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Table of Contents

User Interface Commands

User Interface Commands

This chapter describes the commands used to enter and exit the various Cisco Internetwork Operating System (Cisco IOS) configuration command modes. It provides a description of the help command and help features, lists the command editing keys and functions, and details the command history feature.

You can abbreviate the syntax of Cisco IOS configuration commands. The software recognizes a command when you enter enough characters of the command to uniquely identify it.

For user interface task information and examples, see the "Understanding the User Interface" chapter of the Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide.

disable

To exit privileged EXEC mode and return to user EXEC mode, enter the disable EXEC command.

disable [level]
Syntax Description
level (Optional) Specifies the user-privilege level.

Note The disable command is associated with privilege level 0. If you configure AAA authorization for a privilege level greater than 0, this command will not be included in the command set for that privilege level.
Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command with the level option to reduce the user-privilege level. If a level is not specified, it defaults to the user EXEC mode, which is level 1.

Example

In the following example, entering the disable command causes the system to exit privileged EXEC mode and return to user EXEC mode as indicated by the angle bracket (>):

Router# disable
Router>
Related Command

enable

editing

To enable enhanced editing mode for a particular line, use the editing line configuration command. To disable the enhanced editing mode, use the no form of this command.

editing
no editing

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Table 1 provides a description of the keys used to enter and edit commands. Ctrl indicates the Control key. It must be pressed simultaneously with its associated letter key. Esc indicates the Escape key. It must be pressed first, followed by its associated letter key. Keys are case sensitive.


Table  1: Editing Keys and Functions for Software Release 9.21 and Later
Keys Function
Tab Completes a partial command name entry. When you enter a unique set of characters and press the Tab key, the system completes the command name. If you enter a set of characters that could indicate more than one command, the system beeps to indicate an error. Enter a question mark (?) immediately following the partial command (no space). The system provides a list of commands that begin with that string.
Delete or Backspace Erases the character to the left of the cursor.
Return At the command line, pressing the Return key performs the function of processing a command. At the "---More---" prompt on a terminal screen, pressing the Return key scrolls down a line.
Space Bar Allows you to see more output on the terminal screen. Press the space bar when you see the line "---More---" on the screen to display the next screen.
Left Arrow1 Moves the cursor one character to the left. When you enter a command that extends beyond a single line, you can press the Left Arrow key repeatedly to scroll back toward the system prompt and verify the beginning of the command entry.
Right Arrow1 Moves the cursor one character to the right.
Up Arrow1 or Ctrl-P Recalls commands in the history buffer, beginning with the most recent command. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively older commands.
Down Arrow1 or
Ctrl-N
Return to more recent commands in the history buffer after recalling commands with the Up Arrow or Ctrl-P. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively more recent commands.
Ctrl-A Moves the cursor to the beginning of the line.
Ctrl-B Moves the cursor back one character.
Ctrl-D Deletes the character at the cursor.
Ctrl-E Moves the cursor to the end of the command line.
Ctrl-F Moves the cursor forward one character.
Ctrl-K Deletes all characters from the cursor to the end of the command line.
Ctrl-L and Ctrl-R Redisplays the system prompt and command line.
Ctrl-T Transposes the character to the left of the cursor with the character located at the cursor.
Ctrl-U and Ctrl-X Deletes all characters from the cursor back to the beginning of the command line.
Ctrl-V and Esc Q Inserts a code to indicate to the system that the keystroke immediately following should be treated as a command entry, not as an editing key.
Ctrl-W Deletes the word to the left of the cursor.
Ctrl-Y Recalls the most recent entry in the delete buffer. The delete buffer contains the last ten items you have deleted or cut. Ctrl-Y can be used in conjunction with Esc Y.
Ctrl-Z Ends configuration mode and returns you to the EXEC prompt.
Esc B Moves the cursor back one word.
Esc C Capitalizes the word from the cursor to the end of the word.
Esc D Deletes from the cursor to the end of the word.
Esc F Moves the cursor forward one word.
Esc L Changes the word to lowercase at the cursor to the end of the word.
Esc U Capitalizes from the cursor to the end of the word.
Esc Y Recalls the next buffer entry. The buffer contains the last ten items you have deleted. Press Ctrl-Y first to recall the most recent entry. Then press Esc Y up to nine times to recall the remaining entries in the buffer. If you bypass an entry, continue to press Esc Y to cycle back to it.

