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Table of Contents

System Management Commands

System Management Commands

This chapter describes the commands used to manage the system and its performance on the network. In general, system or network management falls into the following categories. The commands that perform the tasks in these management categories are described in this chapter unless specified otherwise.

The configuration of network routers determines how the network operates. To manage router configurations, you need to list and compare configuration files on running routers, store configuration files on network servers for shared access, and perform software installations and upgrades. (Configuration management commands required to perform these tasks are described in the "System and Configuration File Load Commands" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.)
Other configuration management tasks include naming the router, setting time services, configuring for synchronous logging of unsolicited messages and debug output, configuring a router for weighted fair queueing, and configuring SNMP support. Configuration management commands required to perform these tasks are described in this chapter.
To manage network faults, you need to discover, isolate, and fix the problems. You can discover problems with the system's monitoring commands, isolate problems with the system's test commands, and resolve problems with other commands, including debug.
This chapter describes general fault management commands. For detailed troubleshooting procedures and a variety of scenarios, see the Troubleshooting Internetworking Systems publication. For complete details on all debug commands, see the Debug Command Reference.
To manage system performance, you need to monitor and determine response time, error rates, and availability. Once these factors are determined, you can perform load-balancing and modify system parameters to enhance performance. For example, priority queuing allows you to prioritize traffic order. You can configure fast and autonomous switching to improve network throughput, as described in the "Configuring Interfaces" chapter of the Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide.
See the Internetwork Design Guide for additional information.

For system management configuration tasks and examples, refer to the chapter entitled "Managing the System" in the Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide.

access-enable

To enable the router to create a temporary access list entry in a dynamic access list, use the access-enable EXEC command.

access-enable [host] [timeout minutes]
Syntax Description

host

(Optional) Tells the software to enable access only for the host from which the Telnet session originated. If not specified, the software allows all hosts on the defined network to gain access. The dynamic access list contains the network mask to use for enabling the new network.

timeout minutes

(Optional) Specifies an idle timeout for the temporary access list entry. If the access list entry is not accessed within this period, it is automatically deleted and requires the user to authenticate again. The default is for the entries to remain permanently. It is recommended that this value equal the idle timeout set for the WAN connection.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command enables the lock-and-key access feature.

You should always define either an idle timeout (with the timeout keyword in this command) or an absolute timeout (with the timeout keyword in the access-list command). Otherwise, the temporary access list entry will remain, even after the user has terminated his session.

Example

The following example causes the software to create a temporary access list entry and tells the software to enable access only for the host from which the Telnet session originated. If the access list entry is not accessed within 2 minutes, it is deleted.

autocommand access-enable host timeout 2
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

access-list (extended)
autocommand

access-template

To manually place a temporary access list entry on a router to which you are connected, use the access-template EXEC command.

access-template [access-list-number] [dynamic-name] [source] [destination] [timeout minutes]
Syntax Description

access-list-number

Number of the dynamic access list.

dynamic-name

(Optional) Name of a dynamic access list.

source

(Optional) Source address in a dynamic access list. The keywords host and any are allowed. All other attributes are inherited from the original access-list entry.

destination

(Optional) Destination address in a dynamic access list. The keywords host and any are allowed. All other attributes are inherited from the original access-list entry.

timeout minutes

(Optional) Specifies a maximum time limit for each entry within this dynamic list. This is an absolute time, from creation, that an entry can reside in the list. The default is an infinite time limit and allows an entry to remain permanently.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command provides a way to enable the lock-and-key access feature.

You should always define either an idle timeout (with the timeout keyword in this command) or an absolute timeout (with the timeout keyword in the access-list command). Otherwise, the dynamic access list will remain, even after the user has terminated the session.

Example

In the following example, the software enables IP access on incoming packets in which the source address is 172.30.1.129 and the destination address is 172.16.52.12. All other source and destination pairs are discarded.

access-template 101 payroll host 172.30.1.129 host 172.16.52.12 timeout 2
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

access-list (extended)
autocommand
clear access-template

alias

To create a command alias, use the alias global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to delete all aliases in a command mode or to delete a specific alias, and to revert to the original command syntax.

alias mode alias-name alias-command-line
no alias mode [alias-name]

Syntax Description

mode

Command mode of the original and alias commands. See Table 61 for a list of options for this argument.

alias-name

Command alias.

alias-command-line

Original command syntax.

Defaults

Default aliases are in EXEC mode as follows:
Command Alias Original Command

h

help

lo

logout

p

ping

r

resume

s

show

w

where

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

You can use simple words or abbreviations as aliases. The aliases in the Default section are predefined. They can be turned off using the no alias command.

Table 61 shows the acceptable options for the mode argument in the alias global configuration command.


Table 61: Mode Argument Options
Argument Options Mode

configuration

Global configuration

controller

Controller configuration

exec

EXEC

hub

Hub configuration

interface

Interface configuration

ipx-router

IPX router configuration

line

Line configuration

map-class

Map class configuration

map-list

Map list configuration

route-map

Route map configuration

router

Router configuration

See the summary of command modes in the "User Interface" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide for more information about command modes.

When you use online help, command aliases are indicated by an asterisk (*), as follows:

Router#lo?
*lo=logout    lock    login    logout 

When you use online help, aliases that contain spaces (for example, telnet device.cisco.com 25) are displayed as follows:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# alias exec device-mail telnet device.cisco.com 25
Router(config)# end
Router# device-mail?
*device-mail="telnet device.cisco.com 25" 

When you use online help, the alias is expanded and replaced with the original command, as shown in the following example with the td alias:

Router(config)# alias exec td trace device
Router(config)# ^Z
Router# t?
*td="trace device" telnet terminal test tn3270
trace               

To list only commands and omit aliases, begin your input line with a space. In the following example, the alias td is not shown, because there is a space before the t? command line.

Router# t?
telnet terminal test tn3270 trace

As with commands, you can use online help to display the arguments and keywords that can follow a command alias. In the following example, the alias td is created to represent the command telet device. The /debug and /line switches can be added to telnet device to modify the command:

Router(config)# alias exec td telnet device
Router(config)# ^Z
Router# td  ?
      /debug     Enable telnet debugging mode
      /line      Enable telnet line mode
            ...
      whois      Whois port
      <cr>
Router# telnet device

You must enter the complete syntax for the alias command. Partial syntax for aliases are not accepted. In the following example, the parser does not recognize the command t as indicating the alias td.

bones# t
% Ambiguous command: "t"
Example

In the following example, the alias fixmyrt is created for the ip route198.92.116.16.

alias exec fixmyrt clear ip route 198.92.116.16
Related Command

show aliases

buckets-of-history-kept

To set the number of history buckets that are kept during the response time reporter probe's lifetime, use the buckets-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

buckets-of-history-kept size
no buckets-of-history-kept

Syntax Description

size

Number of history buckets kept during the response time reporter probe's lifetime. The default is 50 buckets.

Default

50 buckets

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

A response time reporter probe can collect history and capture statistics. By default, history is not collected. When a problem arises where history is useful (for example, a large number of timeouts are occurring), you can configure the lives-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration command to collect history. You can optionally adjust the buckets-of-history-kept, filter-for-history, and sample-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration commands.

When the number of buckets reaches the size specified, no further history for this life is stored.


Note Collecting history increases the RAM usage. Only collect history when you think there is a problem. For general network response time information, use statistics.

If history is collected, each bucket contains one or more history entries from the probe. When the probe type is pathEcho, an entry is created for each hop along the path that the probe takes to reach its destination. The type of entry stored in the history table is controlled by the filter-for-history response time reporter configuration command. The total number of entries stored in the history table is controlled by the combination of samples-of-history-kept, buckets-of-history-kept, and lives-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration commands.

Each time the probe starts a response time reporter operation, a new bucket is created until the number of history buckets matches the specified size or the probe's lifetime expires. History buckets do not wrap. The probe's lifetime is defined by the rtr schedule global configuration command. The probe starts a response time reporter operation based on the seconds specified by the frequency response time reporter configuration command.

Example

In the following example, probe 1 is configured to keep 25 history buckets during the probe's lifetime:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.161.21
  buckets-of-history-kept 25
  lives-of-history-kept 1
Related Commands

filter-for-history
lives-of-history-kept
rtr
rtr schedule
samples-of-history-kept

buffers

Use the buffers global configuration command to make adjustments to initial buffer pool settings and to the limits at which temporary buffers are created and destroyed. Use the no form of this command to return the buffers to their default size.

buffers {small | middle | big | verybig | large | huge | type number} {permanent | max-free
| min-free | initial} number
no buffers {small | middle | big | verybig | large | huge | type number} {permanent | max-free
| min-free | initial} number
Syntax Description

small

Buffer size of this public buffer pool is 104 bytes.

middle

Buffer size of this public buffer pool is 600 bytes.

big

Buffer size of this public buffer pool is 1524 bytes.

verybig

Buffer size of this public buffer pool is 4520 bytes.

large

Buffer size of this public buffer pool is 5024 bytes.

huge

Default buffer size of this public buffer pool is 18024 bytes. This value can be configured with the buffers huge size command.

type number

Interface type and interface number of the interface buffer pool. The type value cannot be fddi.

permanent

Number of permanent buffers that the system tries to create and keep. Permanent buffers are normally not trimmed by the system.

max-free

Maximum number of free or unallocated buffers in a buffer pool.
A maximum of 20,480 small buffers can be constructed in the pool.

min-free

Minimum number of free or unallocated buffers in a buffer pool.

initial

Number of additional temporary buffers that are to be allocated when the system is reloaded. This keyword can be used to ensure that the system has necessary buffers immediately after reloading in a high-traffic environment.

number

Number of buffers to be allocated.

Default

The default number of buffers in a pool is determined by the hardware configuration and can be displayed with the EXEC show buffers command.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Normally you need not adjust these parameters; do so only after consulting with technical support personnel. Improper settings can adversely impact system performance.

You cannot configure FDDI buffers.

Examples of Public Buffer Pool Tuning

In the following example, the system will try to keep at least 50 small buffers free:

buffers small min-free 50

In the following example, the permanent buffer pool allocation for big buffers is increased to 200:

buffers big permanent 200
Example of Interface Buffer Pool Tuning

A general guideline is to display buffers with the show buffers command, observe which buffer pool is depleted, and increase that one.

In the following example, the permanent Ethernet 0 interface buffer pool on a Cisco 4000 is increased to 96 because the Ethernet 0 buffer pool is depleted:

buffers ethernet 0 permanent 96
Related Commands

buffers huge size
show buffers

buffers huge size

Use the buffers huge size global configuration command to dynamically resize all huge buffers to the value you specify. Use the no form of this command to restore the default buffer values.

buffers huge size number
no buffers huge size number

Syntax Description

number

Size of huge buffers, in bytes.

Default

18024 bytes

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use only after consulting with technical support personnel. The buffer size cannot be lowered below the default.

Example

In the following example, the system will resize huge buffers to 20000 bytes:

buffers huge size 20000
Related Commands

buffers
show buffers

calendar set

To set the system calendar for a Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, or Cisco 4500 series, use the calendar set EXEC command.

calendar set hh:mm:ss day month year
calendar set hh:mm:ss month day year

Syntax Description

hh:mm:ss

Current time in hours (military format), minutes, and seconds.

day

Current day (by date) in the month.

month

Current month (by name).

year

Current year (no abbreviation).

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

After you set the Cisco 7000, Cisco 7200, or Cisco 4500 calendar, the system clock will be automatically set when the system is restarted or when the clock read-calendar EXEC command is issued. The calendar maintains its accuracy, even after a power failure or system reboot has occurred. The time specified in this command is relative to the configured time zone.

Example

In the following example, the system calendar is manually set to 1:32 p.m. on July 23, 1993:

calendar set 13:32:00 23 July 1993
Related Commands

clock read-calendar
clock set
clock summer-time
clock timezone
clock update-calendar

cdp enable

To enable Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) on an interface, use the cdp enable interface configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable CDP on an interface.

cdp enable
no cdp enable

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled at the global level and on all supported interfaces.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

CDP is enabled by default at the global level and on each supported interface in order to send or receive CDP information. However, some interfaces, such as ATM interfaces, do not support CDP.


Note The cdp enable, cdp timer, and cdp run commands affect the operation of the IP on demand routing feature (that is, the router odr global configuration command). For more information on the router odr command, see the "IP Routing Protocols Commands" chapter in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.
Example

In the following example, CDP is enabled on Ethernet interface 0:

interface ethernet 0
cdp enable
Related Command

cdp run

cdp holdtime

To specify the amount of time the receiving device should hold a CDP packet from your router before discarding it, use the cdp holdtime global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to revert to the default setting.

cdp holdtime seconds
no cdp holdtime

Syntax Description

seconds

Specifies the hold time to be sent in the CDP update packets.

Default

180 seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

CDP packets are sent with time-to-live, or hold time, that is nonzero after an interface is enabled and a hold time of 0 immediately before an interface is idled down.

The CDP hold time must be set to a higher number of seconds than the time between CDP transmissions, which is set using the cdp timer command.

Example

In the following example, the CDP packets being sent from your router should be held by the receiving device for 60 seconds before being discarded. You might want to set the hold time lower than the default setting of 180 seconds if information about your router changes often and you want the receiving devices to purge this information more quickly.

cdp holdtime 60
Related Commands

cdp timer
show cdp

cdp run

To enable CDP, use the cdp run global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable CDP.

cdp run
no cdp run

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

CDP is enabled on your router by default, which means the Cisco IOS software will receive CDP information. CDP also is enabled on supported interfaces by default. To disable CDP on an interface, use the no cdp enable interface configuration command.


Note The cdp enable, cdp timer, and cdp run commands affect the operation of the IP on demand routing feature (that is, the router odr global configuration command). For more information on the router odr command, see the "IP Routing Protocols Commands" chapter in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.
Example

In the following example, CDP is disabled:

no cdp run
Related Command

cdp enable

cdp timer

To specify how often the Cisco IOS software sends CDP updates, use the cdp timer global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to revert to the default setting.

cdp timer seconds
no cdp timer

Syntax Description

seconds

Specifies how often the Cisco IOS software sends CDP updates.

Default

60 seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

The trade-off with sending more frequent transmissions is providing up-to-date information versus using bandwidth more often.


Note The cdp enable, cdp timer, and cdp run commands affect the operation of the IP on demand routing feature (that is, the router odr global configuration command). For more information on the router odr command, see the "IP Routing Protocols Commands" chapter in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.
Example

In the following example, CDP updates are sent every 80 seconds, less frequently than the default setting of 60 seconds. You might want to make this change if you are concerned about preserving bandwidth.

cdp timer 80
Related Commands

cdp holdtime
show cdp

clear cdp counters

To reset CDP traffic counters to zero (0), use the clear cdp counters privileged EXEC command.

clear cdp counters
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Example

In the following example, the CDP counters have been cleared. The show cdp traffic output shows that all of the traffic counters have been reset to zero (0).

Router# clear cdp counters
Router# show cdp traffic
CDP counters:
        Packets output: 0, Input: 0
        Hdr syntax: 0, Chksum error: 0, Encaps failed: 0
        No memory: 0, Invalid packet: 0, Fragmented: 0
Related Commands

clear cdp table
show cdp traffic

clear cdp table

To clear the table that contains CDP information about neighbors, use the clear cdp table privileged EXEC command.

clear cdp table
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Example

In the following example, the CDP table is cleared. The output of the show cdp neighbors command shows that all information has been deleted from the table.

Router# clear cdp table 
CDP-AD: Deleted table entry for neon.cisco.com, interface Ethernet0
CDP-AD: Deleted table entry for neon.cisco.com, interface Serial0
Router# show cdp neighbors
Capability Codes: R - Router, T - Trans Bridge, B - Source Route Bridge
                  S - Switch, H - Host, I - IGMP
 
Device ID        Local Intrfce     Holdtme    Capability    Platform    Port ID
Related Commands

clear cdp counters
show cdp neighbors

clear logging

To clear messages from the logging buffer, use the clear logging privileged EXEC command.

clear logging
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Example

In the following example, the logging buffer is cleared.

Router# clear logging
Clear logging buffer [confirm]
Router#
Related Commands

logging buffered
show logging

clock calendar-valid

To configure the Cisco 7000 series or the Cisco 4500 as a time source for a network based on its calendar, use the clock calendar-valid global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to set the Cisco IOS software so that the calendar is not an authoritative time source.

clock calendar-valid
no clock calendar-valid

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Neither the Cisco 7000 nor the Cisco 4500 are not configured as a time source.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command if no outside time source is available.

Example

In the following example, the Cisco 7000 is configured as the time source for a network based on its calendar:

clock calendar-valid
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

ntp master
vines time use-system

clock read-calendar

To manually read the calendar into either the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, or Cisco 4500 series clock, use the clock read-calendar EXEC command.

clock read-calendar
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When either the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, or Cisco 4500 series calendar is rebooted, the calendar is automatically read into the system clock. However, you may use this command to manually read the calendar setting into the system clock. This command is useful if the calendar set command has been used to change the setting of the calendar.

Example

In the following example, the system clock is configured to set its date and time by the calendar setting:

clock read-calendar
Related Commands

calendar set
clock set
clock update-calendar
ntp update-calendar

clock set

To manually set the system clock, use the clock set EXEC command.

clock set hh:mm:ss day month year
clock set hh:mm:ss month day year

Syntax Description

hh:mm:ss

Current time in hours (military format), minutes, and seconds.

day

Current day (by date) in the month.

month

Current month (by name).

year

Current year (no abbreviation).

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Generally, if the system is synchronized by a valid outside timing mechanism, such as an NTP or VINES clock source, or if you have a Cisco 7000 or Cisco 7200 with calendar capability, you do not need to set the system clock. Use this command if no other time sources are available. The time specified in this command is relative to the configured time zone.

Example

In the following example, the system clock is manually set to 1:32 p.m. on July 23, 1993:

clock set 13:32:00 23 July 1993
Related Commands

calendar set
clock read-calendar
clock summer-time
clock timezone

clock summer-time

To configure the system to automatically switch to summer time (daylight savings time), use one of the formats of the clock summer-time configuration command. Use the no form of this command to configure the Cisco IOS software not to automatically switch to summer time.

clock summer-time zone recurring [week day month hh:mm week day month hh:mm [offset]]
clock summer-time zone date date month year hh:mm date month year hh:mm [offset]
clock summer-time zone date month date year hh:mm month date year hh:mm [offset]
no clock summer-time
Syntax Description

zone

Name of the time zone (PDT,...) to be displayed when summer time is in effect.

week

Week of the month (1 to 5 or last).

day

Day of the week (Sunday, Monday,...).

date

Date of the month (1 to 31).

month

Month (January, February,...).

year

Year (1993 to 2035).

hh:mm

Time (military format) in hours and minutes.

offset

(Optional) Number of minutes to add during summer time (default is 60).

Default

Summer time is disabled. If clock summer-time zone recurring is specified without parameters, the summer time rules default to United States rules. Default of offset is 60.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command if you want to automatically switch to summer time (for display purposes only). Use the recurring form of the command if the local summer time rules are of this form. Use the date form to specify a start and end date for summer time if you cannot use the first form.

In both forms of the command, the first part of the command specifies when summer time begins, and the second part specifies when it ends. All times are relative to the local time zone. The start time is relative to standard time. The end time is relative to summer time. If the starting month is after the ending month, the system assumes that you are in the Southern Hemisphere.

Examples

In the following example, summer time starts on the first Sunday in April at 02:00 and ends on the last Sunday in October at 02:00:

clock summer-time PDT recurring 1 Sunday April 2:00 last Sunday October 2:00

If you live in a place where summer time does not follow the pattern in the first example, you could set it to start on October 12, 1993 at 02:00, and end on April 28, 1994 at 02:00, with the following example:

clock summer-time date 12 October 1993 2:00 28 April 1994 2:00
Related Commands

calendar set
clock timezone

clock timezone

To set the time zone for display purposes, use the clock timezone global configuration command. To set the time to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), use the no form of this command.

clock timezone zone hours [minutes]
no clock timezone

Syntax Description

zone

Name of the time zone to be displayed when standard time is in effect.

hours

Hours offset from UTC.

minutes

(Optional) Minutes offset from UTC.

Default

UTC

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The system internally keeps time in UTC, so this command is used only for display purposes and when the time is manually set.

Example

In the following example, the timezone is set to Pacific Standard Time and is offset 8 hours behind UTC:

clock timezone PST -8
Related Commands

calendar set
clock set
clock summer-time
show clock

clock update-calendar

To set the Cisco 7000, Cisco 7200, or Cisco 4500 calendar from the system clock, use the clock update-calendar EXEC command.

clock update-calendar
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If the system clock and calendar are not synchronized, and the system clock is more accurate, use this command to update the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, or Cisco 4500 series calendar to the correct date and time.

Example

In the following example, the current time is copied from the system clock to the Cisco 7000 calendar:

clock update-calendar
Related Commands

clock read-calendar
ntp update-calendar

custom-queue-list

To assign a custom queue list to an interface, use the custom-queue-list interface configuration command. To remove a specific list or all list assignments, use the no form of the command.

custom-queue-list list
no custom-queue-list [list]
Syntax Description

list

Number of the custom queue list you want to assign to the interface. An integer from 1 to 16.

Default

No custom queue list is assigned.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.


Note Custom queuing is not supported on tunnels.

Only one queue list can be assigned per interface. Use this command in place of the priority-list command (not in addition to it). Custom queuing allows a fairness not provided with priority queuing. With custom queuing, you can control the interfaces' available bandwidth when it is unable to accommodate the aggregate traffic enqueued. Associated with each output queue is a configurable byte count, which specifies how many bytes of data should be delivered from the current queue by the system before the system moves on to the next queue. When a particular queue is being processed, packets are sent until the number of bytes sent exceeds the queue byte count or until the queue is empty.

Use the show queuing custom and show interface commands to display the current status of the custom output queues.

Example

In the following example, custom queue list number 3 is assigned to serial interface 0:

interface serial 0
custom-queue-list 3
Related Commands

queue-list default
queue-list interface
queue-list protocol
queue-list queue byte-count
queue-list queue limit

distributions-of-statistics-kept

To set the number of statistic distributions kept per hop during the response time reporter probe's lifetime, use the distributions-of-statistics-kept response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

distributions-of-statistics-kept size
no distributions-of-statistics-kept

Syntax Description

size

Number of statistic distributions kept per hop. The default is 1 distribution.

Default

1 distribution

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

In most situations, you do not need to change the statistic distribution size for the response time reporter. Only change the size when distributions are needed (for example, when performing statistical modeling of your network).


Note Increasing the distributions also increases the RAM usage. The total number of statistics distributions captured will be: distribution-of-statistics-kept * hops-of-statistics-kept * paths-of-statistics-kept * hours-of-statistics-kept.

When the number of distributions reaches the size specified, no further distribution information is stored.

Example

In the following example, the distribution is set to 5 and the distribution interval is set to 10 ms. This means that the first distribution will contain statistics from 0 to 9 ms, the second distribution will contain statistics from 10 to 19 ms, the third distribution will contain statistics from 20 to 29 ms, the fourth distribution will contain statistics from 30 to 39 ms, and the fifth distribution will contain statistics from 40 ms to infinity.

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.161.21
  distribution-of-statistics-kept 5
  statistics-distribution-interval 10 
Related Commands

hops-of-statistics-kept
hours-of-statistics-kept
paths-of-statistics-kept
rtr
statistics-distribution-interval

downward-compatible-config

To generate a configuration that is compatible with an earlier Cisco IOS Release, use the downward-compatible-config global configuration command. To remove this feature, use the no form of this command.

downward-compatible-config version
no downward-compatible-config

Syntax Description

version

Cisco IOS Release number, not earlier than 10.2.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

In Cisco IOS Release 10.3, IP access lists changed format. Use this command to regenerate a configuration in a format prior to Release 10.3 if you are going to downgrade from a Release 10.3 or later to an earlier release. The earliest release this command accepts is 10.2.

When this command is configured, the router attempts to generate a configuration that is compatible with the specified version. Currently, this command affects only IP access lists.

Under some circumstances, the software might not be able to generate a fully backward-compatible configuration. In such a case, the software issues a warning message.

Example

In the following example, the router attempts to generate a configuration file compatible with Cisco IOS Release 10.2:

downward-compatible-config 10.2
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

access-list (extended)
access-list (standard)

exception core-file

To specify the name of the core dump file, use the exception core-file global configuration command. To return to the default core filename, use the no form of this command.

exception core-file name
no exception core-file

Syntax Description

name

Name of the core dump file saved on the server.

Default

The core file is named hostname-core, where hostname is the name of the router.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Caution Use the exception commands only under the direction of a technical support representative. Creating a core dump while the router is functioning in a network can disrupt network operation. The resulting binary file, which is very large, must be transferred to a TFTP, FTP, or rcp server and subsequently interpreted by technical personnel who have access to source code and detailed memory maps.

If you use TFTP to dump the core file to a server, the router will only dump the first 16 MB of the core file. If the router's memory is larger than 16 MB, the whole core file will not be copied to the server. Therefore, use rcp or FTP to dump the core file.

Example

The following example configures a router to use FTP to dump a core file named dumpfile to the FTP server at 172.17.92.2 when it crashes:

ip ftp username red
ip ftp password blue
exception protocol ftp
exception dump 172.17.92.2
exception core-file dumpfile
Related Commands

exception dump
exception memory
exception protocol
ip ftp password
ip ftp username

exception dump

To configure the router to dump a core file to a particular server when the router crashes, use the exception dump global configuration command. To disable core dumps, use the no form of this command.

exception dump ip-address
no exception dump

Syntax Description

ip-address

IP address of the server that stores the core dump file.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Caution Use the exception commands only under the direction of a technical support representative. Creating a core dump while the router is functioning in a network can disrupt network operation. The resulting binary file, which is very large, must be transferred to a TFTP, FTP, or rcp server and subsequently interpreted by technical personnel who have access to source code and detailed memory maps.

If you use TFTP to dump the core file to a server, the router will only dump the first 16 MB of the core file. If the router's memory is larger than 16 MB, the whole core file will not be copied to the server. Therefore, use rcp or FTP to dump the core file.

The core dump is written to a file named hostname-core on your server, where hostname is the name of the router. You can change the name of the core file by configuring the exception core-file command.

This procedure can fail for certain types of system crashes. However, if successful, the core dump file will be the size of the memory available on the processor (for example, 16 MB for a CSC/4).

Example

The following example configures a router to use FTP to dump a core file to the FTP server at 172.17.92.2 when it crashes:

ip ftp username red
ip ftp password blue
exception protocol ftp
exception dump 172.17.92.2
Related Commands

exception core-file
exception memory
exception protocol
ip ftp password
ip ftp username
ip rcmd remote-username

exception memory

To cause the router to create a core dump and reboot when certain memory size parameters are violated, use the exception memory global configuration command. To disable the rebooting and core dump, use the no form of this command.

exception memory {fragment size | minimum size}
no exception memory {fragment | minimum}

Syntax Description

fragment size

The minimum contiguous block of memory in the free pool, in bytes.

minimum size

The minimum size of the free memory pool, in bytes.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Caution Use the exception commands only under the direction of a technical support representative. Creating a core dump while the router is functioning in a network can disrupt network operation. The resulting binary file, which is very large, must be transferred to a TFTP, FTP, or rcp server and subsequently interpreted by technical personnel who have access to source code and detailed memory maps.

