter, use the appletalk zip-reply-filter interface configuration command. To remove a filter, use the no form of this command.

appletalk zip-reply-filter access-list-number
no appletalk zip-reply-filter [access-list-number]

Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the access list. This is a decimal number from 600 to  699.

Default

No access lists are predefined.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

ZIP reply filters limit the visibility of zones from routers in unprivileged regions throughout the internetwork. These filters filter the zone list for each network provided by a router to neighboring routers to remove restricted zones.

ZIP reply filters apply to downstream routers, not to end stations on networks attached to the local router. With ZIP reply filters, when downstream routers request the names of zones in a network, the local router replies with the names of visible zones only. It does not reply with the names of zones that have been hidden with a ZIP reply filter. To filter zones from end stations, use GZL filters.

ZIP reply filters determine which networks and cable ranges the Cisco IOS software sends out in routing updates. Before sending out routing updates, the software excludes the networks and cable ranges whose zones have been completely denied access by ZIP reply filters. Excluding this information ensures that routers receiving these routing updates do not send unnecessary ZIP requests.

Example

The following example assigns a ZIP reply filter to Ethernet interface 0:

interface ethernet 0
appletalk zip-reply-filter 600
Related Commands

access-list additional-zones
access-list zone
show appletalk interface

appletalk zone

To set the zone name for the connected AppleTalk network, use the appletalk zone interface configuration command. To delete a zone, use the no form of this command.

appletalk zone zone-name
no appletalk zone [zone-name]

Syntax Description

zone-name

Name of the zone. The name can include special characters from the Apple Macintosh character set. To include a special character, type a colon followed by two hexadecimal characters. For zone names with a leading space character, enter the first character as the special sequence :20.

Default

No zone name is set.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If discovery mode is not enabled, you can specify the appletalk zone command only after an appletalk address or appletalk cable-range command. You can issue it multiple times if it follows the appletalk cable-range command.

On interfaces that have discovery mode disabled, you must assign a zone name in order for AppleTalk routing to begin.

If an interface is using extended AppleTalk, the first zone specified in the list is the default zone. The Cisco IOS software always uses the default zone when registering NBP names for interfaces. Nodes in the network will select the zone in which they will operate from the list of zone names valid on the cable to which they are connected.

If an interface is using nonextended AppleTalk, repeated execution of the appletalk zone command will replace the interface's zone name with the newly specified zone name.

The no form of the command deletes a zone name from a zone list or deletes the entire zone list if you do not specify a zone name. For nonextended AppleTalk interfaces, the zone name argument is ignored. You should delete any existing zone-name list using the no appletalk zone interface subcommand before configuring a new zone list.

The zone list is cleared automatically when you issue an appletalk address or appletalk cable-range command. The list also is cleared if you issue the appletalk zone command on an existing network; this can occur when adding zones to a set of routers until all routers are in agreement.

Examples

The following example assigns the zone name Twilight to an interface:

interface Ethernet 0
appletalk cable-range 10-20
appletalk zone Twilight

The following example uses AppleTalk special characters to set the zone name to Cisco:A5Zone.

appletalk zone Cisco:A5Zone
Related Commands

appletalk address
appletalk cable-range
show appletalk zone

clear appletalk arp

To delete all entries or a specified entry from the AARP table, use the clear appletalk arp EXEC command.

clear appletalk arp [network.node]
Syntax Description

network.node

(Optional) AppleTalk network address to be deleted from the AARP table. The argument network is the 16-bit network number in the range 0 to 65279. The argument node is the 8-bit node number in the range 0 to 254. Both numbers are decimal.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example deletes all entries from the AARP table:

clear appletalk arp
Related Command

show appletalk arp

clear appletalk neighbor

To delete all entries or a specified entry from the neighbor table, use the clear appletalk neighbor EXEC command.

clear appletalk neighbor [neighbor-address]
Syntax Description

neighbor-address

(Optional) Network address of the neighboring router to be deleted from the neighbor table. The address is in the format network.node. The argument network is the 16-bit network number in the range 1 to 65279. The argument node is the 8-bit node number in the range 0 to 254. Both numbers are decimal.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You cannot clear the entry for an active neighbor, that is, for a neighbor that still has RTMP connectivity.

Example

The following example deletes the neighboring router 1.129 from the neighbor table:

clear appletalk neighbor 1.129
Related Command

show appletalk neighbors

clear appletalk route

To delete entries from the routing table, use the clear appletalk route EXEC command.

clear appletalk route [network]
Syntax Description

network

(Optional) Number of the network the route is to.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example deletes the route to network 1:

clear appletalk route 1
Related Command

show appletalk route

clear appletalk traffic

To reset AppleTalk traffic counters, use the clear appletalk traffic EXEC command.

clear appletalk traffic
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output after a clear appletalk traffic command was executed.

Router# clear appletalk traffic
Router# show appletalk traffic
AppleTalk statistics:
  Rcvd:  0 total, 0 checksum errors, 0 bad hop count
         0 local destination, 0 access denied
         0 for MacIP, 0 bad MacIP, 0 no client
         0 port disabled, 0 no listener
         0 ignored, 0 martians
  Bcast: 0 received, 0 sent
  Sent:  0 generated, 0 forwarded, 0 fast forwarded, 0 loopback
         0 forwarded from MacIP, 0 MacIP failures
         0 encapsulation failed, 0 no route, 0 no source
  DDP:   0 long, 0 short, 0 macip, 0 bad size
  NBP:   0 received, 0 invalid, 0 proxies
         0 replies sent, 0 forwards, 0 lookups, 0 failures
  RTMP:  0 received, 0 requests, 0 invalid, 0 ignored
         0 sent, 0 replies
  EIGRP: 0 received, 0 hellos, 0 updates, 0 replies, 0 queries
         0 sent,     0 hellos, 0 updates, 0 replies, 0 queries
         0 invalid, 0 ignored
  ATP:   0 received
  ZIP:   0 received, 0 sent, 0 netinfo
  Echo:  0 received, 0 discarded, 0 illegal
         0 generated, 0 replies sent
  Responder:  0 received, 0 illegal, 0 unknown
AppleTalk statistics:
         0 replies sent, 0 failures
  AARP:  0 requests, 0 replies, 0 probes
         0 martians, 0 bad encapsulation, 0 unknown
         0 sent, 0 failures, 0 delays, 0 drops
  Lost: 0 no buffers
  Unknown: 0 packets
  Discarded: 0 wrong encapsulation, 0 bad SNAP discriminator

Table 33 describes the fields shown in the show appletalk traffic display.

Related Commands

show appletalk macip-traffic
show appletalk traffic

clear smrp mcache

To remove all fast-switching entries in the Sample Multicast Routing Protocol (SMRP) fast-switching cache table, use the clear smrp mcache EXEC command.

clear smrp mcache
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Use this command to clear the SMRP fast-switching cache table. The SMRP fast-switching cache table contains the information needed to fast switch SMRP data packets. It is usually unnecessary to clear the table; however, you can do so to repopulate it or to clear a corrupted entry.


Note Using this command clears the table of all entries, not just a single entry.
Example

The following example shows the fast-switching cache table before and after the clear smrp mcache command clears the table of entries:

Router#show smrp mcache
SMRP Multicast Fast Switching Cache
Group        In  Parent        Child         MAC Header (Top)
Address      Use Interface     Interface(s)  Network Header (Bottom)
--------------------------------------------------------------------
AT 11.121    Y   Ethernet0     Ethernet3     090007400b7900000c1740db
                                             001fed750000002aff020a0a0a
AT 11.122    Y   Ethernet0     Ethernet3     090007400b7a00000c1740db
                                             001f47750000002aff020a0a0a
AT 11.123    Y   Ethernet0     Ethernet1     090007400b7b00000c1740d9
                                             001fe77500000014ff020a0a0a
                               Ethernet3     090007400b7b00000c1740db
                                             001ffd750000002aff020a0a0a
AT 11.124    N   Ethernet0     Ethernet1     090007400b7c00000c1740d9
                                             001fef7500000014ff020a0a0a
Router#clear smrp mcache
Router#show smrp mcache
SMRP Multicast Fast Switching Cache
Group        In  Parent        Child         MAC Header (Top)
Address      Use Interface     Interface(s)  Network Header (Bottom)
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Related Command

show smrp mcache

ping (privileged)

To check host reachability and network connectivity, use the ping privileged EXEC command.

ping [appletalk] [network.node]
Syntax Description

appletalk

(Optional) Specifies the AppleTalk protocol.

network.node

(Optional) AppleTalk address of the system to ping.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The privileged ping (packet internet groper function) command provides a complete ping facility for users who have system privileges. The ping command sends AppleTalk Echo Protocol (AEP) datagrams to other AppleTalk nodes to verify connectivity and measure round-trip times.

Only an interface that supports HearSelf can respond to packets generated at a local console and directed to an interface on the same router. The Cisco IOS software only supports HearSelf on Ethernet.

If the system cannot map an address for a host name, it will return an "%Unrecognized host or address" error message.

To abort a ping session, type the escape sequence. By default, this is Ctrl-^ X. You enter this by simultaneously pressing the Ctrl, Shift, and 6 keys, letting go, and then pressing the X key.

Table 2 describes the test characters displayed in ping responses.


Table 2: AppleTalk Ping Characters
Character Meaning

!

Each exclamation point indicates the receipt of a reply (echo) from the target address.

.

Each period indicates the network server timed out while waiting for a reply from the target address.

B

The echo received from the target address was bad or malformed.

C

An echo with a bad DDP checksum was received.

E

Transmission of an echo packet to the target address failed.

R

Transmission of the echo packet to the target address failed because of lack of a route to the target address.

Sample Display of a Standard Ping

The following display shows a sample standard appletalk ping session:

Router# ping
Protocol [ip]: appletalk
Target Appletalk address: 1024.128
Repeat count [5]:
Datagram size [100]:
Timeout in seconds [2]:
Verbose [n]:
Sweep range of sizes [n]: 
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte AppleTalk Echos to 1024.128, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent, round-trip min/avg/max = 4/4/8 ms
Sample Display Using Ping in Verbose Mode

When you answer y in response to the prompt Verbose [n], ping runs in verbose mode. The following display shows a sample appletalk ping session when verbose mode is enabled:

Router# ping
Protocol [ip]: appletalk
Target AppleTalk address: 4.129
Repeat count [5]:
Datagram size [100]:
Timeout in seconds [2]:
Verbose [n]: y
Sweep range of sizes [n]:
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte AppleTalk Echos to 4.129, timeout is 2 seconds:
0 in 4 ms from 4.129 via 1 hop
1 in 8 ms from 4.129 via 1 hop
2 in 4 ms from 4.129 via 1 hop
3 in 8 ms from 4.129 via 1 hop
4 in 8 ms from 4.129 via 1 hop
Success rate is 100 percent, round-trip min/avg/max = 4/6/8 ms

Table 3 describes the fields in the verbose mode portion of the display.


Table 3: AppleTalk Ping Fields
Field Meaning

0

Sequential number identifying the packet's relative position in the group of ping packets sent.

in 4 ms

Round-trip travel time of the ping packet, in milliseconds.

from 4.129

Source address of the ping packet.

via 1 hop

Number of hops the ping packet traveled to the destination.

Related Commands

clear smrp mcache
show appletalk zone

ping (user)

To check host reachability and network connectivity, use the ping user EXEC command.

ping appletalk network.node
Syntax Description

appletalk

Specifies the AppleTalk protocol.

network.node

AppleTalk address of the system to ping.

Command Mode

User EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

The user ping (packet internet groper function) command provides a basic ping facility for users who do not have system privileges. This command is equivalent to the nonverbose form of the privileged ping command. It sends five 100-byte ping packets. The ping command sends AppleTalk Echo Protocol (AEP) datagrams to other AppleTalk nodes to verify connectivity and measure round-trip times.

Only an interface that supports HearSelf can respond to packets generated at a local console and directed to an interface on the same router. The Cisco IOS software supports only HearSelf on Ethernet.

If the system cannot map an address for a host name, it will return an "%Unrecognized host or address" error message.

To abort a ping session, type the escape sequence. By default, this is Ctrl-^ X. You enter this by simultaneously pressing the Ctrl, Shift, and 6 keys, letting go, and then pressing the X key.

Table 2 in the ping (privileged) command section describes the test characters displayed in ping responses.

Sample Display

The following display shows input to and output from the user ping command.

Router> ping appletalk 1024.128
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte AppleTalk Echoes to 1024.128, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent, round-trip min/avg/max = 4/4/8 ms
Related Command

show appletalk access-lists

show appletalk access-lists

To display the AppleTalk access lists currently defined, use the show  appletalk access-lists user EXEC command.

show appletalk  access-lists
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

User EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk access-lists command:

Router> show appletalk access-lists
AppleTalk access list 601:
                  permit zone ZoneA
                  permit zone ZoneB
                  deny additional-zones
                  permit network 55
                  permit network 500
                  permit cable-range 900-950
                  deny includes 970-990
                  permit within 991-995
                  deny other-access

Table 4 describes fields shown in the display.


Table 4: Show AppleTalk Access-Lists Field Descriptions
Field Description

AppleTalk access list 601:

Number of the AppleTalk access lists.

permit zone
deny zone

Indicates whether access to an AppleTalk zone has been explicitly permitted or denied with the access-list zone command.

permit additional-zones
deny additional-zones

Indicates whether additional zones have been permitted or denied with the access-list additional-zones command.

permit network
deny network

Indicates whether access to an AppleTalk network has been explicitly permitted or denied with the access-list network command.

permit cable-range
deny cable-range

Indicates the cable ranges to which access has been permitted or denied with the access-list cable-range command.

permit includes
deny includes

Indicates the cable ranges to which access has been permitted or denied with the access-list includes command.

permit within
deny within

Indicates the additional cable ranges to which access has been permitted or denied with the access-list within command.

permit other-access
deny other-access

Indicates whether additional networks or cable ranges have been permitted or denied with the access-list other-access command.

Related Commands

access-list additional-zones
access-list cable-range
access-list includes
access-list nbp
access-list network
access-list other-access
access-list other-nbps
access-list within
access-list zone
appletalk access-group
appletalk distribute-list in
appletalk distribute-list out
appletalk getzonelist-filter

show appletalk adjacent-routes

To display routes to networks that are directly connected or that are one hop away, use the show appletalk adjacent-routes privileged EXEC command.

show appletalk adjacent-routes
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The show appletalk adjacent-routes command provides a quick overview of the local environment that is especially useful when an AppleTalk internetwork consists of a large number of networks (typically, more then 600 networks).

You can use information provided by this command to determine if any local routes are missing or are misconfigured.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk adjacent-routes command:

Router# show appletalk adjacent-routes
Codes: R - RTMP derived, E - EIGRP derived, C - connected, S - static, P - proxy, 67 
routes in internet
R Net 29-29 [1/G] via gatekeeper, 0 sec, Ethernet0, zone Engineering
C Net 2501-2501 directly connected, Ethernet1, no zone set
C Net 4160-4160 directly connected, Ethernet0, zone Low End SW Lab
C Net 4172-4172 directly connected, TokenRing0, zone Low End SW Lab
R Net 6160 [1/G] via urk, 0 sec, TokenRing0, zone Low End SW Lab

Table 5 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 5: Show AppleTalk Adjacent-Routes Field Descriptions
Field Description

Codes:

Codes defining source of route.

R

Route derived from an RTMP update.

E

Route derived from an Enhanced IGRP.

C

Directly connected network RTMP update.