1 The arrow keys function only with ANSI-compatible terminals.

Table 2 lists the editing keys and functions of the earlier software release.


Table  2: Editing Keys and Functions for Software Release 9.1 and Earlier
Key Function
Delete or Backspace Erases the character to the left of the cursor.
Ctrl-W Erases a word.
Ctrl-U Erases a line.
Ctrl-R Redisplays a line.
Ctrl-Z Ends configuration mode and returns to the EXEC prompt.
Return Executes single-line commands.
Example

In the following example, enhanced editing mode is disabled on line 3:

line 3
no editing
Related Command

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

terminal editing +

enable

To enter privileged EXEC mode, use the enable EXEC command.

enable [level]
Syntax Description
level (Optional) Privileged level on which to log in.

Note The enable command is associated with privilege level 0. If you configure AAA authorization for a privilege level greater than 0, this command will not be included in the command set for that privilege level.
Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Because many of the privileged commands set operating parameters, privileged access should be password-protected to prevent unauthorized use. If the system administrator has set a password with the enable password global configuration command, you are prompted to enter it before being allowed access to privileged EXEC mode. The password is case sensitive.

If an enable password has not been set, enable mode only can be accessed from the router console. If a level is not specified, it defaults to the privileged EXEC mode, which is level 15.

Example

In the following example, the user enters the enable command and is prompted to enter a password. The password is not displayed on the screen. After the user enters the correct password, the system enters privileged command mode as indicated by the pound sign (#).

Router> enable
Password:
Router#
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

disable
enable password
+

end

To exit configuration mode, or any of the configuration submodes, use the end global configuration command.

end
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can also press Ctrl-Z to exit configuration mode.

Example

In the following example, the name is changed to george using the hostname global configuration command. Entering the end command causes the system to exit configuration mode and return to EXEC mode.

Router(config)# hostname george
george(config)# end
george#
Related Command

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

hostname +

exit

To exit any configuration mode or close an active terminal session and terminate the EXEC, use the exit command at the system prompt.

exit
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Available in all command modes.

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use the exit command at the EXEC levels to exit the EXEC mode. Use the exit command at the configuration level to return to privileged EXEC mode. Use the exit command in interface, line, router, IPX-router, and route-map command modes to return to global configuration mode. Use the exit command in subinterface configuration mode to return to interface configuration mode. You also can press Ctrl-Z, or use the end command, from any configuration mode to return to privileged EXEC mode.


Note The exit command is associated with privilege level 0. If you configure AAA authorization for a privilege level greater than 0, this command will not be included in the command set for that privilege level.
Examples

In the following example, the user exits subinterface configuration mode to return to interface configuration mode:

Router(config-subif)# exit
Router(config-if)#

The following example shows how to exit an active session.

Router> exit
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

disconnect +
end
logout
+

full-help

To get help for the full set of user-level commands, use the full-help command.

full-help
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Available in all command modes.

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The full-help command enables (or disables) an unprivileged user to see all of the help messages available. It is used with the show? command.

Example

The following example is output for show? with full-help disabled:

Router> 		show ?
clock 			     Display the system clock
history    	Display the session command history
hosts 		     IP domain-name, lookup style, nameservers, and host table
sessions   	Information about Telnet connections
terminal   	Display terminal configuration parameters
users 	     Display information about terminal lines
version 	   System hardware and software status
Related Command

help

help

To display a brief description of the help system, enter the help command.

help
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Available in all command modes.

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The help command provides a brief description of the context-sensitive help system.


Note The help command is associated with privilege level 0. If you configure AAA authorization for a privilege level greater than 0, this command will not be included in the command set for that privilege level.
Examples

Enter the help command for a brief description of the help system:

Router# help
Help may be requested at any point in a command by entering
a question mark '?'. If nothing matches, the help list will
be empty and you must backup until entering a '?' shows the
available options.
Two styles of help are provided:
1. Full help is available when you are ready to enter a
   command argument (e.g. 'show ?') and describes each possible
   argument.
2. Partial help is provided when an abbreviated argument is entered
   and you want to know what arguments match the input
   (e.g. 'show pr?'.)

The following example shows how to use word help to display all the privileged EXEC commands that begin with the letters "co":

Router# co?
configure  connect  copy

The following example shows how to use command syntax help to display the next argument of a partially complete access-list command. One option is to add a wildcard mask. The <cr> symbol indicates that the other option is to press Return to execute the command.