This command is useful to troubleshoot memory leaks.

The size is checked every 60 seconds. If you enter a size that is greater than the free memory, a core dump and router reload is generated after 60 seconds.

The exception dump command must be configured in order to generate a core file. If the exception dump command is not configured, the router reloads without generating a core dump.

Example

The following example configures the router to monitor the free memory. If the amount of free memory falls below 250,000 bytes,the router will dump the core file and reload.

exception dump 131.108.92.2
exception core-file memory.overrun
exception memory minimum 250000
Related Commands

exception core-file
exception dump
exception protocol
ip ftp password
ip ftp username

exception protocol

To configure the protocol used for core dumps, use the exception protocol global configuration command. To configure the router to use the default protocol, use the no form of this command.

exception protocol {ftp | rcp | tftp}
no exception protocol

Syntax Description

ftp

Use FTP for core dumps.

rcp

Use rcp for core dumps.

tftp

Use TFTP for core dumps. This is the default.

Default

TFTP

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Caution Use the exception commands only under the direction of a technical support representative. Creating a core dump while the router is functioning in a network can disrupt network operation. The resulting binary file, which is very large, must be transferred to a TFTP, FTP, or rcp server and subsequently interpreted by technical personnel who have access to source code and detailed memory maps.

If you use TFTP to dump the core file to a server, the router will only dump the first 16 MB of the core file. If the router's memory is larger than 16 MB, the whole core file will not be copied to the server. Therefore, use rcp or FTP to dump the core file.

Example

The following example configures a router to use FTP to dump a core file to the FTP server at 172.17.92.2 when it crashes:

ip ftp username red
ip ftp password blue
exception protocol ftp
exception dump 172.17.92.2
Related Commands

exception core-file
exception dump
exception memory
ip ftp password
ip ftp username

fair-queue

To enable weighted fair queueing for an interface, use the fair-queue interface configuration command. To disable weighted fair queueing for an interface, use the no form of this command.

fair-queue [congestive-discard-threshold [dynamic-queues [reservable-queues]]]
no fair-queue
Syntax Description

congestive-discard-threshold

(Optional) Number of messages allowed in each queue in the range 1 to 4096. The default is 64 messages. When the number of messages in the queue for a high-bandwidth conversation reaches the specified threshold, new high-bandwidth messages are discarded.

dynamic-queues

(Optional) Number of dynamic queues used for best-effort conversations (that is, a normal conversation not requiring any special network services). Values are 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, 1024, 2048, and 4096. The default is 256.

reservable-queues

(Optional) Number of reservable queues used for reserved conversations in the range 0 to 1000. The default is 0. Reservable queues are used for interfaces configured for the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) feature.

Default

Fair queueing is enabled by default for physical interfaces whose bandwidth is less than or equal to 2.048 megabits per second (Mbps) and that do not use Link Access Procedure, Balanced (LAPB), X.25, or Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) encapsulations. (Fair queuing is not an option for these protocols.) However, if custom queuing or priority queuing is enabled for a qualifying link, it overrides fair queueing, effectively disabling it. Additionally, fair queuing is automatically disabled if you enable autonomous or SSE switching.

Fair queueing is disabled automatically on interfaces configured with the ppp multlilink command. If the no ppp multilink command is configured, you must enable fair queuing manually on the interface.

Congestive-discard-threshold: 64 messages; dynamic-queues: 256; reservable-queues: 0.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.


Note Fair queuing is not supported on tunnels.

When enabled for an interface, weighted fair queueing provides traffic priority management that automatically sorts among individual traffic streams without requiring that you first define access lists. Enabling weighted fair queueing requires use of this command only.

Weighted fair queuing can manage duplex data streams, such as those between pairs of applications, and simplex data streams such as voice or video. From the perspective of weighted fair queueing, there are two categories of sessions: high-bandwidth sessions and low-bandwidth sessions. Low-bandwidth traffic has effective priority over high-bandwidth traffic, and high-bandwidth traffic shares the transmission service proportionally according to assigned weights.

When weighted fair queuing is enabled for an interface, new messages for high-bandwidth traffic streams are discarded after the configured or default congestive-messages threshold has been met. However, low-bandwidth conversations, which include control-message conversations, continue to enqueue data. As a result, the fair queue may occasionally contain more messages than its configured threshold number specifies.

Weighted fair queuing uses a traffic data stream discrimination registry service to determine which traffic stream a message belongs to. For each forwarding protocol, Table 62 shows the attributes of a message that are used to classify traffic into data streams.


Table 62: Weighted Fair Queuing Traffic Stream Discrimination Fields
Forwarder Fields Used

AppleTalk

  • Source net, node, socket

  • Destination net, node, socket

  • Type

CLNS

  • Source NSAP

  • Destination NSAP

DECnet

  • Source address

  • Destination address

Frame Relay switching

  • DLCI value

DDN IP

  • TOS

  • IP Protocol

  • Source IP address (if message is not fragmented)

  • Destination IP address (if message is not fragmented)

  • Source TCP/UDP port

  • Destination TCP/UDP port

Transparent bridging

  • Unicast: Source MAC, Destination MAC

  • Ethertype SAP/SNAP multicast: Destination MAC address

Source-route bridging

  • Unicast: Source MAC, Destination MAC

  • SAP/SNAP multicast: Destination MAC address

VINES

  • Source Network/Host

  • Destination Network/Host

  • Level 2 Protocol

Apollo

  • Source Network/Host/Socket

  • Destination Network/Host/Socket

  • Level 2 protocol

XNS

  • Source/Destination Network/Host/Socket

  • Level 2 Protocol

Novell NetWare

  • Source/Destination Network/Host/Socket

  • Level 2 Protocol

All others (default)

Control protocols (one queue per protocol)

It is important to note that IP precedence, congestion in Frame Relay switching, and discard eligibility flags affect the weights used for queuing.

IP precedence, which is set by the host or by policy maps, is a number in the range of 0 to 7. Data streams of precedence number are weighted so that they are given an effective bit rate of number+1 times as fast as a data stream of precedence 0, which is normal.

In Frame Relay switching, message flags for congestion (FECN and BECN) and discard eligible (DE) message flags cause the algorithm to select weights that effectively impose reduced queue priority, providing the application with "slow down" feedback and sorting traffic, giving the best service to applications within their Committed Information Rate.

Fair queuing is supported for all LAN and line (WAN) protocols except X.25. These protocols are listed in "Default." Because tunnels are software interfaces that are themselves routed over physical interfaces, fair queuing is not supported for tunnels. Fair queuing is on by default for interfaces with bandwidth less than or equal to 2 Mbps.


Note For Release 10.3 and earlier for the Cisco 7000 and 7500 with an RSP card, if you used the tx-queue-limit command to set the transmit (tx-queue) limit available to an interface on an MCI or SCI card and you configured custom queuing or priority queuing for that interface, the configured transmit (tx-queue) limit was automatically overridden and set to 1. With this release, for weighted fair queuing, custom queuing, and priority queuing, the transmit (tx-queue) limit is derived from the bandwidth value set for the interface using the bandwidth command. Bandwidth value divided by 512 rounded up yields the effective transmit (tx-queue) limit. However, the derived value only applies in the absence of a tx-queue-limit command; that is, a configured transmit (tx-queue) limit overrides this derivation.

When Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) is configured on an interface that supports fair queuing or on an interface that is configured for fair queuing with the reservable queues set to 0 (the default), the reservable queue size is automatically configured using the following method: interface bandwidth divided by 32 kbps. You can override this be specifying a reservable queue other than 0. For more information on RSVP, refer to the "Configuring IP Routing" chapter in the Network Protocols Configuration Guide, Part 1.

Examples

The following example enables use of weighted fair queuing on Serial 0, with a congestive threshold of 300. This means that messages will be discarded from the queuing system only when 300 or more messages have been queued and the message is in a data stream that has more than one message in the queue. The transmit queue limit is set to 2, based on the 384-kilobit (kb) line set by the bandwidth command:

interface serial 0
  bandwidth 384
  fair-queue 300

The following example requests a fair queue with 512 dynamic queues, 18 RSVP queues, and a congestive discard threshold of 64 messages:

interface Serial 3/0
  ip unnumbered Ethernet 0/0
  fair-queue 64 512 18
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

custom-queue-list
ip rsvp bandwidth

priority-group
priority-list default
queue-list default
random-detect
show interface

filter-for-history

To define the type of information kept in the history table for the response time reporter probe, use the filter-for-history response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

filter-for-history {none | all | overThreshold | failures}
no filter-for-history {none | all | overThreshold | failures}
Syntax Description

none

No history kept. This is the default.

all

All probe operations attempted are kept in the history table.

overThreshold

Only packets that are over the threshold are kept in the history table.

failures

Only packets that fail for any reason are kept in the history table.

Default

none

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the filter-for-history command to control what gets stored in the history table for the response time reporter. To control how much history gets saved in the history table, use the lives-of-history-kept, buckets-of-history-kept, and the samples-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration commands.

A probe can collect history and capture statistics. By default, history is not collected. When a problem arises where history is useful (for example, a large number of timeouts are occurring), you can configure the lives-of-history-kept command to collect history.


Note Collecting history increases the RAM usage. Only collect history when you think there is a problem. For general network response time information, use statistics.
Example

In the following example, only probe packets that fail are kept in the history table:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.161.21
  lives-of-history-kept 1
  filter-for-history failures
Related Commands

buckets-of-history-kept
lives-of-history-kept
rtr
samples-of-history-kept

frequency

To set the rate at which the response time reporter probe starts a response time operation, use the frequency response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

frequency second
no frequency

Syntax Description

second

Number of seconds between the probe's response time reporter operations. The default value is 60 seconds.

Default

60 seconds

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Caution For normal operation, do not set the frequency value to less than 60 seconds for the following reasons: It is not needed when keeping statistics (the default), and it can slow down the WAN because of the potential overhead that numerous probes can cause.

If the probe takes longer to execute the current response time reporter operation than the specified frequency value, a statistics counter called busy is incremented in lieu of starting a second operation.

The value specified for the frequency command cannot be less than the value specified for the timeout response time reporter configuration command.

Example

In the following example, the probe is configured to execute a response time reporter operation every 90 seconds:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.176
  frequency 90
Related Commands

rtr
timeout

hops-of-statistics-kept

To set the number of hops for which statistics are maintained per path for the response time reporter probe, use the hops-of-statistics-kept response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

hops-of-statistics-kept size
no hops-of-statistics-kept

Syntax Description

size

Number of hops for which statistics are maintained per path. The default is 16 hops for type pathEcho and 1 hop for type echo.

Default

16 hops for type pathEcho

1 hop for type echo

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

One hop is the passage of a timed packet from this router to another network device. The other network device (is assumed to) be a device along the path to the destination (including the destination) when the probe type is pathEcho, or just the destination when the type is echo.

When the number of hops reaches the size specified, no further hop information is stored.

Example

In the following example, probe 2's statistics are maintained for only 10 hops:

rtr 2
  type pathecho protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.177
  hops-of-statistics-kept 10
Related Commands

distributions-of-statistics-kept
hours-of-statistics-kept
paths-of-statistics-kept
rtr
statistics-distribution-interval

hostname

To specify or modify the host name for the network server, use the hostname global configuration command. The host name is used in prompts and default configuration filenames. The setup command facility also prompts for a host name at startup.

hostname name
Syntax Description

name

New host name for the network server.

Default

The factory-assigned default host name is router.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The order of display at startup is banner message-of-the-day (MOTD), then login and password prompts, then EXEC banner.

Do not expect case to be preserved. Upper- and lowercase characters look the same to many internet software applications (often under the assumption that the application is doing you a favor). It may seem appropriate to capitalize a name the same way you might do in English, but conventions dictate that computer names appear all lowercase. For more information, refer to RFC 1178, Choosing a Name for Your Computer.

The name must also follow the rules for ARPANET host names. They must start with a letter, end with a letter or digit, and have as interior characters only letters, digits, and hyphens. Names must be 63 characters or fewer. For more information, refer to RFC 1035, Domain Names-Implementation and Specification.

Example

The following example changes the host name to sandbox:

hostname sandbox

hours-of-statistics-kept

To set the number of hours for which statistics are maintained for the response time reporter probe, use the hours-of-statistics-kept response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

hours-of-statistics-kept hours
no hours-of-statistics-kept

Syntax Description

hours

Number of hours that the router maintains statistics. The default is 2 hours.

Default

2 hours

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

When the number of hours exceeds the specified value, the statistics table wraps (that is, the oldest information is replaced by newer information).

Example

In the following example, probe 2's statistics are maintained for 3 hours:

rtr 2
  type pathecho protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.177
  hours-of-statistics-kept 3
Related Commands

distributions-of-statistics-kept
hops-of-statistics-kept
paths-of-statistics-kept
rtr
statistics-distribution-interval

ip bootp server

To access the BOOTP service available from hosts on the network, use the ip bootp server global configuration command. Use the no form of the command to disable these services.

ip bootp server
no ip bootp server

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

By default, the BOOTP server is enabled.

When you disable the BOOTP server, access to the BOOTP ports cause the Cisco IOS software to send an "ICMP port unreachable" message to the sender and discard the original incoming packet.


Note Unlike defaults for other commands, this command will display when you perform show running config to display current settings, whether or not you have changed the default using the no ip boopt server command.
Example

The following example disables the BOOTP service on the router:

no ip bootp server

ip ftp passive

To configure the router to use only passive FTP connections, use the ip ftp passive global configuration command. To allow all types of FTP connections, use the no form of this command.

ip ftp passive
no ip ftp passive

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

All types of FTP connections are allowed.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Example

The following example configures the router to use only passive FTP connections:

ip ftp passive
Related Commands

ip ftp password
ip ftp source-interface
ip ftp username

ip ftp password

To specify the password to be used for FTP connections, use the ip ftp password global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return the password to its default.

ip ftp password [type] password
no ip ftp password
Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Type of encryption to use on the password. A value of 0 disables encryption. A value of 7 indicates proprietary encryption.

password

Password to use for FTP connections.

Default

The router forms a password username@routername.domain. The variable username is the username associated with the current session, routername is the configured host name, and domain is the domain of the router.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Example

The following example configures the router to use the username red and the password blue for FTP connections:

ip ftp username red
ip ftp password blue
Related Commands

ip ftp passive
ip ftp source-interface
ip ftp username

ip ftp source-interface

To specify the source IP address for FTP connections, use the ip ftp source-interface global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to use the address of the interface where the connection is made.

ip ftp source-interface interface
no ip ftp source-interface

Syntax Description

interface

The interface type and number to use to obtain the source address for FTP connections.

Default

The FTP source address is the the IP address of the interface the FTP packets use to leave the router.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Use this command to set the same source address for all FTP connections.

Example

The following example configures the router to use the IP address associated with the Ethernet 0 interface as the source address on all FTP packets, regardless of which interface is actually used to transmit the packet:

ip ftp source-interface ethernet 0
Related Commands

ip ftp passive
ip ftp password
ip ftp username

ip ftp username

To configure the username for FTP connections, use the ip ftp username global configuration command. To configure the router to attempt anonymous FTP, use the no form of this command.

ip ftp username username
no ip ftp username

Syntax Description

username

Username for FTP connections.

Default

The Cisco IOS software attempts an anonymous FTP.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

The remote username must be associated with an account on the destination server.

Example

The following example configures the router to use the username red and the password blue for FTP connections:

ip ftp username red
ip ftp password blue
Related Commands

ip ftp passive
ip ftp password
ip ftp source-interface


ip telnet source-interface

Use the ip telnet source-interface global configuration command to allow a user to select an address of an interface as the source address for Telnet connections.

ip telnet source-interface interface
no ip telnet source-interface

Syntax Description

interface

The interface whose address is to be used as the source for Telnet connections.

Default

The address of the closest interface to the destination as the source address. If the selected interface is not "up," the Cisco IOS software selects the address of the closest interface to the destination as the source address.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Use this command to set an interface's IP address as the source for all telnet connections.

Example

The following example makes the IP address for interface Ethernet 1 as the source address for telnet connections:

ip telnet source-interface e 1
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

ip tacacs source-interface
ip tftp source-interface
ip radius source-interface

ip tftp source-interface

Use the ip tftp source-interface global configuration command to allow a user to select the interface whose address will be used as the source address for TFTP connections.

ip tftp source-interface interface
no ip tftp source-interface

Syntax Description

interface

The interface whose address is to be used as the source for TFTP connections.

Default

The address of the closest interface to the destination as the source address. If the selected interface is not "up," the Cisco IOS software selects the address of the closest interface to the destination as the source address.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Use this command to set an interface's IP address as the source for all TFTP connections.

Example

The following example makes the IP address for interface Ethernet 1 as the source address for TFTP connections:

ip tftp source-interface e 1
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

ip radius source-interface
ip tacacs source-interface
ip telnet source-interface

lives-of-history-kept

To set the number of lives maintained in the history table for the response time reporter probe, use the lives-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

lives-of-history-kept lives
no lives-of-history-kept

Syntax Description

lives

Number of lives maintained in the history table for the probe. The default is 0 lives.

Default

0 lives

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The default value (0 lives) means that history is not collected for the probe. To disable history collection, use the default value for the lives-of-history-kept command rather than use the filter-for-history none response time reporter configuration command because the lives-of-history-kept command disables history collection before the probe's operation is attempted and the filter-for-history command checks for history inclusion after the probe's operation attempt is made.

When the number of lives exceeds the specified value, the history table wraps (that is, the oldest information is replaced by newer information).

When a probe makes a transition from pending to active, a life starts. When a probe's life ends, the probe makes a transition from active to pending.

Example

In the following example, probe 1's history is maintained for 5 lives:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.176
  lives-of-history-kept 5
Related Commands

buckets-of-history-kept
filter-for-history
rtr
samples-of-history-kept

load-interval

To change the length of time for which data is used to compute load statistics, use the load-interval interface configuration command. Use the no form of this command to revert to the default setting.

load-interval seconds
no load-interval seconds

Syntax Description

seconds

Length of time for which data is used to compute load statistics. A value that is a multiple of 30, from 30 to 600 (30, 60, 90, 120, and so forth).

Default

300 seconds (or 5 minutes)

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

If you want load computations to be more reactive to short bursts of traffic, rather than averaged over five-minute periods, you can shorten the length of time over which load averages are computed.

If the load interval is set to thirty seconds, new data is used for load calculations over a thirty-second period. This data is used to compute load statistics, including input rate in bits and packets per second, output rate in bits and packets per second, load, and reliability.

Load data is gathered every five seconds. This data is used for a weighted average calculation in which more-recent load data has more weight in the computation than older load data. If the load interval is set to thirty seconds, the average is computed for the last thirty seconds of load data.

The load-interval command allows you to change the default interval of five minutes to a shorter or longer period of time. If you change it to a shorter period of time, the input and output statistics that are displayed when you use the show interface command will be more current, and based on more instantaneous data, rather than reflecting a more average load over a longer period of time.

This command is often used for dial backup purposes, to increase or decrease the likelihood of a backup interface being implemented, but it can be used on any interface.

Example

In the following example, the default five-minute average is set it to a thirty-second average. A burst in traffic that would not trigger a dial backup for an interface configured with the default five-minute interval might trigger a dial backup for this interface that is set for a shorter, thirty-second interval.

interface serial 0
load-interval 30
Related Command

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

show interfaces

logging

To log messages to a syslog server host, use the logging global configuration command. The no form of this command deletes the syslog server with the specified address from the list of syslogs.

logging host
no logging host

Syntax Description

host

Name or IP address of the host to be used as a syslog server.

Default

No messages are logged to a syslog server host.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command identifies a syslog server host to receive logging messages. By issuing this command more than once, you build a list of syslog servers that receive logging messages.

Example

The following example logs messages to a host named johnson:

logging johnson
Related Commands

logging trap
service timestamps

logging buffered

To log messages to an internal buffer, use the logging buffered global configuration command. The no form of this command cancels the use of the buffer. The default form of this command returns the buffer size to the default size.

logging buffered [size]
no logging buffered
default logging buffered

Syntax Description

size

(Optional) Size of the buffer from 4096 to 4294967295 bytes. The default size varies by platform.

Default

For most platforms, the Cisco IOS software logs messages to the internal buffer.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command copies logging messages to an internal buffer. The buffer is circular in nature, so newer messages overwrite older messages after the buffer is filled.

To display the messages that are logged in the buffer, use the EXEC command show logging. The first message displayed is the oldest message in the buffer.

Do not make the buffer size too large because the router could run out of memory for other tasks. You can use the show memory EXEC command to view the free processor memory on the router; however, this is the maximum available and should not be approached. The command default logging buffered resets the buffer size to the default for the platform.

Example

The following example illustrates how to enable logging to an internal buffer:

logging buffered
Related Commands

clear logging
show logging

logging console

To limit messages logged to the console based on severity, use the logging console global configuration command. The no form of this command disables logging to the console terminal.

logging console level
no logging console

Syntax Description

level

Limits the logging of messages displayed on the console terminal to a specified level. See Table 63 for a list of the level keywords.

Default

debugging

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Specifying a level causes messages at that level and numerically lower levels to be displayed at the console terminal.

The EXEC command show logging displays the addresses and levels associated with the current logging setup, as well as any other logging statistics.


Table 63: Error Message Logging Priorities
Level Name Level Description Syslog Definition

emergencies

0

System unusable

LOG_EMERG

alerts

1

Immediate action needed

LOG_ALERT

critical

2

Critical conditions

LOG_CRIT

errors

3

Error conditions

LOG_ERR

warnings

4

Warning conditions

LOG_WARNING

notifications

5

Normal but significant condition

LOG_NOTICE

informational

6

Informational messages only

LOG_INFO

debugging

7

Debugging messages

LOG_DEBUG

The effect of the log keyword with the IP access list (extended) command depends on the setting of the logging console command. The log keyword takes effect only if the logging console level is set to 6 or 7. If you change the default to a level lower than 6 and specify the log keyword with the IP access list (extended) command, no information is logged or displayed.

Example

The following example changes the level of messages displayed to the console terminal to alerts, which means alerts and emergencies are displayed:

logging console alerts
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

logging facility
access-list (extended)

logging facility

To configure the syslog facility in which error messages are sent, use the logging facility global configuration command. To revert to the default of local7, use the no form of this command.

logging facility facility-type
no logging facility

Syntax Description

facility-type

Syslog facility. See Table 64 for the facility-type keywords.

Default

local7

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Table 64 describes the acceptable options for the facility-type keyword.


Table 64: Logging Facility-Type Keywords
Keyword Description

auth

Authorization system

cron

Cron facility

daemon

System daemon

kern

Kernel

local0-7

Reserved for locally defined messages

lpr

Line printer system

mail

Mail system

news

USENET news

sys9

System use

sys10

System use

sys11

System use

sys12

System use

sys13

System use

sys14

System use

syslog

System log

user

User process

uucp

UNIX-to-UNIX copy system

Example

The following example configures the syslog facility to kernel:

logging facility kern
Related Command

logging console

logging history

To limit syslog messages sent to the router's history table and the SNMP network management station based on severity, use the logging history global configuration command. The no form of this command returns the logging of syslog messages to the default level.

logging history level
no logging history

Syntax Description

level

Limits the messages saved in the history table and sent to the SNMP network management station to the specified set of levels. See Table 65 for a list of the level keywords.

Default

warnings, errors, critical, alerts, and emergencies messages

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Sending syslog messages to the SNMP network management station occurs when you enable syslog traps with the snmp-server enable trap global configuration command. Because SNMP traps are inherently unreliable and much too important to lose, at least one syslog message, the most recent message, is stored in a history table on the router. The number of messages stored in the table is governed by the logging history size command.

Specifying a level causes messages at that severity level and numerically lower levels to be stored in the router's history table and sent to the SNMP network management station. Severity levels are numbered 1 to 8 with 1 being the most important message and 8 being the least important message (that is, the lower the number, the more critical the message). For example, specifying the level critical causes critical (3), alerts (2), and emergencies (1) messages to be stored to the history table and sent to the SNMP network management station. See Table 65 for a list of severity levels.

The EXEC command show logging history displays information about the history table such as the table size, the status of messages, and text of the messages stored in the table.


Table 65: Error Message Logging Priorities for History Table and SNMP Server
Level Keyword Severity Level Description Syslog Definition

emergencies

1

System unusable

LOG_EMERG

alerts

2

Immediate action needed

LOG_ALERT

critical

3

Critical conditions

LOG_CRIT

errors

4

Error conditions

LOG_ERR

warnings

5

Warning conditions

LOG_WARNING

notifications

6

Normal but significant condition

LOG_NOTICE

informational

7

Informational messages only

LOG_INFO

debugging

8

Debugging messages

LOG_DEBUG

Example

The following example changes the level of messages sent to the history table and to the SNMP server to alerts, which means alerts (2) and emergencies (1) are sent:

logging history alerts
Related Commands

logging history size
show logging
snmp-server enable

logging history size

To change the number of syslog messages stored in the router's history table, use the logging history size global configuration command. The no form of this command returns the number of messages to the default value.

logging history size number
no logging history size

Syntax Description

number

Number from 1 to 500 that indicates the maximum number of messages stored in the history table.

Default

1 message

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

When the history table is full (that is, it contains the maximum number of message entries specified with the logging history size command), the oldest message entry is deleted from the table to allow the new message entry to be stored.

Example

The following example sets the number of messages stored in the history table to 20:

logging history size 20
Related Commands

logging history
show logging

logging monitor

To limit messages logged to the terminal lines (monitors) based on severity, use the logging monitor global configuration command. This command limits the logging messages displayed on terminal lines other than the console line to messages with a level at or above level. The no form of this command disables logging to terminal lines other than the console line.

logging monitor level
no logging monitor

Syntax Description

level

One of the level keywords listed in Table 63.

Default

debugging

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Specifying a level causes messages at that level and numerically lower levels to be displayed to the monitor.

Example

The following example specifies that only messages of the levels errors, critical, alerts, and emergencies be displayed on terminals:

logging monitor errors
Related Command

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

terminal monitor

logging on

To control logging of error messages, use the logging on global configuration command. This command sends debug or error messages to a logging process, which logs messages to designated locations asynchronously to the processes that generated the messages. The no form of this command disables the logging process.

logging on
no logging on

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

The Cisco IOS software sends messages to the asynchronous logging process.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The logging process controls the distribution of logging messages to the various destinations, such as the logging buffer, terminal lines, or syslog server. You can turn logging on and off for these destinations individually using the logging buffered, logging monitor, and logging commands. However, if the logging on command is disabled, no messages will be sent to these destinations. Only the console will receive messages.