S

Static route.

P

Proxy route.

67 routes in internet

Total number of known routes in the AppleTalk network.

Net 29-29

Cable range or network to which the route goes.

[1/G]

Hop count, followed by the state of the route.

Possible values for state include the following:

  • G---Good (update has been received within the last 10 seconds)

  • S---Suspect (update has been received more than 10 seconds ago but less than 20 seconds ago)

  • B---Bad (update was received more than 20 seconds ago)

via

NBP registered name or address of the router that sent the routing information.

directly connected

Indicates that the network or cable range is directly connected to the router.

0 sec

Time, in seconds, since information about this network cable range was last received.

Ethernet0

Possible interface through which updates to this NBP registered name or address will be sent.

zone

Zone name assigned to the network or cable range sending this update.

show appletalk arp

To display the entries in the AARP cache, use the show appletalk arp privileged EXEC command.

show appletalk arp
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

ARP establishes associates between network addresses and hardware (MAC) addresses. This information is maintained in the ARP cache.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk arp command:

Router# show appletalk arp
Address            Age (min)    Type            Hardware Addr      Encap          Interface
2000.1                              -    Hardware    0000.0c04.1111    SNAP            Ethernet1
2000.2                              0    Dynamic      0000.0c04.2222    SNAP            Ethernet1
2000.3                              0    Dynamic      0000.0c04.3333    SNAP            Ethernet3
2000.4                              -    Hardware    0000.0c04.4444    SNAP            Ethernet3

Table 6 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 6: Show AppleTalk ARP Field Descriptions
Field Description

Address

AppleTalk network address of the interface.

Age (min)

Time, in minutes, that this entry has been in the ARP table. Entries are purged after they have been in the table for 240 minutes (4 hours). A hyphen indicates that this is a new entry.

Type

Indicates how the ARP table entry was learned. It can be one of the following:

  • Dynamic---Entry was learned via AARP.

  • Hardware---Entry was learned from an adapter in the router.

  • Pending---Entry for a destination for which the router does not yet know the address. When a packet requests to be sent to an address for which the router does not yet have the MAC-level address, the Cisco IOS software creates an AARP entry for that AppleTalk address, then sends an AARP Resolve packet to get the MAC-level address for that node. When the software gets the response, the entry is marked "Dynamic." A pending AARP entry times out after 1 minute.

Hardware Addr

MAC address of this interface.

Encap

Encapsulation type. It can be one of the following:

  • ARPA---Ethernet-type encapsulation

  • Subnetwork Access Protocol (SNAP)---IEEE 802.3 encapsulation.

Interface

Type and number of the interface.

show appletalk aurp events

To display the pending events in the AURP update-events queue, use the show appletalk aurp events privileged EXEC command.

show appletalk aurp events
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk aurp events command:

Router# show appletalk aurp events 
100-100, NDC EVENT pending
17043-17043, ND EVENT pending

Table 7 explains the fields shown in the display.


Table 7: Show AppleTalk AURP Events Fields
Field Description

100-100

Network number or cable range.

NCD EVENT pending

Type of update event that is pending.

show appletalk aurp topology

To display entries in the AURP private path database, which consists of all paths learned from exterior routers, use the show appletalk aurp topology privileged EXEC command.

show appletalk aurp topology
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usgae Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk aurp topology command:

Router# show appletalk aurp topology
30
             via Tunnel0, 3 hops
80
             via Tunnel0, 3 hops
101-101
             via Tunnel0, 8 hops
102-102
             via Tunnel0, 8 hops
103-103
             via Tunnel0, 8 hops
104-104
             via Tunnel0, 8 hops
105-105
             via Tunnel0, 8 hops
108-108
             via Tunnel0, 8 hops
109-109
             via Tunnel0, 9 hops
120-120
             via Tunnel0, 10 hops
125-125
             via Tunnel0, 8 hops
169-169
             via Tunnel0, 7 hops
201-205
             via Tunnel0, 4 hops

Table 8 explains the field shown in the display.


Table 8: Show AppleTalk AURP Topology Fields
Field Description

30

AppleTalk network number or cable range.

via Tunnel0

Interface used to reach the network.

3 hops

Number of hops to the network.

show appletalk cache

To display the routes in the AppleTalk fast-switching table on an extended AppleTalk network, use the show appletalk  cache EXEC command.

show appletalk  cache
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The show appletalk cache command displays information for all fast-switching route cache entries, regardless of whether they are valid.

Route entries are removed from the fast-switching cache if one of the following occurs:

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk cache command:

Router> show appletalk cache 
AppleTalk Routing Cache, * = active entry, cache version is 227
Destination          Interface          MAC Header
*            29.0          Ethernet0          00000C00008200000C00D8DD
*    1544.000          Ethernet1          AA000400013400000C000E8C809B84BE02
*        33.000          Ethernet1          AA000400013400000C000E8C809B84BE02

The following is sample output from the show appletalk cache command when AppleTalk load balanced is enabled. The output displayed shows additional MAC headers for parallel paths (for example, 6099.52):

Router> show appletalk cache
Appletalk Routing cache, * = active entry, cache version is 11021
Desintation          Interface          MAC Header
*          82.36          Ethernet1/4      00000CF366A600000C12C52D
    17043.208          Ethernet1/5      00000C367B4000000C12C52E
*    60099.52          Ethernet1/5      00000C367B4000000C12C52E
                                Ethernet1/2      00000C367B3D00000C12C52B
                                Ethernet1/3      00000C367B3E00000C12C52C

Table 9 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 9: Show AppleTalk Cache Field Descriptions
Field Description

*

Indicates the entry is valid.

cache version is

Version number of the AppleTalk fast-switching cache.

Destination

Destination network for this packet.

Interface

Router interface through which this packet is transmitted.

MAC Header

First bytes of this packet's MAC header.

Related Commands

appletalk maximum-paths
appletalk route-cache

show appletalk domain

To display all domain-related information, use the show appletalk domain EXEC command.

show appletalk domain [domain-number]
Syntax Description

domain-number

(Optional) Number of an AppleTalk domain about which to display information. It can be a decimal integer from 1 to 1000000.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

If you omit the argument domain-number, the show appletalk domain command displays information about all domains.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show appletalk domain command:

Router# show appletalk domain
                AppleTalk   Domain   Information:
        Domain 1        Name : Xerxes
      ---------------------------------------
        State                               : Active
        Inbound remap range  : 100-199
        Outbound remap range : 200-299
        Hop reduction        : OFF
        Interfaces in domain :
               Ethernet1     : Enabled
        Domain 2        Name : Desdemona
      ---------------------------------------
        Statue                              : Active
        Inbound remap range  : 300-399
        Outbound remap range : 400-499
        Hop reduction        : OFF
        Interfaces in domain :
               Ethernet3     : Enabled

The following is sample output from the show appletalk domain command when you specify a domain number:

Router# show appletalk domain 1
                AppleTalk   Domain   Information:
        Domain 1        Name : Xerxes
      ---------------------------------------
        Statue                              : Active
        Inbound remap range  : 100-199
        Outbound remap range : 200-299
        Hop reduction        : OFF
        Interfaces in domain :
               Ethernet1     : Enabled

Table 10 explains the fields shown in the displays.


Table 10: Show AppleTalk Domain Field Descriptions
Field Description

Domain

Number of the domain as specified with the appletalk domain name global configuration command.

Name

Name of the domain as specified with the appletalk domain name global configuration command.

Status

Status of the domain. It can be either Active or Nonactive.

Inbound remap range

Inbound mapping range as specified with the appletalk domain remap-range in global configuration command.

Outbound remap range

Outbound mapping range as specified with the appletalk domain remap-range out global configuration command.

Hop reduction

Indicates whether hop reduction has been enabled with the appletalk domain hop-reduction global configuration command. It can be either OFF or ON.

Interfaces in domain

Indicates which interfaces are in the domain as specified with the appletalk domain-group interface configuration command and whether they are enabled.

Related Commands

appletalk domain-group
appletalk domain hop-reduction
appletalk domain name
appletalk domain remap-range

show appletalk eigrp interfaces

To display information about interfaces configured for Enhanced IGRP, use the show appletalk eigrp interfaces EXEC command.

show  appletalk eigrp interfaces [type number]
Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Interface type.

number

(Optional) Interface number.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the show appletalk eigrp interfaces command to determine on which interfaces Enhanced IGRP is active and to find out information about Enhanced IGRP relating to those interfaces.

If an interface is specified, only that interface is displayed. Otherwise, all interfaces on which Enhanced IGRP is running are displayed.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk eigrp interfaces command:

Router> show appletalk eigrp interfaces
AT/EIGRP interfaces for process 1, router id 24096
                                        Xmit Queue        Mean      Pacing Time      Multicast      Pending
Interface      Peers      Un/Reliable      SRTT      Un/Reliable      Flow Timer    Routes
Di0                      0                  0/0                    0            11/434                    0                    0
Et0                      1                  0/0                337              0/10                      0                    0
SE0:1.16            1                  0/0                  10              1/63                  103                    0
Tu0                      1                  0/0                330              0/16                      0                    0

Table 11 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 11: Show AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP Interfaces Field Descriptions
Field Description

process 1

Autonomous system number of the process.

router id

Identification number of the router, as configured in the appletalk routing eigrp command.

Interface

Interface name.

Peers

Number of neighbors on the interface.

Xmit Queue

Count of unreliable and reliable packets queued for transmission.

Mean SRTT

Average round-trip time for all neighbors on the interface.

Pacing Time

Number of milliseconds to wait after transmitting unreliable and reliable packets.

Multicast Flow Timer

Number of milliseconds to wait for acknowledgment of a multicast packet by all neighbors before transmitting the next multicast packet.

Pending Routes

Number of routes still to be transmitted on this interface.

Related Command

show appletalk eigrp neighbors

show appletalk eigrp neighbors

To display the neighbors discovered by Enhanced IGRP, use the show appletalk eigrp neighbors EXEC command.

show appletalk eigrp neighbors [interface]
Syntax Description

interface

(Optional) Displays information about the specified neighbor router.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

The show appletalk eigrp neighbors command lists only the neighbors running AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP. To list all neighboring AppleTalk routers, use the show appletalk neighbors command.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk eigrp neighbors command:

Router# show appletalk eigrp neighbors 
AT/EIGRP Neighbors for process 1, router id 83
Address                 Interface     Holdtime Uptime   Q      Seq  SRTT  RTO
                                      (secs)   (h:m:s)  Count  Num  (ms)  (ms)
warp.Ethernet1          Ethernet2     41       0:02:48  0      282  4     20
master.Ethernet2        Ethernet2     40       1:16:46  0      333  4     20

Table 12 explains the fields shown in the display.


Table 12: Show AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP Neighbors Field Descriptions
Field Description

process 1

Number of the Enhanced IGRP routing process.

router id 83

Autonomous system number specified in the appletalk routing  global configuration command.

Address

AppleTalk address of the AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP peer.

Interface

Interface on which the router is receiving hello packets from the peer.

Holdtime

Length of time, in seconds, that the Cisco IOS software will wait to hear from the peer before declaring it down. If the peer is using the default hold time, this number will be less than 15. If the peer configures a nondefault hold time, it will be reflected here.

Uptime

Elapsed time, in hours, minutes, and seconds, since the local router first heard from this neighbor.

Q Count

Number of AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP packets (update, query, and reply) that the Cisco IOS software is waiting to send.

Seq Num

Sequence number of the last update, query, or reply packet that was received from this neighbor.

SRTT

Smooth round-trip time. This is the number of milliseconds it takes for an AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP packet to be sent to this neighbor and for the local router to receive an acknowledgment of that packet.

RTO

Retransmission timeout, in milliseconds. This is the amount of time the Cisco IOS software waits before retransmitting a packet from the retransmission queue to a neighbor.

Related Commands

appletalk routing
show appletalk neighbors

show appletalk eigrp topology

To display the AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP topology table, use the show appletalk eigrp topology EXEC command.

show appletalk eigrp topology [network-number | active | zero-successors]
Syntax Description

network-number

(Optional) Number of the AppleTalk network whose topology table entry you want to display.

active

(Optional) Displays the entries for all active routes.

zero-successors

(Optional) Displays the entries for destinations for which no successors exist. These entries are destinations that the Cisco  IOS software currently does not know how to reach via Enhanced IGRP. This option is useful for debugging network problems.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

All Enhanced IGRP routes that are received for a destination, regardless of metric, are placed in the topology table. The route to a destination that is currently in use is the first route listed. Routes that are listed as "connected" take precedence over any routes learned from any other source.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk eigrp topology command:

Router# show appletalk eigrp topology 
IPX EIGRP Topology Table for process 1, router id 1
Codes: P - Passive, A - Active, U - Update, Q - Query, R - Reply, 
              r - Reply status
P 3165-0, 1 successors, FD is 0
                    via Redistributed (25601/0),
                    via 100.1 (2198016/2195456), Fddi0
                    via 4080.67 (2198016/53760), Serial4
P 3161-0, 1 successors, FD is 307200
                    via Redistributed (1025850/0),
                    via 100.1 (2198016/2195456), Fddi0
                    via 4080.67 (2198016/1028410), Serial4
P 100-100, 1 successors, FD is 0
                    via Connected, Fddi0
                    via 4080.67 (2198016/28160), Serial4
P 4080-4080, 1 successors, FD is 0
                    via Connected, Serial4
                    via 100.1 (2172416/2169856), Fddi0

Table 13 explains the fields that may be displayed in the output.


Table 13: Show AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP Topology Field Descriptions
Field Description

Codes

State of this topology table entry. Passive and Active refer to the Enhanced IGRP state with respect to this destination; and Update, Query, and Reply refer to the type of packet that is being sent.

P - Passive

No Enhanced IGRP computations are being performed for this destination.

A - Active

Enhanced IGRP computations are being performed for this destination.

U - Update

Indicates that an update packet was sent to this destination.

Q - Query

Indicates that a query packet was sent to this destination.

R - Reply

Indicates that a reply packet was sent to this destination.

r - Reply status

Flag that is set after the Cisco IOS software has sent a query and is waiting for a reply.

3165, 3161, and so on

Destination AppleTalk network number.

successors

Number of successors. This number corresponds to the number of next hops in the AppleTalk routing table.

FD

Feasible distance. This value is used in the feasibility condition check. If the neighbor's reported distance (the metric after the slash) is less than the feasible distance, the feasibility condition is met and that path is a feasible successor. Once the software determines it has a feasible successor, it does not have to send a query for that destination.

replies

Number of replies that are still outstanding (have not been received) with respect to this destination. This information appears only when the destination is in the Active state.

state

Exact Enhanced IGRP state that this destination is in. It can be the number 0, 1, 2, or 3. This information appears only when the destination is Active.

via

AppleTalk address of the peer who told the software about this destination. The first n of these entries, where n is the number of successors, are the current successors. The remaining entries on the list are feasible successors.

(345088/319488)

The first number is the Enhanced IGRP metric that represents the cost to the destination, The second number is the Enhanced IGRP metric that this peer advertised to us.

Ethernet0

Interface from which this information was learned.