Router(config)# access-list 99 deny 131.108.134.234 ?
  A.B.C.D  Mask of bits to ignore
<cr>
Related Command

full-help

history

To enable the command history function, or to change the command history buffer size for a particular line, use the history line configuration command. To disable the command history feature, use the no form of this command.

history [size number-of-lines]
no history
[size number-of-lines]
Syntax Description
size number-of-lines (Optional) Specifies the number of command lines that the system will record in its history buffer. The range is 0 to 256.
Default

10 lines

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The history command without the size keyword and the number-of-lines argument enables the history function with the last buffer size specified or with the default of 10 lines, if there was not a prior setting.

The no history command without the size keyword and the number-of lines argument disables the history feature but remembers the buffer size if it was something other than the default. The no history size command resets the buffer size to 10.


Note The history size command only sets the size of the buffer; it does not reenable the history feature. If the no history command is used, the history command must be used to reenable this feature.

The command history feature provides a record of EXEC commands that you have entered. This feature is particularly useful for recalling long or complex commands or entries, including access lists.

Table 3 lists the keys and functions you can use to recall commands from the command history buffer.


Table  3: History Keys
Key Functions
Ctrl-P or Up Arrow1 Recalls commands in the history buffer in a backward sequence, beginning with the most recent command. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively older commands.
Ctrl-N or Down Arrow1 Returns to more recent commands in the history buffer after recalling commands with Ctrl-P or the Up Arrow. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively more recent commands.

1 The arrow keys function only with ANSI-compatible terminals such as VT100s.
Example

In the following example, line 4 is configured with a history buffer size of 35 lines:

line 4
history size 35
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

show history
terminal history size
+

ip http access-class

To assign an access-list to the http server used by the Cisco IOS ClickStart software or the Cisco Web browser interface, use the ip http access-class global configuration command. To remove the assigned access list, use the no form of this command.

ip http access-class {access-list-number | name}
no ip http access-class
{access-list-number | name}
Syntax Description
access-list-number Standard IP access list number in the range 0 to 99, as configured by the access-list (standard) command.
name Name of a standard IP access list, as configured by the ip access-list command.
Default

There is no access list applied to the http server.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

If this command is configured, the specified access list is assigned to the http server. Before the http server accepts a connection, it checks the access list. If the check fails, the http server does not accept the request for a connection.

Example

The following command assigns the access list named marketing to the http server:

ip http access-class marketing
ip access-list standard marketing
 permit 192.5.34.0  0.0.0.255
 permit 128.88.0.0  0.0.255.255
 permit 36.0.0.0  0.255.255.255
! (Note: all other access implicitly denied)
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

ip access-list +
ip http server

ip http port

To specify the port to be used by the Cisco IOS ClickStart software or the Cisco Web browser interface, use the ip http port global configuration command. To use the default port, use the no form of this command.

ip http port number
no ip http port

Syntax Description
number Port number for use by ClickStart or the Cisco Web browser interface. The default is 80.
Default

80

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use this command if ClickStart or the Cisco Web browser interface cannot use port 80.

Example

The following command configures the router so that you can use ClickStart or the Cisco Web browser interface via port 60:

ip http server
ip http port 60
Related Command

ip http server

ip http server

To enable a Cisco 1003, Cisco 1004, or Cisco 1005 router to be configured from a browser using the Cisco IOS ClickStart software, and to enable any router to be monitored or have its configuration modified from a browser using the Cisco Web browser interface, use the ip http server global configuration command. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

ip http server
no ip http server

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

This feature is enabled on Cisco 1003, Cisco 1004, and Cisco 1005 routers that have not yet been configured. For Cisco 1003, Cisco 1004, and Cisco 1005 routers that have already been configured, and for all other routers, this feature is disabled.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Example

The following command configures the router so that you can use the Cisco Web browser interface to issue commands to it:

ip http server
Related Commands

ip http access-class
ip http port

menu (EXEC)

Use the menu EXEC command to invoke a user menu.

menu name
Syntax Description
name The configuration name of the menu.
Command Mode

User EXEC mode or privileged EXEC mode

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

A menu can be invoked at either the user or privileged EXEC level, but if an item in the menu contains a privileged EXEC command, the user must be logged in at the privileged level for the command to succeed.