Additionally, the logging process logs messages to the console and the various destinations after the processes that generated them have completed. When the logging process is disabled, messages are displayed on the console as soon as they are produced, often appearing in the middle of command output.

Caution Disabling the logging on command will significantly slow down the router. Any process generating debug or error messages will wait until the messages have been displayed on the console before continuing.

The logging synchronous command also affects the displaying of messages to the console. When the logging synchronous command is enabled, messages will only appear after the user types a carriage return.

Examples

The following example shows command output and message output when logging is enabled. The ping process finishes before any of the logging information is printed to the console (or any other destination).

Router(config)# logging on
Router(config)# end
Router#
%SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console  
Router# ping dirt
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 172.16.1.129, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 4/5/8 ms
Router#
IP: s=172.21.96.41 (local), d=172.16.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), len 100, sending
IP: s=171.69.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), d=172.21.96.41, len 114, rcvd 1
IP: s=172.21.96.41 (local), d=172.16.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), len 100, sending
IP: s=171.69.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), d=172.21.96.41, len 114, rcvd 1
IP: s=172.21.96.41 (local), d=172.16.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), len 100, sending
IP: s=171.69.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), d=172.21.96.41, len 114, rcvd 1
IP: s=172.21.96.41 (local), d=172.16.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), len 100, sending
IP: s=171.69.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), d=172.21.96.41, len 114, rcvd 1
IP: s=172.21.96.41 (local), d=172.16.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), len 100, sending
IP: s=171.69.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), d=172.21.96.41, len 114, rcvd 1

In the next example, logging is disabled. The message output is displayed as messages are generated, causing the debug messages to be interspersed with "Type escape sequence to abort."

Router(config)# no logging on
Router(config)# end
%SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console
Router#
Router# ping dirt
IP: s=172.21.96.41 (local), d=172.16.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), len 100, sendingTyp
IP: s=171.69.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), d=172.21.96.41, len 114, rcvd 1e
IP: s=172.21.96.41 (local), d=172.16.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), len 100, sending esc
IP: s=171.69.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), d=172.21.96.41, len 114, rcvd 1
IP: s=172.21.96.41 (local), d=172.16.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), len 100, sendingape 
IP: s=171.69.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), d=172.21.96.41, len 114, rcvd 1
IP: s=172.21.96.41 (local), d=172.16.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), len 100, sendingse
IP: s=171.69.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), d=172.21.96.41, len 114, rcvd 1
IP: s=172.21.96.41 (local), d=172.16.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), len 100, sendingquen
IP: s=171.69.1.129 (Ethernet1/0), d=172.21.96.41, len 114, rcvd 1ce to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 172.16.1.129, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 152/152/156 ms
Router#
Related Commands

logging
logging buffered
logging monitor
logging synchronous

logging source-interface

To specify the source IP address of syslog packets, use the logging source-interface global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the source designation.

logging source-interface type number
no logging source-interface

Syntax Description

type

Interface type.

number

Interface number.

Default

No interface is specified.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Normally, a syslog message contains the IP address of the interface it uses to leave the router. The logging source-interface command specifies that syslog packets contain the IP address of a particular interface, regardless of which interface the packet uses to exit the router.

Examples

The following example specifies that the IP address for Ethernet interface 0 is the source IP address for all syslog messages:

logging source-interface ethernet 0

The following example specifies that the IP address for Ethernet interface 2/1 on a Cisco 7000 is the source IP address for all syslog messages:

logging source-interface ethernet 2/1

logging synchronous

To synchronize unsolicited messages and debug output with solicited Cisco IOS software output and prompts for a specific console port line, auxiliary port line, or virtual terminal line, use the logging synchronous line configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable synchronization of unsolicited messages and debug output.

logging synchronous [level severity-level | all] [limit number-of-buffers]
no logging synchronous [level severity-level | all] [limit number-of-buffers]
Syntax Description

level severity-level

(Optional) Specifies the message severity level. Messages with a severity level equal to or higher than this value are printed asynchronously. Low numbers indicate greater severity and high numbers indicate lesser severity. The default value is 2.

all

(Optional) Specifies that all messages are printed asynchronously, regardless of the severity level.

limit number-of-buffers

(Optional) Specifies the number of buffers to be queued for the terminal after which new messages are dropped. The default value is 20.

Defaults

This feature is turned off by default.

If you do not specify a severity level, the default value of 2 is assumed.

If you do not specify the maximum number of buffers to be queued, the default value of 20 is assumed.

Command Mode

Line configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When synchronous logging of unsolicited messages and debug output is turned on, unsolicited Cisco IOS software output is displayed on the console or printed after solicited Cisco IOS software output is displayed or printed. Unsolicited messages and debug output is displayed on the console after the prompt for user input is returned. This is to keep unsolicited messages and debug output from being interspersed with solicited software output and prompts. After the unsolicited messages are displayed, the console displays the user prompt again.

When specifying a severity level number, consider that for the logging system, low numbers indicate greater severity and high numbers indicate lesser severity.

When a terminal line's message-queue limit is reached, new messages are dropped from the line, although these messages might be displayed on other lines. If messages are dropped, the notice "%SYS-3-MSGLOST number-of-messages due to overflow" follows any messages that are displayed. This notice is displayed only on the terminal that lost the messages. It is not sent to any other lines, any logging servers, or the logging buffer.

Caution By configuring abnormally large message-queue limits and setting the terminal to "terminal monitor" on a terminal that is accessible to intruders, you expose yourself to "denial of service" attacks. An intruder could carry out the attack by putting the terminal in synchronous output mode, making a Telnet connection to a remote host, and leaving the connection idle. This could cause large numbers of messages to be generated and queued, and these messages would consume all available RAM. Although unlikely to occur, you should guard against this type of attack through proper configuration.
Example

The following example identifies line 4 and enables synchronous logging for line 4 with a severity level of 6. Then the example identifies another line, line 2, and enables synchronous logging for line 2 with a severity level of 7 and specifies a maximum number of buffers to be 70000:

line 4
logging synchronous level 6 line 2 logging synchronous level 7 limit 70000
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

line
logging on

logging trap

To limit messages logged to the syslog servers based on severity, use the logging trap global configuration command. The command limits the logging of error messages sent to syslog servers to only those messages at the specified level. Use the no form of this command to disable logging to syslog servers.

logging trap level
no logging trap

Syntax Description

level

One of the level keywords listed in Table 63.

Default

Informational

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The EXEC command show logging displays the addresses and levels associated with the current logging setup. The command output also includes ancillary statistics.

Table 63 lists the syslog definitions that correspond to the debugging message levels. Additionally, there are four categories of messages generated by the software, as follows:

Use the logging and logging trap commands to send messages to a UNIX syslog server.

Example

The following example logs messages to a host named johnson:

logging johnson
logging trap notifications
Related Command

logging

ntp access-group

To control access to the system's Network Time Protocol (NTP) services, use the ntp access-group global configuration command. To remove access control to the system's NTP services, use the no form of this command.

ntp access-group {query-only | serve-only | serve | peer} access-list-number
no ntp access-group {query-only | serve-only | serve | peer}

Syntax Description

query-only

Allows only NTP control queries. See RFC 1305 (NTP version 3).

serve-only

Allows only time requests.

serve

Allows time requests and NTP control queries, but does not allow the system to synchronize to the remote system.

peer

Allows time requests and NTP control queries and allows the system to synchronize to the remote system.

access-list-number

Number (1 to 99) of a standard IP access list.

Default

No access control (full access granted to all systems)

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The access group options are scanned in the following order from least restrictive to most restrictive:

    1 . peer

    2 . serve

    3 . serve-only

    4 . query-only

Access is granted for the first match that is found. If no access groups are specified, all access is granted to all sources. If any access groups are specified, only the specified access is granted. This facility provides minimal security for the time services of the system. However, it can be circumvented by a determined programmer. If tighter security is desired, use the NTP authentication facility.

Example

In the following example, the system is configured to allow itself to be synchronized by a peer from access list 99. However, the system restricts access to allow only time requests from access list 42.

ntp access-group peer 99
ntp access-group serve-only 42
Related Command

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

access-list

ntp authenticate

To enable Network Time Protocol (NTP) authentication, use the ntp authenticate global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable the feature.

ntp authenticate
no ntp authenticate

Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Default

No authentication

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command if you want authentication. If this command is specified, the system will not synchronize to a system unless it carries one of the authentication keys specified in the ntp trusted-key command.

Example

The following example enables NTP authentication:

ntp authenticate
Related Commands

ntp authentication-key
ntp trusted-key

ntp authentication-key

To define an authentication key for Network Time Protocol (NTP), use the ntp authentication-key global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the authentication key for NTP.

ntp authentication-key number md5 value
no ntp authentication-key number

Syntax Description

number

Key number (1 to 4294967295).

md5

Authentication key. Message authentication support is provided using the Message Digest (MD5) algorithm. The key type md5 is currently the only key type supported.

value

Key value (an arbitrary string of up to eight characters).

Default

No authentication key is defined for NTP.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command to define authentication keys for use with other NTP commands in order to provide a higher degree of security.


Note When this command is written to NVRAM, the key is encrypted so that it is not displayed when the configuration is viewed.
Example

The following example sets authentication key 10 to aNiceKey:

ntp authentication-key 10 md5 aNiceKey
Related Commands

ntp authenticate
ntp peer
ntp server
ntp trusted-key

ntp broadcast

To specify that a specific interface should send Network Time Protocol (NTP) broadcast packets, use the ntp broadcast interface configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this capability.

ntp broadcast [version number]
no ntp broadcast

Syntax Description

version number

(Optional) Number from 1 to 3 indicating the NTP version.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

In the following example, Ethernet interface 0 is configured to send NTP version 2 packets:

interface ethernet 0
ntp broadcast version 2
Related Commands

ntp broadcast client
ntp broadcastdelay

ntp broadcast client

To allow the system to receive NTP broadcast packets on an interface, use the ntp broadcast client command. Use the no form of this command to disable this capability.

ntp broadcast client
no ntp broadcast client

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command to allow the system to listen to broadcast packets on an interface-by-interface basis.

Example

In the following example, the Cisco IOS software synchronizes to NTP packets broadcast on Ethernet interface 1:

interface ethernet 1
ntp broadcast client
Related Commands

ntp broadcast
ntp broadcastdelay

ntp broadcastdelay

To set the estimated round-trip delay between the Cisco IOS software and a Network Time Protocol (NTP) broadcast server, use the ntp broadcastdelay global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to revert to the default value.

ntp broadcastdelay microseconds
no ntp broadcastdelay

Syntax Description

microseconds

Estimated round-trip time (in microseconds) for NTP broadcasts. The range is from 1 to 999999.

Default

3000 microseconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command when the router is configured as a broadcast client and the round-trip delay on the network is other than 3000 microseconds.

Example

In the following example, the estimated round-trip delay between a router and the broadcast client is set to 5000 microseconds:

ntp broadcastdelay 5000
Related Commands

ntp broadcast
ntp broadcast client

ntp clock-period

Caution Do not enter this command; it is documented for informational purposes only. The system automatically generates this command as Network Time Protocol (NTP) determines the clock error and compensates.

As NTP compensates for the error in the system clock, it keeps track of the correction factor for this error. The system automatically saves this value into the system configuration using the ntp clock-period global configuration command. The system uses the no form of this command to revert to the default.

ntp clock-period value
no ntp clock-period

Syntax Description

value

Amount to add to the system clock for each clock hardware tick (in units of
2-32 seconds).

Default

17179869 (4 milliseconds)

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If a copy running-config startup-config command is entered to save the configuration to NVRAM, this command will automatically be added to the configuration. It is a good idea to perform this task after NTP has been running for a week or so; this will help NTP synchronize more quickly if the system is restarted.

ntp disable

To prevent an interface from receiving Network Time Protocol (NTP) packets, use the ntp disable interface configuration command. To enable receipt of NTP packets on an interface, use the no form of this command.

ntp disable
no ntp disable

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command provides a simple method of access control.

Example

In the following example, Ethernet interface 0 is prevented from receiving NTP packets:

interface ethernet 0
ntp disable

ntp master

To configure the Cisco IOS software as a Network Time Protocol (NTP) master clock to which peers synchronize themselves when an external NTP source is not available, use the ntp master global configuration command. To disable the master clock function, use the no form of this command.

ntp master [stratum]
no ntp master [stratum]

Caution Use this command with extreme caution. It is very easy to override valid time sources using this command, especially if a low stratum number is configured. Configuring multiple machines in the same network with the ntp master command can cause instability in keeping time if the machines do not agree on the time.
Syntax Description

stratum

(Optional) Number from 1 to 15. Indicates the NTP stratum number that the system will claim.

Default

By default, the master clock function is disabled. When enabled, the default stratum is 8.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Because Cisco's implementation of NTP does not support directly attached radio or atomic clocks, the router is normally synchronized, directly or indirectly, to an external system that has such a clock. In a network without Internet connectivity, such a time source may not be available. The ntp master command is used in such cases.

If the system has ntp master configured, and it cannot reach any clock with a lower stratum number, the system will claim to be synchronized at the configured stratum number, and other systems will be willing to synchronize to it via NTP.


Note The system clock must have been set from some source, including manually, before ntp master will have any effect. This protects against distributing erroneous time after the system is restarted.
Example

In the following example, a router is configured as an NTP master clock to which peers may synchronize:

ntp master 10
Related Command

clock calendar-valid

ntp peer

To configure the system clock to synchronize a peer or to be synchronized by a peer, use the
ntp peer global configuration command. To disable this capability, use the no form of this command.

ntp peer ip-address [version number] [key keyid] [source interface] [prefer]
no ntp peer ip-address

Syntax Description

ip-address

IP address of the peer providing, or being provided, the clock synchronization.

version

(Optional) Defines the Network Time Protocol (NTP) version number.

number

(Optional) NTP version number (1 to 3).

key

(Optional) Defines the authentication key.

keyid

(Optional) Authentication key to use when sending packets to this peer.

source

(Optional) Names the interface.

interface

(Optional) Name of the interface from which to pick the IP source address.

prefer

(Optional) Makes this peer the preferred peer that provides synchronization.

Default

No peers are configured by default. If a peer is configured, the default NTP version number is 3, no authentication key is used, and the source IP address is taken from the outgoing interface.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command if you want to allow this machine to synchronize with the peer, or vice versa. Using the prefer keyword reduces switching back and forth between peers.

If you are using the default version of 3 and NTP synchronization does not occur, try using NTP version number 2. Many NTP servers on the Internet run version 2.

Example

In the following example, a router is configured to allow its system clock to be synchronized with the clock of the peer (or vice versa) at IP address 192.168.22.33 using NTP version 2. The source IP address is the address of Ethernet 0.

ntp peer 192.168.22.33 version 2 source ethernet 0
Related Commands

ntp authentication-key
ntp server
ntp source

ntp server

To allow the system clock to be synchronized by a time server, use the ntp server global configuration command. To disable this capability, use the no form of this command.

ntp server ip-address [version number] [key keyid] [source interface] [prefer]
no ntp server ip-address

Syntax Description

ip-address

IP address of the time server providing the clock synchronization.

version

(Optional) Defines the Network Time Protocol (NTP) version number.

number

(Optional) NTP version number (1 to 3).

key

(Optional) Defines the authentication key.

keyid

(Optional) Authentication key to use when sending packets to this peer.

source

(Optional) Identifies the interface from which to pick the IP source address.

interface

(Optional) Name of the interface from which to pick the IP source address.

prefer

(Optional) Makes this server the preferred server that provides synchronization.

Default

No peers are configured by default. If a peer is configured, the default NTP version number is 3, no authentication key is used, and the source IP address is taken from the outgoing interface.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command if you want to allow this machine to synchronize with the specified server. The server will not synchronize to this machine.

Using the prefer keyword reduces switching back and forth between servers.

If you are using the default version of 3 and NTP synchronization does not occur, try using NTP version number 2. Many NTP servers on the Internet run version 2.

Example

In the following example, a router is configured to allow its system clock to be synchronized with the clock of the peer at IP address 172.16.22.44 using NTP version 2:

ntp server 172.16.22.44 version 2
Related Commands

ntp authentication-key
ntp peer
ntp source

ntp source

To use a particular source address in Network Time Protocol (NTP) packets, use the ntp source global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the specified source address.

ntp source type number
no ntp source

Syntax Description

type

Type of interface.

number

Number of the interface.

Default

Source address is determined by the outgoing interface.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use this command when you want to use a particular source IP address for all NTP packets. The address is taken from the named interface. This command is useful if the address on an interface cannot be used as the destination for reply packets. If the source keyword is present on an ntp server or ntp peer command, that value overrides the global value.

Example

In the following example, a router is configured to use the IP address of Ethernet 0 as the source address of all outgoing NTP packets:

ntp source ethernet 0
Related Commands

ntp peer
ntp server

ntp trusted-key

To authenticate the identity of a system to which Network Time Protocol (NTP) will synchronize, use the ntp trusted-key global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable authentication of the identity of the system.

ntp trusted-key key-number
no ntp trusted-key key-number

Syntax Description

key-number

Key number of authentication key to be trusted.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If authentication is enabled, use this command to define one or more key numbers (corresponding to the keys defined with the ntp authentication-key command) that a peer NTP system must provide in its NTP packets, in order for this system to synchronize to it. This provides protection against accidentally synchronizing the system to a system that is not trusted, since the other system must know the correct authentication key.

Example

In the following example, the system is configured to synchronize only to systems providing authentication key 42 in its NTP packets:

ntp authenticate
ntp authentication-key 42 md5 aNiceKey
ntp trusted-key 42
Related Commands

ntp authenticate
ntp authentication-key

ntp update-calendar

To periodically update the Cisco 7000 series or Cisco 7200 series calendar from Network Time Protocol (NTP), use the ntp update-calendar global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

ntp update-calendar
no ntp update-calendar

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

The calendar is not updated.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If a Cisco 7000 or Cisco 7200 is synchronized to an outside time source via NTP, it is a good idea to periodically update the calendar with the time learned from NTP. Otherwise, the calendar will tend to gradually lose or gain time. The calendar will be updated only if NTP has synchronized to an authoritative time server.

Example

In the following example, the system is configured to periodically update the calendar from the system clock:

ntp update-calendar
Related Commands

clock read-calendar
clock update-calendar

owner

To configure the SNMP owner of the response time reporter probe, use the owner response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

owner text
no owner

Syntax Description

text

Name of the SNMP owner from 0 to 255 ASCII characters. The default is none.

Default

No owner is specified.

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The owner name contains one or more of the following: ASCII form of the network management station's transport address, network management station name (that is, the domain name), and network management personnel's name, location, or phone number. In some cases, the agent itself will be the owner of the probe. In these cases, the name can begin with "agent."

Example

In the following example, probe 1's owner is set:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.176
  owner 172.16.1.189 cwb.cisco.com John Doe RTP 555-1212
Related Command

rtr

paths-of-statistics-kept

To set the number of paths for which statistics are maintained per hour for the response time reporter probe, use the paths-of-statistics-kept response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

paths-of-statistics-kept size
no paths-of-statistics-kept

Syntax Description

size

Number of paths for which statistics are maintained per hour. The default is 5 paths for type pathEcho and 1 path for type echo.

Default

5 paths for type pathEcho

1 path for type echo

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

A path is the route the probe's request packet takes through the network to get to its destination. The probe may take a different path to reach its destination for each response time reporter operation.

When the number of paths reaches the size specified, no further path information is stored.

Example

In the following example, probe 2's statistics are maintained for only 3 paths:

rtr 2
  type pathEcho protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.177
  paths-of-statistics-kept 3
Related Commands

distributions-of-statistics-kept
hops-of-statistics-kept
hours-of-statistics-kept
rtr
statistics-distribution-interval

ping (privileged)

Use the ping (packet internet groper) privileged EXEC command to diagnose basic network connectivity on Apollo, AppleTalk, Connectionless Network Service (CLNS), DECnet, IP, Novell IPX, VINES, or XNS networks.

ping [protocol] {host | address}
Syntax Description

protocol

(Optional) Protocol keyword, one of apollo, appletalk, clns, decnet, ip, ipx, vines, or xns.

host

Host name of system to ping.

address

Address of system to ping.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The ping program sends an echo request packet to an address, then awaits a reply. Ping output can help you evaluate path-to-host reliability, delays over the path, and whether the host can be reached or is functioning.

To abnormally terminate a ping session, type the escape sequence-by default, Ctrl-^ X. You type the default by simultaneously pressing and releasing the Ctrl, Shift, and 6 keys, and then pressing the X key.

Table 66 describes the test characters that the ping facility sends.


Table 66: Ping Test Characters
Char Meaning

!

Each exclamation point indicates receipt of a reply.

.

Each period indicates the network server timed out while waiting for a reply.

U

A destination unreachable error PDU was received.

C

A congestion experienced packet was received.

I

User interrupted test.

?

Unknown packet type.

&

Packet lifetime exceeded.


Note Not all protocols require hosts to support pings. For some protocols, the pings are Cisco-defined and are only answered by another Cisco router.
Example

After you enter the ping command in privileged mode, the system prompts for one of the following keywords: appletalk, clns, ip, novell, apollo, vines, decnet, or xns. The default protocol is IP.

If you enter a host name or address on the same line as the ping command, the default action is taken as appropriate for the protocol type of that name or address.

While the precise dialog varies somewhat from protocol to protocol, all are similar to the ping session using default values shown in the following display.

Router# ping
Protocol [ip]:
Target IP address: 192.168.7.27
Repeat count [5]:
Datagram size [100]:
Timeout in seconds [2]:
Extended commands [n]:
Sweep range of sizes [n]:
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.7.27, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent, round-trip min/avg/max = 1/2/4 ms

Table 67 describes the default ping fields shown in the display.


Table 67: Ping Field Descriptions
Field Description

Protocol [ip]:

Prompts for a supported protocol. Enter appletalk, clns, ip, novell, apollo, vines, decnet, or xns. Default: ip.

Target IP address:

Prompts for the IP address or host name of the destination node you plan to ping. If you have specified a supported protocol other than IP, enter an appropriate address for that protocol here. Default: none.

Repeat count [5]:

Number of ping packets that will be sent to the destination address. Default: 5.

Datagram size [100]:

Size of the ping packet (in bytes). Default: 100 bytes.

Timeout in seconds [2]:

Timeout interval. Default: 2 (seconds).

Extended commands [n]:

Specifies whether or not a series of additional commands appears. Many of the following displays and tables show and describe these commands.

Sweep range of sizes [n]:

Allows you to vary the sizes of the echo packets being sent. This capability is useful for determining the minimum sizes of the MTUs configured on the nodes along the path to the destination address. Packet fragmentation contributing to performance problems can then be reduced.

!!!!!

Each exclamation point (!) indicates receipt of a reply. A period (.) indicates the network server timed out while waiting for a reply. Other characters may appear in the ping output display, depending on the protocol type.

Success rate is 100 percent

Percentage of packets successfully echoed back to the router. Anything less than 80 percent is usually considered problematic.

round-trip min/avg/max = 1/2/4 ms

Round-trip travel time intervals for the protocol echo packets, including minimum/average/maximum (in milliseconds).

Related Command

ping (user)

ping (user)

Use the ping (packet internet groper) user EXEC command to diagnose basic network connectivity on AppleTalk, CLNS, IP, Novell, Apollo, VINES, DECnet, or XNS networks.

ping [protocol] {host | address}
Syntax Description

protocol

(Optional) Protocol keyword, one of apollo, appletalk, clns, decnet, ip, ipx, vines, or xns.

host

Host name of system to ping.

address

Address of system to ping.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The user-level ping feature provides a basic ping facility for users who do not have system privileges. This feature allows the Cisco IOS software to perform the simple default ping functionality for a number of protocols. Only the terse form of the ping command is supported for user-level pings.

If the system cannot map an address for a host name, it returns an "%Unrecognized host or address" error message.

To abnormally terminate a ping session, type the escape sequence-by default, Ctrl-^ X. You type the default by simultaneously pressing and releasing the Ctrl, Shift, and 6 keys and then pressing the X key.

Table 68 describes the test characters that the ping facility sends.


Table 68: Ping Test Characters
Char Meaning

!

Each exclamation point indicates receipt of a reply.

.

Each period indicates the network server timed out while waiting for a reply.

U

A destination unreachable error PDU was received.

C

A congestion experienced packet was received.

I

User interrupted test.

?

Unknown packet type.

&

Packet lifetime exceeded.

Example

The following display shows sample ping output when you ping the IP host named donald:

Router> ping donald
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.7.27, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent, round-trip min/avg/max = 1/3/4 ms
Related Command

ping (privileged)

priority-group

To assign the specified priority list to an interface, use the priority-group interface configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the specified priority group assignment.

priority-group list
no priority-group

Syntax Description

list

Priority list number assigned to the interface. An integer from 1 to 16.

Default

None

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.


Note Priority queuing is not supported on tunnels.

Only one list can be assigned per interface. Priority output queueing provides a mechanism to prioritize packets transmitted on an interface.

Use the show queuing priority and show interface commands to display the current status of the output queues.

Example

The following example causes packets on interface serial 0 to be classified by priority list 1:

interface serial 0
priority-group 1
Related Commands

priority-list default
priority-list interface
priority-list queue-limit

prompt

priority-list default

To assign a priority queue for those packets that do not match any other rule in the priority list, use the priority-list default global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default or assign normal as the default.

priority-list list-number default {high | medium | normal | low}
no priority-list list-number default {high | medium | normal | low}

Syntax Description

list-number

Arbitrary integer between 1 and 16 that identifies the priority list selected by the user.

high | medium | normal | low

Priority queue level.

Default

The normal queue, if you use the no form of the command.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When using multiple rules, remember that the system reads the priority-list commands in order of appearance. When classifying a packet, the system searches the list of rules specified by priority-list commands for a matching protocol or interface type. When a match is found, the packet is assigned to the appropriate queue. The list is searched in the order it is specified, and the first matching rule terminates the search.

Example

The following example sets the priority queue for those packets that do not match any other rule in the priority list to a low priority:

priority-list 1 default low
Related Commands

priority-group
show queueing

priority-list interface

To establish queuing priorities on packets entering from a given interface, use the priority-list interface global configuration command. Use the no form of this command with the appropriate arguments to remove an entry from the list.

priority-list list-number interface interface-type interface-number {high | medium |
normal | low}
no priority-list list-number interface interface-type interface-number {high | medium |
normal | low}

Syntax Description

list-number

Arbitrary integer between 1 and 16 that identifies the priority list selected by the user.

interface-type

Specifies the name of the interface.

interface-number

Number of the specified interface.

high | medium | normal | low

Priority queue level.

Default

No queuing priorities are established.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When using multiple rules, remember that the system reads the priority-list commands in order of appearance. When classifying a packet, the system searches the list of rules specified by priority-list commands for a matching protocol or interface type. When a match is found, the packet is assigned to the appropriate queue. The list is searched in the order it is specified, and the first matching rule terminates the search.

