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Telnet Configuration Commands

Telnet Configuration Commands

Telnet is a simple remote terminal protocol that is part of the Internet Protocol (IP) suite. Telnet allows a user at one site to establish a TCP connection to a login server at another site; then, Telnet passes the keystrokes from one system to the other. Telnet can accept either an IP address or a domain name as the remote system address.

Use the commands in this chapter to configure Telnet support. For configuration information, refer to the Access Services Configuration Guide. For information about making connections, see the chapter "Making Connections to Network Devices" in the Access Services Configuration Guide.

ip alias

To assign an IP address to the service provided on a TCP port, use the ip alias interface configuration command. Use the no form of the command to remove the specified address for the router.

ip alias ip-address tcp-port
no ip alias
ip-address
Syntax Description
ip-address Specifies the IP address for the service.
tcp-port Specifies the number of the TCP port.
Default

None

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

A user attempting to establish a connection is connected to the first free line in a rotary group using the Telnet protocol.

The IP address must be on the same network or subnet as the router's main address, and must not be used by another host on that network or subnet. Connecting to the IP address has the same effect as connecting to the router's main address, using tcp-port as the TCP port.

You can use the ip alias command to assign multiple IP addresses to the router. For example, in addition to the primary alias address, you can specify addresses that correspond to lines or rotary groups. Using the ip alias command in this way makes the process of connecting to a specific rotary group transparent to the user.

When asynchronous mode is implemented, the Cisco IOS software creates the appropriate IP aliases, which map the asynchronous addresses to the lines they are connected to. This process is automatic and does not require configuration.

Example

The following example configures connections to IP address 172.30.42.42 to act identically to connections made to the server's primary IP address on TCP port 3001. In other words, a user trying to connect is connected to the first free line in rotary group that is 1 using the Telnet protocol.

ip alias 172.30.42.42 3001

ip tcp chunk-size

To enable a faster response to user interrupt characters, use the ip tcp chunk-size global configuration command.

ip tcp chunk-size number
Syntax Description
number The number of characters output before the interrupt executes. The suggested value is 80, which will typically abort output within a line or two of where the user types the interrupt character. Values of less than 50 are not recommended for efficiency reasons.
Default

None

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When used with a correctly operating host, the Cisco IOS software implements the Telnet Synchronize and Abort Output signals, which can stop output within one packet's worth of data from the time the user types the interrupt character.

Changing the chunk size (the number of characters output before the interrupt executes) affects neither the size of the packet used nor the TCP window size, either of which would cause serious efficiency problems for the remote host as well as for the router. Instead, the Telnet status is checked after the number of characters specified, causing only a relatively minor performance loss.

Example

The following example allows a router to execute an interrupt after an output of 100 characters, when an interrupt character or sequence is entered (Ctrl-C, for example):

ip tcp chunk-size 100

telnet break-on-ip

To cause the system to generate a hardware BREAK signal on the RS-232 line that is associated with a reverse Telnet connection when a Telnet Interrupt-Process command is received on that connection, use the telnet break-on-ip line configuration command.

telnet break-on-ip
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No hardware Break signal is generated when an Interrupt-Process command is received.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command causes the system to generate a hardware BREAK signal on the RS-232 line that is associated with a reverse Telnet connection. It is useful when a Telnet Interrupt-Process command is received on that connection because it can control the translation of Telnet Interrupt-Process commands into X.25 BREAK indications. It is also a useful workaround in the following situations:

A hardware BREAK signal is generated when a Telnet BREAK command is received.

Example

In the following example, line 5 is configured with the telnet break-on-ip command. The location text notes that this refers to the high-speed modem. The telnet transparent command sets end-of-line handling.

line 5
location high-speed modem
telnet transparent
telnet break-on-ip
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

connect +
telnet (EXEC) +
telnet transparent
terminal telnet break-on-ip
+

telnet refuse-negotiations

To set a line using Telnet to refuse to negotiate full duplex, remote echo requests on incoming connections, use the telnet refuse-negotiations line configuration command.

telnet refuse-negotiations
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command on reverse Telnet connections to allow the Cisco IOS software to refuse full-duplex, remote echo option connection requests from the other end. This command suppresses negotiation of the Telnet Remote Echo and Suppress Go Ahead options.

This command does not apply to protocol translation configurations. It is intended for applications wherein the router is functioning as a terminal server to allow terminal connections to remote devices through the asynchronous terminal ports of the router. Terminal server connections are those where the user types a command similar to the following to access network resources:

telnet access-server 2005

where access-server is the host name of the Cisco router functioning as a terminal server, and 2005 is the port number on the router to which the remote terminal is connected.

Example

The following example shows how to set line 5 to refuse full duplex, remote echo requests:

line 5
telnet refuse-negotiations
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

connect +
telnet (EXEC) +
terminal telnet refuse-negotiations +

telnet speed

To allow the Cisco IOS software to negotiate transmission speed of the line to a connected device, use the telnet speed line configuration command.

telnet speed default-speed maximum-speed
Syntax Description
default-speed Line speed (in bps) that the Cisco IOS software will use if the device on the other end of the connection has not specified a speed.
maximum-speed Maximum speed (in bps) that the device on the port will use.
Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Negotiates speeds on reverse Telnet lines. You can match line speeds on remote systems in reverse Telnet, on host machines hooked up to a router used to access the network, or on a group of console lines hooked up to the router, when disparate line speeds are in use at the local and remote ends of the connection. Line speed negotiation adheres to the Remote Flow Control option, defined in RFC 1080.

Example

The following example allows a router to negotiate a bit rate on the line using the Telnet option. If no speed is negotiated, the line will run at 2400 bits per second. If the remote host requests a speed of greater than 9600 bps, then 9600 will be used.

line 5
telnet speed 2400 9600
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

connect +
telnet (EXEC) +
terminal telnet speed +

telnet sync-on-break

To configure the Cisco IOS software to cause an incoming connection to send a Telnet Synchronize signal when it receives a Telnet BREAK signal, use the telnet sync-on-break line configuration command.

telnet sync-on-break
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command causes a reverse Telnet line to send a Telnet Synchronize signal when it receives a Telnet BREAK signal. This option is used very rarely to ensure the ordering of BREAK reception with respect to data characters sent after the BREAK.

Example

In the following example, line 8 is configured with the telnet sync-on-break command:

line aux 0
telnet sync-on-break
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

connect +
telnet (EXEC) +
terminal telnet sync-on-break +

telnet transparent

To configure the Cisco IOS software to send a CARRIAGE RETURN (CR) as a CR followed by a NULL instead of a CR followed by a LINE FEED (LF), use the telnet transparent line configuration command.

telnet transparent
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

CARRIAGE RETURN followed by a LINE FEED.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command is useful for coping with different interpretations of end-of-line handling in the Telnet protocol specification.

Example

The following example causes the Cisco IOS software, when sending a CR, to send a CR followed by a NULL character:

line 7
telnet transparent
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

connect +
telnet (EXEC) +
terminal telnet transparent +

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