The following is sample output from the show appletalk eigrp topology command when you specify an AppleTalk network number:

Router# show appletalk eigrp topology 3165
AT-EIGRP topology entry for 3165-0 
State is Passive, Query origin flag is 1, 1 Successor(s) 
Routing Descriptor Blocks: 
0.0, from 0.0
 Composite metric is (25601/0), Send flag is 0x0, Route is Internal 
 Vector metric: 
  Minimum bandwidth is 2560000000 Kbit 
  Total delay is 1000000 nanoseconds 
  Reliability is 255/255 
  Load is 1/255 
  Minimum MTU is 1500 
  Hop count is 0 
100.1 (Fddi0), from 100.1
 Composite metric is (2198016/2195456), Send flag is 0x0, Route is External 
 Vector metric: 
  Minimum bandwidth is 1544 Kbit 
  Total delay is 21100000 nanoseconds 
  Reliability is 255/255 
  Load is 1/255 
  Minimum MTU is 1500 
  Hop count is 2 
4080.83 (Serial4), from 4080.83
      Composite metric is (2198016/53760), Send flag is 0x0, Route is Internal
      Vector metric:
      Minimum bandwidth is 1544 Kbit
      Total delay is 21100000 nanoseconds
      Reliability is 255/255
      Load is 1/255
      Minimum MTU is 1500
      Hop count is 2
 

Table 14 explains the fields that may be in the output.


Table 14: Show AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP Topology Field Descriptions for a Specified Network
Field Description

3165

AppleTalk network number of the destination.

State is...

State of this entry. It can be either Passive or Active. Passive means that no Enhanced IGRP computations are being performed for this destination, and Active means that they are being performed.

Query origin flag

Exact Enhanced IGRP state that this destination is in. It can be the number 0, 1, 2, or 3. This information appears only when the destination is Active.

Successors

Number of successors. This number corresponds to the number of next hops in the IPX routing table.

Next hop is ...

Indicates how this destination was learned. It can be one of the following:

  • Connected---The destination is on a network directly connected to this router.

  • Redistributed---The destination was learned via RTMP or another routing protocol.

  • AppleTalk host address---The destination was learned from that peer via this Enhanced IGRP process.

Ethernet0

Interface from which this information was learned.

from

Peer from whom the information was learned. For connected and redistributed routers, this is 0.0. For information learned via Enhanced IGRP, this is the peer's address. Currently, for information learned via Enhanced IGRP, the peer's AppleTalk address always matches the address in the "Next hop is" field.

Composite metric is

Enhanced IGRP composite metric. The first number is this device's metric to the destination, and the second is the peer's metric to the destination.

Send flag

Numeric representation of the "flags" field. It is 0 when nothing is being sent, 1 when an Update is being sent, 3 when a Query is being sent, and 4 when a Reply is being sent. Currently, 2 is not used.

Route is ...

Type of router. It can be either internal or external. Internal routes are those that originated in an Enhanced IGRP autonomous system, and external routes are those that did not. Routes learned via RTMP are always external.

Vector metric:

This section describes the components of the Enhanced IGRP metric.

Minimum bandwidth

Minimum bandwidth of the network used to reach the next hop.

Total delay

Delay time to reach the next hop.

Reliability

Reliability value used to reach the next hop.

Load

Load value used to reach the next hop.

Minimum MTU

Smallest Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) size of the network used to reach the next hop.

Hop count

Number of hops to the next hop.

External data

This section describes the original protocol from which this route was redistributed. It appears only for external routes.

Originating router

Network address of the router that first distributed this route into AppleTalk Enhanced IGRP.

External protocol..metric..delay

External protocol from which this route was learned. The metric will match the external hop count displayed by the show appletalk route command for this destination. The delay is the external delay.

Administrator tag

Currently not used.

Flag

Currently not used.

Related Command

show appletalk route

show appletalk globals

To display information and settings about the AppleTalk internetwork and other parameters, use the show  appletalk globals EXEC command.

show  appletalk globals
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk globals command:

Router# show appletalk globals
AppleTalk global information:
            The router is a domain router.
            Internet is compatible with older, AT Phase1, routers.
            There are 67 routes in the internet.
            There are 25 zones defined.
            All significant events will be logged.
            ZIP resends queries every 10 seconds.
            RTMP updates are sent every 10 seconds.
            RTMP entries are considered BAD after 20 seconds.
            RTMP entries are discarded after 60 seconds.
            AARP probe retransmit count: 10, interval: 200.
            AARP request retransmit count: 5, interval: 1000.
            DDP datagrams will be checksummed.
            RTMP datagrams will be strictly checked.
            RTMP routes may not be propagated without zones.
            Alternate node address format will not be displayed.

Table 15 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 15: Show AppleTalk Globals Field Descriptions
Field Description

AppleTalk global information:

Heading for the command output.

The router is a domain router.

Indicates whether this router is a domain router.

Internet is compatible with older, AT Phase1, routers.

Indicates whether the AppleTalk internetwork meets the criteria for interoperation with Phase 1 routers.

There are 67 routes in the internet.

Total number of routes in the AppleTalk internetwork from which this router has heard in routing updates.

There are 25 zones defined.

Total number of valid zones in the current AppleTalk internetwork configuration.

All significant events will be logged.

Indicates whether the router has been configured with the appletalk event-logging command.

ZIP resends queries every 10  seconds.

Interval, in seconds, at which zone name queries are retried.

RTMP updates are sent every 10  seconds.

Interval, in seconds, at which the Cisco IOS software sends routing updates.

RTMP entries are considered BAD after 20 seconds.

Time after which routes for which the software has not received an update will be marked as candidates for being deleted from the routing table.

RTMP entries are discarded after 60 seconds.

Time after which routes for which the software has not received an update will be deleted from the routing table.

AARP probe retransmit count: 10, interval: 200.

Number of AARP probe retransmissions that will be done before abandoning address negotiations and instead using the selected AppleTalk address, followed by the time, in milliseconds, between retransmission of ARP probe packets. You set these values with the appletalk arp retransmit-count and appletalk arp interval commands, respectively.

AARP request retransmit count: 5, interval: 1000.

Number of AARP request retransmissions that will be done before abandoning address negotiations and using the selected AppleTalk address, followed by the time, in milliseconds, between retransmission of ARP request packets. You set these values with the appletalk arp retransmit-count and appletalk arp interval commands, respectively.

DDP datagrams will be checksummed.

Indicates whether the appletalk checksum configuration command is enabled. When enabled, the software discards DDP packets when the checksum is incorrect and when the router is the final destination for the packet.

RTMP datagrams will be strictly checked.

Indicates whether the appletalk strict-rtmp-checking configuration command is enabled. When enabled, RTMP packets arriving from routers that are not directly connected to the router performing the check are discarded.

RTMP routes may not be propagated without zones.

Indicates whether the appletalk require-route-zones configuration command is enabled. When enabled, the Cisco IOS software does not advertise a route to its neighboring routers until it has obtained a network/zone association for that route.

Alternate node address format will not be displayed.

Indicates whether AppleTalk addresses will be printed in numeric or name form. You configure this with the appletalk lookup-type and appletalk name-lookup-interval commands.

Related Commands

appletalk arp interval
appletalk arp retransmit-count
appletalk checksum
appletalk event-logging
appletalk lookup-type
appletalk name-lookup-interval
appletalk require-route-zones
appletalk strict-rtmp-checking

show appletalk interface

To display the status of the AppleTalk interfaces configured in the Cisco IOS software and the parameters configured on each interface, use the show appletalk interface privileged EXEC command.

show appletalk interface [brief] [type number]
Syntax Description

brief

(Optional) Displays a brief summary of the status of the AppleTalk interfaces.

type

(Optional) Interface type. It can be one of the following types: asynchronous, dialer, Ethernet (IEEE 802.3), Token Ring
(IEEE 802.5), FDDI, High-Speed Serial Interface (HSSI), Virtual Interface, ISDN Basic Rate Interface (BRI), ATM interface, loopback, null, or serial.

number

(Optional) Interface number.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The show appletalk  interface is particularly useful when you first enable AppleTalk on a router interface.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show appletalk interface command for an extended AppleTalk network:

Router# show appletalk interface fddi 0
Fddi0 is up, line protocol is up
        AppleTalk cable range is 4199-4199
        AppleTalk address is 4199.82, Valid
        AppleTalk zone is "Low End SW Lab"
        AppleTalk address gleaning is disabled										
        AppleTalk route cache is enabled
        Interface will not perform pre-FDDITalk compatibility

Table 16 describes the fields shown in the display as well as some fields not shown but that also may be displayed. Note that this command can show a node name in addition to the address, depending on how the software has been configured with the appletalk lookup-type and appletalk name-lookup-interval commands.


Table 16: Show AppleTalk Interface Field Descriptions for an Extended Network
Field Description

FDDI is ...

Type of interface and whether it is currently active and inserted into the network (up) or inactive and not inserted (down).

line protocol

Indicates whether the software processes that handle the line protocol believe the interface is usable (that is, whether keepalives are successful).

AppleTalk cable range

Cable range of the interface.

AppleTalk address is ..., Valid

Address of the interface, and whether the address conflicts with any other address on the network ("Valid" means it does not).

AppleTalk zone

Name of the zone that this interface is in.

AppleTalk port configuration verified...

When our access server implementation comes up on an interface, if there are other routers detected and the interface we are bringing up is not in discovery mode, our access server "confirms" our configuration with the routers that are already on the cable. The address printed in this field is that of the router with which the local router has verified that the interface configuration matches that on the running network.

AppleTalk discarded...packets due to input errors

Number of packets the interface discarded because of input errors. These errors are usually incorrect encapsulations (that is, the packet has a malformed header format).

AppleTalk address gleaning

Indicates whether the interface is automatically deriving ARP table entries from incoming packets (referred to as gleaning).

AppleTalk route cache

Indicates whether fast switching is enabled on the interface.

Interface will ...

Indicates that the AppleTalk interface will check to see if AppleTalk packets sent on the FDDI ring from routers running Cisco software releases prior to Release 9.0(3) or 9.1(2) are recognized.

AppleTalk domain

AppleTalk domain of which this interface is a member.

The following is sample output from the show appletalk interface command for a nonextended AppleTalk network:

Router# show appletalk interface ethernet 1
Ethernet 1 is up, line protocol is up
        AppleTalk address is 666.128, Valid
        AppleTalk zone is Underworld
        AppleTalk routing protocols enabled are RTMP
        AppleTalk address gleaning is enabled
        AppleTalk route cache is not initialized

Table 17 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 17: Show AppleTalk Interface Field Descriptions for a Nonextended
Network
Field Description

Ethernet 1

Type of interface and whether it is currently active and inserted into the network (up) or inactive and not inserted (down).

line protocol

Indicates whether the software processes that handle the line protocol believe the interface is usable (that is, whether keepalives are successful).

AppleTalk address is ..., Valid

Address of the interface, and whether the address conflicts with any other address on the network ("Valid" means it does not).

AppleTalk zone

Name of the zone that this interface is in.

AppleTalk routing protocols enabled

AppleTalk routing protocols that are enabled on the interface.

AppleTalk address gleaning

Indicates whether the interface is automatically deriving ARP table entries from incoming packets (referred to as gleaning).

AppleTalk route cache

Indicates whether fast switching is enabled on the interface.

The following is sample output from the show appletalk interface brief command:

Router# show appletalk interface brief
Interface      Address          Config                Status/Line Protocol      Atalk Protocol
TokenRing0    108.36            Extended            up                                          down
TokenRing1    unassigned    not config'd    administratively down    n/a
Ethernet0      10.82              Extended            up                                          up
Serial0          unassigned    not config'd    administratively down    n/a
Ethernet1      30.83              Extended            up                                          up
Serial1          unassigned    not config'd    administratively down    n/a
Serial2          unassigned    not config'd    administratively down    n/a
Serial3          unassigned    not config'd    administratively down    n/a
Serial4          unassigned    not config'd    administratively down    n/a
Serial5          unassigned    not config'd    administratively down    n/a
Fddi0              50001.82        Extended            administratively down    down
Ethernet2      unassigned    not config'd    up                                          n/a
Ethernet3      9993.137        Extended            up                                          up
Ethernet4      40.82              Non-Extended    up                                          up
Ethernet5      unassigned    not config'd    administratively down    n/a
Ethernet6      unassigned    not config'd    administratively down    n/a
Ethernet7      unassigned    not config'd    administratively down    n/a

Table 18 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 18: Show AppleTalk Interface Brief Field Descriptions
Field Description

Interface

Interface type and number.

Address

Address assigned to the interface.

Config

How the interface is configured. Possible values are extended, nonextended, and not configured.

Status/Line Protocol

Whether the software processes that handle the line protocol believe the interface is usable (that is, whether keepalives are successful).

Atalk Protocol

Whether AppleTalk routing is up and running on the interface.

The following sample output displays the show appletalk interface command when AppleTalk RTMP stub mode is enabled. The last line of the output notes that this mode is turned on.

Router#sh app int e 2
Ethernet2 is up, line protocol is up
  AppleTalk cable range is 30-30
  AppleTalk address is 30.1, Valid
  AppleTalk zone is "Zone30-30"
  AppleTalk address gleaning is disabled
  AppleTalk route cache is enabled
  AppleTalk RTMP stub mode is enabled
Related Commands

appletalk access-group
appletalk address
appletalk cable-range
appletalk client-mode
appletalk discovery
appletalk distribute-list in
appletalk distribute-list out
appletalk free-trade-zone
appletalk getzonelist-filter
appletalk glean-packets
appletalk pre-fdditalk
appletalk protocol
appletalk route-cache
appletalk rtmp-stub
appletalk send-rtmps
appletalk zip-reply-filter
appletalk zone

show appletalk macip-clients

To display status information about all known MacIP clients, use the show  appletalk  macip-clients EXEC command.

show appletalk macip-clients
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk macip-clients command:

Router# show  appletalk  macip-clients
131.108.199.1@[27001n,69a,72s] 45 secs    'S/W Test Lab'

Table 19 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 19: Show AppleTalk MacIP-Clients Field Descriptions
Field Description

131.108.199.1@

Client IP address.

[2700ln,69a,72s]

DDP address of the registered entity, showing the network number, node address, and socket number.

45 secs

Time (in seconds) since the last NBP confirmation was received.

`S/W Test Lab'

Name of the zone to which the MacIP client is attached.

Related Command

show appletalk traffic

show appletalk macip-servers

To display status information about related servers, use the show  appletalk  macip-servers EXEC command.

show  appletalk  macip-servers
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The information in the show appletalk macip-servers display can help you quickly determine the status of your MacIP configuration. In particular, the STATE field can help identify problems in your AppleTalk environment.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk macip-servers command:

Router# show  appletalk  macip-servers
MACIP SERVER 1, IP 131.108.199.221,  ZONE 'S/W Test Lab' STATE is server_up
Resource #1 DYNAMIC 131.108.199.1-131.108.199.10, 1/10 IP in use
Resource #2 STATIC 131.108.199.11-131.108.199.20, 0/10 IP in use

Table 20 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 20: Show AppleTalk MacIP-Servers Field Descriptions
Field Description

MACIP SERVER 1

Number of the MacIP server. This number is assigned arbitrarily.

IP 131.108.199.221

IP address of the MacIP server.

ZONE `S/W Test Lab'

AppleTalk server zone specified with the appletalk  macip  server command.

STATE is server_up

State of the server. Table 22 lists the possible states.

If the server remains in the "resource_wait" state, check that resources have been assigned to this server with either the appletalk macip dynamic or the appletalk macip static command.

Resource #1 DYNAMIC 131.108.199.1-131.108.199.10,
1/10 IP in use

Resource specifications defined in the appletalk macip dynamic and appletalk macip static commands. This list indicates whether the resource address was assigned dynamically or statically, identifies the IP address range associated with the resource specification, and indicates the number of active MacIP clients.