Example

The following example shows how to invoke the menu named Access1:

menu Access1

menu (global)

Use the menu global configuration command with the appropriate keyword to specify menu-display options. Use the no form of the global configuration command to delete a specified, or named, menu from the configuration.

menu name [clear-screen | line-mode | single-space | status-line]
no menu
name
Syntax Description
name The configuration name of the menu.
clear-screen (Optional) Clears the terminal screen before displaying a menu.
line-mode (Optional) In a menu of nine or fewer items, you ordinarily select a menu item by entering the item number. In line mode, you select a menu entry by entering the item number and pressing Return. Line mode allows you to backspace over the selected number and enter another number before pressing Return to execute the command. This option is activated automatically when more than nine menu items are defined but also can be configured explicitly for menus of nine or fewer items.
single-space (Optional) Displays menu items single-spaced rather than double-spaced. This option is activated automatically when more than nine menu items are defined but also can be configured explicitly for menus of nine or fewer items.
status-line (Optional) Displays a line of status information about the current user.
Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The clear-screen option uses a terminal-independent mechanism based on termcap entries defined in the router and the terminal type configured for the user's terminal. The clear-screen option allows the same menu to be used on multiple types of terminals instead of having terminal-specific strings embedded within menu titles. If the termcap entry does not contain a clear string, the menu system enters 24 newlines, causing all existing text to scroll off the top of the terminal screen.

The status-line option displays the status information at the top of the screen before the menu title is displayed. This status line includes the router's host name, the user's line number, and the current terminal type and keymap type (if any).

A menu can be activated at the user EXEC level or at the privileged EXEC level, depending upon whether the given menu contains menu entries using privileged commands.

When a particular line should always display a menu, that line can be configured with an autocommand configuration command. The menu should not contain any exit paths that leave users in an unfamiliar interface environment.

Menus can be run on a per-user basis by defining a similar autocommand for that local username.

Examples

The following example shows how to invoke the menu named Access1:

menu Access1

The following example shows how to display the status information using the status-line option for the menu named Access1:

menu Access1 status-line
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

menu command +
menu text
menu title
resume
+

menu command

Use the menu command global configuration command to specify underlying commands for user interface menus.

menu name command number
Syntax Description
name The configuration name of the menu. You can specify a maximum of 20 characters.
number The selection number associated with the menu entry. This number is displayed to the left of the menu entry. You can specify a maximum of 18 menu entries. When the tenth item is added to the menu, the line-mode and single-space options are activated automatically.
Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The menu command and menu text commands define a menu entry. These commands must use the same menu name and menu selection number.

The menu command has a special option, menu-exit, that is available only within menus. It is used to exit a submenu and return to the previous menu level or exit the menu altogether and return to the EXEC command prompt.

You can create submenus that are opened by selecting a higher-level menu entry. Use the menu command to invoke a menu as the command in a line specifying a higher-level menu entry.


Note If you nest too many levels of menus, the system prints an error message on the terminal and returns to the previous menu level.

When a menu allows connections (their normal use), the command for an entry activating the connection should contain a resume command, or the line should be configured to prevent users from escaping their sessions with the escape-char none command. Otherwise, when they escape from a connection and return to the menu, there will be no way to resume the session and it will sit idle until the user logs off.

Specifying the resume command as the action that is performed for a selected menu entry permits a user to resume a named connection or connect using the specified name, if there is no active connection by that name. As an option, you can also supply the connect string needed to connect initially. When you do not supply this connect string, the command uses the specified connection name.

You can also use the resume/next command, which resumes the next connection in the user's list of connections. This function allows you to create a single menu entry that steps through all of the user's connections.

Refer to the Access Services Configuration Guide for more information on the menu command.

Example

The following example shows how to specify the commands to be executed when a user enters the selection number associated with the menu entry for the menu named Access1:

menu Access1 command 1 tn3270 vms.cisco.com
menu Access1 command 2 rlogin unix.cisco.com
menu Access1 command 3 menu-exit
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

menu (global) +
menu text
menu title
resume
+

menu text

Use the menu text global configuration command to specify the text of a menu item in a user interface menu.

menu name text number
Syntax Description
name The configuration name of the menu. You can specify a maximum of 20 characters.
number The selection number associated with the menu item. This number is displayed to the left of the menu item. You can specify a maximum of 18 menu items. When the tenth item is added to the menu, the line-mode and single-space options are activated automatically.
Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The menu text command and the menu command define a menu item. These commands must use the same menu name and menu selection number.

