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Table of Contents

Terminal Line and Modem Support Commands

Terminal Line and Modem Support Commands

The line configuration commands described in this chapter are used to configure modems and modem lines on access servers and routers.

Some commands in this chapter describe how to set terminal operating characteristics on lines for all connections to an interface line. You also can set terminal operating characteristics for only the current connection when in EXEC mode. The commands that change terminal operating characteristics for currently open sessions are described in the "Connection Commands" chapter in this publication.

For example, the transport preferred command sets the preferred transport method on a line for all connections and is described in this chapter. The terminal transport preferred command sets the preferred transport method in EXEC mode for the current connection only, and is described in the "Connection Commands" chapter.


Note Some commands previously documented in this chapter have been replaced by new commands. Although these continue to perform their normal functions in the current release, support for these commands will cease in future releases.

For line configuration information and examples, refer to the "Configuring Terminal Lines and Modem Support" chapter in the Access Services Configuration Guide.

absolute-timeout

To set the interval for closing the connection, use the absolute-timeout line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default.

absolute-timeout minutes
no absolute-timeout

Syntax Description
minutes The number of minutes after which the user's session will be terminated.
Default

No timeout interval is automatically set.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

This command terminates the connection after the specified time period has elapsed, regardless of whether the connection is being used at the time of termination. You can specify an absolute-timeout value for each port. The user is given 20 seconds notice before the session is terminated. You can use this command in conjunction with the logout-warning command, which notifies the user of an impending logout.


Note You can set this command and an ARAP timeout for the same line; however, this command supersedes any timeouts set in ARAP. Additionally, ARAP users will receive no notice of any impending termination if you use this command.
Example

The following example sets an interval of 60 minutes on line 5:

line 5
absolute-timeout 60
Related Commands

logout-warning
session-timeout

activation-character

To define the character you enter at a vacant terminal to begin a terminal session, use the activation-character line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to make any character activate a terminal.

activation-character ascii-number
no activation-character

Syntax Description
ascii-number Decimal representation of the activation character.
Default

Return (decimal 13)

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

See the "ASCII Character Set" appendix in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference for a list of ASCII characters.


Note If you are using the autoselect function, set the activation character to the default Return, and exec-character-bits to 7. If you change these defaults, the application will not recognize the activation request.
Example

The following example sets the activation character for the console to Delete, which is Decimal 127:

line console
activation-character 127

autobaud

To set the line for automatic baud detection, use the autobaud line configuration command. Use the no autobaud command to restore the default.

autobaud
no autobaud

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No autobaud detection

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The autobaud detection supports a range from 300 to 19200 baud. A line set for autobaud cannot be used for outgoing connections, nor can you set autobaud capability on a line using 19200 baud when the parity bit is set (because of hardware limitations).

Example

The following example sets the auxiliary port for autobaud detection:

line 5
autobaud

autocommand

To configure the Cisco IOS software to automatically execute a command when a user connects to a particular line, use the autocommand line configuration command.

autocommand command
Syntax Description
command Any appropriate EXEC command, including the host name and any switches that occur with the EXEC command.
Default

None

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command enables you to automatically execute an EXEC command when a user connects to a line.

Example

The following example forces an automatic connection to a host named host21 (which could be an IP address):

line vty 4
 autocommand connect host21 

autohangup

To configure automatic line disconnect, use the autohangup line configuration command. This command causes the EXEC to issue the exit command when the last connection closes.

autohangup
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command is useful for UNIX UUCP applications that automatically disconnect lines because UUCP scripts cannot issue the exit command to hang up the telephone.

Example

The following example enables automatic line disconnect on lines 5 through 10:

line 5 10
autohangup

autoselect

To configure a line to start an ARA, PPP, or SLIP session, use the autoselect line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this function on a line.

autoselect {arap | ppp | slip | during-login}
no autoselect

Syntax Description
arap Configures the Cisco IOS software to allow an ARA session to start up automatically.
ppp Configures the Cisco IOS software to allow a PPP session to start up automatically.
slip Configures the Cisco IOS software to allow a SLIP session to start up automatically.
during-login The username and/or password prompt is displayed without pressing the Return key. After the user logs in, the autoselect function begins.
Default

ARA session.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3. The no autoselect command and the during-login command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

This command eliminates the need for users to enter an EXEC command to start an ARA, PPP, or SLIP session.


Note SLIP does not support authentication. For PPP and ARAP, you must enable authentication.

The autoselect command configures the Cisco IOS software to identify the type of connection being requested. For example, when a user on a Macintosh running ARA selects the Connect button, the Cisco IOS software automatically starts an ARAP session. If, on the other hand, the user is running SLIP or PPP and uses the autoselect ppp or autoselect slip command, the Cisco IOS software automatically starts a PPP or SLIP session, respectively. This command is used on lines making different types of connections.

A line that does not have autoselect configured views an attempt to open a connection as noise. The router does not respond and the user client times out.


Note After the modem connection is established, a Return is required to evoke a response, such as to get the username prompt. You might need to update your scripts to include this requirement. Additionally, the activation character should be set to the default Return and exec-character-bits to 7. If you change these defaults, the application cannot recognize the activation request.
Examples

The following example enables ARA on a line:

line 3
arap enable
autoselect arap

The following example enables PPP on a line:

line 7
autoselect ppp

The following example enables ARA on a line and allows logins from users with a modified CCL script and an unmodified script to log in:

line 3
arap enable
autoselect arap
autoselect during-login
arap noguest if-needed
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

arap use-tacacs +
ppp authentication chap
+
ppp authentication pap +
ppp use-tacacs
+



banner exec

To display a banner on terminals with an interactive EXEC, use the banner exec global configuration command. This command specifies a message to be displayed when an EXEC process is created (a line is activated, or an incoming connection is made to a VTY line). The no form of this command deletes the EXEC banner.

banner exec d message d
no banner exec

Syntax Description
d Delimiting character of your choice--a pound sign (#) for example. You cannot use the delimiting character in the banner message.
message Message text.
Default

None

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Follow this command with one or more blank spaces and a delimiting character of your choice. Then enter one or more lines of text, terminating the message with the second occurrence of the delimiting character.

When someone connects to the router, the MOTD banner appears before the login prompt. After the user successfully logs in to the router, the EXEC banner or incoming banner will be displayed, depending on the type of connection. For a reverse Telnet login, the incoming banner will be displayed. For all other connections, the router will display the EXEC banner.

To disable the EXEC banner on a particular line, use the no exec-banner line configuration command.

Example

The following example sets an EXEC banner. The dollar sign ($) is used as a delimiting character.

banner exec $
Session activated. Enter commands at the prompt.
$
Related Commands

banner incoming
banner login
banner motd
exec-banner

banner incoming

To specify a banner used when you have an incoming connection to a line from a host on the network, use the banner incoming global configuration command. The no form of this command deletes the incoming connection banner.

banner incoming d message d
no banner incoming

Syntax Description
d Delimiting character of your choice--a pound sign (#) for example. You cannot use the delimiting character in the banner message.
message Message text.
Default

None

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Follow this command with one or more blank spaces and a delimiting character of your choice. Then enter one or more lines of text, terminating the message with the second occurrence of the delimiting character.

An incoming connection is one initiated from the network side of the router. Incoming connections are also called reverse Telnet sessions. These sessions can display MOTD banners and incoming banners, but they do not display EXEC banners. Use the no motd-banner line configuration command to disable the MOTD banner for reverse Telnet sessions on asynchronous lines.

When a user connects to the router, the MOTD banner appears before the login prompt. After the user successfully logs in to the router, the EXEC banner or incoming banner will be displayed, depending on the type of connection. For a reverse Telnet login, the incoming banner will be displayed. For all other connections, the router will display the EXEC banner.

Incoming banners cannot be suppressed. If you do not want the incoming banner to appear, you must delete it with the no banner incoming command.

Example

The following example sets an incoming connection banner. The pound sign (#) is used as a delimiting character.

banner incoming #
Welcome to Reuses.
#
Related Commands

banner exec
banner login
banner motd
motd-banner

banner login

To display a login banner, use the banner login global configuration command. This command specifies a message to be displayed before the username and password login prompts. The no form of this command deletes the login banner.

banner login d message d
no banner login

Syntax Description
d Delimiting character of your choice--a pound sign (#) for example. You cannot use the delimiting character in the banner message.
message Message text.
Default

None

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Follow this command with one or more blank spaces and a delimiting character of your choice. Then enter one or more lines of text, terminating the message with the second occurrence of the delimiting character.

When someone connects to the router, the MOTD banner (if configured) appears first, followed by the login banner and prompts. After the user successfully logs in to the router, the EXEC banner or incoming banner will be displayed, depending on the type of connection. For a reverse Telnet login, the incoming banner will be displayed. For all other connections, the router will display the EXEC banner.

Example

The following example sets a login banner. The dollar sign ($) is used as a delimiting character.

banner login $
Welcome to Bob's Router
$
Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

banner exec
banner incoming
banner motd

banner motd

To specify a message-of-the-day (MOTD) banner, use the banner motd global configuration command. The no form of this command deletes the MOTD banner.

banner motd d message d
no banner motd

Syntax Description
d Delimiting character of your choice--a pound sign (#) for example. You cannot use the delimiting character in the banner message.
message Message text.
Default

None

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Follow this command with one or more blank spaces and a delimiting character of your choice. Then enter one or more lines of text, terminating the message with the second occurrence of the delimiting character.

This MOTD banner is displayed to all terminals connected and is useful for sending messages that affect all users (such as impending system shutdowns). Use the no exec-banner or no motd-banner command to disable the MOTD banner on a line. The no exec-banner command also disables the EXEC banner on the line.

When someone connects to the router, the MOTD banner appears before the login prompt. After the user successfully logs in to the router, the EXEC banner or incoming banner will be displayed, depending on the type of connection. For a reverse Telnet login, the incoming banner will be displayed. For all other connections, the router will display the EXEC banner.

The banner command without any keywords specified defaults to the banner motd command. When a new banner motd command is added to the configuration, it overwrites the existing banner command if no keyword is specified. Similarly, if a banner command is added to the configuration, any existing banner motd command is overwritten.

Example

The following example sets a MOTD banner. The pound sign (#) is used as a delimiting character.

banner motd #
Building power will be off from 7:00 AM until 9:00 AM this coming Tuesday.
#
Related Commands

banner exec
banner incoming
banner login
exec-banner
motd-banner

busy-message

To create a "host failed" message that displays when a connection fails, use the busy-message global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable the "host failed" message from displaying on the specified host.

busy-message hostname d message d
no busy-message
hostname
Syntax Description
hostname Name of the host that cannot be reached.
d Delimiting character of your choice--a pound sign (#) for example. You cannot use the delimiting character in the message.
message Message text.
Default

None

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command applies only to Telnet connections.

Follow the busy-message command with one or more blank spaces and a delimiting character of your choice. Then enter one or more lines of text, terminating the message with the second occurrence of the delimiting character.

Defining a "host failed" message for a host prevents all Cisco IOS software-initiated user messages, including the initial message that indicates the connection is "Trying..." The busy-message command can be used in the autocommand command to suppress these messages.

Example

The following example sets a message that will be displayed on the terminal whenever an attempt to connect to the host named dross fails. The pound sign (#) is used as a delimiting character.

busy-message dross #
Cannot connect to host. Contact the computer center.
#

callback forced-wait

To force the Cisco IOS software to wait before initiating a callback to a requesting client, use the callback forced-wait global configuration command.

callback forced-wait
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

The forced waiting period is not set.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Use this command when the router is calling back a modem that initiated a call, then dropped the connection, but requires a rest period before subsequent input is accepted.

Example

The following example sets a waiting period during which a callback chat script is delayed from being sent on an outgoing target line:

callback-forced-wait 
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter. Two daggers (++) indicate that the command is documented in the Debug Command Reference.

arap callback +
chat-script
+
debug callback ++
ppp callback +
service exec-callback
username
+

clear line

To return a terminal line to idle state, use the clear line EXEC command.

clear line line-number
Syntax Description
line-number Absolute line number.
Default

None

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command to log out of a specific session running on another line. If the line uses a modem, the modem will be disconnected.

Example

In the following example, line 3 is reset to idle state:

clear line 3

clear modem

To reset a manageable modem's hardware on a Cisco AS5200 access server, use the clear modem EXEC command.

clear modem [slot/modem-port | group group-number]
Syntax Description
slot/modem-port Slot and modem port number. Remember to include the forward slash (/) when entering this variable.
group group-number Modem group.
Default

Disabled

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

This command resets the specified modem or group of modems, or all the modems in the system. The modem hardware is reset for modems that are idle or busied out for long periods of time.

You can construct a logical modem group using the interface group-async command.

Example

The following example resets the hardware for manageable modem 1/1:

clear modem 1/1

clear modem at-mode

To clear an attention (AT) directly connected session to a manageable modem from a second Telnet session into the Cisco AS5200, use the clear modem at-mode EXEC command.

clear modem at-mode slot/modem-port
Syntax Description
at-mode An AT directly connected session.
slot/modem-port Slot and modem port number. Remember to include the forward slash (/) when entering this variable.
Default

Disabled

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

This command applies only to the Cisco AS5200 access server.

An AT directly connected session is usually initiated and closed from the same Telnet session by means of the modem at-mode command and Ctrl-C. However, you can clear an AT directly connected session that was mistakenly left open, by enabling the clear modem at-mode command from a second Telnet session into the access server.

Examples

The following example shows how to execute the modem at-mode command from a Telnet session:

modem at-mode 1/1

The following example shows how to execute the clear modem at-mode command from a second Telnet session while the first Telnet session is connected to the modem:

AS5200# clear modem at-mode 1/1
clear "modem at-mode" for modem 1/1 [confirm]
AS5200#

The following output is displayed in the first Telnet session once the modem is cleared by the second Telnet session:

Direct connect session cleared by vty0 (171.69.1.164)
Related Command

modem at-mode

clear modem counters

To clear the statistical counters on a manageable modem installed in a Cisco AS5200 access server, use the clear modem counters EXEC command.

clear modem counters [slot/modem-port | group group-number]
Syntax Description
slot/modem-port (Optional) Slot and modem port number. Remember to include the forward slash (/) when entering this variable.
group group-number (Optional) Modem group.
Default

Disabled

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Entering the clear modem counters command without specifying an optional keyword or argument resets the modem statistics on each Cisco AS5200 modem and the summary statistics displayed in the show modem summary command.

You can create a logical modem group using the interface group-async command.

Example

The following example shows how clear the statistical counters on manageable modem 1/1:

clear modem counters 1/1

copy modem

To download firmware to modems in the Cisco AS5200 access server, use the copy modem EXEC command.

copy {flash | tftp | rcp} modem
Syntax Description
flash Copies firmware from Flash memory to the modem.
tftp Copies firmware from the TFTP server to the modem.
rcp Downloads a remote copy of the firmware from a network server to the modem.
Default

Disabled

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

After you enable this command, you are asked to provide the download destination (a slot/modem-port or all), the remote host name, and the path leading to the source modem firmware.

If a modem that you wish to upgrade is busy with a call when the copy modem command is enabled, the upgrade for that modem yields until the active call is dropped. All other idle modems in the upgrade range proceed with the downloading operation.

Examples

The following example shows how to copy the modem firmware file called modem_upgrade from the TFTP server called Modem_Server to modem 2/0, which is installed in the Cisco AS5200 access server:

AS5200# copy tftp modem
Modem Firmware Download Modem Numbers? 2/0
Address or name of remote host [UNKNOWN]? Modem_Server
Source file name? dirt/elem/modem_upgrade
Accessing file 'dirt/elem/modem_upgrade on Modem_Server...
Loading dirt/elem/modem_upgrade .from 223.255.254.254 (via Ethernet0): ! [OK]
Loading dirt/elem/modem_upgrade from 223.255.254.254 (via Ethernet0): !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
[OK - 237503/278528 bytes]
AS5200#
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/0) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/0) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85

As shown in this example, you might want to upgrade and test one modem's firmware before upgrading the firmware of all the modems on the access server, as shown in the next example.