Use the show appletalk macip-servers command with show appletalk interface to identify AppleTalk network problems, as follows.

Step 1 Determine the state of the MacIP server using show  macip-servers. If the STATE field continues to indicate an anomalous status (something other than "server_up," such as "resource_wait" or "zone_wait"), there is a problem.

Step 2 Determine the status of AppleTalk routing and the specific interface using the show appletalk interface command.

Step 3 If the protocol and interface are up, check the MacIP configuration commands for inconsistencies in the IP address and zone.

The STATE field of the show appletalk macip-servers command indicates the current state of each configured MacIP server. Each server operates according to the finite-state machine table described in Table 21. Table 22 describes the state functions listed in Table 21. These are the states that are displayed by the show appletalk macip-servers command.


Table 21: MacIP Finite-State Machine Table
State Event New State Notes

initial

ADD_SERVER

resource_wait

Server configured

resource_wait

TIMEOUT

resource_wait

Wait for resources

resource_wait

ADD_RESOURCE

zone_wait

Wait for zone seeding

zone_wait

ZONE_SEEDED

server_start

Register server

zone_wait

TIMEOUT

zone_wait

Wait until seeded

server_start

START_OK

reg_wait

Wait for server register

server_start

START_FAIL

del_server

Could not start (possible configuration error)

reg_wait

REG_OK

server_up

Registration successful

reg_wait

REG_FAIL

del_server

Registration failed (possible duplicate IP address)

reg_wait

TIMEOUT

reg_wait

Wait until register

server_up

TIMEOUT

send_confirms

NBP confirm all clients

send_confirms

CONFIRM_OK

server_up

send_confirms

ZONE_DOWN

zone_wait

Zone or IP interface down; restart

*

ADD_RESOURCE

*

Ignore, except resource_wait

*

DEL_SERVER

del_server

"No server" statement (HALT)

*

DEL_RESOURCE

ck_resource

Ignore

ck_resource

YES_RESOURCES

*

Return to previous state

ck_resource

NO_RESOURCES

resource_wait

Shut down and wait for resources


Table 22:
Server States
State Description

ck_resource

The server verifies that at least one client range is available. If not, it deregisters NBP names and returns to the resource_wait state.

del_server

State at which all servers end. In this state, the server deregisters all NBP names, purges all clients, and deallocates server resources.

initial

The state at which all servers start.

resource-wait

The server waits until a client range for the server has been configured.

send_confirms

The server tickles active clients every minute, deletes clients that have not responded within the last 5 minutes, and checks IP and AppleTalk interfaces used by MacIP server. If the interfaces are down or have been reconfigured, the server restarts.

server_start

The server registers configured IPADDRESS and registers as IPGATEWAY. It then opens an ATP socket to listen for IP address assignment requests, sends NBP lookup requests for existing IPADDRESSes, and automatically adds clients with addresses within one of the configured client ranges.

server_up

The server has registered. Being in this state enables routing to client ranges. The server now responds to IP address assignment requests.

zone_wait

The server waits until the configured AppleTalk zone name for the server is up. The server will remain in this state if no such zone has been configured or if AppleTalk routing is not enabled.

*

An asterisk in the first column represents any state. An asterisk in the second column represents a return to the previous state.

Related Commands

appletalk macip dynamic
appletalk macip server
appletalk macip static
show appletalk interface
show appletalk traffic

show appletalk macip-traffic

To display statistics about MacIP traffic through the router, use the show  appletalk  macip-traffic privileged EXEC command.

show appletalk macip-traffic
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use the show appletalk macip-traffic command to obtain a detailed breakdown of MacIP traffic that is sent through a router from an AppleTalk to an IP network. The output from this command differs from that of the show appletalk traffic command, which shows normal AppleTalk traffic generated, received, or routed by the router.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk macip-traffic command:

Router# show  appletalk  macip-traffic
  -- MACIP Statistics
                                    MACIP_DDP_IN:    11062
                            MACIP_DDP_IP_OUT:    10984
      MACIP_DDP_NO_CLIENT_SERVICE:       78
                                      MACIP_IP_IN:     7619
                            MACIP_IP_DDP_OUT:     7619
                              MACIP_SERVER_IN:       62
                            MACIP_SERVER_OUT:       52
                    MACIP_SERVER_BAD_ATP:       10
                MACIP_SERVER_ASSIGN_IN:       26
              MACIP_SERVER_ASSIGN_OUT:       26
                    MACIP_SERVER_INFO_IN:       26
                  MACIP_SERVER_INFO_OUT:       26

Table 23 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 23: Show AppleTalk MacIP-Traffic Field Descriptions
Field Description

MACIP_DDP_IN

Number of DDP packets received.

MACIP_DDP_IP_OUT

Number of DDP packets received that were sent to the IP network.

MACIP_DDP_NO_CLIENT_
SERVICE

Number of DDP packets received for which there is no client.

MACIP_IP_IN

Number of IP packets received.

MACIP_IP_DDP_OUT

Number of IP packets received that were sent to the AppleTalk network.

MACIP_SERVER_IN

Number of packets destined for MacIP servers.

MACIP_SERVER_OUT

Number of packets sent by MacIP servers.

MACIP_SERVER_BAD_ATP

Number of MacIP allocation requests received with a bad request.

MACIP_SERVER_ASSIGN_IN

Number of MacIP allocation requests received asking for an IP address.

MACIP_SERVER_ASSIGN_ OUT

Number of IP addresses assigned.

MACIP_SERVER_INFO_IN

Number of MacIP packets received requesting server information.

MACIP_SERVER_INFO_OUT

Number of server information requests answered.

Related Command

show appletalk traffic

show appletalk name-cache

To display a list of NBP services offered by nearby routers and other devices that support NBP, use the show  appletalk  name-cache privileged EXEC command.

show  appletalk  name-cache
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The show appletalk name-cache command displays the information currently in the NBP name cache.

Support for names allows you to easily identify and determine the status of any associated device. This can be important in AppleTalk internetworks where node numbers are dynamically generated.

You can authorize the show  appletalk name-cache command to display any AppleTalk services of interest in local zones. This contrasts with the show  appletalk  nbp command, which you use to display services registered by routers.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk name-cache command:

Router# show  appletalk  name-cache
AppleTalk Name Cache:
Net          Adr    Skt    Name                                  Type                          Zone
4160        19      8        gatekeeper                      SNMP Agent              Underworld
4160        19      254    gatekeeper.Ether4        ciscoRouter            Underworld
4160        86      8        bones                                SNMP Agent              Underworld
4160        86      72      131.108.160.78              IPADDRESS                Underworld
4160        86      254    bones.Ethernet0            IPGATEWAY                Underworld

Table 24 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 24: Show AppleTalk Name-Cache Field Descriptions
Field Description

Net

AppleTalk network number or cable range.

Adr

Node address.

Skt

DDP socket number.

Name

Name of the service.

Type

Device type. The possible types vary, depending on the service. The following are the Cisco server types:

  • ciscoRouter---Server is a Cisco router.

  • SNMP Agent---Server is an SNMP agent.

  • IPGATEWAY---Active MacIP server names.

  • IPADDRESS---Active MacIP server addresses.

Zone

Name of the AppleTalk zone to which this address belongs.

Related Command

show appletalk nbp

show appletalk nbp

To display the contents of the NBP name registration table, use the show appletalk nbp EXEC command.

show appletalk nbp
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The show  appletalk  nbp command lets you identify specific AppleTalk nodes. It displays services registered by the router. In contrast, use the show  appletalk name-cache command to display any AppleTalk services of interest in local zones.

Routers with active AppleTalk interfaces register each interface separately. The Cisco IOS software generates a unique interface NBP name by appending the interface type name and unit number to the router name. For example, for the router named "router" that has AppleTalk enabled on Ethernet interface 0 in the zone Marketing, the NBP registered name is as follows:

router.Ethernet0:ciscoRouter@Marketing

Registering each interface on the router provides you with an indication that the device is configured and operating properly.

One name is registered for each interface. Other service types are registered once for each zone.

The Cisco IOS software deregisters the NBP name if AppleTalk is disabled on the interface for any reason.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk nbp command:

Router# show appletalk nbp
Net  Adr Skt Name                    Type            Zone
4160 211 254 pag.Ethernet0           ciscoRouter     Low End SW Lab
4160 211   8 pag                     SNMP Agent      Low End SW Lab
4172  84 254 pag.TokenRing0          ciscoRouter     LES Tokenring
4172  84   8 pag                     SNMP Agent      LES Tokenring
200  75 254 myrouter. Ethernet1      			ciscoRouter     Marketing    *

Table 25 describes the fields shown in the display as well as some fields not shown but that also may be displayed.


Table 25: Show AppleTalk NBP Field Descriptions
Field Description

Net

AppleTalk network number.

Adr

Node address.

Skt

DDP socket number.

Name

Name of the service.

Type

Device type. The possible types vary, depending on the service. The following are the Cisco server types:

  • ciscoRouter---Cisco routers displayed by port.

  • SNMP Agent---SNMP agents displayed by zone if AppleTalk SNMP-over-DDP is enabled.

  • IPGATEWAY---Active MacIP server names.

  • IPADDRESS---Active MacIP server addresses.

Zone

Name of the AppleTalk zone to which this address belongs.

*

An asterisk in the right margin indicates that the name registration is pending confirmation.

Related Command

show appletalk name-cache

show appletalk neighbors

To display information about the AppleTalk routers that are directly connected to any of the networks to which this router is directly connected, use the show appletalk neighbors EXEC command.

show appletalk  neighbors [neighbor-address]
Syntax Description

neighbor-address

(Optional) Displays information about the specified neighbor router.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If no neighbor address is specified, this command displays information about all AppleTalk routers.

The local router determines the AppleTalk network topology from its neighboring routers and learns from them most of the other information it needs to support the AppleTalk protocols.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show appletalk neighbors command:

Router# show appletalk neighbors
AppleTalk neighbors:
  17037.2      anger.Ethernet0/0        Ethernet0/0, uptime 8:33:27, 2 secs
            Neighbor is reachable as a RTMP peer
  17037.108     Ethernet0/0, uptime 8:33:21, 7 secs
            Neighbor is reachable as a RTMP peer
  17037.248     Ethernet0/0, uptime 8:33:30, 4 secs
            Neighbor is reachable as a RTMP peer
  17046.2      anger.Ethernet0/1        Ethernet0/1, uptime 8:33:27, 2 secs
            Neighbor is reachable as a RTMP peer
  17435.87     firewall.Ethernet0/0         Ethernet0/3, uptime 8:33:27, 6 secs
            Neighbor is reachable as a RTMP peer
  17435.186    the-wall.Ethernet0       Ethernet0/3, uptime 8:33:24, 5 secs
            Neighbor is reachable as a RTMP peer
  17435.233    teach-gw.Ethernet0       Ethernet0/3, uptime 8:33:24, 7 secs
            Neighbor is reachable as a RTMP peer
  17036.1      other-gw.Ethernet5 Ethernet0/5, uptime 8:33:29, 9 secs
            Neighbor is reachable as a RTMP peer
  4021.5       boojum.Hssi4/0   Hssi1/0, uptime 10:49:02, 0 secs
        Neighbor has restarted 1 time in 8:33:11.
            Neighbor is reachable as a static peer

Table 26 describes the fields shown in this display. Depending on the configuration of the appletalk lookup-type and appletalk name-lookup-interval commands, a node name as well as a node address also may be shown in this display.


Table 26: Show AppleTalk Neighbors Field Descriptions
Field Description

31.86

AppleTalk address of the neighbor router.

Ethernet0/0

Router interface through which the neighbor router can be reached.

uptime 133:28:06

Amount of time (in hours, minutes, and seconds) that the Cisco  IOS software has received this neighboring router's routing updates.

2 secs

Time (in seconds) since the software last received an update from the neighbor router.

Neighbor is reachable as a RTMP peer
Neighbor is reachable as a static peer

Indicates how the route to this neighbor was learned.

Neighbor is down.
Neighbor has restarted 1 time

Indicates whether neighbor is up or down, and number of times it has restarted in the specified time interval, displayed in the format hours:minutes:seconds.

The following is sample output from the show appletalk neighbor command when you specify the AppleTalk address of a particular neighbor:

Router# show appletalk neighbors 69.163
Neighbor 69.163, Ethernet0, uptime 268:00:52, last update 7 secs ago
    We have sent queries for 299 nets via 214 packets.
    Last query was sent 4061 secs ago.
    We received 152 replies and 0 extended replies.
    We have received queries for 14304 nets in 4835 packets.
    We sent 157 replies and 28 extended replies.
    We received 0 ZIP notifies.
    We received 0 obsolete ZIP commands.
    We received 4 miscellaneous ZIP commands.
    We received 0 unrecognized ZIP commands.
    We have received 92943 routing updates.
    Of the 92943 valid updates, 1320 entries were invalid.
    We received 1 routing update which were very late.
    Last update had 0 extended and 2 nonextended routes.
    Last update detail: 2 old

Table 27 describes the fields shown in this display. Depending on the configuration of the appletalk lookup-type and appletalk name-lookup-interval commands, a node name as well as a node address can be shown in this display.


Table 27: Show AppleTalk Neighbor Field Descriptions for a Specific Address
Field Description

Neighbor 69.163

AppleTalk address of the neighbor.

Ethernet0

Interface through which the router receives this neighbor's routing updates.

uptime 268:00:52

Amount of time (in hours, minutes, and seconds) that the Cisco  IOS software has received this neighboring router's routing updates.

last update 7 secs ago

Time (in seconds) since the software last received an update from the neighbor router.

received queries

Number of RTMP queries that have been received from this neighbor.

Last query was sent

Time (in seconds) since last query was sent.

replies received

Number of RTMP replies heard from this neighbor.

extended replies

Number of extended RTMP replies received from this neighbor.

ZIP notifies

Number of ZIP notify packets received from this neighbor.

obsolete ZIP commands

Number of nonextended-only (obsolete) ZIP commands received from this neighbor.

miscellaneous ZIP commands

Number of ZIP commands (for example, GNI, GZI, and GMZ) from end systems rather than from routers.

unrecognized ZIP commands

Number of bogus ZIP packets received from this neighbor.

routing updates

Number of RMTP updates received from this neighbor.

invalid entries

Of the routing update packets received from this neighbor, the number of invalid entries discarded.

Last update detail

Of the routing update packets received from this neighbor, the number already known about.