Example

The following example sets any packet type entering on Ethernet interface 0 to a medium priority:

priority-list 3 interface ethernet 0 medium
Related Commands

priority-group
show queueing

priority-list protocol

To establish queuing priorities based upon the protocol type, use the priority-list protocol global configuration command. Use the no form of this command with the appropriate list number to remove an entry from the list.

priority-list list-number protocol protocol-name {high | medium | normal | low}
queue-keyword keyword-value
no priority-list list-number protocol [protocol-name {high | medium | normal | low}
queue-keyword keyword-value]

Syntax Description

list-number

Arbitrary integer between 1 and 16 that identifies the priority list selected by the user.

protocol-name

Specifies the protocol type: aarp, arp, apollo, appletalk, bridge (transparent), clns, clns_es, clns_is, compressedtcp, cmns, decnet, decnet_node, decnet_router-l1, decnet_router-l2, dlsw, ip, ipx, pad, rsrb, stun, vines, xns, and x25.

high | medium | normal | low

Priority queue level.

queue-keyword keyword-value

Possible keywords are fragments, gt, lt, list, tcp, and udp. See Table 69.

Default

No queuing priorities are established.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When using multiple rules for a single protocol, remember that the system reads the priority settings in order of appearance. When classifying a packet, the system searches the list of rules specified by priority-list commands for a matching protocol or interface type. When a match is found, the packet is assigned to the appropriate queue. The list is searched in the order it is specified, and the first matching rule terminates the search.

The decnet_router-l1 keyword refers to the multicast address for all level-1 routers, which are intra-area routers, and the decnet_router-l2 keyword refers to all level 2 routers, which are interarea routers.

The dlsw, rsrb, and stun keywords refer only to direct encapsulation.

Use Table 69, Table 70, and Table 71 to configure the queuing priorities for your system.


Table 69: Protocol Priority Queue Keywords and Values
Option Description

fragments

Assigns the priority level defined to fragmented IP packets (for use with IP protocol only). More specifically, IP packets whose fragment offset field is nonzero are matched by this command. The initial fragment of a fragmented IP packet has a fragment offset of zero, so such packets are not matched by this command.

Note: Packets with a nonzero fragment offset do not contain TCP or UDP headers, so other instances of this command that use the tcp or udp keyword will always fail to match such packets.

gt byte-count

Specifies a greater-than count. The priority level assigned goes into effect when a packet size exceeds the value entered for the argument byte-count. The size of the packet must also include additional bytes because of MAC encapsulation on the outgoing interface.

lt byte-count

Specifies a less-than count. The priority level assigned goes into effect when a packet size is less than the value entered for the argument byte-count. The size of the packet must also include additional bytes because of MAC encapsulation on the outgoing interface.

list list-number

Assigns traffic priorities according to a specified list when used with AppleTalk, bridging, IP, IPX, VINES, or XNS. The list-number argument is the access list number as specified by the access-list global configuration command for the specified protocol-name. For example, if the protocol is AppleTalk, list-number should be a valid AppleTalk access list number.

tcp port

Assigns the priority level defined to TCP segments originating from or destined to a specified port (for use with the IP protocol only). Table 70 lists common TCP services and their port numbers.

udp port

Assigns the priority level defined to UDP packets originating from or destined to a specified port (for use with the IP protocol only). Table 71 lists common UDP services and their port numbers.


Table 70: Common TCP Services and Their Port Numbers
Service Port

Telnet

23

SMTP

25


Table 71: Common UDP Services and Their Port Numbers
Service Port

TFTP

69

NFS

2049

SNMP

161

RPC

111

DNS

53


Note The
TCP and UDP ports listed in Table 70 and Table 71 include some of the more common port numbers. However, you can specify any port number to be prioritized; you are not limited to those listed.
For some protocols, such as TFTP and FTP, only the initial request uses port 69. Subsequent packets use a randomly chosen port number. For these types of protocols, the use of port numbers fails to be an effective method to manage queued traffic.

Use the no priority-list global configuration command followed by the appropriate list-number argument and the protocol keyword to remove a priority list entry assigned by protocol type.

Examples

The following example assigns 1 as the arbitrary priority list number, specifies DECnet as the protocol type, and assigns a high-priority level to the DECnet packets transmitted on this interface:

priority-list 1 protocol decnet high

The following example assigns a medium-priority level to every DECnet packet with a size greater than 200 bytes:

priority-list 2 protocol decnet medium gt 200

The following example assigns a medium-priority level to every DECnet packet with a size less than 200 bytes:

priority-list 4 protocol decnet medium lt 200

The following example assigns a high-priority level to traffic that matches IP access list 10:

priority-list 1 protocol ip high list 10

The following example assigns a medium-priority level to Telnet packets:

priority-list 4 protocol ip medium tcp 23

The following example assigns a medium-priority level to UDP Domain Name service packets:

priority-list 4 protocol ip medium udp 53

The following example assigns a high-priority level to traffic that matches Ethernet type code access list 201:

priority-list 1 protocol bridge high list 201

The following example assigns a high-priority level to DLSw+ traffic with TCP encapsulation:

priority-list 1 protocol ip  high  tcp 2065

The following example assigns a high-priority level to DLSw+ traffic with Direct encapsulation:

priority-list 1 protocol dlsw high
Related Commands

priority-group
show queueing

priority-list queue-limit

To specify the maximum number of packets that can be waiting in each of the priority queues, use the priority-list queue-limit global configuration command.The no form of this command selects the normal queue.

priority-list list-number queue-limit high-limit medium-limit normal-limit low-limit
no priority-list list-number queue-limit

Syntax Description

list-number

Arbitrary integer between 1 and 16 that identifies the priority list selected by the user.

high-limit medium-limit
normal-limit low-limit

Priority queue maximum length. A value of 0 for any of the four arguments means that the queue can be of unlimited size for that particular queue.

Default

The default queue limit arguments are listed in Table 72.


Table 72: Priority Queue Packet Limits
Priority Queue Argument Packet
Limits

high-limit

20

medium-limit

40

normal-limit

60

low-limit

80

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If a priority queue overflows, excess packets are discarded and quench messages can be sent, if appropriate, for the protocol.

Example

The following example sets the maximum packets in the priority queue to 10:

priority-list 2 queue-limit 10 40 60 80
Related Commands

priority-group
show queueing

prompt

To customize the prompt, use the prompt global configuration command. To revert to the default prompt, use the no form of this command.

prompt string
no prompt [string]
Syntax Description

string

Prompt. It can consist of all printing characters and the escape sequences listed in Table 73.

Default

The default prompt is either Router or the name defined with the hostname global configuration command, followed by an angle bracket (>) for EXEC mode or a pound sign (#) for privileged EXEC mode.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

You can include escape sequences when specifying the prompt. All escape sequences are preceded by a percent sign (%). Table 73 lists the valid escape sequences.


Table 73: Custom Prompt Escape Sequences
Escape Sequence Interpretation

%h

Host name. This is either Router or the name defined with the hostname global configuration command.

%n

Physical terminal line (TTY) number of the EXEC user.

%p

Prompt character itself. It is either an angle bracket (>) for EXEC mode or a pound sign (#) for privileged EXEC mode.

%s

Space.

%t

Tab.

%%

Percent sign (%)

Issuing the prompt%h command has the same effect as issuing the no prompt command.

Examples

The following example changes the EXEC prompt to include the TTY number, followed by the name and a space:

prompt TTY%n@%h%s%p

The following are examples of user and privileged EXEC prompts that result from the previous command:

TTY17@Router1 >
TTY17SRouter1 #
Related Command

hostname

queue-list default

To assign a priority queue for those packets that do not match any other rule in the queue list, use the queue-list default global configuration command. To restore the default value, use the no form of this command.

queue-list list-number default queue-number
no queue-list list-number default queue-number

Syntax Description

list-number

Number of the queue list. An integer from 1 to 16.

queue-number

Number of the queue. An integer from 1 to 16.

Default

Queue number 1

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When using multiple rules, remember that the system reads the queue-list commands in order of appearance. When classifying a packet, the system searches the list of rules specified by queue-list commands for a matching protocol or interface type. When a match is found, the packet is assigned to the appropriate queue. The list is searched in the order it is specified, and the first matching rule terminates the search.

Queue number 0 is a system queue. It is emptied before any of the other queues are processed. The system enqueues high-priority packets, such as keepalives, to this queue.

Use the show interface command to display the current status of the output queues.

Example

In the following example, the default queue for list 10 is set to queue number 2:

queue-list 10 default 2
Related Commands

custom-queue-list
show queueing

queue-list interface

To establish queuing priorities on packets entering on an interface, use the queue-list interface global configuration command. To remove an entry from the list, use the no form of the command.

queue-list list-number interface type number queue-number
no queue-list list-number interface queue-number

Syntax Description

list-number

Number of the queue list. An integer from 1 to 16.

type

Required argument that specifies the name of the interface.

number

Number of the specified interface.

queue-number

Number of the queue. An integer from 1 to 16.

Default

No queuing priorities are established.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When using multiple rules, remember that the system reads the queue-list commands in order of appearance. When classifying a packet, the system searches the list of rules specified by queue-list commands for a matching protocol or interface type. When a match is found, the packet is assigned to the appropriate queue. The list is searched in the order it is specified, and the first matching rule terminates the search.

Example

In the following example, queue list 4 established queuing priorities for packets entering on interface tunnel 3. The queue number assigned is 10.

queue-list 4 interface tunnel 3 10
Related Commands

custom-queue-list
show queueing

queue-list protocol

To establish queuing priority based upon the protocol type, use the queue-list protocol global configuration command. Use the no form of this command with the appropriate list number to remove an entry from the list.

queue-list list-number protocol protocol-name queue-number queue-keyword keyword-value
no queue-list list-number protocol protocol-name

Syntax Description

list-number

Number of the queue list. An integer from 1 to 16.

protocol-name

Required argument that specifies the protocol type: aarp, arp, apollo, appletalk, bridge (transparent), clns, clns_es, clns_is, compressedtcp, cmns, decnet, decnet_node, decnet_routerl1, decnet_routerl2, dlsw, ip, ipx, pad, rsrb, stun, vines, xns, and x25.

queue-number

Number of the queue. An integer from 1 to 16.

queue-keyword keyword-value

Possible keywords are gt, lt, list, tcp, and udp. See Table 69.

Default

No queuing priorities are established.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When using multiple rules, remember that the system reads the queue-list commands in order of appearance. When classifying a packet, the system searches the list of rules specified by queue-list commands for a matching protocol or interface type. When a match is found, the packet is assigned to the appropriate queue. The list is searched in the order it is specified, and the first matching rule terminates the search.

The decnet_router-l1 keyword refers to the multicast address for all level-1 routers, which are intra-area routers, and the decnet_router-l2 keyword refers to all level 2 routers, which are interarea routers.

The dlsw, rsrb, and stun keywords refer only to direct encapsulation.

Use Table 69, Table 70, and Table 71 from the priority-list protocol command to configure custom queuing for your system.

Examples

The following example assigns 1 as the custom queue list, specifies DECnet as the protocol type, and assigns 3 as a queue number to the packets transmitted on this interface:

queue-list 1 protocol decnet 3

The following example assigns DECnet packets with a size greater than 200 bytes to queue number 2:

queue-list 2 protocol decnet 2 gt 200

The following example assigns DECnet packets with a size less than 200 bytes to queue number 2:

queue-list 4 protocol decnet 2 lt 200

The following example assigns traffic that matches IP access list 10 to queue number 1:

queue-list 1 protocol ip 1 list 10

The following example assigns Telnet packets to queue number 2:

queue-list 4 protocol ip 2 tcp 23

The following example assigns UDP Domain Name service packets to queue number 2:

queue-list 4 protocol ip 2 udp 53

The following example assigns traffic that matches Ethernet type code access list 201 to queue number 1:

queue-list 1 protocol bridge 1 list 201
Related Commands

custom-queue-list
show queueing

queue-list queue byte-count

To designate the byte size allowed per queue, use the queue-list queue byte-count global configuration command. To return the byte size to the default value, use the no form of the command.

queue-list list-number queue queue-number byte-count byte-count-number
no queue-list list-number queue queue-number byte-count byte-count-number

Syntax Description

list-number

Number of the queue list. An integer from 1 to 16.

queue-number

Number of the queue. An integer from 1 to 16.

byte-count-number

Specifies the lower boundary on how many bytes the system allows to be delivered from a given queue during a particular cycle.

Default

1500 bytes

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

In the following example, queue list 9 establishes the byte-count as 1400 for queue number 10:

queue-list 9 queue 10 byte-count 1400
Related Commands

custom-queue-list
show queueing

queue-list queue limit

To designate the queue length limit for a queue, use the queue-list queue limit global configuration command. To return the queue length to the default value, use the no form of the command.

queue-list list-number queue queue-number limit limit-number
no queue-list list-number queue queue-number limit limit-number

Syntax Description

list-number

Number of the queue list. An integer from 1 to 16.

queue-number

Number of the queue. An integer from 1 to 16.

limit-number

Maximum number of packets which can be enqueued at any time.
Range is 0 to 32767 queue entries. A value of 0 means that the queue can be of unlimited size.

Default

20 entries

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

In the following example, the queue length of queue 10 is increased to 40:

queue-list 5 queue 10 limit 40
Related Commands

custom-queue-list
show queueing

random-detect

To enable random early detection on an interface, use the random-detect interface configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable random early detection on the interface.

random-detect [weighting]
no random-detect
Syntax Description

weighting

(Optional) Exponential weighting constant in the range 1 to 16 used to determine the rate that packets are dropped when congestion occurs. The default is 10 (that is, drop 1 packet every 210).

Default

Random early detection is disabled.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Random early detection (RED) is useful in high-speed TCP/IP networks to avoid congestion by dropping packets at a controlled rate. RED is not recommended for protocols, such as AppleTalk or Novell Netware, that respond to dropped packets by retransmitting the packets at the same rate. RED should only be configured on an interface where most of the traffic is TCP/IP traffic.

Cisco recommends using the default value for the exponential weighting constant; however, you may need to change this value depending on your operational environment. For example, a value of 10 (the default), which might achieve a loss rate of 10-4, is recommended for high-speed links such as DS3 and OC3, whereas a value of 7, which might achieve a loss rate of 10-3, is recommended for T1 links.

Random early detection cannot be configured on an interface already configured with custom, priority, or fair queueing.

When RSVP is configured on the interface, packets from other traffic flows are dropped before RSVP flows (when possible). Also, the IP precedence of the packet determines whether the packet is dropped. Lower-precedence traffic is dropped before higher-precedence traffic. Therefore, lower-precedence traffic is more likely to be throttled back.

Example

The following example shows how to enable random early detection on a serial interface:

interface serial 0
random-detect
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

custom-queue-list
fair-queue
ip rsvp bandwidth

priority-group
priority-list default
queue-list default
random-detect
show interface

request-data-size

To set the protocol data size in the payload of the response time reporter probe's request packet, use the request-data-size response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

request-data-size byte
no request-data-size

Syntax Description

byte

Size of the protocol data in the payload of the probe's request packet. Range is 0 to the protocol's maximum. The default is 1 byte.

Default

1 byte

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

When the protocol name has the suffix "appl," the packet uses both a request and respond data size (see the response-data-size response time reporter configuration command), and the data size is 12 bytes smaller than the normal payload size (this 12 bytes is the ARR Header used to control send and data response sizes).

Example

In the following example, probe 3's request packet size is set to 40 bytes:

rtr 3
  type echo protocol snalu0echoappl cwbc0a
  request-data-size 40
Related Commands

response-data-size
rtr

response-data-size

To set the protocol data size in the payload of the response time reporter probe's response packet, use the response-data-size response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

response-data-size byte
no response-data-size

Syntax Description

byte

Size of the protocol data in the payload in the probe's response packet. For "appl" protocols, the default is 0 bytes. For all others, the default is the same value as the request-data-size.

Default

For "appl" protocols, 0 bytes

For all others, the same value as the request-data-size

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The response-data-size command is only applicable for protocols defined with the type command that end in "appl" (for example, snalu0echoappl). When the protocol ends in "appl," the response data size is 12 bytes smaller than normal payload size.

Example

In the following example, probe 3's response packet size is set to 1440 bytes:

rtr 3
  type echo protocol snalu0echoappl cwbc0a
  response-data-size 1440
Related Commands

request-data-size
rtr

rmon

To enable Remote Network Monitoring (RMON) on an Ethernet interface, use the rmon interface configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable RMON on the interface.

rmon {native | promiscuous}
no rmon
Syntax Description

native

Enables RMON on the Ethernet interface. In native mode, the router processes only packets destined for this interface.

promiscuous

Enables RMON on the Ethernet interface. In promiscuous mode, the router examines every packet.

Default

RMON is disabled on the interface.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command enables RMON on Ethernet interfaces of Cisco 2500 series routers only. A generic RMON console application is required in order to use the RMON network management capabilities. SNMP must also be configured. RMON provides visibility of individual nodal activity and allows you to monitor all nodes and their interaction on a LAN segment. When the rmon command is issued, the router automatically installs an Ethernet statistics study for the associated interface.


Note RMON can be very data and processor intensive. Users should measure usage effects to ensure that router performance is not degraded and to minimize excessive management traffic overhead. Native mode is less intensive than promiscuous mode.

All Cisco IOS software Release 11.1 feature sets support RMON alarm and event groups. Additional RMON groups are supported in certain feature sets. Refer to the Cisco IOS Release 11.1 Release Notes for feature set descriptions. As a security precaution, support for the packet capture group allows capture of packet header information only; data payloads are not captured.

The RMON MIB is described in RFC 1757.

Example

The following example enables RMON on Ethernet interface 0 and allows the router to examine only packets destined for the interface:

interface ethernet 0
  rmon native
Related Commands

rmon alarm
rmon event
rmon queuesize
show rmon

rmon alarm

To set an alarm on any MIB object, use the rmon alarm configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable the alarm.

rmon alarm number variable interval {delta | absolute} rising-threshold value [event-number]
falling-threshold value [event-number] [owner string]
no rmon alarm number

Syntax Description

number

Alarm number, which is identical to the alarmIndex in the alarmTable in the Remote Monitoring (RMON) MIB.

variable

MIB object to monitor, which translates into the alarmVariable used in the alarmTable of the RMON MIB.

interval

Time in seconds the alarm monitors the MIB variable, which is identical to the alarmValue used in the alarmTable of the RMON MIB.

delta

Tests the change between MIB variables, which affects the alarmSampleType in the alarmTable of the RMON MIB.

absolute

Tests each MIB variable directly, which affects the alarmSampleType in the alarmTable of the RMON MIB.

rising-threshold value

Value at which the alarm is triggered.

event-number

(Optional) Event number to trigger when the rising or falling threshold exceeds its limit. This value is identical to the alarmRisingEventIndex or the alarmFallingEventIndex in the alarmTable of the RMON MIB.

falling-threshold value

Value at which the alarm is reset.

owner string

(Optional) Specifies an owner for the alarm, which is identical to the alarm owner in the alarmTable of the RMON MIB.

Default

No alarms configured

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The MIB object must be specified as a dotted decimal value after the entry sequence (for example, ifEntry.10.1). You cannot specify the variable name and the instance (for example, ifInOctets.1) or the entire dotted decimal notation. The variable must be of the form entry.integer.instance.

To disable the RMON alarms, you must use the no form of the command on each configured alarm. For example, enter no rmon alarm 1, where the 1 identifies which alarm is to be removed.

See RFC 1757 for more information about the RMON alarm group.

Example

The following example configures an RMON alarm using the rmon alarm command:

rmon alarm 10 ifEntry.20.1 20 delta rising-threshold 15 1 falling-threshold 0
          owner jjohnson

This example configures RMON alarm number 10. The alarm monitors the MIB variable ifEntry.20.1 once every 20 seconds until the alarm is disabled, and checks the change in the variable's rise or fall. If the ifEntry.20.1 value shows a MIB counter increase of 15 or more, such as from 100000 to 100015, the alarm is triggered. The alarm in turn triggers event number 1, which is configured with the rmon event command. Possible events include a log entry or a SNMP trap. If the ifEntry.20.1 value changes by 0 (falling-threshold 0), the alarm is reset and can be triggered again.

Related Commands

rmon
rmon event
show rmon

rmon event

To add or remove an event in the RMON event table that is associated with an RMON event number, use the rmon event global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable RMON on the interface.

rmon event number [log] [trap community] [description string] [owner string]
no rmon event number

Syntax Description

number

Assigned event number, which is identical to the eventIndex in the eventTable in the RMON MIB.

log

(Optional) Generates an RMON log entry when the event is triggered and sets the eventType in the RMON MIB to log or log-and-trap.

trap community

(Optional) SNMP community string used for this trap. Configures the setting of the eventType in the RMON MIB for this row as either snmp-trap or log-and-trap. This value is identical to the eventCommunityValue in the eventTable in the RMON MIB.

description string

(Optional) Specifies a description of the event, which is identical to the event description in the eventTable of the RMON MIB.

owner string

(Optional) Owner of this event, which is identical to the eventDescription in the eventTable of the RMON MIB.

Default

No events configured

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

This command applies only to the AS5200 access server.

See RFC 1757 for more information about the RMON MIB.

Example

The following example enables the rmon event command:

rmon event 1 log trap eventtrap description "High ifOutErrors" owner sdurham 

This example configuration creates RMON event number 1, which is defined as High ifOutErrors, and generates a log entry when the event is triggered by an alarm. The user sdurham owns the row that is created in the event table by this command. This configuration also generates a Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) trap when the event is triggered.

Related Commands

rmon
show rmon

rmon queuesize

To change the size of the queue that holds packets for analysis by the Remote Network Monitoring (RMON) process, use the rmon queuesize global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default value.

rmon queuesize size
no rmon queuesize

Syntax Description

size

Number of packets allowed in the queue awaiting RMON analysis. Default queue size is 64 packets.

Default

64 packets

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command applies to the RMON function, which is available on Ethernet interfaces of Cisco 2500 series routers only.

You might want to increase the queue size if the RMON function indicates it is dropping packets. You can determine this from the output of the show rmon command or from the etherStatsDropEvents object in the etherStats table. A feasible maximum queue size depends on the amount of memory available in the router and the configuration of the buffer pool.

Example

The following example configures the RMON queue size to be 128 packets:

rmon queuesize 128
Related Commands

rmon
show rmon

rtr

To configure a response time reporter probe, use the rtr global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove all configuration information for a probe including the probe's schedule, reaction configuration, and reaction triggers.

rtr probe
no rtr probe

Syntax Description

probe

Number of the response time reporter probe (instance) to configure.

Default

None

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

A probe is used for the purpose of collecting response time information.

Each platform has a limit on the number of probes that can be configured. In general this limit is less than 20.

Debugging is supported only on the first 32 probe numbers.

The response time reporter feature allows customers to monitor the performance of their network, network resources, and applications by measuring response times and availability. With this feature, a customer can perform troubleshooting, problem notification, and preproblem analysis. The response time reporter feature is currently available only with the IBM feature set of the Cisco IOS software. For more information, refer to the "Managing the System" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide and the Cisco Round-Trip Time Monitor (RTTMON) MIB in the Cisco MIB User Quick Reference.

This command places you in (config-rtr) mode.


Note After you schedule a probe with the rtr schedule global configuration command, you cannot modify the probe's configuration. To modify the probe's configuration after it is scheduled, use the no rtr command. You can now reenter the probe's configuration with the rtr command.

Use the following response time reporter configuration commands (config-rtr) to configure the probe's characteristics:

After you configure a probe, you must schedule the probe. For information on scheduling a probe, refer to the rtr schedule global configuration command. You can also optionally set reaction triggers for the probe. For information on reaction triggers, refer to the rtr reaction-configuration and rtr reaction-trigger global configuration commands.

To display the probe's current configuration settings, use the show rtr configuration EXEC command.

Example

In the following example, probe 1 is configured to perform end-to-end response time operations using an SNA LU Type 0 connection with the host name cwbc0a. Only the type response time reporter configuration command is required; all others are optional.

rtr 1
  type echo protocol snalu0echoappl cwbc0a
  request-data-size 40
  response-data-size 1440

Note If probe 1 already existed and it has not been scheduled, you are placed into response time reporter configuration command mode. If the probe already exists and has been scheduled, this command will fail.
Related Commands

rtr reaction-configuration
rtr reaction-trigger
rtr reset
rtr schedule

rtr reaction-configuration

To configure certain actions to occur based on events under the control of the response time reporter, use the rtr reaction-configuration global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the probe's default values.

rtr reaction-configuration probe [connection-loss-enable] [timeout-enable]
[threshold-falling milliseconds] [threshold-type option] [action-type option]
no rtr reaction-configuration probe
Syntax Description

probe

Number of the response time reporter probe to configure.

connection-loss-enable

(Optional) Enable checking for connection loss in connection-oriented protocols. The default is disabled.

timeout-enable

(Optional) Enable checking for response time reporting operation timeouts based on the timeout value configured for the probe with the timeout response time reporter configuration command. The default is disabled.

threshold-falling milliseconds

(Optional) Set the falling threshold (standard RMON-type hysteresis mechanism) in milliseconds. When the falling threshold is met, generate a resolution reaction event. The probe's rising over threshold is set with the threshold response time reporter configuration command. The default value is 3000 ms.

threshold-type option

(Optional) Specify the algorithm used by the response time reporter to calculate over and falling threshold violations. Option can be one of the following keywords:

· never-Do not calculate threshold violations (the default).

· immediate-When the response time exceeds the rising over threshold or drops below the falling threshold, immediately perform the action defined by action-type.

· consecutive [occurrences]-When the response time exceeds the rising threshold consecutively 5 times or drops below the falling threshold consecutively 5 times, perform the action defined by action-type. Optionally specify the number of consecutive occurrences. The default is 5.

· xofy [x-value y-value]-When the response time exceeds the rising threshold 5 out of the last 5 times or drops below the falling threshold 5 out of the last 5 times, perform the action defined by action-type. Optionally specify the number of violations that must occur and the number that must occur within a specified number. The default is 5 for both x-value and y-value.

· average [attempts]-When the average of the last 5 response times exceeds the rising threshold or when the average of the last 5 response times drops below the falling threshold, perform the action defined by action-type. Optionally specify the number of operations to average. The default is the average of the last 5 response time operations. For example: if the probe's threshold is 5000 ms and the probe's last 3 attempts results are 6000, 6000, and 5000 ms, the average would be 6000+6000+5000=17000/3>5000, thus violating the 5000-ms threshold.

action-type option

(Optional) Specify what action or combination of actions the probe performs when you configure connection-loss-enable or timeout-enable, or threshold events occur. For the action-type to occur for threshold events, the threshold-type must be defined to anything other than never. Option can be one of the following keywords:

· none-No action is taken.

