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Table of Contents

TN3270 Configuration Commands

TN3270 Configuration Commands

TN3270 terminal emulation software allows any terminal to be used as an IBM 3270-type terminal. Users with non-3270 terminals can take advantage of the emulation capabilities to perform the functions of an IBM 3270-type terminal. Specifically, the Cisco IOS software supports emulation of an IBM 3278-2 terminal providing an 80-by-24 display.

Use the commands in this chapter to configure and monitor TN3270 connections. For configuration information and examples, refer to the Access Services Configuration Guide. For information about making connections to IBM 3278 hosts, refer to the chapter "Making Connections to Network Devices" in the Access Services Configuration Guide.

keymap

To define specific characteristics of keyboard mappings, use the keymap global configuration command. To remove the named keymap from the current image of the configuration file, use the no form of this command.

keymap keymap-name keymap-entry
no keymap
keymap-name
Syntax Description
keymap-name Name of the file containing the keyboard mappings. The name can be up to 32 characters long and must be unique.
keymap-entry Commands that define the keymap.
Default

VT100 keyboard emulation

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The keymap command maps individual keys on a non-3270 keyboard to perform the function defined for the 3270 keyboard. Use the EXEC command show keymap to test for the availability of a keymap.

The guidelines for creating a keymap file follow.

Do not name a ttycap entry filename default or the Cisco IOS software will adopt the newly defined entry as the default.

The Keymap Entry Structure

A keymap is a keyboard map file. A keymap consists of an entry for a keyboard. The first part of keymap lists the names of the keyboards that use that entry. These names will often be the same as in the ttycaps (terminal emulation) file, and often the terminals from various ttycap entries will use the same keymap entry. For example, both 925 and 925vb (for 925 with visual bells) terminals would probably use the same keymap entry. There are other circumstances in which it is necessary to specify a keyboard name as the name of the entry (for example, if a user requires a custom key layout).

After the names, which are separated by vertical bars (|), comes a left brace ({), the text that forms the definitions, and a right brace (}), as follows:

ciscodefault{
	clear = '^z';\
	flinp = '^x';\
	enter = '^m';\
	delete = '^d' | '^?';\
	synch = '^r';\
ebcdic_xx='string'
	reshow = '^v';\
	eeof = '^e';\
	tab = '^i';\
	btab = '^b';\
	nl = '^n';\
	left = '^h';\
	right = '^l';\
	up = '^k';\
	down = '^j';\
	einp = '^w';\
	reset = '^t';\
	ferase = '^u';\
	insrt = '\E ';\
	pa1 = '^p1'; pa2 = '^p2'; pa3 = '^p3';\
	pfk1 = '\E1'; pfk2 = '\E2'; pfk3 = '\E3'; pfk4 = '\E4';\
	pfk5 = '\E5'; pfk6 = '\E6'; pfk7 = '\E7'; pfk8 = '\E8';\
	pfk9 = '\E9'; pfk10 = '\E0'; pfk11 = '\E-'; pfk12 = '\E=';\
	pfk13 = '\E!'; pfk14 = '\E@'; pfk15 = '\E#'; pfk16 = '\E$';\
	pfk17 = '\E%'; pfk18 = '\E'; pfk19 = '\E&'; pfk20 = '\E*';\
	pfk21 = '\E('; pfk22 = '\E)'; pfk23 = '\E_'; pfk24 = '\E+';\
}

Each definition consists of a reserved keyword, which identifies the 3270 function, followed by an equal sign (=), followed by the various ways to generate this particular function, followed by a semicolon (;), as follows:

	pa1 = '^p1'; pa2 = '^p2'; pa3 = '^p3';\

Each alternative way to generate the function is a sequence of ASCII characters enclosed inside single quotes (''); the alternatives are separated by vertical bars (|), as follows:

	delete = '^d' | '^?';\

Inside the single quotes, a few characters are special. A caret (^) specifies that the next character is a control (Ctrl) character. The two-character string caret-a (^a) represents Ctrl-a. The caret-A sequence (^A) generates the same code as caret-a (^a). To generate Delete (or DEL), enter the caret-question mark (^?) sequence.


Note The Ctrl-caret combination (Ctrl-^), used to generate a hexadecimal 1E, is represented as two caret symbols in sequence (^^)--not as a caret-backslash-caret combination (^\^).