Related Commands

appletalk lookup-type
appletalk name-lookup-interval

show appletalk remap

To display domain remapping information, use the show appletalk remap EXEC command.

show appletalk remap [domain domain-number [{in | out} [{to | from} domain-network]]]
Syntax Description

domain domain-number

(Optional) Number of an AppleTalk domain about which to display remapping information. It can be a decimal integer from 1 through 1000000.

in

(Optional) Displays remapping information about inbound packets, that is, on packets entering the local segment of the domain.

out

(Optional) Displays remapping information about outbound packets, that is on packets exiting from the local segment of the domain.

to

(Optional) Displays information about the network number or cable range to which an address has been remapped.

from

(Optional) Displays information about the original network number or cable range.

domain-network

(Optional) Number of an AppleTalk network.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

If you omit all options keywords and arguments, the show appletalk remap command displays all remapping information about all domains.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show appletalk remap command:

Router# show appletalk remap
              AppleTalk   Remapping  Table :
              ------------------------------
              Domain 1 : Domain 1   State : Active
              ------------------------------------------
              Direction : IN
              Domain Net(Cable)       Remapped to         Status
              3     - 3               100   - 100          Good
                Direction : OUT
              Domain Net(Cable)       Remapped to         Status
              1     - 1               200   - 200          Good
              Domain 2 : Domain 2   State : Active
              ------------------------------------------
              Direction : IN
              Domain Net(Cable)       Remapped to         Status
              Direction : OUT
              Domain Net(Cable)       Remapped to         Status
              2     - 2               400   - 400          Good
              100   - 100             401   - 401          Good

The following is sample output from the show appletalk remap command when you specify a domain number:

Router# show appletalk remap domain 1 
              AppleTalk   Remapping  Table :
              ------------------------------
              Domain 1 : Domain 1   State : Active
              ------------------------------------------
              Direction : IN
              Domain Net(Cable)       Remapped to         Status
              3     - 3               100   - 100          Good
              Direction : OUT
              Domain Net(Cable)       Remapped to         Status
              1     - 1               201   - 201          Good

The following is sample output from the show appletalk remap command to display inbound remappings for AppleTalk network 100:

Router# show appletalk remap domain 1 in from 100
              AppleTalk   Remapping  Table :
             ------------------------------
For the Remap 100    the Domain    net is 3

Table 28 explains the fields shown in the display.


Table 28: Show AppleTalk Remap Field Descriptions
Field Description

Domain

Number of the AppleTalk IP domain.

State

State of the domain. It can be either Active or Nonactive.

Direction

Indicates whether the mapping is an inbound one (for packets entering the local domain segment) or an outbound one (for packets leaving the local domain segment).

Domain Net (Cable)

Network number or cable range that is being remapped.

Remapped to

Number or range of numbers to which a network number or cable range has been remapped.

Status

It can be one of the following values:

  • Unassigned---The network number or cable range was just remapped.

  • Unzipped---The remapped network number or cable range is trying to acquire a zone list. This state is possible for inbound remapped network numbers only.

  • Suspect---The Cisco IOS software suspects that it already has this entry in the routing table, and it is performing loop detection for this entry. This state is possible for inbound remappings only.

  • Good---The remapped entry has a complete zone list and, for inbound remappings only, it is in the main routing table.

  • Bad---The remapping entry is about to be deleted from the remapping table.

Related Command

appletalk domain remap-range

show appletalk route

To display all entries or specified entries in the AppleTalk routing table, use the show appletalk route EXEC command.

show appletalk  route [network | type number]
Syntax Description

network

(Optional) Displays the routing table entry for the specified network.

type number

(Optional) Displays the routing table entries for networks that can be reached via the specified interface type and number.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If you omit the arguments, this command displays all entries in the routing table.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show appletalk route command for a nonextended AppleTalk network:

Router#  show appletalk route
Codes: R - RTMP derived, E - EIGRP derived, C - connected, A - AURP
P - proxy, S - static 5 routes in internet C Net 258 directly connected, 1431 uses, Ethernet0, zone Twilight R Net 6 [1/G] via 258.179, 8 sec, 0 uses, Ethernet0, zone The O C Net 11 directly connected, 472 uses, Ethernet1, zone No Parking R Net 2154 [1/G] via 258.179, 8 sec, 6892 uses, Ethernet0, zone LocalTalk S Net 1111 via 258.144, 0 uses, Ethernet0, no zone set [hops/state] state can be one of G:Good, S:Suspect, B:Bad

The following is sample output from the show appletalk route command for an extended AppleTalk network:

Router#  show appletalk route
Codes: R - RTMP derived, E - EIGRP derived, C - connected, A - AURP
P - proxy, S - static 5 routes in internet E Net 10000 -10000 [1/G] via 300.199, 275 sec, Ethernet2, zone France R Net 890 [2/G] via 4.129, 1 sec, Ethernet0, zone release lab R Net 901 [2/G] via 4.129, 1 sec, Ethernet0, zone Dave's House C Net 999-999 directly connected, Serial3, zone Magnolia Estates R Net 2003 [4/G] via 80.129, 6 sec, Ethernet4, zone Bldg-13

The following is sample output from the show appletalk route command when AppleTalk load balancing is enabled. The output displayed shows additional equal-cost path entries.

Router# show appletalk route
Codes:  R  -  RTMP derived,  E  -  EIGRP derived,  C  -  connected,  A  -  AURP
             P  -  proxy,  S  -  static 759 routes in internet. Up to 4 parallel paths allowed. The first zone listed for each entry is its default (primary) zone. R  Net  20-20  [2/G]  via 60.172, 1 sec, Ethernet1/2,                                    via 1010.68 1 sec, Ethernet1/3,                                    via 70.199, 2 sec, Ethernet1/5, zone zone20 R  Net  32-32  [9/G]  via 60172, 2 sec, Ethernet1/2                                    via 1010.68, 2 sec, Ethernet1/3,                                    via 70.199, 2 sec, Ethernet1/5,                                    Zone: "Executive Briefing Center" R  Net  43-43  [7/G]  via 60.172, 2 sec, Ethernet1/2,                                    via 1010.68, 2 sec, Ethernet1/3,                                    via 70.199, 2 sec, Ethernet1/5, zone ISDN Tunnel R  Net  57-57  [6/G]  via 60.172, 2 sec, Ethernet1/2,                                    via 1010.68, 2 sec, Ethernet1/3,                                    via 70.199, 2 sec, Ethernet1/5, zone zone-home-bumi

Table 29 describes the fields shown in the two displays as well as some fields not shown, but that also may be displayed. Depending on the configuration of the global configuration commands appletalk lookup-type and appletalk name-lookup-interval, a node name may appear in this display instead of a node address.


Table 29: Show AppleTalk Route Field Descriptions
Field Description

Codes:

Codes defining how the route was learned.

R

Route learned from an RTMP update.

E

Route learned from an Enhanced IGRP update.

C

Directly connected network.

A

Route learned from an AURP update.

S

Statically defined route.

P

Proxy route. Proxy routes are included in outgoing RTMP updates as if they were directly connected routes (although they are not really directly connected), since they are not associated with any interface. Whenever an NBQ BrRq for the zone in question is generated by anyone anywhere in the internetwork, an NBP FwdReq is directed to any router connected to the proxy route. The Phase 2 router (which is the only router directly connected) converts the FwdReq to LkUps, which are understood by Phase 1 routers, and sends them to every network in the zone.

3 routes

Number of routes in the table.

Net 258

Network to which the route goes.

Net 999-999

Cable range to which the route goes.

directly connected

Indicates that the network is directly connected to the router.

1431 uses

Fair estimate of the number of times a route gets used. It actually indicates the number of times the route has been selected for use prior to operations such as access list filtering.

Ethernet0

Possible interface through which updates to the remote network will be sent.

zone Twilight

Name of zone of which the destination network is a member.

[1/G]

Number of hops to this network, followed by the state of the link to that network. The state can be one of the following letters:

  • G---Link is good.

  • S---Link is suspect.

  • B---Link is bad.

The state is determined from the routing updates that occur at 10-second intervals. A separate and nonsynchronized event occurs at 20-second intervals, checking and flushing the ratings for particular routes that have not been updated. For each 20-second period that passes with no new routing information, a rating changes from G to S and then from S to B. After 1 minute with no updates, that route is flushed. Every time the Cisco IOS software receives a useful update, the status of the route in question is reset to G. Useful updates are those advertising a route that is as good or better than the one currently in the table.

When an AppleTalk route is poisoned by another router, its metric gets changed to poisoned (that is, 31 hops). The software then will age this route normally during a holddown period, during which the route will still be visible in the routing table.

via 258.179

Address of a router that is the next hop to the remote network.

via gatekeeper

Node name of a router that is the next hop to the remote network.

8 sec

Number of seconds that have elapsed since an RMTP update about this network was last received.

The following is sample output from the show appletalk  route command when you specify a network number:

Router#  show appletalk route 69
Codes: R - RTMP derived, E - EIGRP derived, C - connected, A - AURP
P - proxy, S - static The first zone listed for each entry is its default (primary) zone. R Net 69-69 [2/G] via gatekeeper, 0 sec, Ethernet0, zone Empty Guf Route installed 125:20:21, updated 0 secs ago Next hop: gatekeeper, 2 hops away Zone list provided by gatekeeper Route has been updated since last RTMP was sent Valid zones: "Empty Guf"

Table 30 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 30: Show AppleTalk Route Field Descriptions for a Specified Network
Field Description

Codes:

Codes defining how the route was learned.

R

Route learned from an RTMP update.

E

Route learned from an Enhanced IGRP update.

C

Directly connected network.

A

Route learned from an AURP update.

S

Statically defined route.

P

Proxy route.

67 routes in internet

Number of routes in the Apple Talk internet.

Net 69-69

Cable range to which the route goes. This is the number of the network you specified on the show appletalk route command line.

[2/G]

Number of hops to this network, followed by the state of the link to that network. The state can be one of the following letters:

  • G---Link is good.

  • S---Link is suspect.

  • B---Link is bad.

The state is determined from the routing updates that occur at 10-second intervals. A separate and nonsynchronized event occurs at 20-second intervals, checking and flushing the ratings for particular routes that have not been updated. For each 20-second period that passes with no new routing information, a rating changes from G to S and then from S to B. After 1 minute with no updates, that route is flushed. Every time the Cisco IOS software receives a useful update, the status of the route in question is reset to G. Useful updates are those advertising a route that is as good or better than the one currently in the table.

When an AppleTalk route is poisoned by another router, its metric gets changed to poisoned (that is, 31 hops). The software then will age this route normally during a holddown period, during which the route will still be visible in the routing table.

via gatekeeper

Address or node name of a router that is the next hop to the remote network.

0 sec

Number of seconds that have elapsed since an RMTP update about this network was last received.

Ethernet0

Possible interface through which updates to the remote network will be sent.

zone Empty Guf

Name of zone of which the destination network is a member.

Route installed 125:20:21

Length of time (in hours, minutes, and seconds) since this route was first learned about.

updated 0 secs ago

Time (in seconds) since the software received an update for this route.

Next hop: gatekeeper

Address or node name of the router that is one hop away.

2 hops away

Number of hops to the network specified in the show appletalk route command line.

Zone list provided by gatekeeper

Address or node name of the router that provided the zone list included with the RTMP update.

Route has been updated since last RTMP was sent

Indicates whether the software has received a routing update from a neighboring router since the last time the software sent an RTMP update for this route.

Valid zones: "Empty Guf"

Zone names that are valid for this network.

Related Commands

appletalk lookup-type
appletalk maximum-paths
appletalk name-lookup-interval
appletalk proxy-nbp
clear appletalk route

show appletalk sockets

To display all information or specified information about process-level operation in the sockets of an AppleTalk interface, use the show appletalk  sockets privileged EXEC command.

show appletalk  sockets [socket-number]
Syntax Description

socket-number

(Optional) Displays information about the specified socket number.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If no socket number is specified, this command displays information about all sockets.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk sockets command when you do not specify a socket number:

Router# show appletalk sockets
Socket      Name            Owner                    Waiting/Processed
1                RTMP            AT RTMP                    0        148766
2                NIS              AT NBP                      0        15642
4                AEP              AT Maintenance      0        0
6                ZIP              AT ZIP                      0        13619
8                SNMP             AT SNMP                     0        0
10 SMRP SMRP Input 0 56393 253            PingServ    AT Maintenance      0        0

The following is sample output from the show appletalk sockets command when you do specify a socket number:

Router# show appletalk sockets 6
6                ZIP              AT ZIP                      0        13619

Table 31 describes the fields shown in these displays.


Table 31: Show AppleTalk Socket Field Descriptions
Field Description

Socket

Socket number.

Name

Name of the socket.

Owner

Process that is managing communication with this socket.

Waiting/Processed

Number of packets waiting to be processed by the socket, and number of packets that have been processed by the socket since it was established.

show appletalk static

To display information about the statically defined routes, including floating static routes, use the show appletalk  static EXEC command.

show appletalk  static
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk static command:

Router# show appletalk static

AppleTalk Static Entries
---------------------------------------
Network NextIR Zone Status

100-109 1.10 Zone100 A
200 1.10 Zone200 A
300-309 1.10 Zone300 A(Floating)

Table 32 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 32: Show AppleTalk Static Field Descriptions

Field Description

Network

For an extended AppleTalk network, the network range. For a nonextended AppleTalk network, the network number.

NextIR

The next internetwork router.

Zone

The AppleTalk zone name.

Status

The status of the route, which can be one of the following:

  • A---The static route is active.

  • A(Floating)---The floating static route is active.

  • N/A---The static route is not active.

  • N/A(Floating)---The floating static route is not active.

Related Commands

appletalk static cable-range
appletalk static network
show appletalk neighbors
show appletalk route

show appletalk traffic

To display statistics about AppleTalk traffic, including MacIP traffic, use the show appletalk traffic EXEC command.

show appletalk traffic
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

For MacIP traffic, an IP alias is established for each MacIP client and for the IP address of the MacIP server if it does not match an existing IP interface address. To display the client aliases, use the show  ip aliases command.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk traffic command:

Router# show appletalk traffic
AppleTalk statistics:
    Rcvd:    357471 total, 0 checksum errors, 264 bad hop count
                  321006 local destination, 0 access denied
                  0 for MacIP, 0 bad MacIP, 0 no client
                  13510 port disabled, 2437 no listener
                  0 ignored, 0 martians
    Bcast:  191881 received, 270406 sent
    Sent:    550293 generated, 66495 forwarded, 1840 fast forwarded, 0 loopback
                  0 forwarded from MacIP, 0 MacIP failures
                  436 encapsulation failed, 0 no route, 0 no source
    DDP:      387265 long, 0 short, 0 macip, 0 bad size
    NBP:      302779 received, 0 invalid, 0 proxies
                  57875 replies sent, 59947 forwards, 418674 lookups, 432 failures
    RTMP:    108454 received, 0 requests, 0 invalid, 40189 ignored
                  90170 sent, 0 replies
    EIGRP: 0 received, 0 hellos, 0 updates, 0 replies, 0 queries
         0 sent,     0 hellos, 0 updates, 0 replies, 0 queries
         0 invalid, 0 ignored
  AURP: 0 Open Requests, 0 Router Downs
        0 Routing Information sent, 0 Routing Information received
        0 Zone Information sent, 0 Zone Information received
        0 Get Zone Nets sent, 0 Get Zone Nets received
        0 Get Domain Zone List sent, 0 Get Domain Zone List received
AppleTalk statistics:
        0 bad sequence
    ATP:      0 received
    ZIP:   13619 received, 33633 sent, 32 netinfo
  Echo:  0 received, 0 discarded, 0 illegal
         0 generated, 0 replies sent
  Responder:  0 received, 0 illegal, 0 unknown
         0 replies sent, 0 failures
  AARP:  85 requests, 149 replies, 100 probes
         84 martians, 0 bad encapsulation, 0 unknown
         278 sent, 0 failures, 29 delays, 315 drops
  Lost: 0 no buffers
  Unknown: 0 packets
  Discarded: 130475 wrong encapsulation, 0 bad SNAP discriminator

Table 33 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 33: Show AppleTalk Traffic Field Descriptions
Field Description

Rcvd:

This section describes the packets received.

357741 total

Total number of packets received.

0 checksum errors

Number of packets that were discarded because their DDP checksum was incorrect. The DDP checksum is verified for packets that are directed to the router. It is not verified for forwarded packets.

264 bad hop count

Number of packets discarded because they had traveled too many hops.

321006 local destination

Number of packets addressed to the local router.