You can specify a maximum of 18 items in a menu.

Example

The following example shows how to specify the descriptive text for the three entries in the menu Access1:

menu Access1 text 1 IBM Information Systems
menu Access1 text 2 UNIX Internet Access
menu Access1 text 3 Exit menu system
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

menu (global)
menu command
menu title
resume
+

menu title

Use the menu title global configuration command to create a title, or banner, for a user menu.

menu name title delimiter
Syntax Description
name The configuration name of the menu. You can specify a maximum of 20 characters.
delimiter Characters that mark the beginning and end of a title. Text delimiters are characters that do not ordinarily appear within the text of a title, such as slash ( / ), double quote ("), and tilde ( ~ ). Ctrl-C is reserved for special use and should not be used in the text of the title.
Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The menu title command must use the same menu name used with the menu text and menu command commands used to create a menu.

You can position the title of the menu horizontally by preceding the title text with blank characters. You can also add lines of space above and below the title by pressing Return.

Follow the title keyword with one or more blank characters and a delimiting character of your choice. Then enter one or more lines of text, ending the title with the same delimiting character. You cannot use the delimiting character within the text of the message.

When you are configuring from a terminal and are attempting to include special control characters, such as a screen-clearing string, you must use Ctrl-V before the special control characters so that they are accepted as part of the title string. The string ^[[H^[[J is an escape string used by many VT100-compatible terminals to clear the screen. To use a special string, you must enter Ctrl-V before each escape character.

You also can use the clear-screen option of the menu command to clear the screen before displaying menus and submenus, instead of embedding a terminal-specific string in the menu title. The clear-screen option allows the same menu to be used on different types of terminals.

Example

The following example specifies the title that will be displayed when the menu Access1 is invoked:

cs101(config)# menu Access1 title /^[[H^[[J
               Welcome to Access1 Internet Services
               
                  Type a number to select an option;
                           Type 9 to exit the menu.
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

menu (global)
menu command
menu text
resume
+

show history

To list the commands you have entered in the current EXEC session, use the show history EXEC command.

show history
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The command history feature provides a record of EXEC commands you have entered. The number of commands that the history buffer will record is determined by the history size line configuration command or the terminal history size EXEC command.

Table 4 lists the keys and functions you can use to recall commands from the command history buffer.


Table  4: History Keys
Key Function
Ctrl-P or Up Arrow Recalls commands in the history buffer in a backward sequence, beginning with the most recent command. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively older commands.
Ctrl-N or Down Arrow Returns to more recent commands in the history buffer after recalling commands with Ctrl-P or the Up Arrow. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively more recent commands.
Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show history command, which lists the commands the user has entered in EXEC mode for this session:

Router# show history
  help
  where
  show hosts
  show history
Router# 
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

history size
terminal history size
+

terminal editing

To enable the enhanced editing mode on the local line, use the terminal editing EXEC command. To disable the enhanced editing mode on the current line, use the no form of this command.

terminal editing
terminal no editing

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Table 5 provides a description of the keys used to enter and edit commands. Ctrl indicates the Control key. It must be pressed simultaneously with its associated letter key. Esc indicates the Escape key. It must be pressed first, followed by its associated letter key. Keys are not case sensitive.