In addition to the caret, a letter can be preceded by a backslash (\). Because this has little effect for most characters, its use is usually not recommended. In the case of a single quote ('), the backslash prevents that single quote from terminating the string. In the case of a caret (^), the backslash prevents the caret from having its special meaning. To include the backslash in the string, place two backslashes (\\) in the keymap. Table 64 lists other supported special characters.


Table 64: Special Characters Supported by TN3270 Keymap Capability
Character Description
\E Escape character
\n Newline
\t Tab
\r Carriage return

It is not necessary for each character in a string to be enclosed within single quotes. For example, \E\E\E means three escape characters.

To enter a keymap, provide a unique name for it and explicitly define all special keys you intend to include in it within curly brackets. Also, except for the last line, each line must be terminated with a backslash symbol (\). The last line ends with the closing curly brackets (}) symbol and an end-of-line character.

Keymap Restrictions

When emulating IBM-style 3270 terminals, a mapping must be performed between sequences of keys pressed at a user's (ASCII) keyboard and the keys available on a 3270-type keyboard. For example, a 3270-type keyboard has a key labeled EEOF that erases the contents of the current field from the location of the cursor to the end. To accomplish this function, the terminal user and a program emulating a 3270-type keyboard must agree on what keys will be typed to invoke the function. The requirements for these sequences follow:

Following are examples of acceptable keymap entries:

pfk1 = '\E1';
pfk2 = '\E2';

Following are examples of unacceptable keymap entries:

pfk1 = '\E1';
pfk11 = '\E11';

In the acceptable example, the keymap entry for pfk1 is not completely included in the keymap entry for pfk2. By contrast, in the unacceptable, or conflicting keymap pair, the sequence used to represent pfk1 is a complete subset of the sequence used to represent pfk11. Refer to the keymap entry provided later in this section for an example of how various keys can be represented to avoid this kind of conflict.

Table 65 lists 3270 key names that are supported in this keymap. Note that some of the keys do not really exist on a 3270-type keyboard. An unsupported function will cause the Cisco IOS software to send a (possibly visual) bell sequence to the user's terminal.


Table 65: 3270 Key Names Supported by Default Keymap
3270 Key Name Functional Description
LPRT1 Local print
DP Duplicate character
FM Field mark character
CURSEL Cursor select
CENTSIGN EBCDIC cent sign
RESHOW Redisplay the screen
EINP Erase input
EEOF Erase end of field
DELETE Delete character
INSRT Toggle insert mode
TAB Field tab
BTAB Field back tab
COLTAB Column tab
COLBAK Column back tab
INDENT Indent one tab stop
UNDENT Undent one tab stop
NL New line
HOME Home the cursor
UP Up cursor
DOWN Down cursor
RIGHT Right cursor
LEFT Left cursor
SETTAB Set a column tab
DELTAB Delete a column tab
SETMRG Set left margin
SETHOM Set home position
CLRTAB Clear all column tabs
APLON1 Apl on
APLOFF1 Apl off
APLEND1 Treat input as ASCII
PCON1 Xon/xoff on
PCOFF1 Xon/xoff off
DISC Disconnect (suspend)
INIT1 New terminal type
ALTK1 Alternate keyboard dvorak
FLINP Flush input
ERASE Erase last character
WERASE Erase last word
FERASE Erase field
SYNCH We are in synch with the user
RESET Reset key-unlock keyboard
MASTER_RESET Reset, unlock and redisplay
XOFF1 Please hold output
XON1 Please give me output
WORDTAB Tab to beginning of next word
WORDBACKTAB Tab to beginning of current/last word
WORDEND Tab to end of current/next word
FIELDEND Tab to last nonblank of current/next unprotected (writable) field
PA1 Program attention 1
PA2 Program attention 2
PA3 Program attention 3
CLEAR Local clear of the 3270 screen
TREQ Test request
ENTER Enter key
PFK1 to PFK30 Program function key 1 program function key 30

1 Not supported by Cisco's TN3270 implementation.

Table 66 illustrates the proper keys used to emulate each 3270 function when using default key mappings.


Table 66: Keys Used to Emulate Each 3270 Function with Default Keymap
Key Types IBM 3270 Key Default Keys
Cursor Movement Keys New Line

Tab

Back Tab

Back Tab

Cursor Left

Cursor Right

Cursor Up

Cursor Down

Ctrl-n or Home

Ctrl-i

Ctrl-b

Ctrl-b

Ctrl-h

Ctrl-l

Ctrl-k

Ctrl-j or LINE FEED

Edit Control Keys Delete Char

Erase EOF

Erase Input

Insert Mode

End Insert

Ctrl-d or RUB

Ctrl-e

Ctrl-w

ESC-Space1

ESC-Space

Program Function Keys PF1

PF2

...