0 access denied

Number of packets discarded because they were denied by an access list.

0 for MacIP

Number of AppleTalk packets the Cisco IOS software received that were encapsulated within an IP packet.

0 bad MacIP

Number of bad MacIP packets the software received and discarded. These packets may have been malformed or may not have included a destination address.

0 no client

Number of packets discarded because they were directed to a nonexistent MacIP client.

13510 port disabled

Number of packets discarded because routing was disabled for that port (extended AppleTalk only). This is the result of a configuration error or a packet's being received while the software is in verification/discovery mode.

2437 no listener

Number of packets discarded because they were directed to a socket that had no services associated with it.

0 ignored

Number of routing update packets ignored because they were from a misconfigured neighbor or because routing was disabled.

0 martians

Number of packets discarded because they contained bogus information in the DDP header. What distinguishes this error from the others is that the data in the header is never valid as opposed to not being valid at a given point in time.

Bcast:

Number of broadcast packets sent and received.

Sent:

This section describes the packets transmitted.

550293 generated

Number of packets sent that were generated.

66495 forwarded

Number of packets sent that were forwarded.

1840 fast forwarded

Number of packets sent using routes from the fast-switching cache.

0 loopback

Number of packets that were broadcast out an interface on the router for which the device simulated reception of the packet because the interface does not support sending a broadcast packet to itself. The count is cumulative for all interfaces on the device.

0 forwarded from MacIP

Number of IP packets forwarded that were encapsulated within an AppleTalk DDP packet.

0 MacIP failures

Number of MacIP packets sent that were corrupted during the MacIP encapsulation process.

436 encapsulation failed

Number of packets the router could not send because encapsulation failed. This can happen because encapsulation of the DDP packet failed or because AARP address resolution failed.

0 no route

Number of packets the router could not send because it knew of no route to the destination.

0 no source

Number of packets the router sent when it did not know its own address. This should happen only if something is seriously wrong with the router or network configuration.

DDP:

This section describes DDP packets seen.

387265 long

Number of DDP long packets.

0 short

Number of DDP short packets.

0 macip

Number of IP packets encapsulated in an AppleTalk DDP packet that the router sent.

0 bad size

Number of packets whose physical packet length and claimed length differed.

NBP:

This section describes NBP packets.

302779 received

Total number of NBP packets received.

0 invalid

Number of invalid NBP packets received. Causes include invalid op code and invalid packet type.

0 proxies

Number of NBP proxy lookup requests received by the router when it was configured for NBP proxy transition usage.

57875 replies sent

Number of NBP replies sent.

59947 forwards

Number of NBP forward requests received or sent.

418674 lookups

Number of NBP lookups received.

432 failures

Generic counter that increments any time the NBP process experiences a problem.

RTMP:

This section describes RTMP packets.

108454 received

Total number of RTMP packets received.

0 requests

Number of RTMP requests received.

0 invalid

Number of invalid RTMP packets received. Causes include invalid op code and invalid packet type.

40189 ignored

Number of RTMP packets ignored. One reason for this is that the interface is still in discovery mode and is not yet initialized.

90170 sent

Number of RTMP packets sent.

0 replies

Number of RTMP replies sent.

ATP:

This section describes ATP packets.

0 received

Number of ATP packets the router received.

ZIP:

This section describes ZIP packets.

13619 received

Number of ZIP packets the router received.

33633 sent

Number of ZIP packets the router sent.

32 netinfo

Number of packets that requested port configuration via ZIP GetNetInfo requests. These are commonly used during node startup and are occasionally used by some AppleTalk network management software packages.

Echo:

This section describes AEP packets.

0 received

Number of AEP packets the router received.

0 discarded

Number of AEP packets the router discarded.

0 illegal

Number of illegal AEP packets the router received.

0 generated

Number of AEP packets the router generated.

0 replies sent

Number of AEP replies the router sent.

Responder:

This section describes Responder Request packets.

0 received

Number of Responder Request packets the router received.

0 illegal

Number of illegal Responder Request packets the router received.

0 unknown

Number of Responder Request packets the router received that it did not recognize.

0 replies sent

Number of Responder Request replies the router sent.

0 failures

Number of Responder Request replies the router could not send.

AARP:

This section describes AARP packets.

85 requests

Number of AARP requests the router received.

149 replies

Number of AARP replies the router received.

100 probes

Number of AARP probe packets the router received.

84 martians

Number of AARP packets the router did not recognize. If you start seeing an inordinate number of martians on an interface, check whether a bridge has been inserted into the network. When a bridge is starting up, it floods the network with AARP packets.

0 bad encapsulation

Number of AARP packets received that had an unrecognizable encapsulation.

0 unknown

Number of AARP packets the router did not recognize.

278 sent

Number of AARP packets the router sent.

0 failures

Number of AARP packets the router could not send.

29 delays

Number of AppleTalk packets delayed while waiting for the results of an AARP request.

315 drops

Number of AppleTalk packets dropped because an AARP request failed.

Lost: 0 no buffers

Number of packets lost because of lack of buffer space.

Unknown: 0 packets

Number of packets whose protocol could not be determined.

Discarded:

This section describes the number of packets that were discarded.

130475 wrong

Number of packets discarded because they had the wrong encapsulation.That is, nonextended AppleTalk packets were on an extended AppleTalk network, or vice versa.

0 bad SNAP discrimination

Number of packets discarded because they had the wrong SNAP discriminator. This occurs when another AppleTalk device has implemented an obsolete or incorrect packet format.

Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

clear appletalk traffic
show appletalk macip-traffic

show ip aliases

show appletalk zone

To display all entries or specified entries in the zone information table, use the show  appletalk  zone EXEC command.

show appletalk  zone [zone-name]
Syntax Description

zone-name

(Optional) Displays the entry for the specified zone.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If no zone name is specified, the command displays all entries in the zone information table.

You can use this command on extended and nonextended networks.

A zone name can be associated with multiple network addresses or cable ranges, or both. There is not a one-to-one correspondence between a zone name and a LAN; a zone name may correspond to one or more networks (LANs or network interfaces). This means that a zone name will effectively replace multiple network addresses in zone filtering. This is reflected in the output of the show appletalk zone command. For example, the zone named Mt. View 1 in the following sample display is associated with two network numbers and four cable ranges.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show appletalk zone command:

Router# show appletalk zone
Name                                      Network(s)
Gates of Hell                    666-666
Engineering                        3 29-29 4042-4042
customer eng                      19-19
CISCO IP                              4140-4140
Dave's House                      3876 3924 5007
Narrow Beam                        4013-4013 4023-4023 4037-4037 4038-4038
Low End SW Lab                  6160 4172-4172 9555-9555 4160-4160
Tir'n na'Og                        199-199
Mt. View 1                          7010-7010 7122 7142 7020-7020 7040-7040 7060-7060
Mt. View 2                          7152 7050-7050
UDP                                        1112-12
Empty Guf                            69-69
Light                                    80
europe                                  2010 3010 3034 5004
Bldg-13                                4032 5026 61669 3012 3025 3032 5025 5027
Bldg-17                                3004 3024 5002 5006

Table 34 describes the fields shown in the display.

The following is sample output from the show appletalk zone command when you specify a zone name:

Router# show appletalk zone CISCO IP
AppleTalk Zone Information for CISCO IP:
    Valid for nets: 4140-4140
    Not associated with any interface.
    Not associated with any access list.

Table 34: Show AppleTalk Zone Field Descriptions for a Specific Zone Name
Field Description

AppleTalk Zone Information for CISCO IP:

Name of the zone.

Valid for nets: 4140-4140

Cable range(s) or network numbers assigned to this zone.

Not associated with any interface.

Interfaces that have been assigned to this zone.

Not associated with any access list.

Access lists that have been defined for this zone.

Related Command

appletalk zone

show smrp forward

To display all entries or specific entries in the SMRP forwarding table, use the show smrp forward EXEC command.

show smrp forward [appletalk [group-address]]
Syntax Description

appletalk

(Optional) Displays SMRP forwarding table entries for all AppleTalk networks. Currently SMRP services are supported over AppleTalk only.

group-address

(Optional) SMRP group address. All members of a group listen for multicast packets on this address.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

The SMRP forwarding table describes the relationship between the SMRP router and the distribution tree for each SMRP group on the internetwork. An SMRP router has an entry in this table for every SMRP group for which the router is forwarding data. When data for an SMRP group arrives on the parent interface, it is forwarded to each child interface.

Looking at child and parent interfaces in relation to members of an SMRP group, a child interface is a neighbor that is farther away from the SMRP creator node and a parent interface is one that is closer to the creator node.

If no SMRP group address is specified, then the show smrp forward command displays information for all entries in the SMRP forwarding table. For all entries, the show smrp forward command displays the SMRP group address, the state of the SMRP group, the parent interface and address, and one or more child interfaces and addresses.

If an SMRP group address is specified, the command displays additional information for that group showing the child count, the time elapsed since the entry was updated, and the next poll time.


Note Because SMRP is currently supported over AppleTalk networks only, sample output resulting from the show smrp forward command is the same as output from the show smrp forward appletalk command.
Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show smrp forward command showing all entries:

Router# show smrp forward 
SMRP Forwarding Table 
Group       State           Parent                   Child
Address             Interface     Address   Interface     Address
------------------------------------------------------------------
AT 1.2 Fwd Ethernet2 20.3 Ethernet3 30.2
AT 10.1 Fwd Ethernet2 20.4 Ethernet4 40.2
AT 30.1 Fwd Ethernet3 30.1 Ethernet2 20.2

The following is sample output from the show smrp forward command with the appletalk keyword and an SMRP group address specified:

Router# show smrp forward appletalk 10.1
Group        State          Parent                   Child
Address             Interface     Address   Interface     Address
----------------------------------------------------------------
AT 10.1 Fwd Ethernet2 20.4 Ethernet4 40.2

Child count: 1
Elapsed update time: 01:15:32
Next poll time (sec): 3

Table 35 describes the fields shown in the displays.


Table 35: Show SMRP Forwarding Field Descriptions
Field Description

Group Address

Address of the SMRP group.

State

State of the group. Possible states are as follows:

  • Join---Joining the group

  • Fwd---Forwarding data

  • Leave---Leaving the group

Parent Interface

Interface that receives data to be forwarded.

Parent Address

Address of the parent interface.

Child Interface

One or more interfaces to which data is forwarded.

Child Address

Address of the interface.

Child Count

For a specific SMRP group address, the number of children for the group.

Elapsed update time

Time elapsed since the last change was made to the forwarding entry.

Next poll time

Time remaining before polling all child members.

show smrp globals

To display global information about SMRP---such as whether SMRP is enabled and running and settings for timers, most of which are used internally---use the show smrp globals EXEC command.

show smrp globals
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show smrp globals command:

Router# show  smrp globals
SMRP global information:
  SMRP is running.
Maximum number of retries for requests is 4 times.
Request transactions are sent every 10 seconds. Response transactions are sent every 100 seconds. Creators are polled every 60 seconds. Members are polled every 30 seconds. Hellos are sent every 10 seconds. Neighbors are down after not being heard from for 30 seconds. Poisoned routes purged after 60 seconds. Primary requests sent every 1 second. Secondary requests sent every 1 second.

Table 36 describes the global information shown in the display.


Table 36: Show SMRP Globals Field Descriptions
Field Description

SMRP is running.

SMRP is enabled.

Maximum number of retry times for requests is 4.

This value is used internally.

Request transactions are sent every 10 seconds.

This timer is used internally.

Response transactions are sent every 100 seconds.

This timer is used internally. This is a variable value that is determined by the following formula:
2 * request-interval * (maximum-retries +1)

Creators are polled every 60 seconds.

Identifies how often the Cisco IOS software polls the SMRP group creator. This timer is used internally.

Members are polled every 30 seconds.

Identifies how often the software polls the SMRP group members. This timer is used internally.

Hellos are sent every 10 seconds.

Identifies how often the software sends hello packets to its neighbors.

Neighbors are down after not being heard from for 30 seconds.

Identifies the time in seconds that elapses after which neighbors that are not heard from are assumed to be down.

Poisoned routes are purged after 60 seconds.

Poisoned routes are bad route having a distance of 255 hops.

Primary requests sent every 1  second.

Primary requests are requests from a secondary router requesting to become the primary router. Only a secondary router can become a primary router.

Secondary requests sent every 1  second.

Secondary requests are requests from a router in normal operation mode requesting to become a secondary router. Only a router in normal mode can become a secondary router.

show smrp group

To display all entries or specific entries in the SMRP group table, use the show smrp group EXEC command.

show smrp group [appletalk [group-address]]
Syntax Description

appletalk

(Optional) Displays SMRP group table entries for all AppleTalk networks. Currently SMRP services are supported over AppleTalk networks only.

group-address

(Optional) SMRP group address.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

If no SMRP group address is specified, the command displays the group address, the state, and the parent and child information for all entries in the SMRP group table. If a group address is specified, the command displays the standard information plus additional information for that group showing the child count, the elapsed update time, and the next poll time.


Note Because SMRP is currently supported over AppleTalk networks only, sample output resulting from the show smrp group command is the same as output from show smrp group appletalk command.

An SMRP group address is an address that is based on the local network address of the network to which the creator of the SMRP group belongs.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show smrp group command showing all group table entries:

Router# show  smrp group
SMRP Group Table
Group         Creation  Next          Creator      
Address       Time      Poll  Interface     Address
---------------------------------------------------------------
AT 30.1       0:04:37   22    Ethernet3     30.1      
AT 40.2       0:04:35   24    Ethernet4     40.1      
AT 40.1       0:04:36   23    Ethernet4     40.1 

The following is sample output from the show smrp group command with the appletalk keyword and an SMRP group address specified:

Router# show  smrp group appletalk 40.2
SMRP Group Table
Group       Creation  Next          Creator
Address     Time      Poll  Interface     Address
---------------------------------------------------------------
AT 40.2     0:05:58   1     Ethernet4     40.1      


Table 37 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 37: Show SMRP Group Field Descriptions
Field Description

Group Address

SMRP group address. AT signifies that this is an AppleTalk network group.

Creation Time

Elapsed time since the group was created in hours, minutes, and seconds (hh:mm:ss).

Next Poll

Time remaining until the next check is performed to determine if the creator is still active.

Creator Interface

Interface that the creator of the SMRP group is on.

Creator Address

Address of the creator.

show smrp mcache

To display the SMRP fast-switching cache table, use the show smrp mcache EXEC command.

show smrp mcache [appletalk [group-address]]
Syntax Description

appletalk

(Optional) Displays the SMRP fast-switching cache table entries for all AppleTalk network groups. Currently, SMRP services are supported over AppleTalk only.

group-address

(Optional) SMRP group address. Use this argument to display only this group's fast-switching cache table entry.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

An SMRP router has an entry in its forwarding table for every SMRP group for which the router forwards data. For each group, the forwarding table lists the parent interface and address and one or more child interfaces and addresses. When data for an SMRP group arrives on the parent interface, the router forwards it to each child interface. The SMRP fast-switching cache table specifies whether or not to fast switch SMRP data packets out the interfaces specified by the forwarding table.

Use show smrp mcache command to view the SMRP fast-switching cache table. The command displays which interfaces are fast-switch enabled. If a parent interface is not fast-switch enabled, then there is no entry (row) in the table. If a child interface is not fast-switch enabled, then it is not in the list of child interfaces for an entry in the table.

If you do not specify an SMRP group address, then the show smrp mcache command displays information for all entries in the SMRP fast-switching cache table. If you specify an SMRP group address, the command displays cache entries for only that group.