· trapOnly-Send an SNMP trap on both over and falling threshold violations.

· nmvtOnly-Send an SNA NMVT Alert on over threshold violation and an SNA NMVT Resolution on falling threshold violations.

· triggerOnly-Have one or more target probe's operational state make the transition from "pending" to "active" on over (and falling) threshold violations. The target probes are defined with the rtr reaction-trigger command. A target probe will continue until its life expires as specified by the target probe's life value configured with the rtr schedule global configuration command. A triggered target probe must finish its life before it can be triggered again.

· trapAndMmvt-Send a combination of trapOnly and nmvtOnly.

· trapAndTrigger-Send a combination of trapOnly and triggerOnly.

· nmvtAndTrigger-Send a combination of nmvtOnly and triggerOnly.

· trapNmvtAndTrigger-Send a combination of trapOnly, nmvtOnly, and triggerOnly.

Default

No reactions are generated.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Triggers are used for diagnostics purposes and are not used in normal operation.

You can use triggers to assist you in determining where delays are happening in the network when excessive delays are being seen on an end-to-end basis.

The reaction applies only to attempts to the target (that is, attempts to any hops along the path in pathEcho do not generate reactions).


Note Keywords are not case sensitive and are shown in mixed case for readability only.
Example

In the following example, probe 19 sends an SNMP trap when there is an over or falling threshold violation:

rtr reaction-configuration 19 threshold-type immediate action-type trapOnly

Figure 2 shows that an alert (rising trap) would be issued immediately when the response time exceeds the rising threshold and a resolution (falling trap) would be issued immediately when the response time drops below the falling threshold.


Figure 2: Example of Rising and Falling Thresholds
Related Commands

rtr
rtr reaction-trigger
threshold
timeout

rtr reaction-trigger

To define a second response time reporter probe to make the transition from a "pending" state to an "active" state when one of the trigger action-type options are defined with the rtr reaction-configuration global configuration command, use the rtr reaction-trigger global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the trigger combination.

rtr reaction-trigger probe target-probe
no rtr reaction-trigger probe

Syntax Description

probe

Number of the probe in the "active" state that has the action-type set with the rtr reaction-configuration global configuration command.

target-probe

Number of the probe in the "pending" state that is waiting to be triggered with the rtr global configuration command.

Default

None

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Triggers are usually used for diagnostics purposes and are not used in normal operation.

Example

In the following example, probe 1's state is changed from pending state to active state when probe 2's action-type occurs:

rtr reaction-trigger 2 1
Related Commands

rtr
rtr reaction-configuration
rtr schedule

rtr reset

To perform a shutdown and restart of the response time reporter, use the rtr reset global configuration command.

rtr reset
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

None

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Caution Use the rtr reset command only in extreme situations such as the incorrect configuration of a number of probes.

The rtr reset command stops all probes, clears response time reporter configuration information, and returns the response time reporter feature to the startup condition. This command does not reread the response time reporter configuration stored in startup-config in NVRAM. You must retype the configuration or perform a config memory command.

Example

The following example illustrates how to reset the response time reporter feature:

rtr reset

rtr schedule

To configure the time parameters for a response time reporter probe, use the rtr schedule global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to stop the probe and restart it with the default parameters (that is, pending).

rtr schedule probe [life seconds] [start-time {pending | now | hh:mm [month day |
day month]}] [ageout seconds]
no rtr schedule probe
Syntax Description

probe

Number of the response time reporter probe to schedule.

life seconds

(Optional) Number of seconds the probe actively collects information. The default is 3600 seconds (one hour).

start-time

(Optional) Time when the probe starts collecting information. If the start-time is not specified, no information is collected until the start-time is configured or a trigger occurs that performs a start-time now.

pending

No information is collected. This is the default value.

now

Information is immediately collected.

hh:mm

Information is collected at the specified time (use a 24-hour clock). The time is the current day if you do not specify the month and day.

month

(Optional) Name of the month, any characters in a unique string. If month is not specified, the current month is used. This requires a day.

day

Number of the day in the range 1 to 31. If day is not specified, the current day is used. This requires a month.

ageout seconds

(Optional) Number of seconds to keep the probe when it is not actively collecting information. The default is 0 seconds (never ages out).

Default

Place the probe in a pending state (that is, the probe is started but not actively collecting information).

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

After you schedule the probe with the rtr schedule command, you cannot change the probe's configuration (with the rtr global configuration command). To change the probe's configuration, use the no form of the rtr global command and reenter the configuration information.

If the probe is in a pending state, you can define the conditions under which the probe makes the transition from pending to active with the rtr reaction-trigger and rtr reaction-configuration global configuration commands. When the probe is in an active state, it immediately begins collecting information.

The following time line shows the probe's age-out process:

W----------------------X----------------------Y----------------------Z

where:

Age out starts counting down at W and Y, is suspended between X and Y, and is reset to its configured size at Y.

It is possible for the probe to age out before it executes (that is, Z can occur before X). To ensure that this does not happen, the difference between the probe's configuration time and start time (X and W) must be less than the age-out seconds.


Note The total RAM required to hold the history and statistics tables is allocated at this time. This is to prevent router memory problems when the router gets heavily loaded and to lower the amount of overhead the feature causes on a router when it is active.
Example

In the following example, probe 25 begins actively collecting data at 3:00 p.m. on April 5. This probe will age out after 12 hours of inactivity, which can be before it starts or after it has finished with its life. When this probe ages out, all configuration information for the probe is removed (that is, the configuration information is no longer in the running-config in RAM.

rtr schedule 25 life 43200 start-time 15:00 apr 5 ageout 43200
Related Commands

rtr
rtr reaction-configuration
rtr reaction-trigger

samples-of-history-kept

To set the number of entries kept in the history table per bucket for the response time reporter probe, use the samples-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

samples-of-history-kept samples
no samples-of-history-kept

Syntax Description

samples

Number of entries kept in the history table per bucket. The default is 16 entries for type pathEcho and 1 entry for type echo.

Default

16 entries for type pathEcho

1 entry for type echo

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the samples-of-history-kept command to control how many entries are saved in the history table. To control the type of information that gets saved in the history table, use the filter-for-history command. To set how many buckets get created in the history table, use the buckets-of-history-kept command.

A probe can collect history and capture statistics. By default, history is not collected. When a problem arises where history is useful (for example, a large number of timeouts are occurring), you can configure the lives-of-history-kept response time reporter configuration command to collect history.


Note Collecting history increases the usage of RAM. Only collect history when you think there is a problem. For general network response time information, use statistics.
Example

In the following example, ten entries are kept in the history table for each of the of probe's three lives:

rtr 1
  type pathecho protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.176
  lives-of-history-kept 3
  samples-of-history-kept 10
Related Commands

buckets-of-history-kept
filter-for-history
lives-of-history-kept
rtr

scheduler allocate

To guarantee CPU time for processes, use the scheduler allocate global configuration command on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series. The no form of this command restores the default.

scheduler allocate interrupt-time process-time
no scheduler allocate

Syntax Description

interrupt-time

Integer (in microseconds) that limits the maximum number of microseconds to spend on fast switching within any one network interrupt context. The range is 400 to 60000 microseconds. The default is 4000 microseconds.

process-time

Integer (in microseconds) that guarantees the minimum number of microseconds to spend at the process level when network interrupts are disabled. The range is 100 to 4000. The default is 200 microseconds.

Default

Approximately 5 percent of the CPU is available for process tasks.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

This command applies to the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

Caution Cisco recommends that you do not change the default values.
Example

The following example makes 20 percent of the CPU available for process tasks:

scheduler allocate 2000 500
Related Command

scheduler interval

scheduler interval

To control the maximum amount of time that can elapse without running system processes, use the scheduler interval global configuration command. The no form of this command restores the default.

scheduler interval milliseconds
no scheduler interval

Syntax Description

milliseconds

Integer that specifies the interval, in milliseconds. The minimum interval that you can specify is 500 milliseconds; there is no maximum value.

Default

High-priority operations are allowed to use as much of the central processor as needed.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The normal operation of the network server allows the switching operations to use as much of the central processor as is required. If the network is running unusually heavy loads that do not allow the processor the time to handle the routing protocols, give priority to the system process scheduler. High-priority operations are allowed to use as much of the central processor as needed.

On the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, use the scheduler allocate global configuration command.

Example

The following example changes the low-priority process schedule to an interval of 750 milliseconds:

scheduler interval 750
Related Command

scheduler allocate

service decimal-tty

To specify that line numbers be displayed and interpreted as decimal numbers rather than octal numbers, use the service decimal-tty global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default.

service decimal-tty
no service decimal-tty

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Decimal numbers on the 500-CS and Cisco 2500 Series.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example shows how to display decimal rather than octal line numbers:

service decimal-tty

service exec-wait

To delay the startup of the EXEC on noisy lines, use the service exec-wait global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

service exec-wait
no service exec-wait

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command delays startup of the EXEC until the line has been idle (no traffic seen) for 3 seconds. The default is to enable the line immediately on modem activation.

This command is useful on noisy modem lines or when a modem attached to the line is configured to ignore MNP or V.42 negotiations, and MNP or V.42 modems may be dialing in. In these cases, noise or MNP/V.42 packets may be interpreted as usernames and passwords, causing authentication failure before the user gets a chance to type a username/password. The command is not useful on non-modem lines or lines without some kind of login configured.

Example

The following example delays the startup of the EXEC:

service exec-wait

service finger

To allow Finger protocol requests (defined in RFC 742) to be made of the network server, use the service finger global configuration command. This service is equivalent to issuing a remote show users command. Use the no form of this command to remove this service.

service finger
no service finger

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following is an example of how to disable the Finger protocol:

no service finger

service hide-telnet-address

To hide addresses while trying to establish a Telnet session, use the service hide-telnet-address global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove this service.

service hide-telnet-address
no service hide-telnet-address

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Addresses are displayed.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

When you attempt to connect to a device, the router displays addresses and other messages (for example, Trying router1 (171.69.1.154, 2008)...). With the hide feature, the router suppresses the display of the address (for example, Trying router1 address #1...). The router continues to display all other messages that would normally display during a connection attempt, such as detailed error messages if the connection was not successful.

The hide feature improves the functionality of the busy-message feature. When you configure only the busy-message command, the normal messages generated during a connection attempt are not displayed; only the busy-message is displayed. When you use the hide and busy features together you can customize the information displayed during Telnet connection attempts. When you configure the service hide-telnet-address command and the busy-message command, the router suppresses the address and displays the message specified with the busy-message command if the connection attempt is not successful.

Example

The following example shows how to hide Telnet addresses:

service hide-telnet-address
Related Command

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

busy-message

service nagle

To enable the Nagle congestion control algorithm, use the service nagle global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

service nagle
no service nagle

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When using a standard TCP implementation to send keystrokes between machines, TCP tends to send one packet for each keystroke typed. On larger networks, many small packets use up bandwidth and contribute to congestion.

John Nagle's algorithm (RFC 896) helps alleviate the small-packet problem in TCP. In general, it works this way: The first character typed after connection establishment is sent in a single packet, but TCP holds any additional characters typed until the receiver acknowledges the previous packet. Then the second, larger packet is sent, and additional typed characters are saved until the acknowledgment comes back. The effect is to accumulate characters into larger chunks, and pace them out to the network at a rate matching the round-trip time of the given connection. This method is usually a good for all TCP-based traffic. However, do not use the service nagle command if you have XRemote users on X Window sessions.

Example

The following example enables the Nagle algorithm:

service nagle

service prompt config

To display the configuration prompt (config), use the service prompt config global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the configuration prompt.

service prompt config
no service prompt config

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Router(config)#

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Examples

In the following example, notice how the configuration prompt varies, depending on what subdivision of configuration mode you are using:

Router#config terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#interface ethernet 0
Router(config-if)#line config 0
Router(config-line)#router rip
Router(config-router)#map-list muruga 
Router(config-map-list)#map-class atm bar
Router(config-map-class)#exit
Router(config)#exit
Router#
Related Commands

hostname
prompt

service slave-log

To allow slave Versatile Interface Processor (VIP) cards to log important error messages to the console, use the service slave-log global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable slave logging.

service slave-log
no service slave-log

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

This command is enabled by default.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command allows slave slots to log error messages of level 2 or higher (critical, alerts, and emergencies).

Examples

The following example logs important messages from the slave cards to the console:

service slave-log

The following example illustrates sample output when this command is enabled:

%IPC-5-SLAVELOG: VIP-SLOT2:
 IPC-2-NOMEM: No memory available for IPC system initialization

The first line indicates which slot sent the message. The second line contains the error message.


service tcp-keepalives-in

To generate keepalive packets on idle incoming network connections (initiated by the remote host), use the service tcp-keepalives-in global configuration command. The no form of this command with the appropriate keyword disables the keepalives.

service tcp-keepalives-in
no service tcp-keepalives-in

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example generates keepalives on incoming TCP connections:

service tcp-keepalives-in

service tcp-keepalives-out

To generate keepalive packets on idle outgoing network connections (initiated by a user), use the service tcp-keepalives-out global configuration command. The no form of this command with the appropriate keyword disables the keepalives.

service tcp-keepalives-out
no service tcp-keepalives-out

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example generates keepalives on outgoing TCP connections:

service tcp-keepalives-out

service tcp-small-servers

To access minor TCP/IP services available from hosts on the network, use the service tcp-small-servers command. Use the no form of the command to disable these services.

service tcp-small-servers
no service tcp-small-servers

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

By default, the TCP servers for Echo, Discard, Chargen, and Daytime services are enabled.

When you disable the minor TCP/IP servers, access to the Echo, Discard, Chargen, and Daytime ports cause the Cisco IOS software to send a TCP RESET packet to the sender and discard the original incoming packet.


Note Unlike defaults for other commands, this command will display when you perform show running config to display current settings whether or not you have changed the default using the no service tcp-small-servers command.
Example

The following example enables minor TCP/IP services available from the network:

service tcp-small-servers

service telnet-zero-idle

To set the TCP window to zero (0) when the Telnet connection is idle, use the service telnet-zero-idle global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable this feature.

service telnet-zero-idle
no service telnet-zero-idle

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Normally, data sent to noncurrent Telnet connections is accepted and discarded. When service telnet-zero-idle is enabled, if a session is suspended (that is, some other connection is made active or the EXEC is sitting in command mode), the TCP window is set to zero. This action prevents the remote host from sending any more data until the connection is resumed. Use this command when it is important that all messages sent by the host be seen by the users and the users are likely to use multiple sessions.

Do not use this command if your host will eventually time out and log out a TCP user whose window is zero.

Example

The following example sets the TCP window to zero when the Telnet connection is idle:

service telnet-zero-idle
Related Command

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

resume

service timestamps

To configure the system to timestamp debugging or logging messages, use one of the service timestamps global configuration commands. Use the no form of this command to disable this service.

service timestamps type [uptime]
service timestamps type datetime [msec] [localtime] [show-timezone]
no service timestamps type

Syntax Description

type

Type of message to timestamp: debug or log.

uptime

(Optional) Timestamp with time since the system was rebooted.

datetime

Timestamp with the date and time.

msec

(Optional) Include milliseconds in the date and timestamp.

localtime

(Optional) Timestamp relative to the local time zone.

show-timezone

(Optional) Include the time zone name in the timestamp.

Default

No timestamping.

If service timestamps is specified with no arguments or keywords, default is service timestamps debug uptime.

The default for service timestamps type datetime is to format the time in UTC, with no milliseconds and no time zone name.

The command no service timestamps by itself disables timestamps for both debug and log messages.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Timestamps can be added to either debugging or logging messages independently. The uptime form of the command adds timestamps in the format HHHH:MM:SS, indicating the time since the system was rebooted. The datetime form of the command adds timestamps in the format MMM DD HH:MM:SS, indicating the date and time according to the system clock. If the system clock has not been set, the date and time are preceded by an asterisk (*) to indicate that the date and time are probably not correct.

Examples

The following example enables timestamps on debugging messages, showing the time since reboot:

service timestamps debug uptime

The following example enables timestamps on logging messages, showing the current time and date relative to the local time zone, with the time zone name included:

service timestamps log datetime localtime show-timezone
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented in the Debug Command Reference.

clock set
debug

ntp

service udp-small-servers

To access minor User Datagram Protocol (UDP) services available from hosts on the network, use the service udp-small-servers command. Use the no form of the command to disable these services.

service udp-small-servers
no service udp-small-servers

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

By default the UPD servers for Echo, Discard, and Chargen services are enabled.

When you disable the servers, access to Echo, Discard, and Chargen ports causes the Cisco IOS software to send an "ICMP port unreachable" message to the sender and discard the original incoming packet.


Note Unlike defaults for other commands, this command will display when you perform show running config to display current settings, whether or not you have changed the default using the no service udp-small-servers command.
Example

The following example disables minor UDP services on the router:

no service udp-small-servers

show aliases

To display all alias commands, or the alias commands in a specified mode, use the show aliases EXEC command.

show aliases [mode]
Syntax Description

mode

(Optional) Command mode. See Table 61 in the description of the alias command for acceptable options for the mode argument.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

All of the modes listed in Table 61 have their own prompts, except for the null interface mode. For example, the prompt for interface configuration mode is Router(config-if).

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show aliases exec commands. The aliases configured for commands in EXEC mode are displayed.

Router# show aliases exec
Exec mode aliases:
    h                                        help
    lo                                      logout
    p                                        ping
    r                                        resume
    s                                        show
    w                                        where
Related Command

alias

show buffers

Use the show buffers EXEC command to display statistics for the buffer pools on the network server.

show buffers [type number | alloc [dump]]
Syntax Description

type number

(Optional) Displays interface pool information. If the specified interface type and number has its own buffer pool, displays information for that pool. Value of type can be ethernet, serial, tokenring, fddi, bri, atm, e1, t1.

alloc

(Optional) Displays a brief listing of all allocated buffers.

dump

(Optional) Dumps all allocated buffers. This keyword must be used with the alloc keyword, not by itself.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show buffers command with no arguments, showing all buffer pool information:

Router# show buffers
Buffer elements:
     398 in free list (500 max allowed)
     1266 hits, 0 misses, 0 created
 
Public buffer pools:
Small buffers, 104 bytes (total 50, permanent 50):
     50 in free list (20 min, 150 max allowed)
     551 hits, 0 misses, 0 trims, 0 created
Middle buffers, 600 bytes (total 25, permanent 25):
     25 in free list (10 min, 150 max allowed)
     39 hits, 0 misses, 0 trims, 0 created
Big buffers, 1524 bytes (total 50, permanent 50):
     49 in free list (5 min, 150 max allowed)
     27 hits, 0 misses, 0 trims, 0 created
VeryBig buffers, 4520 bytes (total 10, permanent 10):
     10 in free list (0 min, 100 max allowed)
     0 hits, 0 misses, 0 trims, 0 created
Large buffers, 5024 bytes (total 0, permanent 0):
     0 in free list (0 min, 10 max allowed)
     0 hits, 0 misses, 0 trims, 0 created
Huge buffers, 18024 bytes (total 0, permanent 0):
     0 in free list (0 min, 4 max allowed)
     0 hits, 0 misses, 0 trims, 0 created
          
Interface buffer pools:
Ethernet0 buffers, 1524 bytes (total 64, permanent 64):
     16 in free list (0 min, 64 max allowed)
     48 hits, 0 fallbacks
     16 max cache size, 16 in cache
Ethernet1 buffers, 1524 bytes (total 64, permanent 64):
     16 in free list (0 min, 64 max allowed)
     48 hits, 0 fallbacks
     16 max cache size, 16 in cache
Serial0 buffers, 1524 bytes (total 64, permanent 64):
     16 in free list (0 min, 64 max allowed)
     48 hits, 0 fallbacks
     16 max cache size, 16 in cache
Serial1 buffers, 1524 bytes (total 64, permanent 64):
     16 in free list (0 min, 64 max allowed)
     48 hits, 0 fallbacks
     16 max cache size, 16 in cache
TokenRing0 buffers, 4516 bytes (total 48, permanent 48):
     0 in free list (0 min, 48 max allowed)
     48 hits, 0 fallbacks
     16 max cache size, 16 in cache
TokenRing1 buffers, 4516 bytes (total 32, permanent 32):
     32 in free list (0 min, 48 max allowed)
     16 hits, 0 fallbacks
0 failures (0 no memory)

Table 74 describes significant fields shown in the display.


Table 74: Show Buffers Field Descriptions
Field Description

Buffer elements

Buffer elements are small structures used as placeholders for buffers in internal operating system queues. Buffer elements are used when a buffer may need to be on more than one queue.

Free list

Total number of the currently unallocated buffer elements.

Max allowed

Maximum number of buffers that are available for allocation.

Hits

Count of successful attempts to allocate a buffer when needed.

Misses

Count of buffer allocation attempts that resulted in growing the buffer pool
to allocate a buffer.

Created

Count of new buffers created to satisfy buffer allocation attempts when the available buffers in the pool have already been allocated.

Public buffer pools:

Small buffers

Buffers that are 104 bytes long.

Middle buffers

Buffers that are 600 bytes long.

Big buffers

Buffers that are 1524 bytes long.

VeryBig buffers

Buffers that are 4520 bytes long.

Large buffers

Buffers that are 5024 bytes long.

Huge buffers

Buffers that are 18024 bytes long.

Total

Total number of this type of buffer.

Permanent

Number of these buffers that are permanent.

Free list

Number of available or unallocated buffers in that pool.

Min

Minimum number of free or unallocated buffers in the buffer pool

Max allowed

Maximum number of free or unallocated buffers in the buffer pool

Hits

Count of successful attempts to allocate a buffer when needed.

Misses

Count of buffer allocation attempts that resulted in growing the buffer pool in order to allocate a buffer.

Trims

Count of buffers released to the system because they were not being used. This field is displayed only for dynamic buffer pools, not interface buffer pools, which are static.

Created

Count of new buffers created in response to misses. This field is displayed only for dynamic buffer pools, not interface buffer pools, which are static.

Interface buffer pools:

Total

Total number of this type of buffer.

Permanent

Number of these buffers that are permanent.

Free list

Number of available or unallocated buffers in that pool.

Min

Minimum number of free or unallocated buffers in the buffer pool.

Max allowed

Maximum number of free or unallocated buffers in the buffer pool.

Hits

Count of successful attempts to allocate a buffer when needed.

Fall backs

Count of buffer allocation attempts that resulted in falling back to the public buffer pool that is the smallest pool at least as big as the interface buffer pool.

Max Cache Size

Maximum number of buffers from that interface's pool that can be in that interface buffer pool's cache. Each interface buffer pool has its own cache. These are not additional to the permanent buffers; they come from the interface's buffer pools. Some interfaces place all of their buffers from the interface pool into the cache. In this case, it is normal for the free list to display 0.

Failures

Total number of allocation requests that have failed because no buffer was available for allocation; the datagram was lost. Such failures normally occur at interrupt level.

(no memory)

Number of failures that occurred because no memory was available to create a new buffer.

The following is sample output from the show buffers command with an interface type and number:

Router# show buffers Ethernet 0
Ethernet0 buffers, 1524 bytes (total 64, permanent 64):
     16 in free list (0 min, 64 max allowed)
     48 hits, 0 fallbacks
     16 max cache size, 16 in cache

The following is sample output from the show buffers command when alloc is specified:

Router# show buffers alloc
Buffer elements:
     398 in free list (500 max allowed)
     1266 hits, 0 misses, 0 created
 
Public buffer pools:
Small buffers, 104 bytes (total 50, permanent 50):
     50 in free list (20 min, 150 max allowed)
     551 hits, 0 misses, 0 trims, 0 created
Middle buffers, 600 bytes (total 25, permanent 25):
     25 in free list (10 min, 150 max allowed)
     39 hits, 0 misses, 0 trims, 0 created
Big buffers, 1524 bytes (total 50, permanent 50):
     49 in free list (5 min, 150 max allowed)
     27 hits, 0 misses, 0 trims, 0 created
VeryBig buffers, 4520 bytes (total 10, permanent 10):
     10 in free list (0 min, 100 max allowed)
     0 hits, 0 misses, 0 trims, 0 created
Large buffers, 5024 bytes (total 0, permanent 0):
     0 in free list (0 min, 10 max allowed)
     0 hits, 0 misses, 0 trims, 0 created
Huge buffers, 18024 bytes (total 0, permanent 0):
     0 in free list (0 min, 4 max allowed)
     0 hits, 0 misses, 0 trims, 0 created
          
Interface buffer pools:
Ethernet0 buffers, 1524 bytes (total 64, permanent 64):
     16 in free list (0 min, 64 max allowed)
     48 hits, 0 fallbacks
     16 max cache size, 16 in cache
Ethernet1 buffers, 1524 bytes (total 64, permanent 64):
     16 in free list (0 min, 64 max allowed)
     48 hits, 0 fallbacks
     16 max cache size, 16 in cache
Serial0 buffers, 1524 bytes (total 64, permanent 64):
     16 in free list (0 min, 64 max allowed)
     48 hits, 0 fallbacks
     16 max cache size, 16 in cache
Serial1 buffers, 1524 bytes (total 64, permanent 64):
     16 in free list (0 min, 64 max allowed)
     48 hits, 0 fallbacks
     16 max cache size, 16 in cache
TokenRing0 buffers, 4516 bytes (total 48, permanent 48):
     0 in free list (0 min, 48 max allowed)
     48 hits, 0 fallbacks
     16 max cache size, 16 in cache
TokenRing1 buffers, 4516 bytes (total 32, permanent 32):
     32 in free list (0 min, 48 max allowed)
     16 hits, 0 fallbacks
0 failures (0 no memory)
Address    PakAddr    Data          Off  Data    Pool    Ref  Link  Enc          Flags  Output    Input
                                    Area          set  Size                Cnt  Type  Type        (Hex)  Idb          Idb
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
604B37A0 604B37C0 40004A38    62    60 Big     1   65    3        0 Et0          
604C6DA0 604C6DC0 40007038    84     0 Ether   1    0    0        0              
604C6F60 604C6F80 400076E4    84     0 Ether   1    0    0        0              
604C7120 604C7140 40007D90    84     0 Ether   1    0    0        0              
604C72E0 604C7300 4000843C    84     0 Ether   1    0    0        0              
604C74A0 604C74C0 40008AE8    84     0 Ether   1    0    0        0              
604C7660 604C7680 40009194    84     0 Ether   1    0    0        0              
604C7820 604C7840 40009840    84     0 Ether   1    0    0        0              
.
.
.

show c7200

Use the show c7200 EXEC command to display information about the CPU and midplane for Cisco 7200 series routers.

show c7200
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

You can use the output of this command to determine whether the hardware version level and upgrade is current. The information is generally useful for diagnostic tasks performed by technical support only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show c7200 command:

router# show c7200
C7200 Network IO Interrupt Throttling:
 throttle count=0, timer count=0
 active=0, configured=0
 netint usec=3999, netint mask usec=200
 
C7200 Midplane EEPROM:
                Hardware revision 1.2                      Board revision A0
                Serial number          2863311530        Part number        170-43690-170
                Test history            0xAA                    RMA number          170-170-170
                MAC=0060.3e28.ee00, MAC Size=1024
                EEPROM format version 1, Model=0x6
                EEPROM contents (hex):
                    0x20: 01 06 01 02 AA AA AA AA AA AA AA AA 00 60 3E 28
                    0x30: EE 00 04 00 AA AA AA AA AA AA AA 50 AA AA AA AA
 
C7200 CPU EEPROM:
                Hardware revision 2.0                      Board revision A0
                Serial number          3509953              Part number          73-1536-02
                Test history            0x0                      RMA number            00-00-00
                EEPROM format version 1
                EEPROM contents (hex):
                    0x20: 01 15 02 00 00 35 8E C1 49 06 00 02 00 00 00 00
                    0x30: 50 00 00 00 FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF

show calendar

To display the calendar hardware setting for the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, or Cisco 4500 series, use the show calendar EXEC command:

show calendar
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can compare the time and date shown with this command with the time and date listed via the show clock command to verify that the calendar and system clock are in sync with each other. The time displayed is relative to the configured time zone.