PF10

PF11

PF12

PF13

PF14

...

PF24

ESC 1

ESC 2

...

ESC 0

ESC -

ESC =

ESC !

ESC @

...

ESC +

Program Attention Keys PA1

PA2

PA3

Ctrl-p 1

Ctrl-p 2

Ctrl-p 3

Local Control Keys Reset After Error

Purge Input Buffer

Keyboard Unlock

Redisplay Screen

Ctrl-r

Ctrl-x

Ctrl-t

Ctrl-v

Other Keys Enter

Clear

Erase current field

Return

Ctrl-z

Ctrl-u


1 ESC refers to the Escape key.
Example

The following example is the default entry used by the TN3270 emulation software when it is unable to locate a valid keymap in the active configuration image. Table 65 lists the key names supported by the default Cisco TN3270 keymap.

ciscodefault{
	clear = '^z';\
	flinp = '^x';\
	enter = '^m';\
	delete = '^d' | '^?';\
	synch = '^r';\
	reshow = '^v';\
ebcdic_xx='string'
	eeof = '^e';\
	tab = '^i';\
	btab = '^b';\
	nl = '^n';\
	left = '^h';\
	right = '^l';\
	up = '^k';\
	down = '^j';\
	einp = '^w';\
	reset = '^t';\
	ferase = '^u';\
	insrt = '\E ';\
	pa1 = '^p1'; pa2 = '^p2'; pa3 = '^p3';\
	pfk1 = '\E1'; pfk2 = '\E2'; pfk3 = '\E3'; pfk4 = '\E4';\
	pfk5 = '\E5'; pfk6 = '\E6'; pfk7 = '\E7'; pfk8 = '\E8';\
	pfk9 = '\E9'; pfk10 = '\E0'; pfk11 = '\E-'; pfk12 = '\E=';\
	pfk13 = '\E!'; pfk14 = '\E@'; pfk15 = '\E#'; pfk16 = '\E$';\
	pfk17 = '\E%'; pfk18 = '\E'; pfk19 = '\E&'; pfk20 = '\E*';\
	pfk21 = '\E('; pfk22 = '\E)'; pfk23 = '\E_'; pfk24 = '\E+';\
}

The following keymap statement maps the "|" character to send EBCDIC 0x6A:

ebcdic_6f='|'
Related Commands

keymap-type
show keymap
terminal-type

keymap-type

To specify the keyboard map for a terminal connected to the line, use the keymap-type line configuration command. To reset the keyboard type for the line to the default, use the no form of this command.

keymap-type keymap-name
no keymap-type

Syntax Description
keymap-name Name of a keymap defined within the configuration file of the router. The TN3270 terminal-type negotiations use the specified keymap type when setting up a connection with the remote host.
Default

VT100

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command must follow the corresponding keymap global configuration entry in the configuration file. The TN3270 terminal-type negotiations use the specified keymap type when setting up a connection with the remote host.

Setting the keyboard to a different keymap requires that a keymap be defined with the Cisco IOS software's configuration either by obtaining a configuration file over the network that includes the keymap definition or by defining the keyboard mapping using the global configuration command keymap.

Use the EXEC command show keymap to test for the availability of a keymap.

Example

The following example sets the keyboard mapping to a keymap named vt100map:

line 3
keymap-type vt100map
Related Commands

keymap
show keymap
ttycap

show keymap

Use the show keymap EXEC command to test for the availability of a keymap after a connection on a router takes place.

show keymap [keymap-name | all]
Syntax Description
keymap-name (Optional) Name of the keymap.
all (Optional) Lists the names of all defined keymaps. The name of the default keymap is not listed.
Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Cisco IOS software searches for the specified keymap in its active configuration image and lists the complete entry if found. If the keymap is not found, an appropriate "not found" message appears.