SMRP fast-switching is enabled by default.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show smrp mcache command:

Router# show smrp mcache
SMRP Multicast Fast Switching Cache
Group        In  Parent        Child         MAC Header (Top)
Address      Use Interface     Interface(s)  Network Header (Bottom)
--------------------------------------------------------------------
AT 11.121    Y   Ethernet0     Ethernet3     090007400b7900000c1740db
                                             001fed750000002aff020a0a0a
AT 11.122    Y   Ethernet0     Ethernet3     090007400b7a00000c1740db
                                             001f47750000002aff020a0a0a
AT 11.123    Y   Ethernet0     Ethernet1     090007400b7b00000c1740d9
                                             001fe77500000014ff020a0a0a
                               Ethernet3     090007400b7b00000c1740db
                                             001ffd750000002aff020a0a0a
AT 11.124    N   Ethernet0     Ethernet1     090007400b7c00000c1740d9
                                             001fef7500000014ff020a0a0a

Table 38 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 38: Show SMRP Mcache Field Descriptions
Field Description

Group Address

SMRP group address. AT signifies that this is an AppleTalk network group.

In Use

Y= Router can use the cache entry to fast-switch packets.

N= Router cannot use cache entry to fast-switch packets. Router forwards packets via the process level.

Parent Interface

Interface that receives the SMRP data packet to send out. The interface must be fast-switch enabled.

Child Interface(s)

One or more interfaces to which the SMRP data packet is sent. At least one of the child interfaces must be fast-switch enabled.

MAC Header (Top)

Network Header (Bottom)

MAC header and network header for only fast-switch enabled child interfaces.

Related Commands

clear smrp mcache
show smrp forward

show smrp neighbor

To display all entries or specific entries in the SMRP neighbor table, use the show smrp neighbor EXEC command.

show smrp neighbor [appletalk [network-address]]
Syntax Description

appletalk

(Optional) Displays SMRP neighbor table entries for all AppleTalk networks. Currently SMRP services are supported over AppleTalk networks only.

network-address

(Optional) Network address of the neighbor router.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

A neighbor is an adjacent router. Neighboring routers keep track of one another by sending and receiving hello packets periodically. Using this method, the Cisco IOS software can determine if it has heard from a neighbor router within a certain amount of time. The software creates an entry in its neighbor table when it finds a neighboring route. The software maintains the entry, indicating, among other information, the current state of the neighbor. The software updates the entry if the state of the neighbor router changes; for example, a secondary router became a primary router. The secondary router is the router that becomes the primary router when the primary router is no longer heard from.

For all neighboring routers, the show smrp neighbor command displays the address of the neighbor router, the state of the neighbor, its interface, the last time it was heard from, its route version number, and whether or not routes need to be sent to the neighbor. If the network address of a specific neighbor is given as a command parameter, this information is displayed for that neighbor router only.


Note Because SMRP is currently supported over AppleTalk networks only, sample output resulting from the show smrp neighbor command is the same as output from show smrp neighbor appletalk command.
Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show smrp neighbor command displaying SMRP neighbor table entries for all neighbors:

Router# show  smrp neighbor
SMRP Neighbor Table
Last Neighbor State Interface Heard ----------------------------------- 20.3 (S) Ethernet2 5 10.4 (N) Ethernet1 3 11.5 (S) Ethernet1 7

The following is sample output from the show smrp neighbor command with the appletalk keyword and the network address of a specific neighboring node:

Router# show  smrp neighbor appletalk 20.3
SMRP Neighbor Table
                              Last      
Neighbor  State Interface     Heard   
-----------------------------------
20.3      (S)   Ethernet2     5

Route version: 0x0000000E Routes needed: False

Table 39 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 39: Show SMRP Neighbor Field Descriptions
Field Description

Neighbor

Network address of the neighbor router.

State

State of the neighbor. Possible states are:

  • (P) ---Primary operation

  • (S) ---Secondary operation

  • (N) ---Normal operation

  • PN.. ---Primary negotiation

  • SN.. ---Secondary negotiation

  • -D- ---Down

Interface

Interface to the neighbor router.

Last Heard

Last time in seconds that the neighbor was heard from.

Route Version

Route version number of the neighbor. If the route version number is less than the neighbor's route version, then the route will be sent to that neighbor.

Route Needed

True if routes need to be sent to the neighbor; False if not.

show smrp port

To display all entries or specific entries in the SMRP port table, use the show smrp port EXEC command.

show smrp port [appletalk [type number]]
Syntax Description

appletalk

(Optional) Displays SMRP port table entries for all AppleTalk networks. Currently SMRP services are supported over AppleTalk networks only.

type

(Optional) Interface type.

number

(Optional) Interface number.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

For all SMRP ports, the show smrp port command displays the interface of the SMRP port, the current state of the port, the network protocol type (currently only AppleTalk is supported) and its address, the address of the primary router on the local network, the address of the secondary router on the local network, the current groups on the port, and the last group on the port.

If the interface of a specific SMRP port is given, this information is displayed for that port only.


Note Because SMRP is currently supported over AppleTalk networks only, sample output resulting from the show smrp port command is the same as output from show smrp port appletalk command.
Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show smrp port command:

Router# show smrp port 
SMRP Port Table
Interface     State Network        Type Address   Primary   Secondary
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Ethernet2     (P)   20-22          AT   20.2      20.2      20.3      
Ethernet3     (P)   30-33          AT   30.2      30.2      0.0      
Ethernet4     (S)   40-44          AT   40.3      40.2      40.0     

The following is sample output from the show smrp port command with the appletalk keyword and the interface of a specific port:

Router# show smrp port appletalk ethernet 2
SMRP Port Table
Interface     State Network        Type Address   Primary   Secondary
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Ethernet2     (P)   20-22          AT   20.2      20.2      20.3     
Current groups:
Last group:

Table 40 describes the fields shown in the displays.


Table 40: Show SMRP Port Field Descriptions
Field Description

Interface

Interface of a specific SMRP port.

State

Current state of the port. Possible states are as follows:

  • (P) ---Primary operation

  • (S) ---Secondary operation

  • (N) ---Normal operation

  • PN.. ---Primary negotiation

  • SN.. ---Secondary negotiation

  • -D- ---Down

Network

Network range.

Type

Network protocol type. Currently only AppleTalk (AT) is supported.

Address

Network layer address.

Primary

Address of the primary SMRP router on the local network.

Secondary

Address of the secondary SMRP router on the local network.

Related Command

smrp protocol appletalk

show smrp route

To display all entries or specific entries in the SMRP routing table, use the show smrp route EXEC command.

show smrp route [appletalk [network] | type number]
Syntax Description

appletalk

(Optional) Displays SMRP route table entries for all AppleTalk networks. Currently SMRP services are supported over AppleTalk networks only.

network

(Optional) SMRP network range.

type

(Optional) Interface type.

number

(Optional) Interface number.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

For all SMRP routes, the show smrp route command displays the number of SMRP routes in the internetwork. For each route, it shows the SMRP network range of the route, the version of the route, the elapsed time since the route was updated, the number of hops away the route is from the route's origin, the number of hops away the route is from the tunnel origin, the interface from which the route was received, and the router that sent the route.

If a specific network range is given, this information is displayed for that network range only.

If the interface is specified, the routes that came from this interface are displayed.

If the appletalk keyword is specified with or without an SMRP network range, the number of SMRP routes in the internetwork is not specified. Connected routes have a hop value of 0 and no address value.


Note Because SMRP is currently supported over AppleTalk networks only, sample output resulting from the show smrp port command is the same as output from show smrp port appletalk command.
Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show smrp route command:

Router# show smrp route
 
SMRP Route Table
5 routes in internet
Network         Hop Tunnel          Parent       
                            Interface     Address
-----------------------------------------------------------------
AT 1-1          1     0      Ethernet2     20.3     
AT 10-11        1     0      Ethernet2     20.3     
AT 20-22        0     0      Ethernet2         
AT 40-44        0     0      Ethernet4        
 

The following is sample output from the show smrp route command with the appletalk keyword and a specific SMRP network number within an SMRP network range:

Router# show smrp route appletalk 21
Network        Hop   Tunnel         Parent       
                           Interface     Address
-----------------------------------------------------------------
AT 20-22         0   0      Ethernet2     20.3

Route version: 0x0000000E Elapsed update time: 00:23:55

The following is sample output from the show smrp route command for a specific interface:

Router# show smrp route appletalk ethernet 2
Network        Hop Tunnel         Parent       
                         Interface     Address
-----------------------------------------------------------------

AT 1-1 1 0 Ethernet2 20.3 AT 10-11 1 0 Ethernet2 20.3 AT 20-22 0 0 Ethernet2

Table 41 describes the fields shown in the displays.


Table 41: Show SMRP Route Field Descriptions
Field Description

Network

SMRP network range (the route). "AT" indicates that this is an AppleTalk network.

Hop

Number of hops away from origin.

Tunnel

Number of hops away from the origin of this tunnel.

Parent Interface

Interface from which the route was received.

Parent Address

Address of the router that sent this route.

Route version

Version number of a route. If the route version is greater than the neighbor's route version, then the route will be sent to that neighbor.

Elapsed update time

Time elapsed since the route was last updated.

show smrp traffic

To display all entries or specific entries in the SMRP traffic table, use the show smrp traffic EXEC command.

show smrp traffic [all | group | neighbor | port | route | transaction]
Syntax Description

all

(Optional) Displays SMRP traffic for SMRP groups, neighbors, ports, routes, and transactions.

group

(Optional) Displays SMRP traffic for SMRP groups.

neighbor

(Optional) Displays SMRP traffic for neighbors.

port

(Optional) Displays SMRP traffic for ports.

route

(Optional) Displays SMRP traffic for routes.

transaction

(Optional) Displays SMRP traffic for transactions.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

To display general SMRP statistics, use the show smrp traffic command without keywords. To display traffic for all of the categories defined by the keywords, use the show smrp traffic all command. To display traffic for a specific category, specify the command and the keyword for the category.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show smrp traffic all command:

Router# show smrp traffic all

SMRP statistics:
Rcvd: 350 total, 99 hellos, 0 mc data, 0 fast handled
78 requests, 127 confirms, 1 reject
3 primaries, 6 secondaries
         7 notifies, 2 distance vectors
         3 create groups, 0 delete groups
         4 join groups, 0 leave groups
         54 members
         0 add group entries, 0 remove group entries
         0 locates, 0 tunnels
  Sent:  547 total, 307 hellos
         0 duplicate mc data, 0 mc data, 0 fast forwarded
         176 requests, 62 confirms, 2 rejects
         3 primaries, 3 secondaries
         6 notifies, 1 distance vector
         0 joins, 0 leaves
         42 creators, 81 members
         0 add group entries, 0 remove group entries
  Misc:  0 no buffers, 0 no forwards
         0 bad portids, 0 port downs
         0 bad versions, 0 runts
         0 bad packet types, 0 input errors
SMRP group statistics:
         Groups:  3 added, 0 removed,
         Forwards:  3 new, 1 recycled, 0 deleted
         Child Ports:  4 added, 1 freed,
         Misc: 0 range fulls, 0 not primary drops
                0 no routes
SMRP port statistics:
  Ports:  3 new, 0 recycled, 0 deleted
SMRP route statistics:
  Routes:  5 new, 0 recycled, 0 deleted
  Neighbor AT 20.3:
         1 received updates, 1 send updates
         3 received routes, 0 sent routes
         0 poisoned, 0 improved
         0 better parent interfaces, 0 worst parent interfaces
         0 better parent addresses, 0 worst parent addresses
         0 bad ranges, 0 overlaps
SMRP transaction statistics:
  Requests:  5 new, 135 recycled
         0 deleted, 0 freed
         9 timeouts, 36 resends
0 duplicates, 0 incomplete duplicates Responses: 16 new, 62 recycled, 0 freed 0 deleted, 0 freed 0 unexpected, 0 bad

Table 42 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 42: Show SMRP Traffic Field Descriptions
Field Description

SMRP Statistics:

Rcvd:

   total

Total number of SMRP packets received.

   hellos

Number of hello packets received from neighbors.

   mc data

Number of packets of multicast data received.

   fast handled

Number of input packets handled by the SMRP fast-switching function.

   requests

Number of request transactions received from neighbors.

   confirms

Number of confirm response transactions received.

   reject

Number of reject response transactions received.

   primaries

Number of primary request packets received.

   secondaries

Number of secondary request packets received.

   notifies

Number of notify packets received. A router sends a notify packet when it becomes an SMRP primary, secondary, or normal router. A router in normal operation mode can become a secondary router and a router in secondary operation mode can become a primary router.

   distance vectors

Number of route update packets received.

   create groups

Number of create group packets received from the creator endpoint when it requests to create a group.

   delete groups

Number of delete group packets received. These packets are sent when a group is deleted.

   join groups

Number of join-group packets received. These packets are sent when members join a group.

   leave groups

Number of leave-group packets received. These packets are sent when members leave a group.

   members

Number of member-request packets for polling group members received.

   add group entries

Number of packets received to add group entries.

   remove group entries

Number of packets received to remove group entries.

   locates

Number of locate packets received. Endpoints send locate packets to find the SMRP router on the local network.

   tunnels

Number of SMRP tunnel packets received.

Sent:

total

Total number of SMRP packets sent.

hellos

Number of hello packets sent to neighbors.

duplicate mc data

Number of packets of multicast data duplicated and forwarded.

mc data

Number of packets of multicast data forwarded.

   fast forwarded

Number of packets that were fast-switched out of the fast-switch enabled interface.

requests

Number of request transaction packets sent to neighbors.

confirms

Number of confirm responses sent.

rejects

Number of reject responses sent.

primaries

Number of primary request packets sent.

secondaries

Number of secondary request packets sent. These are sent in attempt to become the secondary router.

notifies

The number of notify packets sent. A router sends a notify packet when it becomes an SMRP primary, secondary, or normal router. A router in normal operation mode can become a secondary router and a router in secondary operation mode can become a primary router.

distance vectors

Number of route-update packets sent.

joins

Number of join-group packets sent. These packets are sent when members join a group.

leaves

Number of leave-group packets sent. These packets are sent when members leave a group.

creators

Number of creator-request packets sent to poll the creator endpoint to verify that it is still active.

members

Number of member request packets sent for polling group members.

add group entries

Number of packets sent to the secondary router to add group entries.

remove group entries

Number of packets sent to the secondary router to remove group entries.

Misc:

no buffers

Number of times no system buffers available condition occurred. Memory allocation failure.

no forwards

Number of packets for which there was no entry in the forwarding table for the packet's destination.

bad portids

Number of packets with invalid port IDs.

port downs

Number of packets for ports that were down.

bad versions

Number of packets with the wrong SMRP protocol version number.

runts

Number of truncated packet.

bad packet types

Number of packets with invalid type field values.

input errors

Number of packets received that failed network layer packet validation.

SMRP group statistics:

Groups:

added

Number of groups added.

removed

Number of groups removed.

Forwards:

new

Number of new entries created in the forwarding table.

recycled

Number of forwarding table entries that were recycled.

deleted

Number of forwarding table entries that were deleted.

Child Ports:

added

Number of child ports added to the forwarding table entries.

freed

Number of child ports removed from the forwarding table entries.

Misc:

range fulls

Number of times attempts were made to create SMRP groups after the range of available SMRP addresses was exhausted. The number of SMRP group addresses available equals the SMRP network range times 254.

not primary drops

Number of packets received and dropped because this router is not the SMRP primary router and, therefore, not responsible for the packets.

no routes

Number of times a route to the creator endpoint was not found in the routing table.