This example shows how to download the same modem firmware file from the TFTP server to all the modems in the Cisco AS5200 access server:

AS5200# copy tftp modem
Modem Firmware Download Modem Numbers? all
Address or name of remote host [UNKNOWN]? Modem_Server
Source file name? dirt/elem/modem_upgrade
Accessing file 'dirt/elem/modem_upgrade on Modem_Server...
Loading dirt/elem/modem_upgrade .from 223.255.254.254 (via Ethernet0): ! [OK]
Loading dirt/elem/modem_upgrade from 223.255.254.254 (via Ethernet0): !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
[OK - 237503/278528 bytes]
AS5200#
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/0) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/1) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/2) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/3) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/4) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/5) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/6) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/7) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/8) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/9) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/10) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/11) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/12) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/13) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/14) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/15) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/16) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/17) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/18) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/19) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/20) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/21) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/22) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (2/23) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/2) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/10) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/4) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/6) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/7) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/12) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/11) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/13) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/1) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/14) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/19) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/22) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/5) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/8) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/9) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/17) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/0) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/3) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/21) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/16) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/15) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/18) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/20) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (2/23) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85

The following example shows how to copy the modem firmware file called STAR.M from Flash memory to the integrated modem 1/2:

AS5200# copy flash modem
Modem Numbers (<slot>/<port> | group <number> | all)? 1/2
System flash directory:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   3539820  as5200-i-m.allcookies  
  2   239203   STAR.M  
  3   23072    BOOT.105 [3802288 bytes used, 4586320 available, 8388608 total]
Source file name? STAR.M
AS5200#
%MODEM-5-DL_START: Modem (1/2) started firmware download
%MODEM-5-DL_GOOD: Modem (1/2) completed firmware download: MNPClass10V.34/V.FCModemRev1.0.23/85.23/85
AS5200#

databits

To set the number of data bits per character that are interpreted and generated by the router hardware, use the databits line configuration command.

databits {5 | 6 | 7 | 8}
Syntax Description
5 Five data bits per character.
6 Six data bits per character.
7 Seven data bits per character.
8 Eight data bits per character.
Default

8 data bits per character

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The databits line configuration command can be used to mask the high bit on input from devices that generate 7 data bits with parity. If parity is being generated, specify 7 data bits per character. If no parity generation is in effect, specify 8 data bits per character. The other keywords are supplied for compatibility with older devices and generally are not used.

Example

The following example changes the data bits to 7 on line 4:

line 4
databits 7
Related Commands

The commands followed by a dagger (+) are documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

terminal data-character-bits +
terminal databits +

data-character-bits

To set the number of data bits per character that are interpreted and generated by the Cisco IOS software, use the data-character-bits line configuration command.

data-character-bits {7 | 8}
Syntax Description
7 Seven data bits per character.
8 Eight data bits per character.
Default

8 data bits per character

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The data-character-bits line configuration command is used primarily to strip parity from X.25 connections on routers with the protocol translation software option. The data-character-bits line configuration command does not work on hard-wired lines.

Example

The following example sets the number of data bits per character for virtual terminal line 1 to 7:

line vty 1
data-character-bits 7
Related Command

The command followed by a dagger (+) is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

terminal data-character-bits+

default-value exec-character-bits

To define the EXEC character width for either 7 bits or 8 bits, use the default-value exec-character-bits global configuration command.

default-value exec-character-bits {7 | 8}
Syntax Description
7 Selects the 7-bit ASCII character set.
8 Selects the full 8-bit ASCII character set.
Default

7-bit ASCII character set

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Configuring the EXEC character width to 8 bits allows you to add graphical and international characters in banners, prompts, and so forth. However, setting the EXEC character width to 8 bits can also cause failures. If a user on a terminal that is sending parity enters the command help, an "unrecognized command" message appears because the system is reading all 8 bits, although the eighth bit is not needed for the help command.

Example

The following example selects the full 8-bit ASCII character set for EXEC banners and prompts:

default-value exec-character-bits 8
Related Commands

The commands followed by a dagger (+) are documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

default-value special-character-bits
exec-character-bits
special-character-bits
terminal exec-character-bits
+
terminal special-character-bits +

default-value special-character-bits

To configure the flow control default value from a 7-bit width to an 8-bit width, use the default-value special-character-bits global configuration command.

default-value special-character-bits {7 | 8}
Syntax Description
7 Selects the 7-bit character set.
8 Selects the full 8-bit character set.
Default

7-bit character set

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Configuring the special character width to 8 bits allows you to add graphical and international characters in banners, prompts, and so forth.

Example

The following example selects the full 8-bit special character set:

default-value special-character-bits 8
Related Commands

The commands followed by a dagger (+) are documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

default-value exec-character-bits
exec-character-bits
special-character-bits
terminal exec-character-bits
+
terminal special-character-bits +

disconnect-character

To define a character to disconnect a session, use the disconnect-character line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the disconnect character.

disconnect-character ascii-number
no disconnect-character

Syntax Description
ascii-number Decimal representation of the session disconnect character.
Default

No disconnect character is defined.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Break character is represented by zero; NULL cannot be represented.

To use the session-disconnect character in normal communications, precede it with the escape character. See the "ASCII Character Set" appendix in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference for a list of ASCII characters.

Example

The following example sets the disconnect character for virtual terminal line 4 to Escape, which is decimal character 27:

line vty 4
disconnect-character 27

dispatch-character

To define a character that causes a packet to be sent, use the dispatch-character line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the definition of the specified dispatch character.

dispatch-character ascii-number1 [ascii-number2 . . . ascii-number]
no dispatch-character
ascii-number1 [ascii-number2 . . . ascii-number]
Syntax Description
ascii-number Decimal representation of the character, such as Return (decimal 13) for line-at-a-time transmissions.
Default

No dispatch character is defined.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The dispatch-character command defines a dispatch character that causes a packet to be sent even if the dispatch timer has not expired. It causes the Cisco IOS software to attempt to buffer characters into larger-sized packets for transmission to the remote host.

Enable the dispatch-character command from the session that initiates the connection, not from the incoming side of a streaming telnet.

This command can take multiple arguments, so you can define any number of characters as dispatch characters.

Example

The following example specifies the Return character (decimal 13) as the dispatch character:

line vty 4
dispatch-character 13
Related Commands

The command followed by a dagger (+) is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

dispatch-machine
dispatch-timeout
state-machine
terminal dispatch-character
+

dispatch-machine

To specify an identifier for a TCP packet dispatch state machine, use the dispatch-machine line configuration command.

dispatch-machine name
Syntax Description
name Name of the state machine that determines when to send packets on the asynchronous line.
Default

No dispatch state machine identifier is defined.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When the dispatch-timeout command is specified, a packet being built will be sent when the timer expires, and the state will be reset to zero.

Any dispatch characters specified using the dispatch-character command are ignored when a state machine is also specified.

If a packet becomes full, it will be sent regardless of the current state, but the state is not reset. The packet size depends on the traffic level on the asynchronous line and the dispatch-timeout value. There is always room for 60 data bytes. If the dispatch-timeout value is greater than or equal to 100 ms, a packet size of 536 (data bytes) is allocated.

Example

The following example specifies the name linefeed for the state machine:

state-machine linefeed 0 0 9 0 
state-machine linefeed 0 11 255 0
state-machine linefeed 0 10 10 transmit
line 1
dispatch-machine linefeed
Related Commands

dispatch-character
dispatch-timeout
state-machine

dispatch-timeout

To set the character dispatch timer, use the dispatch-timeout line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the timeout definition.

dispatch-timeout milliseconds
no dispatch-timeout

Syntax Description
milliseconds Integer that specifies the number of milliseconds that the Cisco IOS software waits after putting the first character into a packet buffer before sending the packet. During this interval, more characters might be added to the packet, which increases the processing efficiency of the remote host.
Default

No dispatch timeout is defined.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The dispatch-timeout line configuration command causes the software to buffer characters into packets for transmission to the remote host. The Cisco IOS software sends a packet a specified amount of time after the first character is put in the buffer. You can use the dispatch-timeout and dispatch-character line configuration commands together. In this case, the software dispatches a packet each time the dispatch character is entered, or after the specified dispatch timeout interval, depending on which condition is met first.


Note The software's response might appear intermittent if the
timeout interval is greater than 100 ms and remote echoing is used. For lines with a reverse-telnet connection, use a dispatch-timeout value less than 10 ms.
Example

The following example sets the dispatch timer to 80 ms:

line vty 0 4
dispatch-timeout 80
Related Commands

dispatch-character
dispatch-machine
state-machine

editing

To enable enhanced editing mode for a particular line, use the editing line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable the enhanced editing mode.

editing
no editing

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Table 1 provides a description of the keys used to enter and edit commands. "Ctrl" indicates the Control key. It must be pressed simultaneously with its associated letter key. "Esc" indicates the Escape key. It must be pressed first, followed by its associated letter key. Keys are not case sensitive.


Table 1: Editing Keys and Functions for Software Release 9.21 and Later
Keys Function
Tab Completes a partial command name entry. When you enter a unique set of characters and press the Tab key, the system completes the command name. If you enter a set of characters that could indicate more than one command, the system beeps to indicate an error. Enter a question mark (?) immediately following the partial command (no space). The system provides a list of commands that begin with that string.
Delete or Backspace Erases the character to the left of the cursor.
Return At the command line, pressing the Return key performs the function of processing a command. At the "---More---" prompt on a terminal screen, pressing the Return key scrolls down a line.
Space Bar Allows you to see more output on the terminal screen. Press the space bar when you see the line "---More---" on the screen to display the next screen.
Left arrow1 Moves the cursor one character to the left. When you enter a command that extends beyond a single line, you can press the Left Arrow key repeatedly to scroll back toward the system prompt and verify the beginning of the command entry.
Right arrow1 Moves the cursor one character to the right.
Up arrow1 or Ctrl-P Recalls commands in the history buffer, beginning with the most recent command. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively older commands.
Down arrow1 or
Ctrl-N
Return to more recent commands in the history buffer after recalling commands with the Up Arrow or Ctrl-P. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively more recent commands.
Ctrl-A Moves the cursor to the beginning of the line.
Ctrl-B Moves the cursor back one character.
Ctrl-D Deletes the character at the cursor.
Ctrl-E Moves the cursor to the end of the command line.
Ctrl-F Moves the cursor forward one character.
Ctrl-K Deletes all characters from the cursor to the end of the command line.
Ctrl-L and Ctrl-R Redisplays the system prompt and command line.
Ctrl-T Transposes the character to the left of the cursor with the character located at the cursor.
Ctrl-U and Ctrl-X Deletes all characters from the cursor back to the beginning of the command line.
Ctrl-V and Esc Q Inserts a code to indicate to the system that the keystroke immediately following should be treated as a command entry, not as an editing key.
Ctrl-W Deletes the word to the left of the cursor.
Ctrl-Y Recalls the most recent entry in the delete buffer. The delete buffer contains the last ten items you have deleted or cut. Ctrl-Y can be used in conjunction with Esc Y.
Ctrl-Z Ends configuration mode and returns you to the EXEC prompt.
Esc B Moves the cursor back one word.
Esc C Capitalizes the word at the cursor.
Esc D Deletes from the cursor to the end of the word.
Esc F Moves the cursor forward one word.
Esc L Changes the word at the cursor to lowercase.
Esc U Capitalizes from the cursor to the end of the word.
Esc Y Recalls the next buffer entry. The buffer contains the last ten items you have deleted. Press Ctrl-Y first to recall the most recent entry. Then press Esc Y up to nine times to recall the remaining entries in the buffer. If you bypass an entry, continue to press Esc Y to cycle back to it.

1 The arrow keys function only with ANSI-compatible terminals.
Example

In the following example, enhanced editing mode is disabled on virtual terminal line 3:

line vty 3
no editing
Related Command

The command followed by a dagger (+) is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

terminal editing+

escape-character

To define a system escape character, use the escape-character line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to set the escape character to Break.

escape-character ascii-number | none
no escape-character

Syntax Description
ascii-number Either the decimal representation of the character or a control sequence (Ctrl-E, for example).
none Disables escape entirely.
Default

Ctrl-^

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Break key cannot be used as an escape character on the console terminal because the Cisco IOS software interprets Break as an instruction to halt the system. To send the escape character to the other side, press Ctrl-^ twice.

See the "ASCII Character Set" appendix in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference for a list of ASCII characters.

Example

The following example sets the escape character to Ctrl-P, which is decimal character 16:

line console
escape-character 16
Related Commands

The command followed by a dagger (+) is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

terminal escape-character+

exec

To allow an EXEC process on a line, use the exec line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to turn off the EXEC process for the specified line.

exec
no exec

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

The EXEC processes start is activated automatically on all lines.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When you want to allow an outgoing connection only for a line, use the no exec command. When a user tries to Telnet to a line with the no exec command configured, the user will get no response when pressing the Return key at the login screen.

Example

The following example illustrates how to turn off the EXEC on line 7. You might want to do this on the auxiliary port if the attached device (for example, the control port of a rack of modems) sends unsolicited data. If this happens, an EXEC process starts, which makes the line unavailable.

line 7
no exec

exec-banner

To display EXEC and MOTD banners, use the exec-banner line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to suppress the banners.

exec-banner
no exec-banner

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled on all lines.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command determines whether the router will display the EXEC banner and the message-of-the-day (MOTD) banner when an EXEC session is created. These banners are defined with the banner exec and banner motd commands. By default, these banner are enabled on all lines. Disable the EXEC and MOTD banners using the no exec-banner command.

This command has no effect on the incoming banner, which is controlled by the banner incoming command.

The MOTD banners can also be disabled by the no motd-banner line configuration command, which disables MOTD banners on a line. If the no exec-banner command is configured on a line, the MOTD banner will be disabled regardless of whether the motd-banner command is enabled or disabled. Table 2 summarizes the effects of the exec-banner command and the motd-banner command.


Table 2: Banners Displayed
exec-banner (default) no exec-banner
motd-banner (default) MOTD banner

EXEC banner

None
no motd-banner EXEC banner None

For reverse Telnet connections, the EXEC banner is never displayed. Instead, the incoming banner is displayed. The MOTD banner is displayed by default, but it is disabled if either the no exec-banner command or no motd-banner command is configured. Table 3 summarizes the effects of the exec-banner command and the motd-banner command for reverse Telnet connections.


Table 3: Banners Displayed--Reverse Telnet Session to Async Lines
exec-banner (default) no exec-banner
motd-banner (default) MOTD banner

incoming banner

incoming banner
no motd-banner incoming banner incoming banner
Example

The following example suppresses the EXEC and MOTD banners on virtual terminal lines 0 to 4:

line vty 0 4
 no exec-banner
Related Commands

banner exec
banner incoming
banner motd
motd-banner

exec-character-bits

To configure the character widths of EXEC and configuration command characters, use the exec-character-bits line configuration command.

exec-character-bits {7 | 8}
Syntax Description
7 Selects the 7-bit character set.
8 Selects the full 8-bit character set for use of international and graphical characters in banner messages, prompts, and so forth.
Default

7-bit ASCII character set

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Setting the EXEC character width to 8 allows you to use special graphical and international characters in banners, prompts, and so forth. However, setting the EXEC character width to 8 bits can cause failures. If a user on a terminal that is sending parity enters the help command, an "unrecognized command" message appears because the system is reading all 8 bits, and the eighth bit is not needed for the help command.


Note If you are using the autoselect function, set the activation-character to the default Return, and exec-character-bits to 7. If you change these defaults, the application will not recognize the activation request.
Example

The following example enables full 8-bit international character sets, except for the console, which is an ASCII terminal. It illustrates use of the default-value exec-character-bits global configuration command and the exec-character-bits line configuration command.

default-value exec-character-bits 8
line 0
exec-character-bits 7
Related Commands

A command followed by a dagger (+) is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

default-value exec-character-bits
default-value special-character-bits
special-character-bits
terminal exec-character-bits
+
terminal special-character-bits +

exec-timeout

To set the interval that the EXEC command interpreter waits until user input is detected, use the exec-timeout line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the timeout definition.

exec-timeout minutes [seconds]
no exec-timeout

Syntax Description
minutes Integer that specifies the number of minutes.
seconds (Optional) Additional time intervals in seconds. An interval of zero specifies no timeouts.
Default

10 minutes

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If no input is detected, the EXEC facility resumes the current connection, or if no connections exist, it returns the terminal to the idle state and disconnects the incoming session. It is the same as entering exec-timeout 0.

Examples

The following example sets a time interval of 2 minutes, 30 seconds:

line console
exec-timeout 2 30

The following example sets a time interval of 10 seconds:

line console
exec-timeout 0 10

flowcontrol

To set the method of data flow control between the terminal or other serial device and the router, use the flowcontrol line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable flow control.

flowcontrol {none | software [lock] [in | out] | hardware [in | out]}
no flowcontrol
{none | software [in | out] | hardware [in | out]}
Syntax Description
none Turns off flow control.
software Sets software flow control. An optional keyword specifies the direction: in causes the Cisco IOS software to listen to flow control from the attached device, and out causes the software to send flow control information to the attached device. If you do not specify a direction, both are assumed.
lock Used to make it impossible to turn off flow control from the remote host when the connected device needs software flow control. This option applies to connections using the Telnet or rlogin protocols.
hardware Sets hardware flow control. An optional keyword specifies the direction: in causes the software to listen to flow control from the attached device, and out causes the software to send flow control information to the attached device. If you do not specify a direction, both are assumed. For more information about hardware flow control, see the hardware manual that was shipped with your router.
Default

No flow control

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When software flow control is set, the default stop and start characters are Ctrl-S and Ctrl-Q (XOFF and XON). You can change them with the stop-character and start-character commands.