If you do not use any arguments with the show keymap command, then the keymap currently used for the terminal is displayed.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show keymap command:

Router# show keymap
ciscodefault { clear = '^z'; flinp = '^x'; enter = '^m';\ 
      delete = '^d' | '^?';\
      synch = '^r'; reshow = '^v'; eeof = '^e'; tab = '^i';\
      btab = '^b'; nl = '^n'; left = '^h'; right = '^l';\
      up = '^k'; down = '^j'; einp = '^w'; reset = '^t';\
      xoff = '^s'; xon = '^q'; escape = '^c'; ferase = '^u';\
      insrt = '\E ';\
      pa1 = '^p1'; pa2 = '^p2'; pa3 = '^p3';\
      	pfk1 = '\E1'; pfk2 = '\E2'; pfk3 = '\E3'; pfk4 = '\E4';\
      pfk5 = '\E5'; pfk6 = '\E6'; pfk7 = '\E7'; pfk8 = '\E8';\
      pfk9 = '\E9'; pfk10 = '\E0'; pfk11 = '\E-'; pfk12 = '\E=';\
      pfk13 = '\E!'; pfk14 = '\E@'; pfk15 = '\E#'; pfk16 = '\E$';\
      pfk17 = '\E%'; pfk18 = '\E\^'; pfk19 = '\E&'; pfk20 = '\E*';\ 
      pfk21 = '\E('; pfk22 = '\E)'; pfk23 = '\E_'; pfk24 = '\E+';\
}

show tn3270 ascii-hexval

To determine ASCII-hexadecimal character mappings, use the show tn3270 ascii-hexval EXEC command.

show tn3270 ascii-hexval
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Use the show tn3270 ascii-hexval command to display the hexadecimal value of a character on your keyboard. After entering the show tn3270 ascii-hexval command, you are prompted to press a key. The hexadecimal value of the ASCII character is displayed. This command is useful for users who do not know the ASCII codes associated with various keys or do not have manuals for their terminals.

Examples

The following examples show how the show tn3270 ascii-hexval command works:

Router> show tn3270 ascii-hexval
Press key> 7 - hexadecimal value is 0x37.
chaff> show tn3270 ascii-hexval
Press key> f - hexadecimal value is 0x66.
tarmac> show tn3270 ascii-hexval
Press key> not printable - hexadecimal value is 0xD.
Related Commands

show tn3270 character-map
tn3270 character-map

show tn3270 character-map

To display character mappings between ASCII and EBCDIC, use the show tn3270 character-map EXEC command.

show tn3270 character-map {all | ebcdic-in-hex}
Syntax Description
all Displays all nonstandard character mappings.
ebcdic-in-hex Displays the ASCII mapping for a specific EBCDIC character.
Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show tn3270 character-map command:

Router# show tn3270 character-map all
EBCDIC 0x81 <=> 0x78 ASCII
EBCDIC 0x82 <=> 0x79 ASCII
EBCDIC 0x83 <=> 0x7A ASCII
Related Commands

tn3270 character-map
show tn3270 ascii-hexval


show ttycap

To test for the availability of a ttycap after a connection on a router takes place, use the show ttycap EXEC command.

show ttycap [ttycap-name | all]
Syntax Description
ttycap-name (Optional) Name of a ttycap.
all (Optional) Lists the names of all defined ttycaps. The name of the default ttycap is not listed.
Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Cisco IOS software searches for the specified ttycap in its active configuration image, and lists the complete entry if found. If it is not found, an appropriate "not found" message appear.

If you do not include any arguments with the show ttycap command, then the current keymap used for the terminal is displayed.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show ttycap command:

Router# show ttycap
	d0|vt100|vt100-am|vt100am|dec vt100:do=^J:co#80:li#24:\
	cl=50^[[;H^[[2J:bs:am:cm=5^[[%i%d;%dH:nd=2^[[C:up=2^[[A:\
	ce=3^[[K:so=2^[[7m:se=2^[[m:us=2^[[4m:ue=2^[[m:md=2^[[1m:\
	me=2^[[m:ho=^[[H:xn:sc=^[7:rc=^[8:cs=^[[%i%d;%dr:
Router# show ttycap all
ttycap3    d0|vt100|vt100-am|vt100am|dec vt100
ttycap2    dl|vt200|vt220|vt200-js|vt220-js|dec vt200 series with jump scroll
ttycap1    ku|h19-u|h19u|heathkit with underscore cursor
Router# show ttycap ttycap1
ttycap1  ku|h19-u|h19u|heathkit with underscore cursor:\:vs@:ve@:tc=h19-b:\
        	:al=1*\EL:am:le=^H:bs:cd=\EJ:ce=\EK:cl=\EE:cm=\EY%+ %+\
        	:co#80:dc=\EN:\:dl=1*\EM:do=\EB:ei=\EO:ho=\EH\
        	:im=\E@:li#24:mi:nd=\EC:as=\EF:ae=\EG:\
        	:ms:pt:sr=\EI:se=\Eq:so=\Ep:up=\EA:vs=\Ex4:ve=\Ey4:\
        	:kb=^h:ku=\EA:kd=\EB:kl=\ED:kr=\EC:kh=\EH:kn#8:ke=\E>:ks=\E=:\
        	:k1=\ES:k2=\ET:k3=\EU:k4=\EV:k5=\EW:\
        	:l6=blue:l7=red:l8=white:k6=\EP:k7=\EQ:k8=\ER:\
        :es:hs:ts=\Ej\Ex5\Ex1\EY8%+ \Eo:fs=\Ek\Ey5:ds=\Ey1:

terminal-type

To specify the type of terminal connected to the line, use the terminal-type line configuration command. To reset the terminal type for the line to the default, use the no form of this command.

terminal-type terminal-name
no terminal-type

Syntax Description
terminal-name Name of a termcap defined within the configuration file.
Default

VT100

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The terminal-type command must follow the corresponding ttycap global configuration entry in the configuration file. Use the EXEC command show ttycap to test for the availability of a ttycap.

The TN3270 terminal-type negotiations use the specified terminal type when setting up a connection with the remote host.

Setting the terminal type to VT220 requires that the ttycap be defined within the Cisco IOS software's configuration either by obtaining a configuration file over the network that includes the ttycap definition, or by defining the ttycap mapping via the ttycap global configuration command.

Example

The following example command sets the terminal line 5 to type VT220:

line 5
terminal-type VT220
Related Commands

keymap
show ttycap
ttycap

tn3270 8bit display

To configure the Cisco IOS software to use the mask set by the data-character-bits {7 | 8} line configuration command or the terminal data-character bits {7 | 8} EXEC command, use the tn3270 8bit display line configuration command. To restore the default 7-bit mask used for TN3270 connections, use the no form of this command.

tn3270 8bit display
no tn3270 8bit display

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use the tn3270-character-map command to map between extended EBCDIC or extended ASCII characters.

Example

The following example configures the Cisco IOS software to use the mask set by the data-character-bits line configuration and EXEC commands on line 5:

line 5
tn3270 8bit display
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

data-character-bits +
terminal data-character-bits +

tn3270 8bit transparent-mode

To configure the Cisco IOS software to use the mask set by the data-character-bits {7 | 8} line configuration command or the terminal data-character bits {7 | 8} EXEC command, use the tn3270 8bit display line configuration command. To restore the default 7-bit mask used for TN3270 connections, use the no form of this command.

tn3270 8bit transparent-mode
no tn3270 8bit transparent-mode

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command is needed if you are using a file transfer protocol such as Kermit in 8-bit mode or you are using 8-bit graphics, both of which rely on transparent mode.

Example

The following example configures the software to use the mask set by the data-character-bits line configuration and EXEC commands on line 5:

line 5
tn3270 8bit transparent-mode
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

data-character-bits +
terminal data-character-bits +

tn3270 character-map

To convert incoming EBCDIC characters into ASCII characters, use the tn3270 character-map global configuration command. To restore default character mappings, use the no form of this command.

tn3270 character-map ebcdic-in-hex ascii-in-hex
no tn3270 character-map
{all | ebcdic-in-hex} [ascii-in-hex]
Syntax Description
ebcdic-in-hex Hexadecimal value of an EBCDIC character.
ascii-in-hex Hexadecimal value of an ASCII character.
all Indicates all character mappings.
Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command to print international characters that are EBCDIC characters not normally printed, including umlauts (¨) and tildes (~). The command first restores default mapping for both EBCDIC and ASCII characters. In the no form of the command, the all keyword resets all character mappings to Cisco defaults.

Table 67 shows the default character mappings between ASCII and EBCDIC in decimal and hexadecimal format.

To convert outgoing ASCII characters into EBCDIC characters, use the keymap command to modify the keymap structure with the tag ebcdic_xx=string, where xx is a hexadecimal value and string is the sequence of characters that send the ESCDIC character.