Table  5: Command Editing Keys and Functions
Keys Function
Tab Completes a partial command name entry. When you enter a unique set of characters and press the Tab key, the system completes the command name. If you enter a set of characters that could indicate more than one command, the system beeps to indicate an error. Enter a question mark (?) immediately following the partial command (no space). The system provides a list of commands that begin with that string.
Delete or Backspace Erases the character to the left of the cursor.
Return At the command line, pressing the Return key performs the function of processing, or carrying out, a command. At the "---More---" prompt on a terminal screen, pressing the Return key scrolls down a line.
Space Bar Scrolls down a page on the terminal screen. Press the space bar when you see the line
"---More---" on the screen to display the next screen.
Left arrow1 Moves the cursor one character to the left. When you enter a command that extends beyond a single line, you can continue to press the left arrow key at any time to scroll back toward the system prompt and verify the beginning of the command entry.
Right arrow1 Moves the cursor one character to the right.
Up arrow1 or Ctrl-P Recalls commands in the history buffer, beginning with the most recent command. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively older commands.
Down arrow1 or
Ctrl-N
Return to more recent commands in the history buffer after recalling commands with the
Up arrow or Ctrl-P. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively more recent commands.
Ctrl-A Moves the cursor to the beginning of the line.
Ctrl-B Moves the cursor back one character.
Ctrl-D Deletes the character at the cursor.
Ctrl-E Moves the cursor to the end of the command line.
Ctrl-F Moves the cursor forward one character.
Ctrl-K Deletes all characters from the cursor to the end of the command line.
Ctrl-L and Ctrl-R Redisplays the system prompt and command line.
Ctrl-T Transposes the character to the left of the cursor with the character located at the cursor.
Ctrl-U and Ctrl-X Deletes all characters from the cursor back to the beginning of the command line.
Ctrl-V and Esc Q Inserts a code to indicate to the system that the key stroke immediately following should be treated as a command entry, not as an editing key.
Ctrl-W Deletes the word to the left of the cursor.
Ctrl-Y Recalls the most recent entry in the delete buffer. The delete buffer contains the last ten items you have deleted or cut. Ctrl-Y can be used in conjunction with Esc Y.
Ctrl-Z Ends configuration mode and returns you to the EXEC prompt.
Esc B Moves the cursor back one word.
Esc C Capitalizes the word at the cursor.
Esc D Deletes from the cursor to the end of the word.
Esc F Moves the cursor forward one word.
Esc L Changes the word at the cursor to lowercase.
Esc U Capitalizes from the cursor to the end of the word.
Esc Y Recalls the next buffer entry. The buffer contains the last ten items you have deleted. Press Ctrl-Y first to recall the most recent entry. Then press Esc Y up to nine times to recall the remaining entries in the buffer. If you bypass an entry, continue to press Esc Y to cycle back to it.

1 The arrow keys function only with ANSI-compatible terminals.

The editing keys and functions for Software Release 9.1 and earlier are listed in Table 6.


Table  6: Editing Keys and Functions for Software Release 9.1 and Earlier
Key Function
Delete or Backspace Erases the character to the left of the cursor.
Ctrl-W Erases a word.
Ctrl-U Erases a line.
Ctrl-R Redisplays a line.
Ctrl-Z Ends configuration mode and returns to the EXEC prompt.
Return Executes single-line commands.
Example

In the following example, enhanced mode editing is reenabled for the current terminal session:

terminal editing
Related Command

editing

terminal full-help (EXEC)

To get help for the full set of user-level commands, use the terminal full-help EXEC command.

terminal full-help
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The terminal full-help command enables (or disables) a user to see all of the help messages available from the terminal. It is used with the show ? command.

Example

The following example is output for show ? with terminal full-help enabled:

Router> terminal full-help
Router> show ?
                                 
access-lists  List access lists
appletalk     AppleTalk information
arap          Show Appletalk Remote Access statistics
arp           ARP table
async         Information on terminal lines used as router interfaces...
Related Commands

full-help
help

terminal history

To enable the command history feature for the current terminal session or change the size of the command history buffer for the current terminal session, use the terminal history EXEC command. To disable the command history feature or reset the command history buffer to its default size, use the no form of this command.

terminal history [size number-of-lines]
terminal no history
[size]
Syntax Description
size (Optional) Sets command history buffer size.
number-of-lines (Optional) Specifies the number of command lines that the system will record in its history buffer. The range is 0 to 256.
Default

10 lines

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The history command without the size keyword and argument enables the command history feature with the last buffer size specified or the default size. The no history command without the size keyword disables the command history feature. The no history size command resets the buffer size to the default of 10 command lines.

The history command provides a record of EXEC commands you have entered. This feature is particularly useful to recall long or complex commands or entries, including access lists.

Table 7 lists the keys and functions you can use to recall commands from the history buffer.


Table  7: History Keys
Key Function
Ctrl-P or up arrow1 Recalls commands in the history buffer in a backward sequence, beginning with the most recent command. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively older commands.
Ctrl-N or down arrow1 Returns to more recent commands in the history buffer after recalling commands with Ctrl-P or the up arrow. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively more recent commands.

1 The arrow keys function only with ANSI-compatible terminals such as VT100s.
Example

In the following example, the number of command lines recorded is set to 15 for the local line:

terminal history size 15
Related Commands

history
show history


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