If a remote Telnet device requires software flow control, the remote system should not be able to turn it off. Using the lock option makes it possible to refuse "dangerous" Telnet negotiations if they are inappropriate.

Example

The following example sets hardware flow control on line 7:

line 7
flowcontrol hardware
Related Commands

The command followed by a dagger (+) is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

start-character
stop-character
terminal flowcontrol
+

hold-character

To define the local hold character used to pause output to the terminal screen, use the
hold-character line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default.

hold-character ascii-number
no hold-character

Syntax Description
ascii-number Either the decimal representation of the hold character or a control sequence (for example, Ctrl-P)
Default

No hold character is defined.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Break character is represented by zero; NULL cannot be represented. To continue the output, enter any character after the hold character. To use the hold character in normal communications, precede it with the escape character. See the "ASCII Character Set" appendix in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference for a list of ASCII characters.

Example

The following example sets the hold character to Ctrl-S, which is decimal 19:

line 8
hold-character 19
Related Command

The dagger (+) means that this command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

terminal hold-character +

insecure

To set the line as an insecure location, use the insecure line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

insecure
no insecure

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example sets up line 10 as a dial-up line that is used by the LAT software to report the line as available to remote hosts:

line 10
insecure

ipx nasi-server enable

To enable NetWare Asynchronous Services Interface (NASI) clients to connect to asynchronous devices attached to your router, use the ipx nasi-server enable global configuration command. To prevent NASI clients from connecting through a router, use the no form of this command.

ipx nasi-server enable
no ipx nasi-server enable

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

NASI is not enabled.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

When you issue this command, NASI clients can connect to any port on the router other than the console port to access network resources. When the user on the NASI client uses the Windows or DOS application to connect to the router, a list of available TTY and VTY lines appears, beginning with TTY1. The user selects the desired outgoing TTY or VTY port.

You can configure TACACS+ security on the router so that after the user selects a TTY or VTY port, a username and password prompt appear for authentication, authorization, and accounting purposes.

Example

The following example shows a minimum configuration to enable NASI client dial-in access with TACACS+ authentication:

ipx routing
ipx internal-network ncs001
interface ethernet 0
  ipx network 1 
ipx nasi-server enable
! enable TACACS+ authentication for NASI clients using the list name swami
aaa authentication nasi swami tacacs+
line 1 8
  modem inout
Related Commands

Two daggers (++) indicate that the command is documented in the Security Command Reference.

aaa authentication nasi ++
nasi authentication ++
show ipx nasi connections
show ipx spx-protocol

length

To set the terminal screen length, use the length line configuration command.

length screen-length
Syntax Description
screen-length Number of lines on the screen. A value of zero disables pausing between screens of output.
Default

24 lines

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Cisco IOS software uses the value of this command to determine when to pause during multiple-screen output. Not all commands recognize the configured screen length. For example, the show terminal command assumes a screen length of 24 lines or more.

Example

The following example illustrates how to disable the screen pause function on the terminal connected to line 6:

line 6
terminal-type VT220
length 0
Related Command

This command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter, which is indicated by a dagger (+).

terminal length +

line

To identify a specific line for configuration and start the line configuration command collection mode, use the line global configuration command.

line [aux | console | tty | vty] line-number [ending-line-number]
Syntax Description
aux (Optional) Auxiliary EIA/TIA-232 DTE port. Must be addressed as relative line 0. The auxiliary port can be used for modem support and asynchronous connections.
console (Optional) Console terminal line. The console port is DCE.
tty (Optional) Standard asynchronous line.
vty (Optional) Virtual terminal for remote console access.
line-number The relative number of the terminal line (or the first line in a contiguous group) that you want to configure when the line type is specified. Numbering begins with zero.
ending-line-number (Optional) The relative number of the last line in a contiguous group that you want to configure. If you omit the keyword, then line-number and ending-line-number are absolute rather than relative line numbers.
Default

There is no default line.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can address a single line or a consecutive range of lines with the line command. A line number is necessary, though, and you will receive an error message if you forget to include it.

Entering the line command with the optional line type (AUX, CON, TTY, or VTY) designates the line number as a relative line number. For example, to configure line parameters for line 7 (a TTY line), you could enter the following:

Router(config)# line tty 7

You also can enter the line command without specifying a line type. In this case, the line number is treated as an absolute line number. For example, to configure line parameters for line 5, which can be of any type, you could enter the following:

Router(config)# line 5

Absolute line numbers increment consecutively and can be difficult to manage on large systems. Relative line numbers are a shorthand notation used in configuration. Internally, the Cisco IOS software uses absolute line numbers. You cannot use relative line numbers everywhere, but you can use absolute line numbers everywhere.

The absolute line number of the auxiliary port is 1. The relative line number of the auxiliary port is 0. See the modem line configuration command to set up modem support on the auxiliary port.

The software keeps a table of absolute and relative line numbers that you can display with the EXEC command show users all. A sample display follows:

Router> show users all
  Line      User     Host(s)               Idle   Location
   0 con 0                                        chaff console
   1 tty 1                                        Engineering printer
   2 tty 2
   3 tty 3           DREGGS                1:07   Katy x1111
   4 tty 4                                        Console E3-D
   5 tty 5                                        Mkt. demo area
   6 tty 6
   7 tty 7           DREGGS                  14   Marie x1112
  10 tty 10
 .  .  .
 135 tty 135
 136 tty 136
 137 tty 137                                      rp4-printer
 140 tty 140                                      Braille printer
 141 aux 0
 142 vty 0   Denise    idle                       DENISE-MAC.CISCO.COM
 143 vty 1   Michael   idle                     0 DREGGS.CISCO.COM
 144 vty 2
 145 vty 3
 146 vty 4
 147 vty 5

The absolute line numbers are listed at the far left, followed by the line type, and then the relative line number. Relative line numbers always begin numbering at zero and define the type of line. Addressing the second virtual terminal line as line vty 1, for example, is easier than remembering it as line 143--its absolute line number.

The line types are ranked as follows in the line table:

    1 . Console 0 (con 0)

    2 . Standard asynchronous line (TTY)

    3 . Auxiliary port (aux)

    4 . Virtual terminal line (VTY)

    5 . Printer

The terminal from which you locally configure the router is attached to the console port. To configure line parameters for the console port, enter the following:

Router(config)# line con 0

The console relative line number must be 0.

Virtual terminal lines are used to allow remote access to the router. A virtual terminal line is not associated with either the auxiliary or console port. The router has five virtual terminal lines by default. However, you can create additional virtual terminal lines as described in the section "Create Additional Virtual Terminal Lines" in the "Configuring Terminal Lines and Modem Support" chapter of the Access Services Configuration Guide.

Configuring the console port or virtual terminal lines allows you to perform such tasks as setting communication parameters, specifying autobaud connections, and configuring terminal operating parameters for the terminal you are using.

Examples

To configure virtual terminal line parameters, you would enter the following:

Router(config)# line vty line-number [ending-line-number]

The following example starts configuration for virtual terminal lines 0 to 4:

line vty 0 4
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

show line
show users
all +

location

To record the location of a serial device, use the location line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the description.

location text
no location

Syntax Description
text Location description.
Default

None

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The location command enters information about the device location and status. Use the show users all EXEC command to display the location information.

Example

The following example identifies the location of the console:

line console
location Building 3, Basement

lockable

To enable the lock EXEC command, use the lockable global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to reinstate the default--the terminal cannot be locked.

lockable
no lockable

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Not lockable

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command allows a terminal to be temporarily inaccessible by use of a temporary password.

This command activates a temporary password, which is set up with the lock EXEC command, so that a terminal is inaccessible.

Example

The following example sets the terminal to the lockable state:

lockable
Related Command

A dagger (+) indicate that the command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter of this book.

lock +

login (line)

To enable password checking at login, use the login line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable password checking and allow connections without a password.

login [local | tacacs]
no login

Syntax Description
local (Optional) Selects local password checking. Authentication is based on the username specified with the username global configuration command.
tacacs (Optional) Selects the TACACS-style user ID and password-checking mechanism.
Default

Virtual terminals require a password. If you do not set a password for a virtual terminal, it responds to attempted connections by displaying an error message and closing the connection.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If you specify the login command without the local or tacacs option, authentication is based on the password specified with the password line configuration command.


Note This command cannot be used with AAA/TACACS+. Use the login authentication command instead.
Examples

The following example sets the password letmein on virtual terminal line 4:

line vty 4
password letmein
login

The following example illustrates how to enable the TACACS-style user ID and password-checking mechanism:

line 0
password mypassword
login tacacs
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

enable password +
password
username
+

login authentication

To enable AAA/TACACS+ authentication for logins, use the login authentication line configuration command. Use the no form of the command to return to the default.

login authentication [default | list-name]
no login authentication [default | list-name]

Syntax Description
default Uses the default list created with the aaa authentication login command.
list-name Use the list specified.
Default

Login authentication uses the default set with aaa authentication login command. If no default is set, the local user database is checked. No authentication is performed on the console.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

This command is a per-line command used with AAA authentication and specifies a list of TACACS+ authentication processes that are tried at login. If no list is specified, the default list is used (whether or not it is specified in the command line). Defaults and lists are created with the aaa authentication login command. Note that entering the no version of login authentication has the same effect as entering the command with the default argument.

Before issuing this command, create a list of authentication processes with the aaa authentication login global configuration command.

 
Caution If you use a list-name that has not been configured with the aaa authentication login command, you will disable logins on this line.
Examples

The following example specifies that the default AAA authentication is to be used on line 4:

line 4
login authentication default

The following example specifies that the AAA authentication list called MIS-access is to be used on line 7:

line 7
login authentication MIS-access
Related Command

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

aaa authentication login +

login-string

To define a string of characters that the Cisco IOS software sends to a host after a successful Telnet connection, use the login-string global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the login string.

login-string hostname d message [%secp] [%secw] [%b] [%m] d
no login-string
hostname
Syntax Description
hostname Specifies the name of the host.
d Sets a delimiting character of your choice--a pound sign (#) for example. You cannot use the delimiting character in the busy message.
message Specifies the login string.
%secp (Optional) Sets a pause in seconds. To insert pauses into the login string, embed a percent sign (%) followed by the number of seconds to pause and the letter "p."
%secw (Optional) Prevents users from issuing commands or keystrokes during a pause.
%b (Optional) Sends a Break character.
%m (Optional) Supports TN3270 terminals. Sends only CR and no LINE FEED.
Default

No login strings are defined.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Follow this command with one or more blank spaces and a delimiting character of your choice. Then enter one or more lines of text, terminating the message with the second occurrence of the delimiting character. To use a percent sign in the login string, precede it with another percent sign; that is, type the characters "%%." The options can be used anywhere within the message string.

This command applies only to rlogin and Telnet sessions.

Example

In the following example, the value %5p causes a 5-second pause:

login-string office #ATDT 555-1234
%5p hello
#

logout-warning

To warn users of an impending forced timeout, use the logout-warning line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default.

logout-warning [number]
Syntax Description
number (Optional) The number of seconds that are counted down before session termination. If no number is specified, the default of 20 seconds is used.
Default

No warning is sent to the user.

Command Mode

Line Configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

This command notifies the user of an impending forced timeout, set by using the absolute-timeout command, or another method such as ARAP.

Example

The following example sets a countdown value of 30 seconds:

line 5
logout-warning 30
Related Commands

absolute-timeout
session-timeout

modem answer-timeout

To set the amount of time that the Cisco IOS software waits for the Clear to Send (CTS) signal after raising the data terminal ready (DTR) signal in response to RING, use the modem answer-timeout line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to revert to the default value.

modem answer-timeout seconds
no modem answer-timeout

Syntax Description
seconds Specifies the timeout interval in seconds.
Default

15 seconds

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command is useful for modems that take a long time to synchronize to the appropriate line speed.

For more information, see the "Configure Modem Control" section of the "Configuring Terminal Lines and Modem Support" chapter in the Cisco IOS Release 11.2 Access Services Configuration Guide.

Example

The following example sets the timeout interval to 20 seconds for the modem connected to lines 3 through 13:

line 3 13
modem answer-timeout 20
Related Commands

modem callin
modem inout

modem at-mode

To open a directly connected session and enter AT command mode on a Cisco AS5200 access server, which is used for sending AT commands to a manageable modem, use the modem at-mode EXEC command.

modem at-mode slot/modem-port
Syntax Description
slot/modem-port Slot and modem port number. Remember to include the forward slash (/) when entering this variable.
Default

Disabled

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Manageable modems return "OK" if the AT command you transmit is successfully enabled. Press Ctrl-C after transmitting an AT command to close the directly connected session.


Note This command does not apply to nonmanageable modems.
Example

The following example opens a directly connected session on modem 1/1, enters AT command mode on modem 1/1, and transmits the AT command ATH through the out-of-band port of modem 1/1:

AS5200# modem at-mode 1/1
You are now entering AT command mode on modem (slot 1 / port 1).
Please type CTRL-C to exit AT command mode.
at%v
 
MNP Class 10 V.34/V.FC Modem Rev 1.0/85
 
OK
at\s
 
IDLE           000:00:00
LAST DIAL      
 
NET ADDR:      FFFFFFFFFFFF
MODEM HW: SA 2W United States
4 RTS 5 CTS 6 DSR - CD 20 DTR - RI 
MODULATION     IDLE
MODEM BPS      28800  AT%G0   
MODEM FLOW     OFF    AT\G0
MODEM MODE     AUT    AT\N3
V.23 OPR.      OFF    AT%F0
AUTO ANS.      ON     ATS0=1
SERIAL BPS     115200 AT%U0   
BPS ADJUST     OFF    AT\J0
SPT BPS ADJ.   0      AT\W0
ANSWER MESSGS  ON     ATQ0   
SERIAL FLOW    BHW    AT\Q3
PASS XON/XOFF  OFF    AT\X0
PARITY         8N     AT
Related Command

clear modem at-mode

modem at-mode-permit

To permit a manageable modem installed in a Cisco AS5200 access server to accept a directly connected session (which is required to send AT commands), use the modem at-mode-permit line configuration command. The no form of this command disables permission for modems to accept a direct connection.

modem at-mode-permit
no modem at-mode-permit

Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

After you enter this command, enter the modem at-mode command to enable a directly connected session on the modem. From AT command mode, you can enter AT commands directly from your terminal session.

Refer to the 12-Port Modem AT Command Set and Register Summary publication (part of the Cisco AS5200 documentation set) for a complete list and description of AT commands.

The no modem at-mode-permit command disables a modem from accepting a direct connection, which is useful for ensuring modem security.


Note This command does not apply to nonmanageable modems.
Example

The following example permits the modem connected to TTY line 1 to accept a directly connected session:

line 1
modem at-mode-permit
Related Commands

clear modem at-mode
modem at-mode

modem autoconfigure discovery

To configure a line to discover what kind of modem is connected to the router and to configure that modem automatically, use the modem autoconfigure discovery command. Use the no form of this command to disable the feature.

modem autoconfigure discovery
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

This command has no default.

Command Mode

Line command

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

The modem is identified each time the line is reset. If a modem cannot be detected, the line continues retrying for 10 seconds. Once the modem type is determined, this information remains stored until the modem is recycled or disconnected. Discovery mode is much slower than configuring a line directly.

Each time the modem is reset (every time a chat reset script is executed), a string of commands is sent to the modem, the first one being "return to factory-defaults."

Example

The following example discovers whatever kind of modem is attached to the router:

modem autoconfigure discovery 
Related Command

modem autoconfigure type

modem autoconfigure type

To direct a line to attempt to configure the attached modem using the entry for modem-name, use the modem autoconfigure type command. Use the no form of this command to disable the feature.

modem autoconfigure type modem-name
no modem autoconfigure type

Syntax Description
modem-name The name of the modem (such as Codex_3260).
Default

This command has no default.

Command Mode

Line command

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

The modem is reconfigured each time the line goes down.

Example

The following example automatically configures the attached modem using the codex_3260 modemcap entry:

modem autoconfigure type Codex_3260
Related Command

modem autoconfigure discovery

modem bad

To remove a modem (installed on a Cisco AS5200 access server), from service and indicate it as suspected or proven to be inoperable, use the modem bad line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore a modem to service.

modem bad
no modem bad

Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

If you mark a modem as inoperable, it appears as Bad--without the asterisk (*)--in the Status column of the show modem command output. A modem marked inoperable by the modem startup-test command appears as Bad* in the show modem command output. Use the no modem bad command to unmark a modem as Bad* or Bad and restore it for dial-up connection services.