Table 67: Default ASCII, EBCDIC Character Mappings
Character ASCII Decimal ASCII Hexadecimal EBCDIC Decimal EBCDIC Hexadecimal
! 33 0x21 90 0x5a
" 34 0x22 127 0x7f
# 35 0x23 123 0x7b
$ 36 0x24 91 0x5b
% 37 0x25 108 0x6c
& 38 0x26 80 0x50
' 39 0x27 125 0x7d
( 40 0x28 77 0x4d
) 41 0x29 93 0x5d
* 42 0x2a 92 0x5c
+ 43 0x2b 78 0x4e
, 44 0x2c 107 0x6b
- 45 0x2d 96 0x60
. 46 0x2e 75 0x4b
/ 47 0x2f 97 0x61
0 48 0x30 240 0xf0
1 49 0x31 241 0xf1
2 50 0x32 242 0xf2
3 51 0x33 243 0xf3
4 52 0x34 244 0xf4
5 53 0x35 245 0xf5
6 54 0x36 246 0xf6
7 55 0x37 247 0xf7
8 56 0x38 248 0xf8
9 57 0x39 249 0xf9
: 58 0x3a 122 0x7a
; 59 0x3b 94 0x5e
< 60 0x3c 76 0x4c
= 61 0x3d 126 0x7e
> 62 0x3e 110 0x6e
? 63 0x3f 111 0x6f
@ 64 0x40 124 0x7c
A 65 0x41 193 0xc1
B 66 0x42 194 0xc2
C 67 0x43 195 0xc3
D 68 0x44 196 0xc4
E 69 0x45 197 0xc5
F 70 0x46 198 0xc6
G 71 0x47 199 0xc7
H 72 0x48 200 0xc8
I 73 0x49 201 0xc9
J 74 0x4a 209 0xd1
K 75 0x4b 210 0xd2
L 76 0x4c 211 0xd3
M 77 0x4d 212 0xd4
N 78 0x4e 213 0xd5
O 79 0x4f 214 0xd6
P 80 0x50 215 0xd7
Q 81 0x51 216 0xd8
R 82 0x52 217 0xd9
S 83 0x53 226 0xe2
T 84 0x54 227 0xe3
U 85 0x55 228 0xe4
V 86 0x56 229 0xe5
W 87 0x57 230 0xe6
X 88 0x58 231 0xe7
Y 89 0x59 232 0xe8
Z 90 0x5a 233 0xe9
[ 91 0x5b 173 0xad
\ 92 0x5c 224 0xe0
] 93 0x5d 189 0xbd
^ 94 0x5e 95 0x5f
_ 95 0x5f 109 0x6d
` 96 0x60 121 0x79
a 97 0x61 129 0x81
b 98 0x62 130 0x82
c 99 0x63 131 0x83
d 100 0x64 132 0x84
e 101 0x65 133 0x85
f 102 0x66 134 0x86
g 103 0x67 135 0x87
h 104 0x68 136 0x88
i 105 0x69 137 0x89
j 106 0x6a 145 0x91
k 107 0x6b 146 0x92
l 108 0x6c 147 0x93
m 109 0x6d 148 0x94
n 110 0x6e 149 0x95
o 111 0x6f 150 0x96
p 112 0x70 151 0x97
q 113 0x71 152 0x98
r 114 0x72 153 0x99
s 115 0x73 162 0xa2
t 116 0x74 163 0xa3
u 117 0x75 164 0xa4
v 118 0x76 165 0xa5
w 119 0x77 166 0xa6
x 120 0x78 167 0xa7
y 121 0x79 168 0xa8
z 122 0x7a 169 0xa9
{ 123 0x7b 192 0xc0
| 124 0x7c 79 0x4f
} 125 0x7d 208 0xd0
~ 126 0x7e 161 0xa1
Example

The following example creates a two-way binding between an EBCDIC character and an ASCII character:

tn3270 character-map 0x81 0x78
Related Commands

show tn3270 ascii-hexval
show tn3270 character-map

tn3270 datastream

Use the tn3270 datastream extended global configuration command to enable the TN3270 extended datastream. Use the no form of the command to return to the normal TN3270 datastream.

tn3270 datastream [extended | normal]
no tn3270 datastream

Syntax Description
extended Extended datastream.
normal Normal datastream.
Default

Normal datastream

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

This command causes an "-E" to be appended to the terminal type string sent to the IBM host. This allows you to use the extended TN3270 features.