Sample Display

In the following sample display, the hardware calendar indicates the timestamp of 12:13:44 p.m. on Friday, July 19, 1996:

Router# show calendar
12:13:44 PST Fri Jul 19 1996
Related Command

show clock

show cdp

To display global CDP information, including timer and hold-time information, use the show cdp privileged EXEC command.

show cdp
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show cdp command. Global CDP timer and hold-time parameters are set to the defaults of 60 and 180 seconds, respectively.

Router# show cdp
Global CDP information:
        Sending CDP packets every 60 seconds
        Sending a holdtime value of 180 seconds
Related Commands

cdp holdtime
cdp timer
show cdp entry
show cdp neighbors

show cdp entry

To display information about a neighbor device listed in the CDP table, use the show cdp entry privileged EXEC command.

show cdp entry {* | entry-name [protocol | version]}
Syntax Description

*

Shows all of the CDP neighbors.

entry-name

Name of neighbor about which you want information.

You can enter an aserisk (*) at the end of an entry-name, such as show cdp entry dev*, which would show information about the neighbor, device.cisco.com.

protocol

(Optional) Limits the display to information about the protocols enabled on a router.

version

(Optional) Limits the display to information about the version of software running on the router.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show cdp entry command with no limits. Information about the neighbor device.cisco.com is displayed, including device ID, address and protocol, platform, interface, hold time, and version.

Router# show cdp entry device.cisco.com
Device ID: device.cisco.com
Entry address(es): 
    IP address: 192.168.68.18
    CLNS address: 490001.1111.1111.1111.00
    DECnet address: 10.1
Interface: Ethernet0, Port ID (outgoing port): Ethernet0
Holdtime: 155 sec
Version:
GS Software (GS3), Experimental Version 10.2(10302) [asmith 161]
Copyright (c) 1986-1994 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Mon 07-Nov-94 14:34

The following is sample output from the show cdp entry privilege command. Only information about the protocols enabled on neon-cisco.com is displayed.

Router# show cdp entry device.cisco.com protocol
Protocol information for device.cisco.com:
    IP address: 192.168.68.18
    CLNS address: 490001.1111.1111.1111.00
    DECnet address: 10.1

The following is sample output from the show cdp entry version command. Only information about the version of software running on device.cisco.com is displayed.

Router# show cdp entry device.cisco.com version 
Version information for device.cisco.com:
    GS Software (GS3), Experimental Version 10.2(10302) [asmith 161]
Copyright (c) 1986-1994 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Mon 07-Nov-94 14:34
Related Command

show cdp neighbors

show cdp interface

To display information about the interfaces on which CDP is enabled, use the show cdp interface privileged EXEC command.

show cdp interface [type number]
Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Type of interface about which you want information.

number

(Optional) Number of the interface about which you want information.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Sample Displays

The following sample output form the show cdp interface command. Status information and information about CDP timer and hold time settings is displayed for all interfaces on which CDP is enabled.

Router# show cdp interface
Serial0 is up, line protocol is up, encapsulation is SMDS
    Sending CDP packets every 60 seconds
    Holdtime is 180 seconds
Ethernet0 is up, line protocol is up, encapsulation is ARPA
    Sending CDP packets every 60 seconds
    Holdtime is 180 seconds

The following is sample output from the show cdp interface command with an interface specified. Status information and information about CDP timer and holdtime settings is displayed for Ethernet interface 0 only.

Router# show cdp interface ethernet 0
Ethernet0 is up, line protocol is up, encapsulation is ARPA
    Sending CDP packets every 60 seconds
    Holdtime is 180 seconds

show cdp neighbors

To display information about neighbors, use the show cdp neighbors privileged EXEC command.

show cdp neighbors [type number] [detail]
Syntax Description

type

(Optional) Type of the interface connected to the neighbors about which you want information.

number

(Optional) Number of the interface connected to the neighbors about which you want information.

detail

(Optional) Displays detailed information about a neighbor (or neighbors) including network address, enabled protocols, hold time, and software version.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show cdp neighbors command. Device ID, interface type and number, holdtime settings, capabilities, platform, and port ID information about neighbors is displayed.

Router# show cdp neighbors
Capability Codes: R - Router, T - Trans Bridge, B - Source Route Bridge
                  S - Switch, H - Host, I - IGMP
Device ID        Local Intrfce     Holdtme    Capability    Platform    Port ID
device.cisco.com      Eth 0          151         R T        AGS       Eth 0
device.cisco.com      Ser 0          165         R T        AGS       Ser 3

The following is sample output from the show cdp neighbors detail command. Additional detail is shown about neighbors, including network address, enabled protocols, and software version:

Router# show cdp neighbors detail 
Device ID: device.cisco.com
Entry address(es): 
    IP address: 192.168.68.18
    CLNS address: 490001.1111.1111.1111.00
    DECnet address: 10.1
Platform: AGS, Capabilities: Router Trans-Bridge 
Interface: Ethernet0, Port ID (outgoing port): Ethernet0
Holdtime: 143 sec
Version:
GS Software (GS3), Experimental Version 10.2(10302) [asmith 161]
Copyright (c) 1986-1994 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Mon 07-Nov-94 14:34
Related Command

show cdp entry

show cdp traffic

To display traffic information from the CDP table, use the show cdp traffic privileged EXEC command.

show cdp traffic
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show cdp traffic command.

Router# show cdp traffic
CDP counters:
        Packets output: 94, Input: 75
        Hdr syntax: 0, Chksum error: 0, Encaps failed: 0
        No memory: 0, Invalid packet: 0, Fragmented: 0

In this example, traffic information is displayed including the numbers of packets sent, the number of packets received, header syntax, checksum errors, failed encapsulations, memory problems, and invalid and fragmented packets is displayed. Header syntax indicates the number of packets CDP receives with that have an invalid header format.

show clock

To display the system clock, use the show clock EXEC command.

show clock [detail]
Syntax Description

detail

(Optional) Indicates the clock source (NTP, VINES, 7000 calendar, 7200 calendar, and so forth) and the current summer-time setting (if any).

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The system clock keeps an "authoritative" flag that indicates whether the time is authoritative (believed to be accurate). If the system clock has been set by a timing source (Cisco 7000 calendar, NTP, VINES, and so forth), the flag is set. If the time is not authoritative, it will be used only for display purposes. Until the clock is authoritative and the "authoritative" flag is set, the flag prevents peers from synchronizing to the clock when the peers' time is invalid.

The symbol that precedes the show clock display indicates the following:
Symbol Description

*

Time is not authoritative.

(blank)

Time is authoritative.

.

Time is authoritative, but NTP is not synchronized.

Sample Display

The following sample output shows that the current clock is authoritative and that the time source is NTP:

Router# show clock detail
15:29:03.158 PST Mon Mar 1 1993
Time source is NTP
Router#
Related Commands

clock set
show calendar

show context

Use the show context EXEC command to display information stored in NVRAM when the router crashes. This command only works on the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series platforms.

show context
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

The display from the show context command includes the following information:

This information is of use only to your technical support representative in analyzing crashes in the field. It is included here in case you need to read the displayed statistics to an engineer over the phone.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show context command following a system failure:

Router> show context
System was restarted by error - a Software forced crash, PC 0x60189354
GS Software (RSP-PV-M), Experimental Version 11.1(2033) [ganesh 111]
Compiled Mon 31-Mar-97 13:21 by ganesh
Image text-base: 0x60010900, data-base: 0x6073E000
Stack trace from system failure:
FP: 0x60AEA798, RA: 0x60189354
FP: 0x60AEA798, RA: 0x601853CC
FP: 0x60AEA7C0, RA: 0x6015E98C
FP: 0x60AEA7F8, RA: 0x6011AB3C
FP: 0x60AEA828, RA: 0x601706CC
FP: 0x60AEA878, RA: 0x60116340
FP: 0x60AEA890, RA: 0x6011632C
Fault History Buffer:
GS Software (RSP-PV-M), Experimental Version 11.1(2033) [ganesh 111]
Compiled Mon 31-Mar-97 13:21 by ganesh
Signal = 23, Code = 0x24, Uptime 00:04:19
$0 : 00000000, AT : 60930120, v0 : 00000032, v1 : 00000120
a0 : 60170110, a1 : 6097F22C, a2 : 00000000, a3 : 00000000
t0 : 60AE02A0, t1 : 8000FD80, t2 : 34008F00, t3 : FFFF00FF
t4 : 00000083, t5 : 3E840024, t6 : 00000000, t7 : 11010132
s0 : 00000006, s1 : 607A25F8, s2 : 00000001, s3 : 00000000
s4 : 00000000, s5 : 00000000, s6 : 00000000, s7 : 6097F755
t8 : 600FABBC, t9 : 00000000, k0 : 30408401, k1 : 30410000
gp : 608B9860, sp : 60AEA798, s8 : 00000000, ra : 601853CC
EPC : 60189354, SREG : 3400EF03, Cause : 00000024
Related Commands

show processes
show stacks

show controllers logging

To display logging information about a VIP card, use the show controllers logging privileged EXEC command.

show controllers vip slot-number logging
Syntax Description

vip slot-number

VIP slot number.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

This command displays the state of syslog error and event logging, including host addresses, and whether console logging is enabled.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show controllers logging command:

Router# show controllers vip 4 logging
Syslog logging: enabled
          Console logging: disabled
          Monitor logging: level debugging, 266 messages logged.
          Trap logging: level informational, 266 messages logged.
          Logging to 192.180.2.238

Table 75 describes significant fields shown in the display.


Table 75: Show Controllers Logging Field Descriptions
Field Description

Syslog logging

When enabled, system logging messages are sent to a UNIX host that acts as a syslog server; that is, it captures and saves the messages.

Console logging

If enabled, states the level; otherwise, this field displays disabled.

Monitor logging

Minimum level of severity required for a log message to be sent to a monitor terminal (not the console).

Trap logging

Minimum level of severity required for a log message to be sent to a syslog server.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show logging

show controllers tech-support

To display general information about a VIP card when reporting a problem, use the show controllers tech-support privileged EXEC command.

show controllers vip slot-number tech-support
Syntax Description

vip slot-number

VIP slot number.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use this command to help collect general information about a VIP card when you are reporting a problem. This command displays the equivalent of the following show commands for the VIP card:

For a sample display of the show controllers tech-support command output, refer to these show commands.

Related Commands

You can use the master indexes or search online to find documentation of related commands.

show buffers
show controllers
show interfaces
show processes cpu
show processes memory
show running-config
show stacks
show tech-support
show version

show debugging

To display information about the types of CDP debugging that are enabled for your router, use the show debugging privileged EXEC command.

show debugging
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show debugging command. In this example, all three types of CDP debugging are enabled.

Router# show debugging
CDP:
    CDP packet info debugging is on
    CDP events debugging is on
    CDP neighbor info debugging is on
CDP-PA: Packet received from neon.cisco.com on interface Ethernet0
CDP-EV: Encapsulation on interface Serial0 failed
CDP-AD: Aging entry for neon.cisco.com, on interface Ethernet0
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented in the Debug Command Reference.

debug cdp adjacency
debug cdp events
debug cdp packets

show environment

Use the show environment EXEC command to display temperature and voltage information on the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series routers.

show environment [all | last | table]
Syntax Description

all

(Optional) Displays a detailed listing of the power supplies, temperature readings, and voltage readings.

last

(Optional) Displays the reason for the last system shutdown that was related to voltage or temperature and the environmental status at that time.

table

(Optional) Displays the temperature and voltage thresholds and a table that lists the ranges of environmental measurements that are within specification.

Default

If no options are specified, the router displays the date and time that the environmental measurements were last checked and whether the environmental measurements were within specifications. For the Cisco 7500 series, the router displays only measurements that are out of normal range.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Once a minute a routine is run that gets environmental measurements from sensors and stores the output into a buffer. This buffer is displayed on the console when show environment is invoked.

If a measurement exceeds desired margins, but has not exceeded fatal margins, a warning message is printed to the system console. The system software queries the sensors for measurements once a minute, but warnings for a given test point are printed at most once every hour for sensor readings in the warning range and once every 5 minutes for sensor readings in the critical range. If a measurement is out of line within these time segments, an automatic warning message appears on the console. As noted, you can query the environmental status with the show environment command at any time to determine whether a measurement is at the warning or critical tolerance.

If a shutdown occurs because of detection of fatal environmental margins, the last measured value from each sensor is stored in internal nonvolatile memory.

For environmental specifications, refer to the hardware installation and maintenance publication for your individual chassis.

Sample Displays

The following example shows the typical show environment display when there are no warning conditions in the system for the Cisco 7000 series and Cisco 7200 series. This information may vary slightly depending on the platform you are using. The date and time of the query are displayed, along with the data refresh information and a message indicating that there are no warning conditions.

Router> show environment
Environmental Statistics
    Environmental status as of 13:17:39 UTC Thu Jun 6 1996 
    Data is 7 second(s) old, refresh in 53 second(s)
    All Environmental Measurements are within specifications

Table 76 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 76: Show Environment Field Descriptions
Field Description

Environmental status as of...

Current date and time.

Data is..., refresh in...

Environmental measurements are output into a buffer every 60 seconds, unless other higher-priority -processes are running.

Status message

If environmental measurements are not within -specification, warning messages are displayed.

Sample Displays for the Cisco 7000 Series

The following are examples of messages that display on the system console when a measurement has exceeded an acceptable margin:

ENVIRONMENTAL WARNING: Air flow appears marginal.
ENVIRONMENTAL WARNING: Internal temperature measured 41.3(C)
ENVIRONMENTAL WARNING: +5 volt testpoint measured 5.310(V)

The system displays the following message if voltage or temperature exceed maximum margins:

SHUTDOWN: air flow problem

In the following example, there have been two intermittent power failures since a router was turned on, and the lower power supply is not functioning. The last intermittent power failure occurred on Monday, June 10, 1996, at 11:07 p.m.

7000# show environment all
Environmental Statistics
    Environmental status as of 23:19:47 UTC Wed Jun 12 1996 
    Data is 6 second(s) old, refresh in 54 second(s)
    WARNING: Lower Power Supply is NON-OPERATIONAL
    Lower Power Supply:700W, OFF     Upper Power Supply: 700W, ON
    Intermittent Powerfail(s): 2     Last on 23:07:05 UTC Mon Jun 10 1996 
    +12 volts measured at    12.05(V)
      +5 volts measured at      4.96(V)
    -12 volts measured at  -12.05(V)
    +24 volts measured at    23.80(V)
    Airflow temperature measured at 38(C)
    Inlet temperature measured at 25(C)

Table 77 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 77: Show Environment All Field Descriptions for the Cisco 7000
Field Description

Environmental status as of...

Date and time of last query.

Data is..., refresh in...

Environmental measurements are output into a buffer every 60 seconds, unless other higher-priority -processes are running.

WARNING:

If environmental measurements are not within -specification, warning messages are displayed.

Lower Power Supply

Type of power supply installed and its status (On or Off).

Upper Power Supply

Type of power supply installed and its status (On or Off).

Intermittent Powerfail(s)

Number of power hits (not resulting in shutdown) since the system was last booted.

Voltage Specifications

System voltage measurements.

Airflow and inlet temperature

Temperature of air coming in and going out.

The following example is for the Cisco 7000 series router. The router retrieves the environmental statistics at the time of the last shutdown. In this example, the last shutdown was Friday, May 19, 1995, at 12:40 p.m., so the environmental statistics at that time are displayed:

Router# show environment last
Environmental Statistics
    Environmental status as of 14:47:00 UTC Sun May 21 1995 
    Data is 6 second(s) old, refresh in 54 second(s)
    WARNING: Upper Power Supply is NON-OPERATIONAL
LAST Environmental Statistics
    Environmental status as of 12:40:00 UTC Fri May 19 1995 
    Lower Power Supply: 700W, ON     Upper Power Supply: 700W, OFF
    No Intermittent Powerfails
    +12 volts measured at    12.05(V)
      +5 volts measured at      4.98(V)
    -12 volts measured at  -12.00(V)
    +24 volts measured at    23.80(V)
  Airflow  temperature measured at 30(C)
    Inlet    temperature measured at 23(C)

Table 78 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 78: Show Environment Last Field Descriptions for the Cisco 7000
Field Description

Environmental status as of...

Current date and time.

Data is..., refresh in...

Environmental measurements are output into a buffer every 60 seconds, unless other higher-priority -processes are running.

WARNING:

If environmental measurements are not within -specification, warning messages are displayed.

LAST Environmental Statistics

Displays test point values at time of the last environmental shutdown.

Lower Power Supply:

Upper Power Supply:

For the Cisco 7000, indicates the status of the two 700W power supplies.

For the Cisco 7010, indicates the status of the single 600W power supply.

The following sample output shows the current environmental status in tables that list voltage and temperature parameters. There are three warning messages: one each about the lower power supply, the airflow temperature, and the inlet temperature. In this example, voltage parameters are shown to be in the normal range, airflow temperature is at a critical level, and inlet temperature is at the warning level:

Router> show environment table
Environmental Statistics
    Environmental status as of Mon 11-2-1992 17:43:36
    Data is 52 second(s) old, refresh in 8 second(s)
    WARNING: Lower Power Supply is NON-OPERATIONAL
    WARNING: Airflow temperature has reached CRITICAL level at 73(C)
    WARNING: Inlet temperature has reached WARNING level at 41(C)
Voltage Parameters:
 SENSE        CRITICAL                NORMAL                CRITICAL
-------|--------------------|------------------------|--------------------
+12(V)                    10.20      12.05(V)      13.80
 +5(V)                     4.74       4.98(V)       5.26
-12(V)                   -10.20     -12.05(V)     -13.80
+24(V)                    20.00      24.00(V)      28.00
Temperature Parameters:
 SENSE     WARNING      NORMAL      WARNING      CRITICAL      SHUTDOWN
-------|-------------|------------|-------------|--------------|-----------
Airflow              10           60             70    73(C)     88
Inlet                 10           39    41(C)      46              64

Table 79 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 79: Show Environment Table Field Descriptions for the Cisco 7000
Field Description

SENSE (Voltage Parameters)

Voltage specification for DC line.

SENSE (Temperature Parameters)

Air being measured. Inlet measures the air coming in, and Airflow measures the temperature of the air inside the chassis.

WARNING

System is approaching an out-of-tolerance condition.

NORMAL

All monitored conditions meet normal requirements.

CRITICAL

Out-of-tolerance condition exists.

SHUTDOWN

Processor has detected condition that could cause physical damage to the system.

Sample Displays for the Cisco 7200 Series

The system displays the following message if the voltage or temperature enters the "Warning" range:

%ENVM-4-ENVWARN: Chassis outlet 3 measured at 55C/131F

The system displays the following message if the voltage or temperature enters the "Critical" range:

%ENVM-2-ENVCRIT: +3.45 V measured at +3.65 V

The system displays the following message if the voltage or temperature exceeds the maximum margins:

%ENVM-0-SHUTDOWN: Environmental Monitor initiated shutdown

The following message is sent to the console if a power supply has been inserted or removed from the system. This message relates only to systems that have two power supplies:

%ENVM-6-PSCHANGE: Power Supply 1 changed from Zytek AC Power Supply to removed

The following message is sent to the console if a power supply has been powered on or off. In the case of the power supply being shut off, this message can be due to the user shutting off the power supply or to a failed power supply. This message relates only to systems that have two power supplies:

%ENVM-6-PSLEV: Power Supply 1 state changed from normal to shutdown

The following is sample output from the show environment all command on the Cisco 7200 series router when there is a voltage warning condition in the system:

7200# show environment all
Power Supplies:
        Power supply 1 is unknown. Unit is off.
        Power supply 2 is Zytek AC Power Supply. Unit is on.
Temperature readings:
        chassis inlet    measured at 25C/77F
        chassis outlet 1 measured at 29C/84F
        chassis outlet 2 measured at 36C/96F
        chassis outlet 3 measured at 44C/111F
Voltage readings:
        +3.45 V measured at +3.83 V:Voltage in Warning range!
        +5.15 V measured at +5.09 V
        +12.15    measured at +12.42 V
        -11.95    measured at -12.10 V

Table 80 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 80: Show Environment All Field Descriptions for the Cisco 7200
Field Description

Power Supplies:

Current condition of the power supplies including the type and whether the power supply is on or off.

Temperature readings:

Current measurements of the chassis temperature at the inlet and outlet locations.

Voltage readings:

Current measurement of the power supply test points.

The following example is for the Cisco 7200 series router. This example shows the measurements immediately before the last shutdown and the reason for the last shutdown (if appropriate).

7200# show environment last
      chassis inlet      previously measured at 27C/80F
      chassis outlet 1   previously measured at 31C/87F
      chassis outlet 2   previously measured at 37C/98F
      chassis outlet 3   previously measured at 45C/113F
      +3.3 V             previously measured at 4.02
      +5.0 V             previously measured at 4.92
      +12.0 V            previously measured at 12.65
      -12.0 V            previously measured at 11.71
last shutdown reason - power supply shutdown

Table 81 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 81: Show Environment Last Field Descriptions for the Cisco 7200
Field Description

chassis inlet

Temperature measurements at the inlet area of the chassis.

chassis outlet

Temperature measurements at the outlet areas of the chassis.

voltages

Power supply test point measurements.

last shutdown reason

Possible shutdown reasons are power supply shutdown, critical temperature, and critical voltage.

The following example is for the Cisco 7200 series router. This information lists the temperature and voltage shutdown thresholds for each sensor.

7200# show environment table
Sample Point      LowCritical    LowWarning     HighWarning    HighCritical
chassis inlet                                   40C/104F       50C/122F
chassis outlet 1                                43C/109F       53C/127F
chassis outlet 2                                75C/167F       75C/167F
chassis outlet 3                                55C/131F       65C/149F
+3.45 V           +2.76          +3.10          +3.80          +4.14
+5.15 V           +4.10          +4.61          +5.67          +6.17
+12.15 V          +9.72          +10.91         +13.37         +14.60
-11.95 V          -8.37          -9.57          -14.34         -15.53
Shutdown system at 70C/158F

Table 82 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 82: Show Environment Table Field Descriptions for the Cisco 7200
Field Description

Sample Point

Area for which measurements are taken.

LowCritical

Level at which a critical message is issued for an out-of-tolerance voltage condition. The system continues to operate; however, the system is approaching shutdown.

LowWarning

Level at which a warning message is issued for an out-of-tolerance voltage condition. The system continues to operate, but operator action is recommended to bring the system back to a normal state.

HighWarning

Level at which a warning message is issued. The system continues to operate, but operator action is recommended to bring the system back to a normal state.

HighCritical

Level at which a critical message is issued. For the chassis, the router is shut down. For the power supply, the power supply is shut down.

Shutdown system at

The system is shut down if the specified temperature is met.

Sample Displays for the Cisco 7500 Series

The sample output for the Cisco 7500 series routers may vary depending on the specific model (for example, the Cisco 7513). The following is sample output from the show environment all command on the Cisco 7500 series router:

7500#show environment all
Arbiter type 1, backplane type 7513 (id 2) 
Power supply #1 is 1200W AC (id 1), power supply #2 is removed (id 7) 
Active fault conditions: none
Fan transfer point: 100%
Active trip points: Restart_Inhibit
15 of 15 soft shutdowns remaining before hard shutdown 
                                                1
                            0123456789012
Dbus slots:      X          XX        X
card                inlet            hotpoint            exhaust
RSP(6)          35C/95F          47C/116F            40C/104F
RSP(7)          35C/95F          43C/109F            39C/102F
Shutdown temperature source is `hotpoint' on RSP(6), requested RSP(6) 
+12V measured at 12.31
+5V measured at 5.21
-12V measured at -12.07
+24V measured at 22.08
+2.5 reference is 2.49
PS1 +5V Current            measured at 59.61 A (capacity 200 A) 
PS1 +12V Current          measured at 5.08 A (capacity 35 A) 
PS1 -12V Current          measured at 0.42 A (capacity 3 A) 
PS1 output is 378 W

Table 83 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 83: Show Environment All Field Descriptions for the Cisco 7500
Field Description

Arbiter type 1

Numbers indicating the arbiter type and backplane type.

Power supply

Number and type of power supply installed in the chassis.

Active fault conditions:

If any fault conditions exist (such as power supply failure, fan failure, and temperature too high), they are listed here.

Fan transfer point:

Software controlled fan speed. If the router is operating below its automatic restart temperature, the transfer point is reduced by 10 percent of the full range each minute. If the router is at or above its automatic restart temperature, the transfer point is increased in the same way.

Active trip points:

Temperature sensor is compared against the values displayed at the bottom of the show environment table command output.

15 of 15 soft shutdowns remaining

When the temperature increases above the "board shutdown" level, a soft shutdown occurs (that is, the cards are shut down, and the power supplies, fans, and CI continue to operate). When the system cools to the restart level, the system restarts. The system counts the number of times this occurs and keeps the up/down cycle from continuing forever. When the counter reaches zero, the system performs a hard shutdown, which requires a power cycle to recover. The soft shutdown counter is reset to its maximum value after the system has been up for 6 hours.

Dbus slots:

Indicates which chassis slots are occupied.

card, inlet, hotpoint, exhaust

Temperature measurements at the inlet, hotpoint, and exhaust areas of the card. The (6) and (7) indicate the slot numbers. Dual-RSP chassis can show two RSPs.

Shutdown temperature source

Indicates which of the three temperature sources is selected for comparison against the "shutdown" levels listed with the show environment table command.

Voltages (+12V, +5V, -12V, +24V, +2.5)

Voltages measured on the backplane.

Power supply current (PS1)

Current measured on the power supply.

The following example is for the Cisco 7500 series router. This example shows the measurements immediately before the last shutdown.