Example

The first part of the following example shows a successful connection between modem 2/1 and modem 2/0, which verifies normal operating conditions between these two modems. However, when modem 2/1 is tested against modem 2/3, the back-to-back modem test fails. Therefore, modem 2/3 is suspected or proven to be inoperable. Modem 2/3 is removed from dial-up services through the use of the modem bad command on line 28.

AS5200# test modem back-to-back 2/1 2/0
Repetitions (of 10-byte packets) [1]: 10
AS5200#
%MODEM-5-B2BCONNECT: Modems (2/1) and (2/0) connected in back-to-back test: CONN
ECT9600/REL-MNP
%MODEM-5-B2BMODEMS: Modems (2/0) and (2/1) completed back-to-back test: success/
packets = 20/20
AS5200# test modem back-to-back 2/1 2/3
Repetitions (of 10-byte packets) [1]: 10
AS5200#
%MODEM-5-BADMODEMS: Modems (2/3) and (2/1) failed back-to-back test: NOCARRIER
AS5200# configure terminal
AS5200(config)# line 28
AS5200(config-line)# modem bad
AS5200(config-line)# end
Related Commands

modem startup-test
show modem
test modem back-to-back

modem buffer-size

To configure the size of the history event queue buffer for manageable modems installed in a Cisco AS5200 access server, use the modem buffer-size command.

modem buffer-size number
Syntax Description
number Defined number of modem events that each manageable modem is able to store.
Default

100 modem events

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

A large buffer size uses significant amounts of processing memory. If the processing memory is running low, reduce the modem buffer size.

To view modem events, use the show modem log command.


Note This command does not apply to nonmanageable modems.
Example

The following example enables each modem in the access server to store 150 modem events:

modem buffer-size 150
Related Command

show modem log

modem busyout

To gracefully disable a modem (installed in a Cisco AS5200 access server) from dialing or answering calls, use the modem busyout line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to reenable a modem.

modem busyout
no modem busyout

Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The disabling action is not executed until the active modem returns to an idle state. No active connections are interrupted when you use this command.

Example

The following example disables the modem associated with line 1 from dialing and answering calls. You do not specify a slot/modem-port number with this command:

line 1
modem busyout
Related Command

modem shutdown

modem callin

To support dial-in modems that use the data terminal ready (DTR) signal to control the off-hook status of the modem, use the modem callin line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

modem callin
no modem callin

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No modem control

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

In response to RING, the router raises the DTR signal, which indicates to the modem that it should answer the call. At the end of the session, the Cisco IOS software lowers DTR, which disconnects the modem. This command is useful for older modems that do not support auto answer.

This command uses CTS, whereas newer modem commands in the Cisco IOS software use DSR.

Only use the modem callin command on the ASM terminal server, where hardware flow control is not possible. If you have a more recent device (such as a Cisco 2509 through 2512, Cisco 2520 through 2523, a Cisco AS5100, or Cisco AS5200), use the modem dialin command instead.

For more information, see the "Configure Modem Control" section of the "Configuring Terminal Lines and Modem Support" chapter in the Cisco IOS Release 11.2 Access Services Configuration Guide.

Example

The following example configures lines 10 through 16 for dial-in modems that can run at speeds from 300 to 19,200 bps:

line 10 16
modem callin
autobaud
Related Commands

modem answer-timeout
modem inout

modem callout

To configure a line for reverse connections, use the modem callout line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

modem callout
no modem callout

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No modem control

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command supports ports connected to computers that would normally be connected to modems. It causes the access server to act somewhat like a modem.

This command uses CTS and should be used only on access servers that do not support hardware flow control. If you have an access server that is newer than the ASM terminal server (such as a Cisco 2509 through 2512, Cisco 2520 through 2523, a Cisco AS5100, or a Cisco AS5200), use the modem host command instead. The modem callout command uses CTS, whereas the modem host command uses DSR/DCD. If CTS is used for modem control instead of DSR/DCD, it prevents CTS from being used by hardware flow control.

For more information, see the "Configure Modem Control" section of the "Configuring Terminal Lines and Modem Support" chapter in the Cisco IOS Release 11.2 Access Services Configuration Guide.

Example

The following example configures lines 17 through 32 in reverse connection mode to a large terminal switch. By using Telnet to connect to a TCP port on this host, the user gets the next free line in the rotary group.

line 17 32
rotary 1
modem callout
Related Commands

modem inout
rotary

modemcap edit

To change a modem value that was returned from the show modemcap command, use the modemcap edit command.

modemcap edit modem-name attribute value

Syntax Description
modem-name Name of the modem whose values are being edited.
attribute Modem capability, or attribute, as defined by the show modemcap command.
value The AT command equivalent (such as &F).
Default

This command has no default.

Command Mode

Global command

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Modemcaps are printed within the configuration file. You can edit them using this command.

Configure one attribute of one modem at a time. See the modem-capability values defined by show modemcap command.

Example

The following example adds the factory default entry, &F, to the configuration file. This entry, and others like it, are stored in a database that is referenced.

modemcap edit Codex_3250 factory-default &F 
Related Commands

modemcap entry
show modemcap

modemcap entry

To store and compress information about the capability of a specified modem, use the modemcap entry command. Use the no form of this command to disable the feature.

modemcap entry modem-type
Syntax Description
modem-type Type of supported modem as specified in Table 4.


Table 4: Modemcap Entries for Supported Modems
Modem Type Output
hayes_optima FD=&F:AA=S0=1:DTR=&D2:CD=&C1:TPL=default.
codex_3260 FD=&F:AA=S0=1:CD=&C1:DTR=&D2:HFL=*FL3:SPD=*SC1:BER=*SM3:BCP=*DC1:NER=*SM1:NCP=*DC0:NEC=E0:NRS=Q1:CID=&S1.
usr_courier HFL=&H1&R2:SPD=&B1:BER=&M4:BCP=&K1:NER=&M0:NCP=&K0:TPL=default.
usr_sportster TPL=usr_courier.
hayes_optima HFL=&K3:BER=&Q5:BCP=&Q9:NER=&Q0:NCP=&Q0:TPL=default.
viva HFL=&K3:BER=&Q5:BCP=%C1:NER=&Q6:NCP=%C0:TPL=default.
telebit_t3000 HFL=S58=2:BER=S180=3:BCP=S190=1:NER=S180=0:NCP=S190=0:TPL=default.
Default

The capability values that exist in the specified modem at the time that the command is issued.

Command Mode

Global Configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command displays the capability of the specified modem.

Modemcaps are printed within the configuration file and are intended to be edited using the modemcap edit command. The modemcap entry command does not display values that are not set in the modem.

Use modemcap entry with the show modemcap command to interpret the capability of the specified modem.

Example

The following example shows the modem capability in a Codex_3260:

modemcap entry Codex_3260
Related Commands

modemcap edit
show modemcap

modem cts-required

The modem printer command replaces the modem cts-required command. Refer to the description of the modem printer command for more information.

modem dialin

To configure a line to enable a modem attached to the router to accept incoming calls only, use the modem dialin line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

modem dialin
no modem dialin

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Do not permit incoming calls to the modem.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command supports modems that can automatically handle telephone line activity, such as answering the telephone after a certain number of rings.

For more information, see the "Configure Modem Control" section of the "Configuring Terminal Lines and Modem Support" chapter in the Cisco IOS Release 11.2 Access Services Configuration Guide.

Example

The following example illustrates how to configure a line for a high-speed modem:

line 5
modem dialin 
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

dialer +
modem inout
parity

modem dtr-active

To configure a line to leave data terminal ready (DTR) signals low, unless the line has an active incoming connection or an EXEC process, use the modem dtr-active line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

modem dtr-active
no modem dtr-active

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No modem control

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command does not use the carrier detect (CD) signal.

This command can be useful if the line is connected to an external device (for example, a time-sharing system) that must know whether a line is in active use. The modem dtr-active command is similar to the no modem line configuration command.

For more information, see the "Configure Modem Control" section of the "Configuring Terminal Lines and Modem Support" chapter in the Cisco IOS Release 11.2 Access Services Configuration Guide.

Example

The following example illustrates how to configure a line for low DTR:

line 5
modem dtr-active
Related Command

modem cts-required

modem hold-reset

To reset and isolate integrated modems (installed in a Cisco AS5200 access server) for extensive troubleshooting, use the modem hold-reset line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restart a modem.

modem hold-reset
no modem hold-reset

Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

This command is also used to reset a modem that is frozen in a suspended state. Disable the suspended modem with the modem hold-reset command, and then restart initialization with the no modem hold-reset command.

Example

The following example disables a suspended modem and resets its initialization:

configure terminal
line 4
modem hold-reset
no modem hold-reset
Related Command

modem bad

modem host

To configure a line for reverse connections where hardware flow control is also required, use the modem host line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable the line modem control for reverse connections.

modem host
no modem host

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No modem control

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command supports ports connected to computers that would normally be connected to modems. This command causes the access server to act somewhat like modem.

The modem host command is identical in operation to the modem callout command except that DSR/DCD is used for modem control instead of CTS. This frees CTS for use by hardware flow control.

Example

The following example illustrates how to configure a line to send a DSR/CD active signal to the modem for data switches and hosts:

line 5
modem host 
Related Commands

modem callout
modem printer

modem inout

To configure a line for both incoming and outgoing calls, use the modem inout line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

modem inout
no modem inout

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No modem control

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command uses DSR and RING signals for carrier detection.

The Cisco IOS software does not support any dialing protocols; therefore, the host system software or the user must provide any special dialing commands when using the modem for outgoing calls.

For more information, see the "Configure Modem Control" section of the "Configuring Terminal Lines and Modem Support" chapter in the Cisco IOS Release 11.2 Access Services Configuration Guide.

Example

The following example illustrates how to configure a line for both incoming and outgoing calls:

line 5
modem inout
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

dialer +
parity

modem poll retry

To set the maximum number of polling attempts used to retrieve performance statistics from a manageable modem installed on a Cisco AS5200 access server, use the modem poll retry global configuration command.

modem poll retry number
Syntax Description
number Maximum number of polling attempts. The configuration range is from 0 to 10 attempts.
Default

Three polling attempts

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Higher settings cause the software to keep polling one modem for status and to avoid polling other modems, which decreases the amount of statistics that are gathered.


Note This command does not apply to nonmanageable modems.
Example

The following example configures the server to attempt to retrieve statistics from a local modem up to five times before discontinuing the polling effort:

modem poll retry 5
Related Commands

clear modem
modem poll time
modem status-poll

modem poll time

To set the time interval between modem polls (which report modem statistics on a Cisco AS5200), use the modem poll time global configuration command. To restore the default setting of the poll time, use the no form of this command.

modem poll time seconds
no modem poll time
seconds
Syntax Description
seconds Number of seconds between polls. The configuration range is 2 to 120 seconds.
Default

12 seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

This command does not apply to nonmanageable modems.

Example

The following example sets the time interval between polls to 10 seconds:

modem poll time 10
Related Commands

modem poll retry
modem status-poll

modem printer

To configure a line to require a data set ready (DSR) signal, use the modem printer line configuration command.

modem printer
no modem printer

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No modem control

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command uses RING/DCD (data carrier detect) /DSR as the modem control signal instead of CTS. This leaves CTS free for use in hardware flow control. You can configure hardware flow control concurrently with the modem printer command.

While the modem dialin command supports modems concurrently with hardware flow control, the other auxiliary modem control options for printers, such as modem cts-required, use CTS instead of DSR/CD, as the CD signal.

Example

The following example illustrates how to configure a line to send a DSR signal to the modem:

line 5
modem printer

modem recovery-time

To set the maximum amount of time the call-switching module waits for a local modem to respond to a request before it is considered locked in a suspended state, use the modem recovery-time global configuration command. The no form of this command sets a 5-minute response time, which is the default setting.

modem recovery-time minutes
no modem recovery-time

Syntax Description
minutes Maximum amount of time local modems wait for a response.
Default

5 minutes

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

This command applies only to the Cisco AS5200 access server.


Note This command does not apply to nonmanageable modems.

After the call-switching module resets a suspended modem, it recovers to a default call switching module state.

Example

The following example configures the call-switching module to wait for 8 minutes:

modem recovery-time 8

modem ri-is-cd

The modem dialin command replaces the modem ri-is-cd command. Refer to the description of the modem dialin command for more information.

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

modem shutdown

To abruptly shut down an active or idle modem installed on a Cisco AS5200 access server, use the modem shutdown line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to take the modem out of a shutdown state and place it back in service.

modem shutdown
no modem shutdown

Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Enable the no modem shutdown command to restore to service a modem that has been shut down.

Example

The following example abruptly shuts down the modem associated with line 2. All active calls on the modem are dropped immediately.

configure terminal
line 2
modem shutdown
Related Command

modem busyout

modem startup-test

To perform diagnostic testing on each modem during the initial startup of the Cisco AS5200 or during rebooting process, use the modem startup-test global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable startup testing.

modem startup-test
no modem startup-test

Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The results of the modem startup test are displayed in the Status column of the show modem command's output. Modems that pass the diagnostic test are marked as Idle, Busy, Downloading, and Reset. Modems that fail the diagnostic test are marked as Bad*. These modems cannot be used for call connections. Depending on how many modems are installed, this diagnostic test may take from 5 to 15 minutes to complete.

Perform additional testing on an inoperative modem by executing the test modem back-to-back command. The no modem startup-test command disables startup testing.

Example

The following example shows how to perform a startup test on the integrated Cisco AS5200 modems:

configure terminal
modem startup-test

Display the results of the modem startup test after you restart the system by enabling the show modem command.

Related Commands

modem bad
show modem
test modem back-to-back

modem status-poll

To poll for modem statistics through an out-of-band port in a Cisco AS5200 access server, use the modem status-poll line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable status polling through the out-of-band port for a specified modem.

modem status-poll
no modem status-poll

Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

This command applies only to manageable modems that have out-of-band ports.


Note This command does not apply to nonmanageable modems.
Example

The following example enables modem status polling through the out-of-band port through
TTY line 1:

configure terminal
line 1
modem status-poll
Related Commands

modem poll retry
modem poll time

motd-banner

To display message-of-the-day (MOTD) banners, use the motd-banner line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to suppress the MOTD banners.

motd-banner
no motd-banner

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled on all lines.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command determines whether the router will display the MOTD banner when an EXEC session is created. The MOTD banner is defined with the banner motd command. By default, the MOTD banner is enabled on all lines. Disable the MOTD banner using the no motd-banner command.

The MOTD banners can also be disabled by the no exec-banner line configuration command, which disables both MOTD banners and EXEC banners on a line. If the no exec-banner command is configured on a line, the MOTD banner will be disabled regardless of whether the motd-banner command is enabled or disabled. Table 5 summarizes the effects of the exec-banner command and the motd-banner command.


Table 5: Banners Displayed
exec-banner (default) no exec-banner
motd-banner (default) MOTD banner

EXEC banner

None
no motd-banner EXEC banner None

For reverse Telnet connections, the EXEC banner is never displayed. Instead, the incoming banner is displayed. The MOTD banner is displayed by default, but it is disabled if either the no exec-banner command or no motd-banner command is configured. Table 6 summarizes the effects of the exec-banner command and the motd-banner command for reverse Telnet connections.


Table 6: Banners Displayed--Reverse Telnet Session to Async Lines
exec-banner (default) no exec-banner
motd-banner (default) MOTD banner

incoming banner

incoming banner
no motd-banner incoming banner incoming banner
Example

The following example suppresses the MOTD banner on virtual terminal lines 0 to 4:

line vty 0 4
 no motd-banner
Related Commands

banner exec
banner incoming
banner motd
exec-banner

notify

To enable terminal notification about pending output from other Telnet connections, use the notify line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to end notification.

notify
no notify

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command sets a line to inform a user who has multiple, concurrent Telnet connections when output is pending on a connection other than the current one.

Example

The following example sets up notification of pending output from connections on virtual terminal lines 0 to 4:

line vty 0 4
notify
Related Command

This command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter, as indicated by
the dagger (+).

terminal notify +

padding

To set the padding on a specific output character, use the padding line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove padding for the specified output character.

padding ascii-number count
no padding
ascii-number
Syntax Description
ascii-number Decimal representation of the character.
count Number of NULL bytes sent after that character, up to 255 padding characters in length.
Default

None

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command when the attached device is an old terminal that requires padding after certain characters (such as ones that scrolled or moved the carriage). See the "ASCII Character Set" appendix in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference for a list of ASCII characters.