Example

The following example shows the supported tn3270 datastream options:

cserver(config)#tn3270 datastream ?
  extended  Use extended TN3270 datastream
  normal    Use normal TN3270 datastream

tn3270 null-processing

Use the tn3270 null-processing global configuration command to specify how NULLs are handled. Use the no form of the command to return to 7171 NULL processing.

tn3270 null-processing [3270 | 7171]
no tn3270 null-processing
[3270 | 7171]
Syntax Description
3270 NULLs are compressed out of the string, as on a 3278-x terminal.
7171 NULLs are converted to spaces, as on a 7171 controller.
Default

7171 NULL processing

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

If a user enters data, uses an arrow key to move the cursor to the right on the screen, and then enters more data, the intervening spaces are filled with NULLs. To specify how NULLs are handled, enter the command tn3270 null-processing either with the argument 3270, where NULLs are compressed out of the string (as on a real 3278-x terminal) or the argument 7171, where NULLs are converted to spaces as on a 7171 controller. Enter this command in global configuration.

Example

This example shows the two available null processing methods.

cserver(config)#tn3270 null-processing ?
  3270  Use 3270-style null processing
  7171  Use 7171-style null processing

tn3270 optimize-cursor-move

To increase performance between a remote user and a TN3270 host by limiting cursor movement information that is sent to user terminals, issue the tn3270 optimize-cursor-move global configuration command. To ensure that all cursor movement information is sent between the user's terminal and the TN3270 host, use the no form of the command.

tn3270 optimize-cursor-move
no tn3270 optimize-cursor-move

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Cursor movement escape strings are sent to the terminal.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Issuing this command increases the speed of information transfer between users and TN3270 hosts through an access server.

If you do not issue this command, virtually every byte of information between the user's terminal and the TN3270 host is prepended and trailed by cursor-movement strings.

Example

The following example disables status messages to users who are connected to 3278 terminals:

Router(config)# tn3270 optimize-cursor-move

Related Command

tn3270 status-message

tn3270 reset-required

Use the tn3270 reset-required global configuration command to lock a terminal after input error until the user resets the terminal. Use the no form of the command to return to the default of no reset required.

tn3270 reset-required
no tn3270 reset-required

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No reset is required

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

On a 3278-x terminal, the keyboard is locked and further input is not permitted after input error (due to field overflow, invalid entry, and so on.), until the user presses the RESET key. Most TN3270 implementations leave the keyboard unlocked and remove any error message on the next key input after the error. Use this command to lock the keyboard until the user performs a reset.

tn3270 status-message

To save bandwidth on asynchronous lines by not displaying status messages, issue the no tn3270 status-message global configuration command. To reenable the display of status messages after they have been disabled, issue the tn3270 status-message command.

tn3270 status-message
no tn3270 status-message

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Status messages appear.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Status messages appear on the user's console by default. These messages include "System Locked," "Field error," and "System UnLocked" messages, among others. These messages are sent back to the user's terminal via the TTY line on the access server.

Disabling status messages saves bandwidth on asynchronous lines, which have very low bandwidth.

Example

The following example disables status messages to users who are connected to 3278 terminals:

Router(config)# no tn3270 status-message 
Related Command

tn3270 optimize-cursor-move

tn3270 typeahead

To buffer keyboard data when a 3278 server is in locked mode, issue the tn3270 typeahead global configuration command. To disable the typeahead function, use the no form of this command.

tn3270 typeahead
no tn3270 typeahead

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

No typeahead

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

When typeahead is enabled, the TN3270 client implementation in the Cisco IOS software permits you (the user) continue typing while the system is trying to obtain a response from the TN3270 server. Information you type while a "System Locked" message appears on the terminal is stored in a buffer. After the "System Locked" message disappears, the information is then used as though it were just typed.

Example

The following example saves user information when "System Locked" messages appear on the screen:

heyjude(config)# tn3270 typeahead ?
Related Command

tn3270 reset-required

ttycap

To define characteristics of a terminal emulation file, use the ttycap global configuration command. To delete any named ttycap entry from the configuration file, use the no form of this command.

ttycap ttycap-name termcap-entry
no ttycap ttycap-name

Syntax Description
ttycap-name Name of a file. It can be up to 32 characters long and must be unique.
termcap-entry Commands that define the tttycap. Consists of two parts (see Usage Guidelines for details).
Default

VT100 terminal emulation

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Use the EXEC command show ttycap to test for the availability of a ttycap.