7500#show environment last
 RSP(4) Inlet       previously measured at 37C/98F
 RSP(4) Hotpoint    previously measured at 46C/114F
 RSP(4) Exhaust     previously measured at 52C/125F
 +12 Voltage        previously measured at 12.26
 +5 Voltage         previously measured at 5.17
 -12 Voltage        previously measured at -12.03
 +24 Voltage        previously measured at 23.78

Table 84 describes the fields shown in the display


Table 84: Show Environment Last Field Descriptions for the Cisco 7500
Field Description

RSP(4) Inlet, Hotpoint, Exhaust

Temperature measurements at the inlet, hotpoint, and exhaust areas of the card.

Voltages

Voltages measured on the backplane.

The following example is for the Cisco 7500 series router. This information lists the temperature and voltage thresholds for each sensor. These thresholds indicate when error messages occur. There are two level of messages: warning and critical.

7500#show env table
Sample Point      LowCritical    LowWarning     HighWarning    HighCritical   
RSP(4) Inlet                                    44C/111F       50C/122F       
RSP(4) Hotpoint                                 54C/129F       60C/140F       
RSP(4) Exhaust                                                                
+12 Voltage       10.90          11.61          12.82          13.38          
+5 Voltage        4.61           4.94           5.46           5.70           
-12 Voltage       -10.15         -10.76         -13.25         -13.86         
+24 Voltage       20.38          21.51          26.42          27.65          
2.5 Reference                    2.43           2.51                          
Shutdown boards at           70C/158F
Shutdown power supplies at   76C/168F
Restart after shutdown below 40C/104F

Table 85 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 85: Show Environment Table Field Descriptions for the Cisco 7500
Field Description

Sample Point

Area for which measurements are taken.

LowCritical

Level at which a critical message is issued for an out-of-tolerance voltage condition. The system continues to operate; however, the system is approaching shutdown.

LowWarning

Level at which a warning message is issued for an out-of-tolerance voltage condition. The system continues to operate, but operator action is recommended to bring the system back to a normal state.

HighWarning

Level at which a warning message is issued. The system continues to operate, but operator action is recommended to bring the system back to a normal state.

HighCritical

Level at which a critical message is issued. For the chassis, the router is shut down. For the power supply, the power supply is shut down.

Shutdown boards at

The card is shut down if the specified temperature is met.

Shutdown power supplies at

The system is shut down if the specified temperature is met.

Restart after shutdown

The system will restart when the specified temperature is met.

show gt64010

Use the show gt64010 EXEC command to display all GT64010 internal registers and interrupt status on the Cisco 7200 series routers.

show gt64010
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines
Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

This command displays information about the CPU interface, DRAM/device address space, device parameters, DMA channels, timers and counters, and PCI internal registers. The information is generally useful for diagnostic tasks performed by technical support only.

Sample Display

The following is a partial sample output for the show gt64010 command:

Router# show gt64010
GT64010 Channel 0 DMA:
  dma_list=0x6088C3EC, dma_ring=0x4B018480, dma_entries=256
  dma_free=0x6088CECC, dma_reqt=0x6088CECC, dma_done=0x6088CECC
  thread=0x6088CEAC, thread_end=0x6088CEAC
  backup_thread=0x0, backup_thread_end=0x0
  dma_working=0, dma_complete=6231, post_coalesce_frames=6231
  exhausted_dma_entries=0, post_coalesce_callback=6231
GT64010 Register Dump: Registers at 0xB4000000
CPU Interface:
  cpu_interface_conf     : 0x80030000 (b/s 0x00000380)
  addr_decode_err            : 0xFFFFFFFF (b/s 0xFFFFFFFF)
Processor Address Space  :
  ras10_low                        : 0x00000000 (b/s 0x00000000)
  ras10_high                      : 0x07000000 (b/s 0x00000007)
  ras32_low                        : 0x08000000 (b/s 0x00000008)
  ras32_high                      : 0x0F000000 (b/s 0x0000000F)
  cs20_low                          : 0xD0000000 (b/s 0x000000D0)
  cs20_high                        : 0x74000000 (b/s 0x00000074)
  cs3_boot_low                  : 0xF8000000 (b/s 0x000000F8)
  cs3_boot_high                : 0x7E000000 (b/s 0x0000007E)
  pci_io_low                      : 0x00080000 (b/s 0x00000800)
  pci_io_high                    : 0x00000000 (b/s 0x00000000)
  pci_mem_low                    : 0x00020000 (b/s 0x00000200)
  pci_mem_high                  : 0x7F000000 (b/s 0x0000007F)
  internal_spc_decode    : 0xA0000000 (b/s 0x000000A0)
  bus_err_low                    : 0x00000000 (b/s 0x00000000)
  bus_err_high                  : 0x00000000 (b/s 0x00000000)
...

show logging

Use the show logging EXEC command to display the state of logging (syslog).

show logging [history]
Syntax Description

history

(Optional) Display information in the syslog history table only.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command displays the state of syslog error and event logging, including host addresses, and whether console logging is enabled. This command also displays Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) configuration parameters and protocol activity.

When you use the optional history keyword, information about the syslog history table is displayed such as the table size, the status of messages, and text of messages stored in the table. Messages stored in the table are governed by the logging history global configuration command.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show logging command:

Router# show logging
Syslog logging: enabled
          Console logging: disabled
          Monitor logging: level debugging, 266 messages logged.
          Trap logging: level informational, 266 messages logged.
          Logging to 192.180.2.238
SNMP logging: disabled, retransmission after 30 seconds
    0 messages logged

Table 86 describes significant fields shown in the display.


Table 86: Show Logging Field Descriptions
Field Description

Syslog logging

When enabled, system logging messages are sent to a UNIX host that acts as a syslog server; that is, it captures and saves the messages.

Console logging

If enabled, states the level; otherwise, this field displays disabled.

Monitor logging

Minimum level of severity required for a log message to be sent to a monitor terminal (not the console).

Trap logging

Minimum level of severity required for a log message to be sent to a syslog server.

SNMP logging

Shows whether SNMP logging is enabled and the number of messages logged, and the retransmission interval.

The following is sample output from the show logging history command:

Router# show logging history
Syslog History Table: 1 maximum table entry, saving level notifications or higher
0 messages ignored, 0 dropped, 15 table entries flushed,
SNMP notifications not enabled
    entry number 16: SYS-5-CONFIG_I
    Configured from console by console
    timestamp: 1110

Table 87 describes the significant fields shown in the display.


Table 87: Show Logging History Field Descriptions
Field Description

maximum table entry

Number of messages that can be stored in the history table. Set with the logging history size command.

saving level notifications or higher

Level of messages that are stored in the history table and sent to the SNMP server (if SNMP notification is enabled). Set with the logging history command.

messages ignored

Number of messages not stored in the history table because the severity level is greater than that specified with the logging history command.

dropped

Number of messages that could not be processed due to lack of system resources. Dropped messages do not appear in the history table and are not sent to the SNMP server.

table entries flushed

Number of messages that have been removed from the history table to make room for newer messages.

SNMP notifications

Whether syslog traps of the appropriate level are sent to the SNMP server. Syslog traps are either enabled or not enabled through the snmp-server enable command.

entry number

Number of the message entry in the history table.

SYS-5-CONFIG_I
Configured from console by console

Cisco IOS syslog message consisting of the facility name (SYS) which indicates where the message came from, the severity level (5), the message name (CONFIG_I), and the message text.

timestamp

Time, based on the router's up time, that the message was generated.

Related Command

logging history size
show controllers logging

show memory

Use the show memory EXEC command to show statistics about memory, including memory free pool statistics.

show memory [memory-type] [free] [summary]
Syntax Description

memory-type

(Optional) Memory type to display (processor, multibus, io, sram). If type is not specified, statistics for all memory types present are displayed.

free

(Optional) Displays free memory statistics.

summary

(Optional) Displays a summary of memory usage including the size and number of blocks allocated for each address of the system call that allocated the block.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The show memory command displays information about memory available after the system image decompresses and loads.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show memory command:

Router# show memory
               Head   Total(b)    Used(b)    Free(b)  Lowest(b) Largest(b)
Processor    B0EE38    5181896    2210036    2971860    2692456    2845368
          Processor memory
Address   Bytes Prev.    Next     Ref  PrevF   NextF   Alloc PC  What
B0EE38     1056 0        B0F280     1                  18F132    List Elements
B0F280     2656 B0EE38   B0FD08     1                  18F132    List Headers
B0FD08     2520 B0F280   B10708     1                  141384    TTY data
B10708     2000 B0FD08   B10F00     1                  14353C    TTY Input Buf
B10F00      512 B10708   B11128     1                  14356C    TTY Output Buf
B11128     2000 B10F00   B11920     1                  1A110E    Interrupt Stack 
B11920       44 B11128   B11974     1                  970DE8    *Init*
B11974     1056 B11920   B11DBC     1                  18F132    messages
B11DBC       84 B11974   B11E38     1                  19ABCE    Watched Boolean 
B11E38       84 B11DBC   B11EB4     1                  19ABCE    Watched Boolean 
B11EB4       84 B11E38   B11F30     1                  19ABCE    Watched Boolean 
B11F30       84 B11EB4   B11FAC     1                  19ABCE    Watched Boolean 
Router#

The following is sample output from the show memory free command:

Router# show memory free
               Head   Total(b)    Used(b)    Free(b)  Lowest(b) Largest(b)
Processor    B0EE38    5181896    2210076    2971820    2692456    2845368
          Processor memory
Address  Bytes Prev.    Next     Ref  PrevF   NextF   Alloc PC  What
             24    Free list 1
CEB844       32 CEB7A4   CEB88C     0  0       0       96B894    SSE Manager
             52    Free list 2
             72    Free list 3
             76    Free list 4
             80    Free list 5
D35ED4       80 D35E30   D35F4C     0  0       D27AE8  96B894    SSE Manager
D27AE8       80 D27A48   D27B60     0  D35ED4  0       22585E    SSE Manager
             88    Free list 6
            100    Free list 7
D0A8F4      100 D0A8B0   D0A980     0  0       0       2258DA    SSE Manager
            104    Free list 8
B59EF0      108 B59E8C   B59F84     0  0       0       2258DA    (fragment)

The display of show memory free contains the same types of information as the show memory display, except that only free memory is displayed, and the information is displayed in order for each free list.

The first section of the display includes summary statistics about the activities of the system memory allocator. Table 88 describes significant fields shown in the first section of the display.


Table 88: Show Memory Field Descriptions-First Section
Field Description

Head

Hexadecimal address of the head of the memory allocation chain.

Total (b)

Sum of used bytes plus free bytes.

Used (b)

Amount of memory in use.

Free (b)

Amount of memory not in use.

Lowest(b)

Smallest amount of free memory since last boot.

Largest (b)

Size of largest available free block.

The second section of the display is a block-by-block listing of memory use. Table 89 describes significant fields shown in the second section of the display.


Table 89: Characteristics of Each Block of Memory-Second Section
Field Description

Address

Hexadecimal address of block.

Bytes

Size of block in bytes.

Prev.

Address of previous block (should match Address on previous line).

Next

Address of next block (should match address on next line).

Ref

Reference count for that memory block, indicating how many different processes are using that block of memory.

PrevF

Address of previous free block (if free).

NextF

Address of next free block (if free).

Alloc PC

Address of the system call that allocated the block.

What

Name of process that owns the block, or "(fragment)" if the block is a fragment, or "(coalesced)" if the block was coalesced from adjacent free blocks.

The show memory io command displays the free IO memory blocks. On the Cisco 4000, this command quickly shows how much unused IO memory is available.

The following is sample output from the show memory io command:

Router# show memory io
Address   Bytes Prev.   Next     Ref    PrevF   NextF   Alloc PC    What
6132DA0   59264 6132664 6141520    0    0       600DDEC    3FCF0         *Packet Buffer*
600DDEC         500 600DA4C 600DFE0    0   6132DA0 600FE68    0 
600FE68         376 600FAC8 600FFE0    0   600DDEC 6011D54    0 
6011D54         652 60119B4 6011FEO    0   600FE68 6013D54    0 
614FCA0         832 614F564 614FFE0    0   601FD54 6177640    0 
6177640 2657056 6172E90 0               0   614FCA0 0                0 
Total: 2723244

The show memory sram command displays the free SRAM memory blocks. For the Cisco 4000, this command supports the high-speed static RAM memory pool to make it easier to debug or diagnose problems with allocation or freeing of such memory.

The following is sample output from the show memory sram command:

Router# show memory sram
Address   Bytes Prev.   Next     Ref    PrevF   NextF   Alloc PC    What
7AE0       38178 72F0    0           0       0         0              0
Total     38178 

The show memory command on the Cisco 4000 includes information about SRAM memory and IO memory, and appears as follows:

Router# show memory
               Head   Total(b)    Used(b)    Free(b)  Lowest(b) Largest(b)
Processor    49C724   28719324    1510864   27208460   26511644   15513908
      I/O   6000000    4194304    1297088    2897216    2869248    2896812
     SRAM      1000      65536      63400       2136       2136       2136
Address   Bytes Prev.   Next     Ref    PrevF   NextF   Alloc PC    What
1000         2032 0       17F0         1                  3E73E     *Init*
17F0         2032 1000        1FE0         1                  3E73E         *Init*
1FE0           544 17F0        2200         1                  3276A         *Init*
2200              52 1FE0        2234         1                  31D68         *Init*
2234             52 2200        2268         1                  31DAA         *Init*
2268             52 2234        229C         1                  31DF2         *Init*
72F0             2032 6E5C        7AE0         1                  3E73E         Init
7AE0       38178 72F0        0               0    0      0           0                 
Router#

The show memory summary command displays a summary of all memory pools as well as memory usage per Alloc PC (address of the system call that allocated the block).

The following is a partial sample output from the show memory summary command. This command shows the size, blocks, and bytes allocated. Bytes equal the size multiplied by the blocks. For a description of the other fields, see Table 88 and Table 89.

router# show memory summary
               Head   Total(b)    Used(b)    Free(b)  Lowest(b) Largest(b)
Processor    B0EE38    5181896    2210216    2971680    2692456    2845368
          Processor memory
Alloc PC        Size     Blocks      Bytes    What
0x2AB2           192          1        192    IDB: Serial Info
0x70EC            92          2        184    Init
0xC916           128         50       6400    RIF Cache
0x76ADE         4500          1       4500    XDI data
0x76E84         4464          1       4464    XDI data
0x76EAC          692          1        692    XDI data
0x77764          408          1        408    Init
0x77776          116          1        116    Init
0x777A2          408          1        408    Init
0x777B2          116          1        116    Init
0xA4600           24          3         72    List
0xD9B5C           52          1         52    SSE Manager
.......................
0x0                0       3413    2072576    Pool Summary
0x0                0         28    2971680    Pool Summary (Free Blocks)
0x0               40       3441     137640    Pool Summary(All Block Headers)
0x0                0       3413    2072576    Memory Summary
0x0                0         28    2971680    Memory Summary (Free Blocks)
Related Command

show processes memory

show ntp associations

To show the status of Network Time Protocol (NTP) associations, use the show ntp associations EXEC command.

show ntp associations [detail]
Syntax Description

detail

(Optional) Shows detailed information about each NTP association.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Displays

Detailed descriptions of the information displayed by this command can be found in the NTP specification (RFC 1305).

The following is sample output from the show ntp associations command:

Router# show ntp associations
     address         ref clock     st    when    poll    reach    delay    offset        disp
  ~172.31.32.2      172.31.32.1       5    29    1024    377     4.2   -8.59     1.6
+~192.168.13.33    192.168.1.111     3    69      128    377     4.1    3.48     2.3
*~192.168.13.57    192.168.1.111     3    32      128    377     7.9   11.18     3.6
* master (synced), # master (unsynced), + selected, - candidate, ~ configured

Table 90 describes significant fields shown in the display.


Table 90: Show NTP Associations Field Descriptions
Field Description

(leading characters in display lines)

The first characters in a display line can be one or more of the following characters:

* Synchronized to this peer

# Almost synchronized to this peer

+ Peer selected for possible synchronization

- Peer is a candidate for selection

~ Peer is statically configured

address

Address of peer.

ref clock

Address of peer's reference clock.

st

Peer's stratum.

when

Time since last NTP packet received from peer.

poll

Polling interval (seconds).

reach

Peer reachability (bit string, in octal).

delay

Round-trip delay to peer (milliseconds).

offset

Relative time of peer's clock to local clock (milliseconds).

disp

Dispersion

The following is sample output of the show ntp associations detail command:

Router# show ntp associations detail
172.31.32.2 configured, insane, invalid, stratum 5
ref ID 172.31.32.1, time AFE252C1.6DBDDFF2 (00:12:01.428 PDT Mon Jul 5 1993)
our mode active, peer mode active, our poll intvl 1024, peer poll intvl 64
root delay 137.77 msec, root disp 142.75, reach 376, sync dist 215.363
delay 4.23 msec, offset -8.587 msec, dispersion 1.62
precision 2**19, version 3
org time AFE252E2.3AC0E887 (00:12:34.229 PDT Mon Jul 5 1993)
rcv time AFE252E2.3D7E464D (00:12:34.240 PDT Mon Jul 5 1993)
xmt time AFE25301.6F83E753 (00:13:05.435 PDT Mon Jul 5 1993)
filtdelay =     4.23    4.14    2.41    5.95    2.37    2.33    4.26    4.33
filtoffset =   -8.59   -8.82   -9.91   -8.42    -10.51    -10.77    -10.13    -10.11
filterror =     0.50    1.48    2.46    3.43    4.41    5.39    6.36    7.34
192.168.13.33 configured, selected, sane, valid, stratum 3
ref ID 192.168.1.111, time AFE24F0E.14283000 (23:56:14.078 PDT Sun Jul 4 1993)
our mode client, peer mode server, our poll intvl 128, peer poll intvl 128
root delay 83.72 msec, root disp 217.77, reach 377, sync dist 264.633
delay 4.07 msec, offset 3.483 msec, dispersion 2.33
precision 2**6, version 3
org time AFE252B9.713E9000 (00:11:53.442 PDT Mon Jul 5 1993)
rcv time AFE252B9.7124E14A (00:11:53.441 PDT Mon Jul 5 1993)
xmt time AFE252B9.6F625195 (00:11:53.435 PDT Mon Jul 5 1993)
filtdelay =     6.47    4.07    3.94    3.86    7.31    7.20    9.52    8.71
filtoffset =    3.63    3.48    3.06    2.82    4.51    4.57    4.28    4.59
filterror =     0.00    1.95    3.91    4.88    5.84    6.82    7.80    8.77
192.168.13.57 configured, our_master, sane, valid, stratum 3
ref ID 192.168.1.111, time AFE252DC.1F2B3000 (00:12:28.121 PDT Mon Jul 5 1993)
our mode client, peer mode server, our poll intvl 128, peer poll intvl 128
root delay 125.50 msec, root disp 115.80, reach 377, sync dist 186.157
delay 7.86 msec, offset 11.176 msec, dispersion 3.62
precision 2**6, version 2
org time AFE252DE.77C29000 (00:12:30.467 PDT Mon Jul 5 1993)
rcv time AFE252DE.7B2AE40B (00:12:30.481 PDT Mon Jul 5 1993)
xmt time AFE252DE.6E6D12E4 (00:12:30.431 PDT Mon Jul 5 1993)
filtdelay =    49.21    7.86    8.18    8.80    4.30    4.24    7.58    6.42
filtoffset =   11.30   11.18   11.13   11.28    8.91    9.09    9.27    9.57
filterror =     0.00    1.95    3.91    4.88    5.78    6.76    7.74    8.71   

Table 91 describes significant fields shown in the display.


Table 91: Show NTP Associations Detail Field Descriptions
Field Descriptions

configured

Peer was statically configured.

dynamic

Peer was dynamically discovered.

our_master

Local machine is synchronized to this peer.

selected

Peer is selected for possible synchronization.

candidate

Peer is a candidate for selection.

sane

Peer passes basic sanity checks.

insane

Peer fails basic sanity checks.

valid

Peer time is believed to be valid.

invalid

Peer time is believed to be invalid.

leap_add

Peer is signaling that a leap second will be added.

leap-sub

Peer is signaling that a leap second will be subtracted.

unsynced

Peer is not synchronized to any other machine.

ref ID

Address of machine peer is synchronized to.

time

Last timestamp peer received from its master.

our mode

Our mode relative to peer (active / passive / client / server / bdcast / bdcast client).

peer mode

Peer's mode relative to us.

our poll ivl

Our poll interval to peer.

peer poll ivl

Peer's poll interval to us.

root delay

Delay along path to root (ultimate stratum 1 time source).

root disp

Dispersion of path to root.

reach

Peer reachability (bit string in octal).

sync dist

Peer synchronization distance.

delay

Round trip delay to peer.

offset

Offset of peer clock relative to our clock.

dispersion

Dispersion of peer clock.

precision

Precision of peer clock in Hz.

version

NTP version number that peer is using.

org time

Originate time stamp.

rcv time

Receive time stamp.

xmt time

Transmit time stamp.

filtdelay

Round trip delay in milliseconds of each sample.

filtoffset

Clock offset in milliseconds of each sample.

filterror

Approximate error of each sample.

Related Command

show ntp status

show ntp status

To show the status of Network Time Protocol (NTP), use the show ntp status EXEC command.

show ntp status
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show ntp status command:

Router# show ntp status
Clock is synchronized, stratum 4, reference is 192.168.13.57
nominal freq is 250.0000 Hz, actual freq is 249.9990 Hz, precision is 2**19
reference time is AFE2525E.70597B34 (00:10:22.438 PDT Mon Jul 5 1993)
clock offset is 7.33 msec, root delay is 133.36 msec
root dispersion is 126.28 msec, peer dispersion is 5.98 msec

Table 92 shows the significant fields in the display.


Table 92: Show NTP Status Field Descriptions
Field Description

synchronized

System is synchronized to an NTP peer.

unsynchronized

System is not synchronized to any NTP peer.

stratum

NTP stratum of this system.

reference

Address of peer we are synchronized to.

nominal freq

Nominal frequency of system hardware clock.

actual freq

Measured frequency of system hardware clock.

precision

Precision of this system's clock (in Hz).

reference time

Reference timestamp.

clock offset

Offset of our clock to synchronized peer.

root delay

Total delay along path to root clock.

root dispersion

Dispersion of root path.

peer dispersion

Dispersion of synchronized peer.

Related Command

show ntp associations

show pci

Use the show pci EXEC command to display information about the peripheral component interconnect (PCI) hardware registers or bridge registers for the Cisco 7200 series routers.

show pci {hardware | bridge [register]}
Syntax Description

hardware

Displays PCI hardware registers.

bridge

Displays PCI bridge registers.

register

(Optional) Number of a specific bridge register in the range 0 to 7. If not specified, this command displays information about all registers.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The output of this command is generally useful for diagnostic tasks performed by technical support only.


Note The show pci hardware command displays a significant amount of information.
Sample Display

The following is sample output for the PCI bridge register 1 on a Cisco 7200 series router:

router# show pci bridge 1
Bridge 4, Port Adaptor 1, Handle=1
DEC21050 bridge chip, config=0x0
(0x00): cfid   = 0x00011011
(0x04): cfcs   = 0x02800147
(0x08): cfccid = 0x06040002
(0x0C): cfpmlt = 0x00010010
(0x18): cfsmlt = 0x18050504
(0x1C): cfsis    = 0x22805050
(0x20): cfmla    = 0x48F04880
(0x24): cfpmla = 0x00004880
(0x3C): cfbc   = 0x00000000
(0x40): cfseed = 0x00100000
(0x44): cfstwt = 0x00008020

The following is partial sample output for the PCI hardware register, which also includes information on all the PCI bridge registers on a Cisco 7200 series router:

router# show pci hardware
GT64010 External PCI Configuration registers:
  Vendor / Device ID      : 0xAB114601 (b/s 0x014611AB)
  Status / Command          : 0x17018002 (b/s 0x02800117)
  Class / Revision          : 0x00000006 (b/s 0x06000000)
  Latency                            : 0x0F000000 (b/s 0x0000000F)
  RAS[1:0] Base                : 0x00000000 (b/s 0x00000000)
  RAS[3:2] Base                : 0x00000001 (b/s 0x01000000)
  CS[2:0] Base                  : 0x00000000 (b/s 0x00000000)
  CS[3] Base                      : 0x00000000 (b/s 0x00000000)
  Mem Map Base                  : 0x00000014 (b/s 0x14000000)
  IO Map Base                    : 0x01000014 (b/s 0x14000001)
  Int Pin / Line              : 0x00010000 (b/s 0x00000100)
Bridge 0, Downstream MB0 to MB1, Handle=0
DEC21050 bridge chip, config=0x0
(0x00): cfid   = 0x00011011
(0x04): cfcs   = 0x02800143
(0x08): cfccid = 0x06040002
(0x0C): cfpmlt = 0x00011810
(0x18): cfsmlt = 0x18000100
(0x1C): cfsis    = 0x02809050
(0x20): cfmla    = 0x4AF04880
(0x24): cfpmla = 0x4BF04B00
(0x3C): cfbc   = 0x00000000
(0x40): cfseed = 0x00100000
(0x44): cfstwt = 0x00008020
...

show processes

Use the show processes EXEC command to display information about the active processes.

show processes [cpu]
Syntax Description

cpu

(Optional) Displays detailed CPU utilization statistics.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show processes command:

Router# show processes
CPU utilization for five seconds: 21%/0%; one minute: 2%; five minutes: 2% 
PID QTy	      PC Runtime (ms)   Invoked   uSecs     Stacks    TTY    Process
    1 Mwe    2FEA4E         1808	       464    3896     1796/3000   0    IP-EIGRP Router
    2 Lst    11682	          10236	      109   93908     1828/2000   0    Check heaps
    3 Mst    3AE9C              	0	      280       0     1768/2000   0    Timers
    4 Lwe    74AD2              	0       	12	       0     1492/2000   0    ARP Input
    5.ME      912E4	              0	        2       	0     1892/2000   0    IPC Zone Manager
    6.ME      91264	              0	        1       	0     1936/2000   0    IPC Realm Manager
    7.ME      91066              	0       30	       0     1784/2000   0    IPC Seat Manager
    8.ME    133368              	0	        1	       0     1928/2000   0    CXBus hot stall
    9.ME    1462EE	              0	        1       	0     1940/2000   0 Microcode load
 10 Msi 127538              	4       76      	52     1608/2000   0 Env Mon
 11.ME    160CF4              	0        	1       	0     1932/2000   0 MIP Mailbox
 12 Mwe 125D7C	              4	      280	      14     1588/2000   0 SMT input
 13 Lwe AFD0E	               0	        1       	0     1772/2000   0 Probe Input
 14 Mwe AF662	               0        	1	       0     1784/2000   0 RARP Input
 15 Hwe A1F9A	             228	      549	     415     3240/4000   0 IP Input
 16 Msa C86A0	               0      	114	       0     1864/2000   0 TCP Timer
 17 Lwe CA700               	0	        1       	0     1756/2000   0 TCP Protocols
 18.ME    CCE7C	               0        	1	       0     1940/2000   0 TCP Listener
 19 Mwe AC49E	               0        	1	       0     1592/2000   0 BOOTP Server
 20 Mwe 10CD84	             24       	77	     311     1652/2000   0 CDP Protocol
 21 Mwe 27BF82              	0	        2	       0     1776/2000   0 ATMSIG Input

The following is sample output from the show processes cpu command:

Router# show processes cpu
CPU utilization for five seconds: 5%/2%; one minute: 3%; five minutes: 2% PID Runtime (ms) Invoked uSecs 5Sec 1Min 5Min TTY Process 1 1736 58 29931 0% 0% 0% Check heaps 2 68 585 116 1.00% 1.00% 0% IP Input 3 0 744 0 0% 0% 0% TCP Timer 4 0 2 0 0% 0% 0% TCP Protocols 5 0 1 0 0% 0% 0% BOOTP Server 6 16 130 123 0% 0% 0% ARP Input 7 0 1 0 0% 0% 0% Probe Input 8 0 7 0 0% 0% 0% MOP Protocols 9 0 2 0 0% 0% 0% Timers 10 692 64 10812 0% 0% 0% Net Background 11 0 5 0 0% 0% 0% Logger 12 0 38 0 0% 0% 0% BGP Open 13 0 1 0 0% 0% 0% Net Input 14 540 3466 155 0% 0% 0% TTY Background 15 0 1 0 0% 0% 0% BGP I/O 16 5100 1367 3730 0% 0% 0% IGRP Router 17 88 4232 20 0.20% 1.00% 0% BGP Router 18 152 14650 10 0% 0% 0% BGP Scanner 19 224 99 2262 0% 0% 1.00% Exec

Table 93 describes significant fields shown in the two displays.