SMRP port statistics:

Ports:

new

Number of new port entries added to the SMRP port table.

recycled

Number of recycled port entries added to the SMRP port table.

deleted

Number of port entries deleted from the SMRP port table.

SMRP route statistics:

Routes:

new

Number of new entries added to the SMRP routing table.

recycled

Number of recycled entries added to the SMRP routing table.

deleted

Number of entries deleted from the SMRP routing table.

received updates

For each SMRP neighbor, the number of distance vector (routing update) packets received.

sent updates

For each SMRP neighbor, the number of distance vector (routing update) packets sent.

received routes

For each SMRP neighbor, the number of routes received.

sent routes

For each SMRP neighbor, the number of routes sent.

poisoned

Number of bad routes (with 255 hops) received in distance vector packets.

improved

Number of routes improved through updates received in distance vector packets.

better parent interfaces

Number of times the Cisco IOS software switches to a better parent interface when a tie condition exists. A tie exists when both routes have equal hop counts. A ties is broken by choosing the neighbor with the higher network address.

worst parent interfaces

Number of times the software does not switch interfaces in a tie condition. The software assesses a tie between two interfaces to choose the interface for the route when the hop count of both routes is equal. A tie is broken by choosing the neighbor with the higher network address.

better parent addresses

Number of times this software wins a tie to forward a packet when a tie condition exists. A tie condition occurs when two routers on the same local net have routes to the packet's destination with the same hop count. Whichever router has the highest network address wins and forwards the packet.

worst parent addresses

Number of times this software loses a tie to forward a packet when a tie condition exists. A tie condition occurs when two routers on the same local net have routes to the packet's destination with the same hop count. Whichever router has the highest network address wins and forwards the packet.

bad ranges

Number of times an invalid SMRP network range was received.

overlaps

Number of times an incoming SMRP network range overlapped with an existing SMRP routing entry.

SMRP transaction statistics:

Requests:

new

Number of new requests created.

recycled

Number of recycled requests.

deleted

Number of times data was allocated for requests.

freed

Number of times deleted requests are freed.

timeouts

Number of times requests timed out.

resends

Number of times requests were resent.

duplicates

Number of times a processed request arrived.

incomplete duplicates

Number of times requests were received while in incomplete state.

Responses:

new

Number of new responses created.

recycled

Number of recycled responses.

freed

Number of freed responses.

deleted

Number of times data was allocated for responses.

freed

Number of times deleted responses are freed.

unexpected

Number of unexpected responses.

bad

Number of bad responses.

smrp mroute-cache protocol appletalk

To enable SMRP fast-switching on a port, use the smrp mroute-cache protocol appletalk interface configuration command. To disable SMRP fast-switching, use the no form of the command.

smrp mroute-cache protocol appletalk
no smrp mroute-cache protocol appletalk

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

By default, fast-switching is enabled on all SMRP ports. A network protocol and interface comprise an SMRP port. Fast switching improves the throughput rate by processing incoming packets more quickly than process switching.

SMRP uses the forwarding table to forward packets for a particular SMRP group. For each group, the forwarding table lists the parent interface and address and one or more child interfaces and addresses. When data for an SMRP group arrives on the parent interface, the router forwards it to each child interface. The SMRP fast-switching cache table specifies whether to fast switch SMRP data packets out the interfaces specified by the forwarding table.

SMRP fast switching requires that

When the parent port is fast-switch enabled, the system populates and validates a fast-switching cache table when forwarding packets out child ports.

To populate the fast-switching cache table with fast-switching information, the first packets are process switched. Thus, the fast-switching cache table is populated with information about fast-switch enabled child ports. When succeeding packets arrive, the system uses the SMRP fast-switching cache table to fast switch the packets out those child ports.

If there are non-fast-switching ports in the forwarding table, then the system process switches the packet out those ports.

To validate the fast-switching cache table, the system validates each cache entry when it forwards the first packet out all child ports. If a cache entry is validated, the router can use the entry to fast switch succeeding packets out the child ports.

If a cache entry is invalidated, the router cannot use the entry to fast switch packets. The entry is removed from the fast-switching cache table and the router process switches packets out the child ports. A cache entry is invalidated when one of these conditions is met:

Example

The following example disables SMRP fast-switching:

no smrp mroute-cache protocol appletalk

smrp protocol appletalk

To make SMRP multicast services available over AppleTalk for a specific interface, use the smrp protocol appletalk interface configuration command. To disable SMRP over AppleTalk for a specific interface, use the no form of the command.

smrp protocol appletalk [network-range beginning-end]
no smrp protocol appletalk [network-range beginning-end]
Syntax Description

network-range

(Optional) SMRP network range for the interface. We recommend that you do not specify an SMRP network range. When you omit the range, the Cisco IOS software uses the AppleTalk cable range configured for the interface as the SMRP network range. If you specify a range, it must fall within the SMRP network range 1  to  65535.

beginning-end

(Optional) The beginning and end of the SMRP network range for this AppleTalk network. If you specify a range, it must fall within the SMRP network range 1 to 65535.

Default

SMRP is disabled.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

SMRP supports point-to-multipoint multicasting of packets for AppleTalk networks. This support provides the capability of sending data from a single source to multiple stations without having to send duplicate copies of the data.

The smrp protocol appletalk command configures SMRP support over an AppleTalk network on an interface basis. Before you use this command, you must issue the smrp routing command to enable SMRP. After you enable SMRP, you can use this command to make SMRP services available over AppleTalk for any number of individual interfaces.

We recommend that you do not specify an SMRP network range for the AppleTalk network. Because the upper limit of the AppleTalk network range is 65,535, AppleTalk network numbers always fit within the SMRP network range; SMRP network numbers are 3 bytes long, whereas AppleTalk network numbers are 2 bytes long. If the AppleTalk network is a nonextended network, which is defined by a single network number, the AppleTalk network is mapped to the SMRP network range using the single number to define both ends of the range (for example, 65,520-65,520).

To disable SMRP services for a specific AppleTalk network, use the no form of this command. To disable SMRP services globally (that is, for all AppleTalk networks whose interfaces you have configured for SMRP support) issue the no smrp routing command.

Examples

The following example enables SMRP globally and turns on SMRP support over AppleTalk for the current interface:

smrp routing 
interface ethernet 0
smrp protocol appletalk

The following example disables SMRP over AppleTalk for the current interface:

interface ethernet 0
no smrp protocol appletalk
Related Commands

show smrp port
smrp routing

smrp routing

To enable the use of the multicast transport services provided by the SMRP, use the smrp routing global configuration command. To disable SMRP services for all interfaces, use the no form of this command.

smrp routing
no smrp routing

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

SMRP is disabled.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Currently, SMRP services are supported over AppleTalk only. The smrp routing command enables the use of SMRP. To enable SMRP for an AppleTalk network over a specific interface, you must use the smrp protocol appletalk interface configuration command after you issue this command. The smrp routing command has no effect until you enable SMRP at the interface level.

Examples

The following example enables SMRP:

smrp routing

The following example disables SMRP:

no smrp routing
Related Command

smrp protocol appletalk

test appletalk

To enter the test mode, use the test appletalk privileged EXEC command.

test appletalk
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Use the test appletalk command to enter test mode. From test mode you can test the NBP protocol.

The following display shows how to enter Appletalk test mode:

Router#test appletalk
Router(atalk test)#

Type ? to display the following list of test options:

Router(atalk test)#?
end Exit AppleTalk test mode
nbp AppleTalk NBP test commands

Use the test appletalk command with the nbp options to test and to perform informational lookups of NBP-registered entities. Use the NBP options when you find that AppleTalk zones are listed in the Chooser, but services in these zones are unavailable.

To learn what NBP test commands you can use, enter

Router(atalk test)# nbp ?
nbp confirm:                  send out an NBP confirm packet to the specified entity
nbp lookup:	                    lookup an NVE. prompt for name, type and zone
nbp parameters:	            display/change lookup parms (ntimes, ncecs, interval)
nbp poll: 	                      for every zone, lookup all devices, using default
?:	                                      print command list
end: 	                                exit nbptest

The following list summarizes the nbp test commands you can use:

The remainder of this section shows and explains the syntax and output of the various NBP test commands.

When running any of the NBP tests, you specify a nonprinting character by entering a three-character string that is the hexadecimal equivalent of the character. For example, type :c5 to specify the test appletalk truncation wildcard.

This is the syntax of the nbp confirm command:

nbp confirm appletalk-address [:skt] object:type@zone

The syntax description is

appletalk-address

AppleTalk network address in the form network.node. The argument network is the 16-bit network number in the range 1 to 65,279. The argument node is the 8-bit node number in the range 0  to 254. Both numbers are decimal.

:skt

(Optional) Name of socket.

object:type

Name of device and the type of service. The colon (:) between object and type is required.

@zone

Name of the AppleTalk zone where the entity object:type resides.

The following display shows sample output of the nbp confirm command. In this example, the test sends a confirm packet to the entity ciscoRouter in zone Engineering.

Router(atalk test)#nbp confirm 24279.173 my-mac:AFPServer@Engineering
confirmed my-mac:AFPServer@Engineering at 24279n,173a,250s

This is the syntax of the nbp lookup command:

nbp lookup object:type@zone

The syntax description is

object:type

Name of device and the type of service. The colon (:) between object and type is required.

@zone

Name of the AppleTalk zone where the entity object:type resides.

The following display shows sample output of the nbp lookup command:

Router(atalk test)# nbp lookup =:macintosh:c5@engineering
(100n,50a,253s)[1]: `userA:Macintosh IIcx@engineering'
(100n,16a,251s)[1]: `userB:Macintosh II@engineering'
(200n,24a,253s)[1]: `userC:Macintosh IIci@engineering'
(200n,36a,251s)[1]: `userD:Macintosh II@engineering'
(300n,21a,252s)[1]: `userE:Macintosh SE/30@engineering'
test appletalk lookup request timed out
Processed 6 replies, 7 events

Table 43 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 43: Test AppleTalk NBP Lookup Field Descriptions
Field Description

(100n,50a,253s) [1]

AppleTalk DDP address of the registered entity, in the format network, node address, and socket number. The number in brackets is either the current value of the field (if this is the first time you have invoked nbptest) or the value the field had the last time you invoked nbptest.

`userA:Macintosh IIcx@engineering'

NBP enumerator:NBP entity string of the registered entity.

NBP lookup request timed out

Indicates whether replies were heard within the timeout interval.

Processed 6 replies, 7 events

Number of NBP replies received.

This is the syntax is of the nbp parameters command:

nbp parameters retransmissions replies interval

The syntax description is

retransmissions

Maximum number of lookup retransmissions. This is a number from 1 to 5. The default value is 5.

replies

Maximum number of replies to accept for each lookup. This is a number from 1 to 500. The default is 1.

interval

Interval, in seconds, between each retry. This value is from 1  to  60  seconds. The default is 5 seconds.

The following display shows sample output of the nbp parameters command. In this example, the maximum number of retransmission is 1, the maximum number of replies is 100, and there are 10 seconds between each retry.

Router(atalk test)# nbp parameters 1 100 10

The nbp poll command has no keywords or arguments. The following display shows sample output from the nbp poll command:

Router(atalk test)# nbp poll
poll: sent 2 lookups
(100n,82a,252s)[1]: `userA:Macintosh IIci@Zone one'
(200n,75a,254s)[1]: `userB:Macintosh IIcx@Zone two'
test appletalk polling completed.
Processed 2 replies, 2 events

Table 44 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 44: Test AppleTalk NBP Poll Field Descriptions
Field Description

poll

Number of lookups the command sent.

(100n,82,252s) [1]

AppleTalk DDP address of the registered entity, in the format network, node address, and socket number. The number in brackets is either the current value of the field (if this is the first time you have invoked nbptest) or the value the field had the last time you invoked nbptest.

`userA:Macintosh IIci@Zone one'

NBP enumerator:NBP entity string of the registered entity.

NBP polling completed.

Indicates that the polling completed successfully.

Processed 2 replies, 2 events

Number of NBP replies received.

Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

test flash
test interfaces
test memory

tunnel mode

To set the encapsulation mode for the tunnel interface, use the tunnel mode interface configuration command. To set to the default, use the no form of this command.

tunnel mode {aurp | cayman | dvmrp | eon | gre ip | nos}
no tunnel mode
Syntax Description

aurp

AppleTalk Update Routing Protocol (AURP).

cayman

Cayman TunnelTalk AppleTalk encapsulation.

dvmrp

Distance Vector Multicast Routing Protocol (DVMRP).

eon

EON-compatible Connectionless Network Service (CLNS) tunnel.

gre ip

Generic routing encapsulation (GRE) protocol over IP.

nos

KA9Q/NOS compatible IP over IP.

Default

GRE tunneling

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

You cannot have two tunnels using the same encapsulation mode with exactly the same source and destination address. The workaround is to create a loopback interface and source packets off of the loopback interface.

Cayman tunneling implements tunneling as designed by Cayman Systems. This enables our routers to interoperate with Cayman GatorBoxes. With Cayman tunneling, you can establish tunnels between two routers or between our router and a GatorBox. When using Cayman tunneling, you must not configure the tunnel with an AppleTalk network address. This means that there is no way to ping the other end of the tunnel.

Use DVMRP when a router connects to a mrouted router to run DVMRP over a tunnel. It is required to configure Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) and an IP address on a DVMRP tunnel.

Generic route encapsulation (GRE) tunneling can be done between our routers only. When using GRE tunneling for AppleTalk, you configure the tunnel with an AppleTalk network address. This means that you can ping the other end of the tunnel.

Examples

The following example enables Cayman tunneling:

interface tunnel 0
tunnel source ethernet 0
tunnel destination 131.108.164.19
tunnel mode cayman

The following example enables GRE tunneling:

interface tunnel 0
appletalk cable-range 4160-4160 4160.19
appletalk zone Engineering
tunnel source ethernet0
tunnel destination 131.108.164.19
tunnel mode gre ip
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

appletalk cable-range
appletalk zone
tunnel destination

tunnel source

tunnel source

To set a tunnel interface's source address, use the tunnel source interface configuration command. To remove the source address, use the no form of this command.

tunnel source {ip-address | type number}
no tunnel source
Syntax Description

ip-address

IP address to use as the source address for packets in the tunnel.

type

All interface types.

number

Specifies the port, connector, or interface card number. The numbers are assigned at the factory at the time of installation or when added to a system, and can be displayed with the show interfaces command.

Default

No tunnel interface's source address is set.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

You cannot have two tunnels using the same encapsulation mode with exactly the same source and destination address. The workaround is to create a loopback interface and source packets off of the loopback interface.

When using tunnels to Cayman boxes, you must set the tunnel source to an explicit IP address on the same subnet as the Cayman box, not the tunnel itself.

Examples

The following example enables Cayman tunneling:

interface tunnel0
tunnel source ethernet0
tunnel destination 131.108.164.19
tunnel mode cayman

The following example enables GRE tunneling:

interface tunnel0
appletalk cable-range 4160-4160 4160.19
appletalk zone Engineering
tunnel source ethernet0
tunnel destination 131.108.164.19
tunnel mode gre ip
Related Commands

appletalk cable-range
appletalk iptalk
appletalk zone
tunnel mode


hometocprevnextglossaryfeedbacksearchhelp
Copyright 1989-1998 © Cisco Systems Inc.