Example

The following example pads a Return (decimal 13) with 25 NULL bytes:

line console
padding 13 25
Related Command

This command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter, as indicated by
the dagger (+).

terminal padding +

parity

To define generation of a parity bit, use the parity line configuration command.

parity {none | even | odd | space | mark}
Syntax Description
none No parity.
even Even parity.
odd Odd parity.
space Space parity.
mark Mark parity.
Default

No parity

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Communication protocols provided by devices such as terminals and modems often require a specific parity bit setting.

Example

The following example changes the default of no parity to even parity:

line 34
parity even
Related Command

This command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter, as indicated by
the dagger (+).

terminal parity +

password

To specify a password on a line, use the password line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the password.

password password
no password

Syntax Description
password Character string that specifies the line password. The first character cannot be a number. The string can contain any alphanumeric characters, including spaces, up to 80 characters. You cannot specify the password in the format number-space-anything. The space after the number causes problems. For example, hello 21 is a legal password, but 21 hello is not. The password checking is case sensitive. For example, the password Secret is different than the password secret.
Default

No password is specified.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When an EXEC process is started on a line with password protection, the EXEC prompts for the password. If the user enters the correct password, the EXEC prints its normal privileged prompt. The user can try three times to enter a password before the EXEC exits and returns the terminal to the idle state.

Example

The following example removes the password from virtual terminal lines 1 to 4:

line vty 1 4
no password
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

enable password +
login (line)

printer (LPD)

To configure a printer and assign a server TTY line (or lines) to it, use the printer global configuration command. Use the no form of the command to disable printing on a tty line.

printer printer-name {line number | rotary number} [newline-convert | formfeed]
no printer

Syntax Description
printer-name Printer name.
line number Assigns a Tty line to the printer.
rotary number Assigns a rotary group of Tty lines to the printer.
newline-convert (Optional) Converts newline (linefeed) characters to a two-character sequence "carriage-return, linefeed."
formfeed (Optional) Causes the Cisco IOS software to send a form-feed character (ASCII 0x0C) to the printer TTY line immediately following each print job received from the network.
Default

No printers are defined by default.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

This command enables you to configure a printer for operations and assign either a single TTY line or a group of TTY lines to it. To make multiple printers available through the same printer name, specify the number of a rotary group.

In addition to configuring the printer with the printer command, you must also modify the file /etc/printcap on your UNIX system to include the definition of the remote printer in the Cisco IOS software. Refer to the Access Services Configuration Guide for additional information.

Use the optional newline-convert keyword in UNIX environments that cannot handle single-character line terminators. This converts new-line characters to a carriage-return, linefeed sequence. Use the formfeed keyword when using the lpd protocol to print and your system is unable to separate individual output jobs with a form feed (page eject). You can enter the newline-convert and formfeed keywords together and in any order.

Example

The following example configures a printer named printer1 and assigns its output to the single TTY line 4.

printer printer1 line 4
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

clear line
show printer +

private

To save user EXEC command changes between terminal sessions, use the private line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default condition.

private
no private

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

User-set configuration options are cleared with the EXEC command exit or when the interval set with the exec-timeout line configuration command has passed.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command ensures that the terminal parameters set by the user remain in effect between terminal sessions. This behavior is desirable for terminals in private offices.

Example

The following example sets up virtual terminal line 1 to keep all user-supplied settings at system restarts:

line 15
private
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

exec-timeout
exit
+

refuse-message

To define a line-in-use message, use the refuse-message line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable the message.

refuse-message d message d
no refuse-message

Syntax Description
d Delimiting character of your choice--a pound sign (#) for example. You cannot use the delimiting character in the message.
message Message text.
Default

No line-in-use message is defined.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Follow this command with one or more blank spaces and a delimiting character of your choice. Then enter one or more lines of text, terminating the message with the second occurrence of the delimiting character. You cannot use the delimiting character within the text of the message.

When you define a message using this command, the Cisco IOS software does the following:

    1 . Accepts the connection.

    2 . Prints the custom message.

    3 . Clears the connection.

Example

In the following example, line 5 is configured with a line-in-use message, and the user is instructed to try again later:

line 5
refuse-message  /The dial-out modem is currently in use.
Please try again later./

rotary

To define a group of lines consisting of one of more lines, use the rotary line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove a line or group of lines from a rotary group.

rotary group
no rotary

Syntax Description
group Integer between 1 and 100 that you choose to identify the rotary group.
Default

None

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Typically, rotary groups are used on devices with multiple modem connections to allow connections to the next free line in a hunt group.

Connections to a rotary group can take advantage of the following features:

The remote host must specify a particular TCP port on the router to connect to a rotary group with connections to an individual line. The available services are the same, but the TCP port numbers are different. Table 7 lists the services and port numbers for both rotary groups and individual lines.


Table 7: Services and Port Numbers for Rotary Groups and Lines
Services Provided Base TCP Port for Rotaries Base TCP Port for
Individual Lines
Telnet protocol 3000 2000
Raw TCP protocol (no
Telnet protocol)
5000 4000
Telnet protocol, binary mode 7000 6000
XRemote protocol 10000 9000

For example, if Telnet protocols are required, the remote host connects to the TCP port numbered 3000 (decimal) plus the rotary group number. If the rotary group identifier is 13, the corresponding TCP port is 3013.

If a raw TCP stream is required, the port is 5000 (decimal) plus the rotary group number. If rotary group 5 includes a raw TCP (printer) line, the user connects to port 5005 and is connected to one of the raw printers in the group.

If Telnet binary mode is required, the port is 7000 (decimal) plus the rotary group number.

Example

The following example establishes a rotary group consisting of virtual terminal lines 2 through 4 and defines a password on those lines. By using Telnet to connect to TCP port 3001, the user gets the next free line in the rotary group. The user does not have to remember the range of line numbers associated with the password.

line vty 2 4
rotary 1
password letmein
login
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

dialer +
modem bad
modem callout
session-timeout

rxspeed

To set the terminal receive speed (how fast the terminal receives information from the modem), use the rxspeed line configuration command.

rxspeed bps
Syntax Description
bps Baud rate in bits per second (bps); see Table 8 for settings.
Default

9600 bps

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Set the speed to match the baud rate of whatever device you have connected to the port. Some baud rates available on devices connected to the port might not be supported on the system. The system will indicate if the speed you select is not supported. Use Table 8 as a guide for setting the line speeds.


Table 8: Router Line Speeds in Bits per Second
Router Model Baud Rates
Cisco 7000 family 50, 75, 110, 134, 150, 200, 300, 600, 1050, 1200, 2000, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400
Cisco 2500 access servers Any speed from 50 to 115200
Cisco 2500 routers, Cisco 4000 75, 110, 134, 150, 300, 600, 1200, 2000, 2400, 4800, 1800, 9600, 19200, 38400
Example

The following example sets the line 5 receive rate to 2400 bps:

line 5
rxspeed 2400
Related Commands

The command followed by a dagger (+) is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

speed
terminal rxspeed
+
txspeed

script activation

To specify that a chat script start on a line any time the line is activated, use the script activation line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

script activation regexp
no script activation

Syntax Description
regexp Regular expression that specifies the set of modem scripts that might be executed. The first script name that matches the argument regexp will be used.
Default

Not assigned to terminal lines

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command provides an asynchronous handshake to a user or device that activates the line. It can be activated by several events, such as a user issuing a carriage return on a vacant line, by a modem on the line sensing an incoming carrier, or an asynchronous device (such as another router) sending data. Each time an EXEC session is started on a line, the system checks to see if a script activation command is configured on the line. If so, and the argument regexp (a regular expression) matches an existing chat script name, the matched script is run on the line. For more information about regular expressions, refer to the "Regular Expressions" appendix in this publication.

The script activation command can mimic a login handshake of another system. For example, a system that dials into a line on a router and expects an IBM mainframe login handshake can be satisfied with an appropriate activation script.

This command also can send strings to asynchronous devices that are connecting or dialing into a router.

The script activation command functions only on physical terminal (TTY) lines. It does not function on virtual terminal (VTY) lines.

Example

The following example specifies that the chat script with a name that includes telebit will be activated whenever line 4 is activated:

line 4
script activation telebit 
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

chat-script +
dialer map modem-script system-script +
dialer map modem-script system-script name +
script activation
script connection
script dialer
+
script reset
script startup
start-chat

script arap-callback

To specify that a chat script start on a line any time an AppleTalk Remote Access (ARA) client requests a callback, use the script arap-callback line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

script arap-callback regexp
no arap-callback

Syntax Description
regexp Regular expression that specifies the set of modem scripts that might be executed. The first script name that matches the argument regexp is used.
Default

Not assigned to terminal lines

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command specifies that if an originating ARA client requests callback, the device will be disconnected and the chat script defined by the argument regexp will be executed to call back the client. The first available line specified for callback, and for which a chat script has been applied, will be used for the callback.

Create a chat script using the chat script command.

The script arap-callback command functions only on physical terminal (TTY) lines. It does not function on virtual terminal (VTY) lines.

Example

The following example specifies that a chat script with a name that includes usr4 will be activated whenever a client requests a callback on line 4:

line 4
script arap-callback usr4
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

chat-script +
script activation
script callback
script connection
script dialer
+
script reset
script startup
start-chat

script callback

To specify that a chat script start on a line any time a client requests a callback, use the script callback line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

script callback regexp
no callback

Syntax Description
regexp Regular expression that specifies the set of modem scripts that might be executed. The first script name that matches the argument regexp is used.
Default

Not assigned to terminal lines

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command specifies that if an originating client requests callback, the device will be disconnected and the chat script defined by the argument regexp will be executed to call back the client. The first available line specified for callback, and for which a chat script has been applied, will be used for the callback.

Create a chat script using the chat script command.

The script callback command functions only on physical terminal (TTY) lines. It does not function on virtual terminal (VTY) lines.

Example

The following example specifies that the chat script with a name that includes supra4 will be activated whenever a client requests a callback on line 4:

line 4
script callback supra4
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

chat-script +
script activation
script connection
script dialer
+
script reset
script startup
start-chat

script connection

To specify that a chat script start on a line any time a remote network connection is made to a line, use the script connection line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

script connection regexp
no script connection

Syntax Description
regexp Specifies the set of modem scripts that might be executed. The first script name that matches the argument regexp will be used.
Default

Not assigned to terminal lines

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command provides modem dialing commands and commands for logging onto remote systems. The script connection command functions only on physical terminal (TTY) lines. It does not function on virtual terminal (VTY) lines.

This command can be used to initialize an asynchronous device sitting on a line to which a reverse network connection is made.

For information about regular expressions, refer to the "Regular Expressions" appendix in this publication.

Example

The following example specifies that the chat script with a name that includes inband will be activated whenever a remote connection to line 4 is established. The router can send a login string and password to the UNIX server when a network tunneling connection comes into line 4:

line 4
script connection inband

Using this example and the topology in Figure 2, the Access Server or router can send a login string and password to the UNIX server when a network tunneling connection comes into line 4.


Figure 2: Network Tunneling Connection on an Asynchronous Line


Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

chat-script +
dialer map modem-script system-script
+
dialer map modem-script system-script name
+
script activation
script dialer
+
script reset
script startup
start-chat

script reset

To specify that a chat script start on a line any time the specified line is reset, use the script reset line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

script reset regexp
no script reset

Syntax Description
regexp Specifies the set of modem scripts that might be executed. The first script name that matches the argument regexp will be used.
Default

Not assigned to terminal lines.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Chat scripts provide modem dialing commands and commands for logging onto remote systems. Use this command to reset a modem attached to a line every time a call is dropped.

The script reset command functions only on physical terminal (TTY) lines. It does not function on virtual terminal (VTY) lines.

For information about regular expressions, refer to the "Regular Expressions" appendix in this publication.

Examples

The following example specifies that any chat script name with the word linebackup in it will be activated any time line 7 is reset:

line 7
script reset linebackup

The following example resets a modem sitting on a line each time a call is dropped:

chat-script drop-line ""+++"" " " ATH OK "ATS0=1" OK "ATS9=21"
line 4
script reset drop-line
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

chat-script +
dialer map modem-script system-script
+
dialer map modem-script system-script name +
script activation
script connection
script dialer
+
script startup
start-chat

script startup

To specify that a chat script start on a line any time the router is powered up, use the script startup line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

script startup regexp
no script startup

Syntax Description
regexp Specifies the set of modem scripts that might be executed. The first script that matches the argument regexp will be used.
Default

Not assigned to terminal lines

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command to initialize asynchronous devices connected to a line when the router is started up or reloaded. You can also use it to start up a banner other than the default banner on lines. The script startup command functions only on physical terminal (TTY) lines. It does not function on virtual terminal (VTY) lines.

For information about regular expressions, refer to the "Regular Expressions" appendix in this publication.

Example

The following example specifies that a chat script with the word linestart in its name will be activated whenever line 5 is started up:

line 5
script startup linestart 
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

chat-script +
dialer map modem-script system-script
+
dialer map modem-script system-script name
+
script activation
script connection
script dialer
+
script reset
start-chat

service exec-callback

To enable the Cisco IOS software to call back clients who request a callback from the EXEC level, use the service exec-callback global configuration command.

service exec-callback
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Callback is not enabled.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command enables the Cisco IOS software to return a call to a device that dials in, connects to the EXEC, and requests callback.

Example

The following example enables EXEC level callback:

service exec-callback 
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter. Two daggers (++) indicate that the command is documented in the Debug Command Reference.

arap callback +
callback forced-wait
debug callback
++
debug confmodem ++
ppp callback +
username
+

service linenumber

To configure the Cisco IOS software to display line number information after the EXEC or incoming banner, use the service linenumber global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this function.

service linenumber
no service linenumber

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

With the service linenumber command, you can have the Cisco IOS software display the host name, line number, and location each time an EXEC process is started, or an incoming connection is made. The line number banner appears immediately after the EXEC banner or incoming banner. This feature is useful for tracking problems with modems, because the host and line for the modem connection are listed. Modem type information can also be included.

Example

The following example illustrates the type of line number information that can appear after the EXEC banner:

user1@location1%telnet cs2 2001
Trying 131.109.44.37
Connected to user1-gw.cisco.com
Escape character is '^]'.
cs1 line 1 virtual terminal 0
Related Command

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

show users +

session-limit

To set the maximum number of terminal sessions per line, use the session-limit line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove any specified session limit.

session-limit session-number
no session-limit

Syntax Description
session-number Specifies the maximum number of sessions.
Default

The default and set session limits are displayed with the show terminal EXEC command.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example limits the number of sessions to eight on a ten-line range:

line 2 12
session-limit 8
Related Command

line vty

session-timeout

To set the interval for closing the connection when there is no input or output traffic, use the session-timeout line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the timeout definition.

session-timeout minutes [output]
no session-timeout

Syntax Description
minutes Specifies the timeout interval in minutes.
output (Optional) Specifies that when traffic is sent to an asynchronous line from the router (within the specified interval), the connection is retained.
Default

The default interval is zero, indicating the router maintains the connection indefinitely.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command sets the interval that the Cisco IOS software waits for traffic before closing the connection to a remote computer and returning the terminal to an idle state. If only session timeout is the specified command, the session timeout interval is based solely on detected input from the user. If session-timeout output is the specified command, the interval is based on input and output traffic. You can specify a session timeout on each port.

Examples

The following example sets an interval of 20 minutes and specifies that the timeout is subject to traffic detected from the user (input only):

line 5
session-timeout 20

The following example sets an interval of 10 minutes, subject to traffic on the line in either direction:

line 5
session-timeout 10 output

show ipx nasi connections

To show the status of NetWare Asynchronous Services Interface (NASI) connections, use the show ipx nasi connections EXEC command.

show ipx nasi connections
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show ipx nasi connections command:

cs-nasi# sh ipx nasi connections
NASI Remote: A001500::0020.afe5.3ec5:626C   Local: ACBB::0000.0000.0001:2010
  flags 0
NASI Remote: A001500::0020.afe5.3ec5:6E6C   Local: ACBB::0000.0000.0001:20D0
  flags 0
   Connected to line 2  incount 0  outcount 0  OVF 0

The following sample display shows an incoming NASI connection on TTY line 2:

cs-nasi# show users
    Line     User      Host(s)               Idle Location
*  0 con 0             idle                     1
   2 tty 2   chris     incoming                 1 A001500.0020.afe5.3ec5

Table 9 describes fields from the show ipx nasi connections sample display.


Table 9: Show IPX NASI Connections Field Descriptions
Field Description
NASI Remote:

  • xxxx:yyyyyyyyy:zzzz is the address for the remote NASI client connected to the router.

  • xxxx is the IPX network number.

  • yyyyyyy is the IPX host node (MAC address) for the client.

  • zzzz is the SPX connection number.