Note Do not type a ttycap entry filename "default" or the Cisco IOS software will adopt the newly defined entry as the default.

The termcap-entry consists of two parts: a name portion and a capabilities portion:

The following example illustrates a name specification for a VT100 termcap.
d0|vt100|vt100-am|vt100am|dec vt100:
A Boolean flag can be set to true by including the two-character capability name in the termcap entry. The absence of any supported flag results in the flag being set to false.
The following is an example of a backspace Boolean flag:
bs:

A string sequence is a two-character capability name followed by an equal sign (=) and the character sequence.

The following example illustrates the capability for homing the cursor:

ho=\E[H:

The sequence \E represents the ESC character.

Control characters can be represented in string sequences by entering a two-character sequence starting with a caret symbol (^), followed by the character to be used as a control character.

The following example illustrates the definition of a control character.

bc=^h:

In this example, the backspace is entered into the termcap-entry as the string sequence as the characters "^h."

A numeric sequence is a two-character capability name followed by an number symbol (#) and the number.

The following example represents the number of columns on a screen.

co#80:

Use the backslash symbol ( \ ) to extend the definition to multiple lines. The end of the ttycap termcap-entry is specified by a colon terminating a line followed by an end-of-line character and no backslash.

For the definitions of supported Boolean-flag ttycap capabilities, see Table 68. For the definitions of supported string-sequence ttycap capabilities, see Table 69. For the definitions of supported number-sequence ttycap capabilities, see Table 70. For the definitions of supported color-sequence ttycap capabilities, see Table 71.


Table 68: Definitions of Ttycap Capabilities: Boolean Flags
Boolean Flag Description
am Automatic margin
bs Terminal can backspace with bs
ms Safe to move in standout modes
nc No currently working carriage return
xn NEWLINE ignored after 80 columns (Concept)
xs Standout not erased by overwriting (Hewlett-Packard)


Table 69: Definitions of Ttycap Capabilities: String Sequences
String Sequence Description
AL Add line below with cursor sequence
bc Backspace if not ^h
bt Backtab sequence
ce Clear to end of line
cl Clear screen, cursor to upper left
cm Move cursor to row # and col #
cr Carriage return sequence
cs Change scrolling region
DL Delete the line the cursor is on
ei End insert mode
ho Home, move cursor to upper left
ic Character insert
im Begin insert mode
is Initialization string (typically tab stop initialization)
ll Move cursor to lower left corner
md Turn on bold (extra bright) character attribute
me Turn off all character attributes
nd Nondestructive space
nl Newline sequence
pc Pad character if not NULL
rc Restore cursor position
rs Resets terminal to known starting state
sc Save cursor position
se End standout mode (highlight)
so Start standout mode (highlight)
ta Tab
te End programs that use cursor motion
ti Initialization for programs that use cursor motion
uc Underline character at cursor
ue End underline mode
up Move cursor up
us Begin underline mode
vb Visual bell
vs Visual cursor
ve Normal cursor


Table 70: Definitions of Ttycap Capabilities: Number Sequences
Number Sequence Description
li Lines on the screen
co Columns on the screen
sg Standout glitch, number of spaces printed when entering or leaving standout display mode
ug Underline glitch, number of spaces printed when entering or leaving underline mode


Table 71: Definitions of Ttycap Capabilities: Color Sequences
Color Sequence Description
x0 Black
x1 Blue
x2 Red or orange
x3 Pink or purple
x4 Green, which is the default color.
x5 Turquoise
x6 Yellow
x7 Grey or white

The ttycap database uses these color sequences to translate IBM directives into screen drawing commands. These color sequences control only foreground terminal colors. They do not control background color, which is configured to black by default.

Example

The following is an example of a ttycap file. Refer to the chapter "Configuring TN3270" in the Access Services Configuration Guide and the tn3270.examples file in the Cisco ftp@cisco.com directory for more examples.

ttycap ttycap1\
d0|vt100|vt100-am|vt100am|dec vt100:do=^J:co#80:li#24:\
cl=50^[[;H^[[2J:bs:am:cm=5^[[%i%d;%dH:nd=2^[[C:up=2^[[A:\
ce=3^[[K:so=2^[[7m:se=2^[[m:us=2^[[4m:ue=2^[[m:md=2^[[1m:\
me=2^[[m:ho=^[[H:xn:sc=^[7:rc=^[8:cs=^[[%i%d;%dr:
Related Commands

keymap-type
terminal-type


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