NASI Local

xxxx:yyyyyyyyyy:zzzz is the local address associated to this connection on the router end of the link.
flags A status bit that is used internally to allow and close connections.
Connected to line 2 Appears only when the connection is associated with a TTY port. Indicates that this NASI connection is attached to TTY 2.
incount 0 Data from the remote client.
outcount 0 Data to be sent to the remote client.
OVF 0 Refers to the number of times data could not be written to the TTY line, because the buffers were full. Ideally, this counter should stay at 0.
Related Commands

ipx nasi-server enable
show ipx spx-protocol

show ipx spx-protocol

To view the status of the SPX protocol stack and related counters, use the show ipx spx-protocol command.

show ipx spx-protocol
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show ipx spx-protocol command:

2509>show ipx spx-protocol
Next wake time:
SPX socket: 1D90
  state: 0  Connections: 2
   SPX Remote: A001500::0000.c047.ed5a:3A80   Local: ACBB::0000.0000.0001:2010
   state 1  flags 1
   Queue counts:  inq 0,  outQ 0,  unackedQ 0
   Sequence: 34,  Ack: 34,  local-alloc: 39,  remote-alloc: 35
   Abort Timer fires in 24 secs
   Verify Watchdog Timer fires in 3 secs
   SPX Remote: A001500::0000.c047.ed5a:C980   Local: ACBB::0000.0000.0001:2900
   state 1  flags 1
   Queue counts:  inq 0,  outQ 0,  unackedQ 0
   Sequence: 111,  Ack: 55,  local-alloc: 60,  remote-alloc: 112
   Abort Timer fires in 27 secs
   Verify Watchdog Timer fires in 0 secs

Table 10 describes significant fields from this sample display.


Table 10: Show IPX SPX-Protocol Field Descriptions
Field Description
SPX socket: IPX/SPX socket number.
state Internal state.
connections: Number of open connections for this IPX/SPX socket.
SPX Remote: xxxx::yyyy::zzzz The SPX client address for each SPX connection on this IPX/SPX socket, where xxxx is the client IPX network number, yyyy is the client IPX MAC address, and zzzz is the client SPX connection number.
SPX Local xxxx::yyyy::zzzz The local SPX address, where xxxx is local IPX network number, yyyy is the local IPX MAC address, and zzzz is the local SPX connection number.
state Internal state.
flags A status bit that is used internally to allow and close connections.
Queue counts inQ, outQ, and unackedQ, as specified in the following three rows.
inQ Number of SPX packets available for the SPX application to read.
outQ Number of SPX packets that must be sent to the remote client.
unackedQ Number of SPX packets sent, but no packet was received by the client, so far.
Sequence: SPX sequence number. Represents the sequence number of next packet of data to be sent by the router.
Ack: SPX acknowledgment number. Represents the sequence number of the client's packet that the router has received, so far.
local-alloc: Maximum packet sequence number that is acceptable from the client. This is a method of imposing flow control on the NASI client.
remote-alloc: Maximum packet sequence number that the NASI client can accept from the router. This is the NASI client's way of imposing flow control on the router.
Purge Timer Time in seconds until this SPX connection is closed and deleted from the list.
Abort Timer Time in seconds until this SPX connection is closed and deleted if a watchdog packet is not received.
Verify Watchdog Timer fires in X secs Indicates the time when you last sent a watchdog packet to the client.
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this publication.

aaa authentication nasi +
ipx nasi-server enable
nasi authentication 103
+
show ipx nasi connections

show line

To display a terminal line's parameters, use the show line EXEC command.

show line [line-number]
Syntax Description
line-number (Optional) Absolute line number of the line for which you want to list parameters.
Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following sample output from the show line command shows that line 17 is a virtual terminal line with a transmit and receive rate of 9600 bps. Also shown is the modem state, terminal screen width and length, and so on.

Router# show line 17
Tty Typ     Tx/Rx     A Modem  Roty AccO AccI  Uses    Noise   Overruns
A 17 VTY   9600/9600   -    -      -    -    -     1        0        0/0
Line 17, Location: "", Type: ""
Length: 24 lines, Width: 80 columns
Baud rate (TX/RX) is 9600/9600
Status: Ready, Connected, Active, No Exit Banner, Async interface active
Capabilities: Line usable as async interface
Modem state: Ready
Special Chars: Escape  Hold  Stop  Start  Disconnect  Activation
                ^^x    none   -     -       none
Timeouts:      Idle EXEC    Idle Session   Modem Answer  Session   Dispatch
                never         never                        none     not set
Session limit is not set.
Time since activation: never
Editing is enabled.
History is enabled, history size is 10.
Full user help is disabled
Allowed transports are lat telnet rlogin mop.  Preferred is lat.
No output characters are padded
No special data dispatching characters
Line is running SLIP routing for address 1.0.0.2.
0 output packets queued, 0 input packets.
Group codes:    0

Table 11 describes the fields in the show line output.


Table 11: Show Line Field Descriptions
Field Description
Tty Line number. In this case, 17.
Typ Type of line. In this case, a virtual terminal line (VTY), which is active, in asynchronous mode denoted by the preceding 'A.' Other possible values are:

  • CTY--console

  • AUX--auxiliary port

  • TTY--asynchronous terminal port

  • lpt--parallel printer

Tx/Rx

Transmit rate/receive rate of the line.
A Indicates whether autobaud has been configured for the line. A value of F indicates that autobaud has been configured; a hyphen indicates that it has not been configured.
Modem Types of modem signals that have been configured for the line. Possible values include

  • callin

  • callout

  • cts-req

  • DTR-Act

  • inout

  • RIisCD

Roty

Rotary group configured for the line.
AccO, AccI Output or Input access list number configured for the line.
Uses Number of connections established to or from the line since the system was restarted.
Noise Number of times noise has been detected on the line since the system restarted.
Overruns Hardware (UART) overruns and/or software buffer overflows, both defined as the number of overruns or overflows that have occurred on the specified line since the system was restarted. Hardware overruns are buffer overruns; the UART chip has received bits from the software faster than it can process them. A software overflow occurs when the software has received bits from the hardware faster than it can process them.
Line Current line.
Location Location of the current line.
Type Type of line, as specified by the line global configuration command.
Length Length of the terminal or screen display.
Width Width of the terminal or screen display.
Baud rate (TX/RX) Transmit rate/receive rate of the line.
Status State of the line: Ready or not, connected or disconnected, active or inactive, exit banner or no exit banner, async interface active or inactive.
Capabilities Current terminal capabilities. In this case, the line is usable as an asynchronous interface.
Modem state Modem control state. This field should always read READY.
Special Characters Current settings that were input by the user (or taken by default) from the following global configuration commands:

  • escape-character

  • hold-character

  • stop-character

  • start-character

  • disconnect-character

  • activation-character

Timeouts

Current settings that were input by the user (or taken by default) from the following global configuration commands:

  • exec-timeout

  • session-timeout

  • dispatch-timeout

  • modem answer-timeout

Session limit

Maximum number of sessions.
Time since activation Last time start_process was run.
Editing Whether or not command line editing is enabled.
History Current history length, set by the user (or taken by default) from the history configuration command.
Full user help Whether or not full user help has been set by the user with the terminal full-help command or by the administrator with the full-help line configuration command.
Transport methods Current set transport method, set by the user (or taken by default) from the transport preferred line configuration command.
Character padding Current set padding, set by the user (or taken by default) from the padding line configuration command.
Data dispatching characters Current dispatch character set by the user (or taken by default) from the dispatch-character line configuration command.
Line protocol Definition of the specified line's protocol and address.
Output, Input Packets Number of output and input packets queued on this line.
Group codes AT group codes.

show modem

To show modem performance statistics on a Cisco AS5200 access server, enable the show modem EXEC command.

show modem [csm | log] [slot/modem-port | group number] [summary | at-mode]
Syntax Description
csm (Optional) Shows the internal status of the call-switching module.
log (Optional) Shows the modem history event status performed on a manageable modem or group of modems.
slot/modem-port (Optional) Specifies the location of a slot and modem port. If this number is not specified, statistics for all connected modems are displayed. Remember to include the forward slash (/) when entering this variable.
group number (Optional) Specifies the location of a specific group of modems. If this number is not specified, statistics for all modems in the access server are displayed.
summary (Optional) Displays a cumulative statistics report for all manageable modems dialing into and out of the network.
at-mode (Optional) Displays all AT sessions connected to manageable modems.
Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The keywords log, summary, and at-mode apply only to manageable modems.

The number of events that you can record and view with the show modem log command is defined using the modem buffer-size command. The events stored in the buffer wrap around the event queue. You cannot clear the modem event queue.

Use the clear modem counters command to reset modem counters and clear the modem summary report of modem statistics.

Sample Displays

The following display shows output information for the show modem command:

AS5200# show modem
                 Inc calls      Out calls   Busied   Failed  No       Succ
  Mdm  Usage    Succ   Fail   Succ   Fail   Out      Dial    Answer   Pct.
  1/0     0%       0      0      0      0       0        0       0      0%
  1/1     0%       0      0      0      0       0        0       0      0%
  1/2     0%       0      0      0      0       0        0       0      0%
  1/3     0%       0      0      0      0       0        0       0      0%

Table 12 describes the fields in the previous display.


Table 12: Show Modem Field Descriptions
Field Description
Mdm Slot and modem port number. The following modem states can appear to the left of a slot/modem port number:

b--Modem was removed from service with the modem shutdown command or the modem busyout command.

R--Modem is held and isolated in a suspended state by the modem hold-reset command.

B--Modem is Bad*, Bad, or the downloaded firmware has failed.

D--Modem is currently downloading firmware.

T--Modem is conducting a back-to-back modem test.

*--Modem is connected or dialing.

Usage Percentage of the total system uptime that all modems are in use.
Inc calls Number of incoming calls that successfully and unsuccessfully connected to an available Cisco AS5200 integrated modem.
Out calls Number of outgoing calls that successfully and unsuccessfully dialed out from an available Cisco AS5200 integrated modem.
Busied Out Number of modems that have been manually removed from service.
Failed Dial Number of modems that attempted to dial into the network but failed to make a connection.
No Answer Number of modems that detected an incoming ring but failed to answer the call.
Succ Pct. Successful connection percentage of total available modems.

The following example shows the statistics and current configurations for the manageable modem 1/1. A dash (-) indicates a field that is not available on nonmanageable modems. An x indicates a field that is available and active on manageable modems.

AS5200# show modem 1/1
   Mdm  Typ  Status   Tx/Rx       G  Duration  TX  RX  RTS  CTS  DSR  DCD  DTR
   1/1  V34  Idle     1200/1200   0  01:39:59   x   x   x    x    x    x    x
Modem 1/1, AS5200 Manageable Modem
Firmware (Boot) Rev: 1.0.1 (0.0.2)
Modem config: Incoming and Outgoing
Protocol: Normal, Compression: None
Management config: status and AT session polling
TX signals: -17 dBm, RX signals: -33 dBm
Last clearing of "show modem" counters 00:11:34
    0 incoming completes, 0 incoming failures, 
    0 outgoing completes, 0 outgoing failures,
    0 failed dial attempts, 0 ring no answers, 0 busied outs
    0 no dial tones, 0 dial timeouts, 0 watchdog timeouts
    0 no carriers, 0 link failures, 0 resets
    0 protocol timeouts, 0 protocol errors, 0 lost events
Connection Speeds      75     300     600   1200   2400   4800
# of connections        0       0       0      0      0      0
Connection Speeds    7200    9600   12000  14400  16800  19200
# of connections        0       0       0      0      0      0
Connection Speeds   21600   24000   26400  28800  31200  33600
# of connections        0       0       0      0      0      0

Table 13 describes the fields in the previous display.


Table 13: Show Modem Slot/Modem Field Descriptions
Field Description
Mdm Slot and modem number.
Typ Modulation type.
Status Current status of the modem. Possible values include

Conn--Modem is connected to a remote host.

Bad--Inoperable state, which is configured by the modem bad command.

Bad*--Inoperable state, which is configured by the modem startup-test command during initial power-up testing.

Reset--Modem is in reset mode.

D/L--Modem is downloading firmware.

Bad FW--Downloaded modem firmware is not operational.

Busy--Modem is out of service and not available for calls.

Idle--Modem is ready for incoming and outgoing calls.

Tx/Rx Transmission and receiving speed for the most recently connected call.
G Modem group number assigned to the modem. The group number 0 means the modem is not part of any group.
Duration Time duration of the current call or the last call.
Modem functions The following modem functions are displayed on manageable modems. A field that is available and turned on is marked with an x. An unavailable field is marked with a dash (--).

TX--Transmit Data. The DTE transmits data to the DCE.

RX--Receive Data. The DCE receives data from the DTE.

RTS--Request To Send. The DTE signals to the DCE that the DTE accepts data into its buffers.

CTS--Clear To Send. The DCE signals to the DTE that the DCE accepts data into its buffers.

DSR--Data Set Ready. The modem is ready to start communication.

DCD--Data Carrier Detect. The DCE indicates to the DTE that a call is present and established with a remote modem. Dropping the DCD function terminates the session.

DTR--Data Terminal Ready. The DTE indicates to the DCE that it accepts calls.

Firmware Installed modem firmware.
Modem config Current modem configuration, which includes the fields Incoming, Outgoing, Incoming and Outgoing, and Unknown.
Protocol Protocol the modem is running, such as Normal, Direct, reliable/MNP, and reliable/LAPM (Link Access Procedure for Modems).
Compression Compression algorithm running on the modem, such as None, V42bis, and MNP class 5.
Management config Indicates if the modem is configured for out-of-band port polling.
TX signals Analog signal levels that the modem transmits for signal-to-noise ratio.
RX signals Analog signal levels that the modem receives for signal-to-noise ratio.
Last clearing of "show modem" counters Last time the modem's counters were cleared using the clear modem counters command. A summary of modem events also appears.

  • Incoming completes and failures--Total number of incoming connection requests that the modem answered and successfully or unsuccessfully connected with the remote DCE.

  • Outgoing completes and failures--Total number of outgoing connection requests that the modem dialed and successfully or unsuccessfully connected with the remote DCE.

  • Failed dial attempts--Number of times the modem attempted to dial out but the call failed to leave the modem.

  • Ring no answers--Number of times the integrated modem detected ringing but did not answer the incoming call.

  • Busied outs--Number of times the integrated modem was intentionally taken out of service (for example, the modem busyout command was enabled on the modem).

  • No dial tones--Number of times the dial-out attempt failed because the modem failed to detect a dial tone.

  • Dial timeouts--Number of times the modem has timed out while attempting to dial.

  • Watchdog timeouts--Number of times the modem internal watchdog timer has expired.

  • No carriers--Number of times the modem disconnected because no carrier was present.

  • Link failures--Number of times the modem has detected a link failure.

  • Resets--Number of times the modem has been reset.

  • Protocol timeouts and errors--Number times the modem protocol failed to make a call connection.

  • Lost events--Number of incomplete modem events performed by the modem.

# of connections

Speed summary of the number of calls that have connected since the system has been up. Speed categories are 2400 bps, 2400-14400 bps, and 14400+ bps.

The following example displays example output for a nonmanageable modem. Notice that unavailable fields are marked with dashes (--).

AS5200# show modem 1/1
   Mdm  Typ  Status   Tx/Rx       G  Duration  TX  RX  RTS  CTS  DSR  DCD  DTR
   1/1   -   Idle    19200/19200  0  00:01:05   -   -   -    -    -    -    -
 
Modem 1/1, AS5200 Non-Manageable Modem
Firmware (Boot) Rev: Unknown
Modem config: Unknown
Management config: Not Manageable Modem
Last clearing of "show modem" counters never
- incoming completes, - incoming failures
- outgoing completes, - outgoing failures,
0 failed dial attempts, 0 ring no answers, 0 busied outs
0 no dial tones, 0 dial timeouts, 0 watchdog timeouts
- no carriers, - link failures, 0 resets
- protocol timeouts, - protocol errors, - lost events
 
Connection Speeds      75     300     600   1200   2400   4800
# of connections        0       0       0      0      0      0
Connection Speeds    7200    9600   12000  14400  16800  19200
# of connections        0       0       0      0      0      0
Connection Speeds   21600   24000   26400  28800  31200  33600
# of connections        0       0       0      0      0      0

The following example displays the call switching module information for modem 1/2:

AS5200# show modem csm 1/2
MODEM_INFO: slot 1, port 2, unit 130, modem_mask=0x0004, modem_port_offset=0
tty_hwidb=0x00000000, modem_tty=0x004370A8, mgmt_tty=0x004370A8, modem_pool=0x0041D99C
csm_status(0): CSM_STATUS_UNLOCKED
csm_state(0x00000000)=CSM_OC_STATE, csm_event_proc=0x0005B448
invalid_event_count=0, wdt_timeout_count=0
wdt_timestamp_started is not activated
wait_for_dialing:False, wait_for_bchan:False
pri_chnl=TDM_ISDN_STREAM(s0, c0), modem_chnl=TDM_ISDN_STREAM(s0, c0)
dchan_idb_start_index=0, dchan_idb_index=0, call_id=0x0000, bchan_num=0
csm_event=CSM_EVENT_NONE, cause=0x0000, phone_num=
ring_indicator=0, oh_state=0, oh_int_enable=0, modem_reset=0
ring_no_answer=0, ic_failure=0, ic_complete=0
dial_failure=0, oc_failure=0, oc_complete=0
oc_busy=0, oc_no_dial_tone=0, oc_dial_timeout=0
remote_link_disc=0, busyout=0, modem_reset=0
call_duration_started=00:00:00, call_duration_ended=00:00:00, total_call_duration=00:00:00
The calling party phone number = 4082968388
The called party phone number = 4085267406

Table 14 describes the most useful fields in the previous display.


Table 14: Show Modem Call Switching Module Field Descriptions
Field Description
MODEM_INFO Displays internal data structure information.
csm_status Displays the status of the call-switching module. Possible displays include unlocked, active call, busyout req, shutdown, bad modem, modem hold, back-to-back, file downloading, and reset.
csm_state Displays the current state of the call-switching module. Possible states include idle and connected. Incoming calls are marked IC and outgoing calls are marked OC.
Modem counters Counters for different modem events.
The calling party phone number
The called party phone number
Phone numbers for the dialing integrated modem and the remote modem.

The following example shows the event log status for a manageable modem and identifies the time elapsed since each modem event was performed (for example, 01:02:41 means the modem event occurred 1 hour, 2 minutes, and 41 seconds ago):

AS5200# show modem log 1/1
Modem 1/1 Events Log:
  00:02:41: Startup Response: Brasil Modem
            Modem (boot) firmware = 1.0.23 (1.0.5)
  00:02:41: Control Reply: 0xFE01
  00:02:41: RS232 event: 
            RTS=On, DTR=Off, CTS=On
            DSR=On, DCD=On, RI=Off, TST=Off
            changes: RTS=No change, DTR=Changed, CTS=Changed
            changes: DSR=Changed, DCD=Changed, RI=No change, TST=No change
  00:02:41: Modem Activity event: Data Active
  00:02:41: RS232 event: 
            RTS=On, DTR=Off, CTS=On
            DSR=On, DCD=On, RI=Off, TST=Off
            changes: RTS=No change, DTR=No change, CTS=No change
            changes: DSR=No change, DCD=No change, RI=No change, TST=No change
  00:02:42: Modem State event: Idle
  00:02:42: End connection event: Retransmits for MNP block (TX/RX) = 0/0
            Duration = 0:00:00, Number of TX/RX char = 0/0
            Local Disc Reason = Unknown, Remote Disc Reason = Unknown
  00:02:29: DTR event: DTR On
  00:02:29: RS232 event: 
            RTS=On, DTR=On, CTS=On
            DSR=On, DCD=On, RI=Off, TST=Off
            changes: RTS=No change, DTR=Changed, CTS=No change
            changes: DSR=No change, DCD=No change, RI=No change, TST=No change
  00:02:34: ISDN outgoing called number: 16664200
  00:02:34: Modem State event: Dialing/Answering
  00:02:22: Modem State event: Waiting for Carrier
  00:01:58: Modem State event: Connected
  00:01:58: Connection event: TX/RX Speed = 26400/26400, Modulation = V34
            Direction = Originate, Protocol = reliable/MNP, Compression = V42bis
  00:01:58: Modem Analog signal event: TX = -13, RX = -14, Signal to noise = -40
  00:01:58: RS232 event: 
            RTS=On, DTR=On, CTS=On
            DSR=On, DCD=Off, RI=Off, TST=Off
            changes: RTS=No change, DTR=No change, CTS=No change
            changes: DSR=No change, DCD=Changed, RI=No change, TST=No change
  00:00:57: Modem State event: Disconnecting
  00:00:57: Modem Activity event: Data Active
  00:00:57: End connection event: Retransmits for MNP block (TX/RX) = 0/0
            Duration = 0:00:59, Number of TX/RX char = 30/2061
            Local Disc Reason = Remote Link Disc, Remote Disc Reason = DTR Drop
  00:00:57: Modem State event: Idle

The following example shows the cumulative system statistics for all manageable modems on the access server:

AS5200# show modem summary
         Incoming calls       Outgoing calls      Busied   Failed   No    Succ
Usage  Succ   Fail  Avail   Succ   Fail  Avail    Out      Dial     Ans   Pct.
5%     2      0     12      0      0      0         0        0     0    100%

Table 15 describes the fields in the previous display.


Table 15: Show Modem Summary Field Descriptions
Fields Descriptions
Incoming and Outgoing calls Calls dialing into and out of the modem.

  • Usage--Percentage of the total system uptime that all the modems are in use.

  • Succ--Total calls successfully connected.

  • Fail--Total calls that did not successfully connect.

  • Avail--Total modems available for use in the system.

Busied Out

Total number of times the modems were taken out of service with the modem busy command or the modem shutdown command.
Failed Dial Total number of attempts the modems did not hang up or there was no dial tone.
No Ans Total number of times call ringing was detected, but the calls were not answered by a modem.
Succ Pct. Successful connection percentage of total available modems.

The following example shows the sample display for modem group 1, which is composed of modem 1/0 through modem 1/23:

AS5200# show modem group 1
              Incoming calls       Outgoing calls    Busied   Failed  No    Succ
Grp  Usage  Succ   Fail  Avail   Succ   Fail  Avail  Out      Dial    Ans   Pct.
1     0%     0      0     24      0      0     24       0        0    0     0%
 
Modem Group 1: 1/0, 1/1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, 1/6, 1/7, 1/8, 1/9, 1/10, 1/11, 1/12, 1/13, 1/14, 1/15, 1/16, 1/17, 1/18, 1/19, 1/20, 1/21, 1/22, 1/23

The following example shows all the directly connected sessions currently using the internal out-of-band ports on the integrated manageable modems:

AS5200# show modem at-mode
Active AT-MODE management sessions:
Modem    User's Terminal
1/1 	0 cty 0

show modemcap

To display the values set for the current modem, use the show modemcap command. This display lists the modems for which the router has entries. To display the attributes associated with a specific modem, use the show modemcap modem-name command.

show modemcap modem-name
Syntax Description
modem-name The name of the modem (such as Codex_3260).
Default

The list of modems for which the router has entries.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

When a modem name is supplied, this command displays the available modem values. Table 16 identifies the list of attributes and their description:


Table 16: Modem Attributes
Modem Attribute Description
Factory defaults (FD) Returns the modem to factory default configuration. This is commonly "&F"
Autoanswer (AA) Sets the modem to answer the phone if DTR is high, preferably on the first ring. This is commonly "S0=1"
Carrier detect (CD) Instructs the modem to raise CD signal when a carrier is detected. Cisco configures modems into auto-answer mode by default. Oddly this is not the default for most modems, which just raise CD and leave it high. This is commonly "&C1."

In auto-answer mode, the modem waits until it detects a ring, then responds to the incoming call and negotiates an end-to-end connection with the other modem. At this point, the modem receiving the call informs the router that it has a call ready to be processed; this notification is performed by raising the signal on RS-232 pin 8 (the Data Carrier Detect signal) to high.

Drop with DTR (DTR) Drops the connection if DTR signal drops. There is frequently an option to reset the configuration while doing this. However, this option should not be used. The connection should only drop. The correct value for this is commonly "&D2."
Set hardware flow control (HFL) Uses RTS/CTS (out-of-band) flow control.
Set software flow control (SFL) Uses XON/XOFF (in-band) flow control.
Lock to maximum DTE speed (SPD) Instructs the modem to lock the speed at which it communicates to the router to a single rate, preferably the highest. This attribute is important and is often hard to find in manuals.

SPD is often linked to the hardware flow control variable. Look for phrases like "bps rate adjust" and "bit rate adjust."

Some modems set the speed to a value that depends on an S-register; other modems simply lock to the speed that was used when the last AT command was issued. Locking to the speed that was last used is handled automatically. To enable the S-register to set the speed, you must include the proper S-register value for the fastest possible DTE speed.

Best error control (BER) Instructs the modem to negotiate its best error control with remote modems. For ARAP users, this is MNP5/LAPB, but not MNP4.
Best compression (BCP) Instructs the modem to negotiate its best compression with remote modems.
No error control (NER) Instructs the modem to negotiate no error control with remote modems. This will be used when placing outgoing (callback) ARAP calls.
No compression (NCP) Instructs the modem to negotiate no compression with remote modems. This is used when placing outgoing (callback) ARAP calls.
No echo (NEC) Requests the modem not to echo characters. This is commonly "E0."
No response codes (NRS) Requests the modem not to send a response when you issue a command. This is commonly "Q1."
Set Caller ID (CID) Requests that Caller ID information be returned when dialin occurs. Currently not used.
Miscellaneous strings (MSC) Sends any extra commands that are needed for the modem to work (possibly with specific platforms).
Template entry (TPL) This is the name of another modem type. It is referenced as the value of any of the previously listed attributes if they are not set on the current modem type.

As an alternative to repeatedly entering the same data, use templates as a way to join modemcap entries. For example, consider the following modemcap entries:

modemcap entry gv_basics:FD=&F:AA=S0=1:CD=&C1:DTR=&D2:NEC=E0:NRS=Q1
modemcap entry global_village:HFL=&K3\\X1:BCP=%C1:NCP=%C0:TPL=gv_basics
modemcap entry gv_teleport:NCP=%C0:TPL=gv_basics

To look up the factory default for a global_village modem, perform the following steps:

Step 1 Look at the global_village modemcap entry for the factory default (FD).

Step 2 If you fail to find FD in global_village, look at the global_village modemcap entry for a template (TPL).

Step 3 Find a TPL called "gv_basics."

Step 4 Look in the gv_basics modemcap entry for the FD.

Step 5 Find FD=&F in the gv_basics modemcap entry.

Step 6 Use &F as the FD for the global_village.

Example

The following example shows the modem values in a Codex_3260:

show modemcap Codex_3260
Related Commands

modemcap edit
modemcap entry

show terminal

To obtain information about the terminal configuration parameter settings for the current terminal line, use the show terminal EXEC command.

show terminal
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show terminal command:

Router# show terminal
Line 2, Location: "", Type: ""
Length: 24 lines, Width: 80 columns
Baud rate (TX/RX) is 9600/9600
Status: Ready, Active, No Exit Banner
Capabilities: Enabled
Modem state: Ready
Special Chars: Escape  Hold  Stop  Start  Disconnect  Activation
                ^^x    none   -     -       none
Timeouts:      Idle EXEC    Idle Session   Modem Answer  Session   Dispatch
                never         never         0:00:15      not imp   not set
Session limit is not set.
Allowed transports are telnet rlogin.  Preferred is telnet
No output characters are padded

Table 17 describes the fields in the first three lines of show terminal output.


Table 17: Show Terminal Field Descriptions--First Three Lines of Output
Field Description
Line 2 Current terminal line
Location:"" Location of the current terminal line, as specified using the location line configuration command
Type: "" Type of the current terminal line, as specified using the line global configuration command
Length: 24 lines Length of the terminal display
Width: 80 columns Width of the terminal display, in character columns
Baud rate (TX/RX) is 9600/9600 Transmit rate/receive rate of the line

The following line of output indicates the status of the line:

Status: Ready, Active, No Exit Banner

Table 18 describes possible values for the Status field.


Table 18: Show Terminal Field Description--Status Field
Field Description
Active A process is actively using the line.
Autobauding The line is running the autobaud process.
Carrier Dropped Some sense of "carrier" has been dropped, so the line process should be killed.
Connected The line has at least one active connection.
Dialing Out A DDR asynchronous interface is dialing a remote site on this line.
Echo Off The line is not echoing what the user types in (for example because a password must be entered).
Escape Started The first character of the escape sequence has been typed.
Escape Typed Both characters of the escape sequence have been typed.
Hanging Up The line state is "hanging up."
Hardware XON/XOFF The line uses a UART that supports XON/XOFF flow control in hardware. (This does not mean that the line is currently using software flow control.)
Hold Typed The user typed the "hold character" (and the line is paused).
Idle The line modem state is "idle" (see modem state diagrams).
Idle Timeout An idle timeout has occurred.
Input Stopped The input has been turned off because of hardware flow control or overflow.
No Exit Banner The normal exit banner will not be displayed on this line.
PSI Enabled The line is paying attention to typed escape characters.
Rcvd BREAK A BREAK sequence has been received on the line.
Rcvd Command The line has received a special command sequence (for example, ^^B for send break).
Rcvd CR The last character received was a carriage return.
Ready The line state is "ready."
Ring Transition A transition has occurred on the RING signal of the line.
Send Break Soon You need to send a BREAK on the line soon.
Send XOFF Soon Your buffers are full and you should send an XOFF soon.
Sending Break You are in the process of sending a BREAK sequence on the line.
Sent XOFF Your buffers were full, so we sent an XOFF.
SLIP Mode The line is running SLIP or PPP.

The following line of output indicates the status of the capabilities of the line. These capabilities correspond closely to configurable parameters that can be set using configuration commands.

Capabilities: Enabled

Table 19 describes possible values for the Capabilities field.


Table 19: Show Terminal Field Descriptions--Capabilities Field
Field Description
Autobaud Full Range Corresponds to the autobaud command.
Character Padding At least one pad c x configuration command has been used.
Enabled The user has "enabled" successfully.
EXEC Suppressed Corresponds to the no exec command.
Hangup on Last Close Corresponds to the autohangup command.
Hardware Flowcontrol In Corresponds to the flowcontrol hardware in command.
Hardware Flowcontrol Out Corresponds to the flowcontrol hardware out command.
Insecure Corresponds to the insecure command.
Lockable Corresponds to the lockable command.
Modem Callin Corresponds to the modem callin command.
Modem Callout Corresponds to the modem callout command.
Modem CTS-Required Corresponds to the modem cts-required command.
Modem DTR-Active Corresponds to the modem dtr-active command.
Modem RI is CD Corresponds to the modem ri-is-cd command.
No Login Banner Corresponds to the no exec-banner command.
Notification Set Corresponds to the notify command.
Output Non-Idle Corresponds to the session-timeout command.
Permanent SLIP Corresponds to the slip-dedicated command
Private Line Corresponds to the private command.
Refuse Suppress-GA Corresponds to the telnet refuse command.
Receives Logging Output Corresponds to the monitor command.
Refuse Telnet Echo Corresponds to the telnet refuse command.
Send BREAK on IP Corresponds to the telnet break-on-ip command.
SLIP allowed Corresponds to the slip address command.
Software Flowcontrol In Corresponds to the flowcontrol software in command.
Software Flowcontrol Out Corresponds to the flowcontrol software out command.
Telnet Transparent Mode Corresponds to the telnet transparent command.

The following line of output indicates the modem state. Possible values include Autobauding, Carrier Dropped, Hanging Up, Idle, and Ready.

Modem state: Ready

The following lines of output indicate the special characters that can be entered to activate various terminal operations. The none or hyphen (-) values imply that no special characters are set.

Special Chars: Escape  Hold  Stop  Start  Disconnect  Activation
                ^^x    none   -     -       none

The following lines of output indicate the timeout values that have been configured for the line:

Timeouts:      Idle EXEC    Idle Session   Modem Answer  Session   Dispatch
                never         never         0:00:15      not imp   not set

Table 20 describes the fields in the preceding lines of output.


Table 20: Show Terminal Field Descriptions--Timeouts Fields
Field Description
Idle EXEC Interval that the EXEC command interpreter waits for user input before resuming the current connection; or if no connections exist, returning the terminal to the idle state and disconnecting the incoming session. This interval is set using the exec-timeout command.
Idle Session Interval that the Cisco IOS software waits for traffic before closing the connection to a remote computer and returning the terminal to an idle state. This interval is set using the session-timeout command.
Modem Answer Interval during which the software raises DTR in response to RING and the modem response to CTS. This interval is set using the modem answer-timeout command.
Session Not implemented in this release.
Dispatch Number of milliseconds the software waits after putting the first character into a packet buffer before sending the packet. This interval is set using the dispatch-timeout command.

The following lines of output indicate how various options have been configured:

Session limit is not set.
Allowed transports are telnet rlogin. Preferred is telnet
No output characters are padded

special-character-bits

To configure the number of data bits per character for special characters such as software flow control characters and escape characters, use the special-character-bits line configuration command.

special-character-bits {7 | 8}
Syntax Description
7 Selects the 7-bit ASCII character set.
8 Selects the full 8-bit character set for special characters.
Default

7-bit ASCII character set

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Setting the special character bits to 8 allows you to use twice as many special characters as with the 7-bit ASCII character set. The special characters affected by this setting are the escape, hold, stop, start, disconnect, and activation characters.

Example

The following example allows the full 8-bit international character set for special characters on line 5:

line 5
special-character-bits 8
Related Commands

The commands followed by a dagger (+) are documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

default-value exec-character-bits
default-value special-character-bits
exec-character-bits
terminal exec-character-bits
+
terminal special-character-bits +

speed

To set the terminal baud rate, use the speed line configuration command. This command sets both the transmit (to terminal) and receive (from terminal) speeds.

speed bps
Syntax Description
bps Baud rate in bits per second (bps); see Table 21 for settings.
Default

9600 bps

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Set the speed to match the transmission rate of whatever device you have connected to the port. Some baud rates available on devices connected to the port might not be supported on the router. The router indicates whether the speed you selected is not supported. Use Table 21 as a guide for setting line speeds.


Table 21: Router Line Speeds in Bits per Second
Router Model Baud Rates
Cisco 7000 50, 75, 110, 134, 150, 200, 300, 600, 1050, 1200, 2000, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400
Cisco 2500 access servers Any speed from 50 to 115200
Cisco 2500 routers, Cisco 4000 series 75, 110, 134, 150, 300, 600, 1200, 2000, 2400, 4800, 1800, 9600, 19200, 38400
Example

The following example sets lines 1 and 2 on a Cisco 2509 access server to 115200 bps:

line 1 2
speed 115200
Related Commands

The command followed by a dagger (+) is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

rxspeed
terminal speed
+
txspeed

start-character

To set the flow control start character, use the start-character line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the character.

start-character ascii-number
no start-character

Syntax Description
ascii-number Decimal representation of the start character.
Default

Decimal 17

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command defines the character that signals the start of data transmission when software flow control is in effect. See the "ASCII Character Set" appendix in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference for a list of ASCII characters.

Example

The following example changes the start character to Ctrl-B, which is decimal 2:

line 2
start-character 2
Related Commands

The command followed by a dagger (+) is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

flowcontrol
stop-character
terminal start-character
+

start-chat

To specify that a chat script start on a specified line at any point, use the start-chat privileged EXEC command. Use the no form of this command to stop the chat script.

start-chat regexp [line-number [dialer-string]]
no start-chat

Syntax Description
regexp Specifies the name of a regular expression or modem script to be executed. If there is more than one script with a name that matches the argument regexp, the first script found will be used.
line-number (Optional) Indicates the line number on which to execute the chat script. If you do not specify a line number, the current line number is chosen. If the specified line is busy, the script is not executed and an error message appears. If the dialer-string argument is specified, line-number must be entered; it is not optional if you specify a dialer string. This command functions only on physical terminal (TTY) lines. It does not function on virtual terminal (VTY) lines.
dialer-string (Optional) String of characters (often a telephone number) to be sent to a DCE. If you enter a dialer string, you must also specify line-number, or the chat script regexp will not start.
Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command provides modem dialing commands for a chat script that you want to apply immediately to a line. If you do not specify a line, the script runs on the current line. If the specified line is already in use, the script is not activated and an error message appears.

The argument regexp is used to specify the name of the modem script that is to be executed. The first script that matches the argument in this command and the dialer map command will be used. For more information about regular expressions, refer to the "Regular Expressions" appendix in this publication.

This command functions only on physical terminal (TTY) lines. It does not function on virtual terminal (VTY) lines.

Example

The following example forces a dialout on line 8 using the script telebit:

Cisco2509# start-chat telebit line 8
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

chat-script +
dialer map modem-script system-script
+
dialer map modem-script system-script name +
script activation
script connection
script dialer
+
script reset
script startup

state-machine

To specify the transition criteria for the state of a particular state machine, use the state-machine global configuration command.

state-machine name state firstchar... lastchar [nextstate | transmit]
Syntax Description
name Specifies the name for the state machine (used in the dispatch-machine line command). The user can specify any number of state machines, but each line can have only one state machine associated with it.
state Defines which state is being modified. There are a maximum of eight states per state machine. Lines are initialized to state 0 and return to state 0 after a packet is transmitted.
firstchar... lastchar Specify a range of characters. If the state machine is in the indicated state, and the next character input is within this range, the process goes to the specified next state. Full 8-bit character comparisons are done, so the maximum value is 255. Take care that the line is configured to strip parity bits (or not generate them), or duplicate the low characters in the upper half of the space.
nextstate (Optional) Defines the state to enter if the character is in the specified range.
transmit (Optional) Causes the packet to be transmitted and the state machine to be reset to state 0. Recurring characters that have not been explicitly defined to have a particular action return the state machine to state 0.
Default

No transition criteria are specified.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command is paired with the dispatch-machine line configuration command, which defines the line on which the state machine is effective.

Example

The following example uses a dispatch machine named function to ensure that the function key characters on an ANSI terminal are lumped together in one packet. Because the default in the example is to remain in state 0 without transmitting anything, normal key signals are transmitted immediately.

line 1 20
dispatch-machine function
!
state-machine function 0 0 255 transmit
Related Commands

dispatch-character
dispatch-machine
dispatch-timeout

stopbits

To set the number of the stop bits transmitted per byte, use the stopbits line configuration command.

stopbits {1 | 1.5 | 2}
Syntax Description
1 One stop bit.
1.5 One and one-half stop bits.
2 Two stop bits.
Default

2 stop bits

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Communication protocols provided by devices such as terminals and modems often require a specific stop bit setting.

Example

The following example changes the default from 2 stop bits to 1 as a performance enhancement:

line 4
stopbits 1
Related Commands

This command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter, as indicated by
the dagger (+).

terminal stopbits +

stop-character

To set the flow control stop character, use the stop-character line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the character.

stop-character ascii-number
no stop-character

Syntax Description
ascii-number Decimal representation of the stop character.
Default

Decimal 19

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command defines the character that signals the end of data transmission when software flow control is in effect. See the "ASCII Character Set" appendix in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference for a list of ASCII characters.

Example

The following example changes the stop character to Ctrl-E, which is decimal 5:

line 3
stop-character 5
Related Commands

The command followed a dagger (+) is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

flowcontrol
start-character
terminal stop-character
+

terminal-queue entry-retry-interval

To change the retry interval for a terminal port queue, use the terminal-queue global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default terminal port queue interval.

terminal-queue entry-retry-interval interval
no terminal-queue

Syntax Description
interval Number of seconds between terminal port retries.
Default

60 seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

If a remote device (such as a printer) is busy, the connection attempt is placed in a terminal port queue. If you want to decrease the waiting period between subsequent connection attempts, decrease the default of 60 to an interval of 10 seconds. Decrease the time between subsequent connection attempts when, for example, a printer queue stalls for long periods.

Example

The following example changes the terminal port queue retry interval from the default of 60 seconds to 10 seconds:

terminal-queue entry-retry-interval 10

terminal-type

To specify the type of terminal connected to a line, use the terminal-type line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove any information about the type of terminal and reset the line to the default terminal emulation.

terminal-type {terminal-name | terminal-type}
no terminal-type

Syntax Description
terminal-name Terminal name.
terminal-type Terminal type.
Default

VT100

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command records the type of terminal connected to the line. The argument terminal-name provides a record of the terminal type and allows terminal negotiation of display management by hosts that provide that type of service.

For TN3270 applications, this command must follow the corresponding ttycap entry in the configuration file.

Example

The following example defines the terminal on line 7 as a VT220:

line 7 
terminal-type VT220
Related Commands

These commands are documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter, as indicated by
the dagger (+).

terminal keymap-type +
terminal terminal-type +

test modem back-to-back

To diagnose a modem that may not be functioning properly in a Cisco AS5200 access server, use the test modem back-to-back EXEC command.

test modem back-to-back {first-slot/modem-number} {second-slot/modem-number}
Syntax Description
first-slot/modem-number Slot and modem number of the first test modem. Remember to include the forward slash (/) when entering this variable.
second-slot/modem-number Slot and modem number of the second test modem. Remember to include the forward slash (/) when entering this variable.
Default

Disabled

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use this command to perform back-to-back testing of two modems. You might need to enable this command on several different combinations of modems to determine which one is not functioning properly.

Example

The following example shows how to perform a back-to-back modem test between modem 2/0 and modem 2/1 and removes modem 2/1 (which is associated with TTY line 26) from all dial-in and dial-out services:

AS5200# test modem back-to-back 2/0 2/1
back2back 2/0 2/1
Repetitions (of 10-byte packets) [1]: 
AS5200#
%MODEM-5-B2BCONNECT: Modems (2/0) and (2/1) connected in back-to-back test: CONNECT9600/REL-MNPM
%MODEM-5-B2BMODEMS: Modems (2/0) and (2/1) completed back-to-back test: success/packets = 2/2
Related Command

modem bad

transport input

To define which protocols to use to connect to a specific line of the router, use the transport input line configuration command.

transport input {all | lat | mop | nasi | none | pad | rlogin | telnet | v120}
Syntax Description
all Selects all protocols. Restores the default configuration.
lat Selects the Digital LAT protocol and specifies both incoming reverse LAT and host-initiated connections.
mop Selects Maintenance Operation Protocol (MOP).
nasi Select NetWare Asynchronous Services Interface as the input transport protocol.
none Prevents any protocol selection on the line. This makes the port unusable by incoming connections.
pad Selects X.3 PAD incoming connections.
rlogin Selects the UNIX rlogin protocol.
telnet Specifies all types of incoming TCP/IP connections.
v120 Select the V.120 protocol for incoming async over ISDN connections.
Default

No protocols allowed on the line (none)

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0. The lat, pad, all, and v120 keywords first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1. The none option became the default in Cisco IOS Release 11.1. Before release 11.1, the default was all.

 
Caution Cisco routers do not accept incoming network connections to asynchronous ports (TTY lines) by default. You have to specify an incoming transport protocol, or specify transport input all before the line will accept incoming connections. For example, if you are using your router as a terminal server to make console-port connections to routers or other devices, you will not be able to use Telnet to connect to these devices. You will receive the message "Connection Refused." This behavior is new as of Cisco IOS Software release 11.1. Previous to release 11.1, the default was transport input all. If you are upgrading to Cisco IOS software version 11.1(1) or later from Cisco IOS Software release 11.0 or earlier, you must add the transport input {protocol | all} command, or you will be locked out of your router.

The process of using Telnet to make a connection out of an asynchronous port is referred to as reverse Telnet. For more information, refer to the section "Configure a Reverse Connection" in the "Configuring Terminal Lines and Modem Support" chapter of the Access Services Configuration Guide.

You can specify one protocol, multiple protocols, all protocols, or no protocols. To specify multiple protocols, enter the keyword for each protocol, separated by a space.

This command can be useful in distributing resources among different types of users, or making certain that only specific hosts can access a particular port. When using two-step protocol translation, the transport input command is useful in controlling exactly which protocols can be translated to other protocols.

Access lists for each individual protocol can be defined in addition to the allowances created by the transport input command. Any settings made with the transport input command override settings made with the transport preferred command.

Example

The following example sets the incoming protocol to Telnet for vtys 0 to 32:

line vty 0 32
transport input telnet
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates the command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

terminal transport input +
transport output
transport preferred

transport output

To determine the protocols that can be used for outgoing connections from a line, use the transport output line configuration command.

transport output {all | lat | mop | nasi | none | pad | rlogin | telnet | v120}
Syntax Description
all Selects all protocols.
lat Selects the Digital LAT protocol, which is the protocol used most often to connect routers to Digital hosts.
mop Selects Maintenance Operation Protocol (MOP).
nasi Select NetWare Asynchronous Services Interface as the output transport protocol.
none Prevents any protocol selection on the line. The system normally assumes that any unrecognized command is a host name. If the protocol is set to none, the system no longer makes that assumption. No connection will be attempted if the command is not recognized.
pad Selects X.3 PAD, used most often to connect routers to X.25 hosts.
rlogin Selects the UNIX rlogin protocol for TCP connections. The rlogin setting is a special case of Telnet. If an rlogin attempt to a particular host has failed, the failure will be tracked, and subsequent connection attempts will use Telnet instead.
telnet Selects the TCP/IP Telnet protocol. It allows a user at one site to establish a TCP connection to a login server at another site.
v120 Select the V.120 protocol for outgoing async over ISDN connections.
Default

Telnet

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0. The all, lat, pad, rlogin, and v120 commands first appeared in IOS Release 11.1.

You can specify one protocol, multiple protocols, all protocols, or no protocols. To specify multiple protocols, enter the keyword for each protocol, separated by a space.

Any settings made with the transport output command override settings made with the transport preferred command.

Example

The following example prevents any protocol selection:

transport output none
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates the command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

terminal transport output +
transport input
transport preferred

transport preferred

To specify the transport protocol that the Cisco IOS software uses if the user does not specify one when initiating a connection, use the transport preferred line configuration command.

transport preferred {lat | mop | nasi | none | pad | rlogin | telnet | v120}
Syntax Description
all Specifies all recognized protocols.
lat Selects the Digital LAT protocol, which is the protocol used most often to connect routers to Digital hosts.
mop Specifies the Maintenance Operation Protocol (MOP).
nasi Specifies the NetWare Asynchronous Services Interface (NASI) protocol.
none Prevents any protocol selection on the line. The system normally assumes that any unrecognized command is a host name. If the protocol is set to none, the system no longer makes that assumption. No connection is attempted if the command is not recognized.
pad Selects X.3 PAD, used most often to connect routers to X.25 hosts.
rlogin Selects the UNIX rlogin protocol for TCP connections. The rlogin setting is part of the Telnet protocol. If an rlogin attempt to a particular host fails, the failure is tracked, and subsequent connection attempts will use Telnet instead.
telnet Selects the TCP/IP Telnet protocol. It allows a user at one site to establish a TCP connection to a login server at another site.
v120 Specifies asynchronous protocols over ISDN.
Default

Telnet

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0. The lat, pad, and rlogin commands first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Specify transport preferred none to prevent errant connection attempts.

Any settings made with the transport input or transport output commands override settings made with the transport preferred command.

Example

The following example sets the preferred protocol to Telnet on physical terminal line 1:

line tty 1
transport preferred telnet
Related Commands

The command followed by a dagger (+) is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

terminal transport preferred +
transport input
transport output

txspeed

To set the terminal transmit speed (how fast the terminal sends information to the modem), use the txspeed line configuration command.

txspeed bps
Syntax Description
bps Baud rate in bits per second (bps); see Table 8 for settings.
Default

9600 bps

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Set the speed to match the baud rate of whatever device you have connected to the port. Some baud rates available on devices connected to the port might not be supported on the router. The Cisco IOS software will indicate if the speed you select is not supported. Use Table 8 as a guide for setting the line speeds.

Example

The following example sets the transmit speed for line 5 to 2400 bps:

line 5
txspeed 2400
Related Commands

The command followed by a dagger (+) is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter.

rxspeed
speed
terminal txspeed
+

vacant-message

To display an idle terminal message, use the vacant-message line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the default vacant message or any other vacant message that may have been set.

vacant-message [d message d]
no vacant-message

Syntax Description
d (Optional) A delimiting character of your choice--a pound sign (#), for example. You cannot use the delimiting character in the banner message.
message (Optional) Vacant terminal message.
d (Optional) A delimiting character of your choice.
Default

The format of the default vacant message is as follows:

<blank lines>
hostname tty# is now available
<blank lines>
Press RETURN to get started.

This message is generated by the system.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command enables the banner to be displayed on the screen of an idle terminal. The vacant-message command without any arguments restores the default message.

Follow this command with one or more blank spaces and a delimiting character of your choice. Then enter one or more lines of text, terminating the message with the second occurrence of the delimiting character.


Note For a rotary group, you only need to define the message for the first line in the group.
Example

The following example turns on the system banner and displays this message:

line 0
vacant-message #
                Welcome to Cisco Systems, Inc.
                 Press Return to get started.

width

To set the terminal screen width, use the width line configuration command. This command sets the number of character columns displayed on the attached terminal.

width characters
Syntax Description
characters Integer that specifies the number of character columns displayed on the terminal.
Default

80 character columns

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The rlogin protocol uses the characters argument to set up terminal parameters on a remote host.

Some hosts can learn the values for both length and width specified with the line and width commands.

Example

The following example changes the character columns to 132 for the terminal on line 7:

line 7
location console terminal
width 132
Related Command

The following command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter, as indicated by the dagger (+).

terminal width +


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