Table 93: Show Processes Field Descriptions
Field Description

CPU utilization for five seconds

CPU utilization for the last 5 seconds. The second number indicates the percent of CPU time spent at the interrupt level.

one minute

CPU utilization for the last minute.

five minutes

CPU utilization for the last 5 minutes.

PID

Process ID.

Q

Process queue priority. Possible values: H (high), M (medium), L (low).

Ty

Scheduler test. Possible values: * (currently running), E (waiting for an event), S (ready to run, voluntarily relinquished processor), rd (ready to run, wakeup conditions have occurred), we (waiting for an event), sa (sleeping until an absolute time), si (sleeping for a time interval), sp (sleeping for a time interval (alternate call), st (sleeping until a timer expires), hg (hung; the process will never execute again), xx (dead. The process has terminated, but not yet been deleted.).

PC

Current program counter.

Runtime (ms)

CPU time the process has used, in milliseconds.

Invoked

Number of times the process has been invoked.

uSecs

Microseconds of CPU time for each process invocation.

Stacks

Low water mark/Total stack space available, shown in bytes.

TTY

Terminal that controls the process.

Process

Name of process.

5Sec

CPU utilization by task in the last 5 seconds.

1Min

CPU utilization by task in the last minute.

5Min

CPU utilization by task in the last 5 minutes.


Note Because the network server has a 4-millisecond clock resolution, run times are considered reliable only after a large number of invocations or a reasonable, measured run time.
Related Command

show processes memory

show processes memory

Use the show processes memory EXEC command to show memory used.

show processes memory
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show processes memory command:

Router# show processes memory
Total: 5611448, Used: 2307548, Free: 3303900
 PID  TTY  Allocated      Freed    Holding    Getbufs    Retbufs Process
   0    0     199592       1236    1907220          0          0 *Init*
   0    0        400      76928        400          0          0 *Sched*
   0    0    5431176    3340052     140760     349780          0 *Dead*
   1    0        256        256       1724          0          0 Load Meter
   2    0        264          0       5032          0          0 Exec
   3    0          0          0       2724          0          0 Check heaps
   4    0      97932          0       2852      32760          0 Pool Manager
   5    0        256        256       2724          0          0 Timers
   6    0         92          0       2816          0          0 CXBus hot stall
   7    0          0          0       2724          0          0 IPC Zone Manager
   8    0          0          0       2724          0          0 IPC Realm Manager
   9    0          0          0       2724          0          0 IPC Seat Manager
  10    0        892        476       3256          0          0 ARP Input
  11    0         92          0       2816          0          0 SERIAL A'detect
  12    0        216          0       2940          0          0 Microcode Loader
  13    0          0          0       2724          0          0 RFSS watchdog
  14    0   15659136   15658584       3276          0          0 Env Mon
...
    77    0        116          0       2844          0          0 IPX-EIGRP Hello
                                   2307224 Total

Table 94 describes significant fields shown in the display.


Table 94: Show Processes Memory Field Descriptions
Field Description

Total

Total amount of memory held.

Used

Total amount of used memory.

Free

Total amount of free memory.

PID

Process ID.

TTY

Terminal that controls the process.

Allocated

Bytes of memory allocated by the process.

Freed

Bytes of memory freed by the process, regardless of who originally allocated it.

Holding

Amount of memory currently allocated to the process.

Getbuffs

Number of times the process has requested a packet buffer.

Retbuffs

Number of times the process has relinguished a packet buffer.

Process

Process name.

*Init*

System initialization.

*Sched*

The scheduler.

*Dead*

Processes as a group that are now dead.

Total

Total amount of memory held by all processes.

Related Commands

show memory
show processes

show protocols

Use the show protocols EXEC command to display the configured protocols.

This command shows the global and interface-specific status of any configured Level 3 protocol; for example, IP, DECnet, IPX, AppleTalk, and so forth.

show protocols
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show protocols command:

Router# show protocols
Global values:
    Internet Protocol routing is enabled
    DECNET routing is enabled
    XNS routing is enabled
    Appletalk routing is enabled
    X.25 routing is enabled
Ethernet 0 is up, line protocol is up
    Internet address is 192.168.1.1, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
    Decnet cost is 5
    XNS address is 2001.AA00.0400.06CC
    AppleTalk address is 4.129, zone Twilight
Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up
    Internet address is 192.168.7.49, subnet mask is 255.255.255.240
Ethernet 1 is up, line protocol is up
    Internet address is 192.168.2.1, subnet mask is 255.255.255.0
    Decnet cost is 5
    XNS address is 2002.AA00.0400.06CC
    AppleTalk address is 254.132, zone Twilight
Serial 1 is down, line protocol is down
    Internet address is 192.168.7.177, subnet mask is 255.255.255.240
    AppleTalk address is 999.1, zone Magnolia Estates

For more information on the parameters or protocols shown in this sample output, see the Network Protocols Configuration Guide, Part 1, Network Protocols Configuration Guide, Part 2, and Network Protocols Configuration Guide, Part 3.

show queueing

To list the current state of the queue lists, use the show queueing privileged EXEC command.

show queueing [custom | fair | priority]
Syntax Description

custom

(Optional) Shows status of custom queuing list configuration.

fair

(Optional) Shows status of the fair queuing configuration. This is the default.

priority

(Optional) Shows status of priority queuing list configuration.

Default

Fair queuing configuration

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

If no keyword is entered, this command show the status of fair queuing configuration.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show queueing custom EXEC command:

Router# show queueing custom
Current custom queue configuration:
List   Queue    Args
3      10     default
3      3      interface Tunnel3
3      3      protocol ip
3      3      byte-count 444 limit 3 

The following is sample output from the show queueing command. On interface Serial0, there are two active conversations. Weighted fair queuing ensures that both of these IP data streams-both using TCP-receive equal bandwidth on the interface while they have messages in the pipeline, even though there is more FTP data in the queue than rcp data.

Router# show queueing 
Current fair queue configuration:
Interface Serial0
    Input queue: 0/75/0 (size/max/drops); Total output drops: 0
    Output queue: 18/64/30 (size/threshold/drops)
          Conversations 2/8 (active/max active)
          Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated)
    (depth/weight/discards) 3/4096/30
    Conversation 117, linktype: ip, length: 556, flags: 0x280
    source: 172.31.128.115, destination: 172.31.58.89, id: 0x1069, ttl: 59,
    TOS: 0 prot: 6, source port 514, destination port 1022
    (depth/weight/discards) 14/4096/0
    Conversation 155, linktype: ip, length: 1504, flags: 0x280
    source: 172.31.128.115, destination: 172.31.58.89, id: 0x104D, ttl: 59, 
    TOS: 0 prot: 6, source port 20, destination port 1554
Related Commands

custom-queue-list
priority-group
priority-list interface

priority-list queue-limit
prompt
queue-list default
queue-list interface
queue-list protocol
queue-list queue byte-count

queue-list queue limit

show rmon

Use the show rmon EXEC command to display the current RMON agent status on the router.

show rmon [alarms | capture | events | filter | history | hosts | matrix | statistics | task | topn]
Syntax Description

alarms

(Optional) Displays the RMON alarm table.

capture

(Optional) Displays the RMON buffer capture table. Available on Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 only.

events

(Optional) Displays the RMON event table.

filter

(Optional) Displays the RMON filter table. Available on Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 only.

history

(Optional) Displays the RMON history table. Available on Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 only.

hosts

(Optional) Displays the RMON hosts table. Available on Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 only.

matrix

(Optional) Displays the RMON matrix table. Available on Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 only.

statistics

(Optional) Displays the RMON statistics table. Available on Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 only.

task

(Optional) Displays general RMON statistics.

topn

(Optional) Displays the RMON top-n hosts table. Available on Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 only.

Default

If no option is specified, the task option is displayed.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Refer to the specific show rmon command for an example and description of the fields.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon command. All counters are from the time the router was initialized.

Router# show rmon
145678 packets input (34562 promiscuous), 0 drops
145678 packets processed, 0 on queue, queue utilization 15/64

Table 95 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 95: Show RMON Field Descriptions
Field Description

x packets input

Number of packets received on RMON-enabled interfaces.

x promiscuous

Number of input packets that were seen by the router only because RMON placed the interface in promiscuous mode.

x drops

Number of input packets that could not be processed because the RMON queue overflowed.

x packets processed

Number of input packets actually processed by the RMON task.

x on queue

Number of input packets that are sitting on the RMON queue, waiting to be processed.

queue utilization x/y

y is the maximum size of the RMON queue; x is the largest number of packets that were ever on the queue at a particular time.

Related Commands

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
rmon queuesize
show rmon alarms
show rmon capture
show rmon events
show rmon filter
show rmon history
show rmon hosts
show rmon matrix
show rmon statistics
show rmon topn

show rmon alarms

Use the show rmon alarms EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON alarm table.

show rmon alarms
Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON alarms to display alarm information with the show rmon alarms command.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon alarms command:

router#show rmon alarms
Alarm 2 is active, owned by manager1
 Monitors ifEntry.1.1 every 30 seconds
 Taking delta samples, last value was 0
 Rising threshold is 15, assigned to event 12
 Falling threshold is 0, assigned to event 0
 On startup enable rising or falling alarm

Table 96 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 96: Show RMON Alarms Field Descriptions
Field Description

Alarm 2 is active, owned by manager1

Unique index into the alarmTable, showing the alarm status is active, and the owner of this row, as defined in the alarmTable of RMON.

Monitors ifEntry.1.1

Object identifier of the particular variable to be sampled. Equivalent to alarmVariable in RMON.

every 30 seconds

Interval in seconds over which the data is sampled and compared with the rising and falling thresholds. Equivalent to alarmInterval in RMON.

Taking delta samples

Method of sampling the selected variable and calculating the value to be compared against the thresholds. Equivalent to alarmSampleType in RMON.

last value was

Value of the statistic during the last sampling period. Equivalent to alarmValue in RMON.

Rising threshold is

Threshold for the sampled statistic. Equivalent to alarmRisingThreshold in RMON.

assigned to event

Index of the eventEntry that is used when a rising threshold is crossed. Equivalent to alarmRisingEventIndex in RMON.

Falling threshold is

Threshold for the sampled statistic. Equivalent to alarmFallingThreshold in RMON.

assigned to event

Index of the eventEntry that is used when a falling threshold is crossed. Equivalent to alarmFallingEventIndex in RMON.

On startup enable rising or falling alarm

Alarm that may be sent when this entry is first set to valid. Equivalent to alarmStartupAlarm in RMON.

Related Commands

rmon
rmon alarm
show rmon

show rmon capture

Use the show rmon capture EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON capture table.

show rmon capture
Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON alarms and events to display alarm information with the show rmon capture command.

This command is available on the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon capture command:

router#show rmon capture
Buffer 4096 is active, owned by manager1
  Captured data is from channel 4096
  Slice size is 128, download size is 128
  Download offset is 0
  Full Status is spaceAvailable, full action is lockWhenFull
  Granted 65536 octets out of 65536 requested
  Buffer has been on since 00:01:16, and has captured 1 packets
    Current capture buffer entries:
      Packet 1 was captured 416 ms since buffer was turned on
      Its length is 326 octets and has a status type of 0
      Packet ID is 634, and contains the following data:
00 00 0c 03 12 ce 00 00 0c 08 9d 4e 08 00 45 00    
01 34 01 42 00 00 1d 11 e3 01 ab 45 30 15 ac 15    
31 06 05 98 00 a1 01 20 9f a8 00 00 00 00 00 00    
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00    
00 00 00 00 

Table 97 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 97: Show RMON Capture Field Descriptions
Field Description

Buffer 4096 is active

Equates to bufferControlIndex in the bufferControlTable of RMON. Uniquely identifies a valid (active) row in this table.

owned by manager1

Denotes the owner of this row. Equates to bufferControlOwner in the bufferControlTable of RMON.

Captured data is from channel

Equates to the bufferControlChannelIndex and identifies which RMON channel is the source of these packets.

Slice size is

Identifies the maximum number of octets of each packet that will be saved in this capture buffer. Equates to bufferControlCaptureSliceSize of RMON.

download size is

Identifies the maximum number of octets of each packet in this capture buffer that will be returned in an SNMP retrieval of that packet. Equates to bufferControlDownloadSliceSize in RMON.

Download offset is

Offset of the first octet of each packet in this capture buffer that will be returned in an SNMP retrieval of that packet. Equates to bufferControlDownloadOffset in RMON.

Full Status is spaceAvailable

Shows whether the buffer is full or has room to accept new packets. Equates to bufferControlFullStatus in RMON.

full action is lockWhenFull

Controls the action of the buffer when it reaches full status. Equates to bufferControlFullAction in RMON.

Granted 65536 octets

Actual maximum number of octets that can be saved in this capture buffer. Equates to bufferControlMaxOctetsGranted in RMON.

out of 65536 requested

Requested maximum number of octets to be saved in this capture buffer. Equates to bufferControlMaxOctetsRequested in RMON.

Buffer has been on since

Indicates how long the buffer has been available.

and has captured 1 packets

Number of packets captured since buffer was turned on. Equates to bufferControlCapturedPackets in RMON.

Current capture buffer entries:

Lists each packet captured.

Packet 1 was captured 416 ms since buffer was turned on

Its length is 326 octets and has a status type of 0

Zero indicates the error status of this packet. Equates to captureBufferPacketStatus in RMON, where its value options are documented.

Packet ID is

Index that describes the order of packets received on a particular interface. Equates to captureBufferPacketID in RMON.

and contains the following data:

Data inside the packet, starting at the beginning of the packet.

Related Commands

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
show rmon

show rmon events

Use the show rmon events EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON event table.

show rmon events
Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON events to display alarm information with the show rmon events command.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon events command:

router#show rmon events
Event 12 is active, owned by manager1
 Description is interface-errors
 Event firing causes log and trap to community rmonTrap, last fired 00:00:00

Table 98 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 98: Show RMON Events Field Descriptions
Field Description

Event 12 is active, owned by manager1

Unique index into the eventTable, showing the event status is active, and the owner of this row, as defined in the eventTable of RMON.

Description is interface-errors

Type of event, in this case an interface error.

Event firing causes log and trap

Type of notification that the router will make about this event. Equivalent to eventType in RMON.

community rmonTrap

If an SNMP trap is to be sent, it will be sent to the SNMP community specified by this octet string. Equivalent to eventCommunity in RMON.

last fired

Last time the event was generated.

Related Commands

rmon
rmon event
show rmon

show rmon filter

Use the show rmon filter EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON filter table.

show rmon filter
Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON alarms and events to display alarm information with the show rmon filter command.

This command is available on the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon filter command:

router#show rmon filter
Filter 4096 is active, and owned by manager1
 Data offset is 12, with 
 Data of    08 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ab 45 30 15 ac 15 31 06 
 Data Mask is ff ff 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff
 Data Not Mask is 0
 Pkt status is 0, status mask is 0, not mask is 0
 Associated channel 4096 is active, and owned by manager1
 Type of channel is acceptFailed, data control is off
 Generate event index 0
 Event status is eventFired, # of matches is 1482
 Turn on event index is 0, turn off event index is 0
  Description: 

Table 99 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 99: Show RMON Filter Field Descriptions
Field Description

Filter 4096 is active, and owned by manager1

Unique index of the filter, its current state, and the owner, as defined in the filterTable of RMON.

Data offset is

Offset from the beginning of each packet where a match of packet data will be attempted. Equivalent to filterPktDataOffset in RMON.

Data of

Data that is to be matched with the input packet. Equivalent to filterPktData in RMON.

Data Mask is

Mask that is applied to the match process. Equivalent to filterPktDataMask in RMON.

Data Not Mask is

Inversion mask that is applied to the match process. Equivalent to filterPktDataNotMask in RMON.

Pkt status is

Status that is to be matched with the input packet. Equivalent to filterPktStatus in RMON.

status mask is

Mask that is applied to the status match process. Equivalent to filterPktStatusMask in RMON.

not mask is

Inversion mask that is applied to the status match process. Equivalent to filterPktStatusNotMask in RMON.

Associated channel 4096 is active, and owned by manager1

Unique index of the channel, its current state, and the owner, as defined in the channelTable of RMON.

Type of channel is acceptMatched

This object controls the action of the filters associated with this channel. Equivalent to channelAcceptType of RMON.

data control is off

This object controls the flow of data through this channel. Equivalent to channelDataControl in RMON.

Generate event index 0

Value of this object identifies the event that is configured to be generated when the associated channelDataControl is on and a packet is matched. Equivalent to channelEventIndex in RMON.

Event status is eventFired

When the channel is configured to generate events when packets are matched, this message indicates the means of controlling the flow of those events. Equivalent to channelEventStatus in RMON.

# of matches is

Number of times this channel has matched a packet. Equivalent to channelMatches in RMON.

Turn on event index is

Value of this object identifies the event that is configured to turn the associated channelDataControl from off to on when the event is generated. Equivalent to channelTurnOnEventIndex in RMON.

Turn off event index is

Value of this object identifies the event that is configured to turn the associated channelDataControl from on to off when the event is generated. Equivalent to channelTurnOffEventIndex in RMON.

Description:

Comment describing this channel.

Related Commands

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
show rmon

show rmon history

Use the show rmon history EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON history table.

show rmon history
Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON alarms and events to display alarm information with the show rmon history command.

This command is available on the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon history command:

router#show rmon history
Entry 1 is active, and owned by manager1
  Monitors ifEntry.1.1 every 30 seconds
  Requested # of time intervals, ie buckets, is 5
  Granted # of time intervals, ie buckets, is 5
    Sample # 14 began measuring at 00:11:00
      Received 38346 octets, 216 packets,
      0 broadcast and 80 multicast packets,
      0 undersized and 0 oversized packets,
      0 fragments and 0 jabbers,
      0 CRC alignment errors and 0 collisions.
      # of dropped packet events is 0
      Network utilization is estimated at 10

Table 100 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 100: Show RMON History Field Descriptions
Field Description

Entry 1 is active, and owned by manager1

Unique index of the history entry, its current state, and the owner as defined in the historyControlTable of RMON.

Monitors ifEntry.1.1

This object identifies the source of the data for which historical data was collected and placed in a media-specific table. Equivalent to historyControlDataSource in RMON.

every 30 seconds

Interval in seconds over which the data is sampled for each bucket in the part of the media-specific table associated with this historyControlEntry. Equivalent to historyControlInterval in RMON.

Requested # of time intervals, ie buckets, is

Requested number of discrete time intervals over which data is to be saved in the part of the media-specific table associated with this historyControlEntry. Equivalent to historyControlBucketsRequested in RMON.

Granted # of time intervals, ie buckets, is

Actual number of discrete time intervals over which data is to be saved in the part of the media-specific table associated with this historyControlEntry. Equivalent to historyControlBucketsGranted in RMON.

Sample # 14 began measuring at

Time at the start of the interval over which this sample was measured.

Received 38346 octets

Total number of octets of data (including those in bad packets) received on the network (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets). Equivalent to etherHistoryOctets in RMON.

x packets

Number of packets (including bad packets) received during this sampling interval. Equivalent to etherHistoryPkts in RMON.

x broadcast

Number of good packets received during this sampling interval that were directed to the broadcast address. Equivalent to etherHistoryBroadcastPkts in RMON.

x multicast packets

Number of good packets received during this sampling interval that were directed to a multicast address. Equivalent to etherHistoryMulticastPkts in RMON.

x undersized

Number of packets received during this sampling interval that were fewer than 64 octets long (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets) and were otherwise well formed. Equivalent to etherHistoryUndersizedPkts in RMON.

x oversized packets

Number of packets received during this sampling interval that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets) but were otherwise well formed. Equivalent to etherHistoryOversizePkts in RMON.

x fragments

Total number of packets received during this sampling interval that were fewer than 64 octets in length (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets), and had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error). Equivalent to etherHistoryFragments in RMON.

x jabbers

Number of packets received during this sampling interval that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets), and had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error). Note that this definition of jabber is different than the definition in IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5 (10BASE5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10BASE2). Equivalent to etherHistoryJabbers in RMON.

x CRC alignment errors

Number of packets received during this sampling interval that had a length (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets) from 64 to 1518 octets, inclusive, but had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error). Equivalent to etherHistoryCRCAlignErrors in RMON.

x collisions

Best estimate of the total number of collisions on this Ethernet segment during this sampling interval. Equivalent to etherHistoryCollisions in RMON.

# of dropped packet events is

Total number of events in which packets were dropped by the probe because of resources during this sampling interval. Note that this number is not necessarily the number of packets dropped, it is just the number of times this condition has been detected. Equivalent to etherHistoryDropEvents in RMON.

Network utilization is estimated at

Best estimate of the mean physical-layer network usage on this interface during this sampling interval, in hundredths of a percent. Equivalent to etherHistoryUtilization in RMON.

Related Commands

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
show rmon

show rmon hosts

Use the show rmon hosts EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON hosts table.

show rmon hosts
Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON alarms and events to display alarm information with the show rmon hosts command.

This command is available on the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon hosts command:

router#show rmon hosts
Host Control Entry 1 is active, and owned by manager1
  Monitors host ifEntry.1.1
  Table size is 51, last time an entry was deleted was 00:00:00
    Creation Order number is 1
      Physical address is 0000.0c02.5808
      Packets: rcvd 6963, transmitted 7041
      Octets: rcvd 784062, transmitted 858530
      # of packets transmitted: broadcast 28, multicast 48
      # of bad packets transmitted is 0

Table 101 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 101: Show RMON Hosts Field Descriptions
Field Description

Host Control Entry 1 is active, and owned by manager1

Unique index of the host entry, its current state, and the owner as defined in the hostControlTable of RMON.

Monitors host ifEntry.1.1

This object identifies the source of the data for this instance of the host function. Equivalent to hostControlDataSource in RMON.

Table size is

Number of hostEntries in the hostTable and the hostTimeTable associated with this hostControlEntry. Equivalent to hostControlTableSize in RMON.

last time an entry was deleted was

Time when the last entry was deleted from the hostTable.

Creation Order number is

Index that defines the relative ordering of the creation time of hosts captured for a particular hostControlEntry. Equivalent to hostCreationOrder in RMON.

Physical address is

Physical address of this host. Equivalent to hostAddress in RMON.

Packets: rcvd

Number of good packets transmitted to this address. Equivalent to hostInPkts in RMON.

transmitted

Number of packets, including bad packets transmitted by this address. Equivalent to hostOutPkts in RMON.

Octets: rcvd

Number of octets transmitted to this address since it was added to the hostTable (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets), except for those octets in bad packets. Equivalent to hostInOctets in RMON.

transmitted

Number of octets transmitted by this address since it was added to the hostTable (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets), including those octets in bad packets. Equivalent to hostOutOctets in RMON.

# of packets transmitted:

Number of good packets transmitted by this address that were broadcast or multicast.

# of bad packets transmitted is

Number of bad packets transmitted by this address.

Related Commands

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
show rmon

show rmon matrix

Use the show rmon matrix EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON matrix table.

show rmon matrix
Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON alarms and events to display alarm information with the show rmon matrix command.

This command is available on the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon matrix command:

router#show rmon matrix
Matrix 1 is active, and owned by manager1
 Monitors ifEntry.1.1
 Table size is 451, last time an entry was deleted was at 00:00:00

Table 102 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 102: Show RMON Matrix Field Descriptions
Field Description

Matrix 1 is active, and owned by manager1

Unique index of the matrix entry, its current state, and the owner as defined in the matrixControlTable of RMON.

Monitors ifEntry.1.1

This object identifies the source of the data for this instance of the matrix function. Equivalent to matrixControlDataSource in RMON.

Table size is 451, last time an entry was deleted was at

Size of the matrix table and the time that the last entry was deleted.

Related Commands

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
show rmon

show rmon statistics

Use the show rmon statistics EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON statistics table.

show rmon statistics
Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON alarms and events to display alarm information with the show rmon statistics command.

This command is available on the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon statistics command:

router#show rmon statistics
Interface 1 is active, and owned by config
  Monitors ifEntry.1.1 which has
  Received 60739740 octets, 201157 packets,
  1721 broadcast and 9185 multicast packets,
  0 undersized and 0 oversized packets,
  0 fragments and 0 jabbers,
  0 CRC alignment errors and 32 collisions.
  # of dropped packet events (due to lack of resources): 511
  # of packets received of length (in octets):
    64: 92955, 65-127: 14204, 128-255: 1116,
    256-511: 4479, 512-1023: 85856, 1024-1518:2547

Table 103 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 103: Show RMON Statistics Field Descriptions
Field Description

Interface 1 is active, and owned by config

Unique index of the statistics entry, its current state, and the owner as defined in the etherStatsTable of RMON.

Monitors ifEntry.1.1

This object identifies the source of the data that this etherStats entry is configured to analyze. Equivalent to etherStatsDataSource in RMON.

Received 60739740 octets

Total number of octets of data (including those in bad packets) received on the network (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets). Equivalent to etherStatsOctets in RMON.

x packets

Number of packets (including bad packets) received. Equivalent to etherStatsPkts in RMON.

x broadcast

Number of good packets received that were directed to the broadcast address. Equivalent to etherStatsBroadcastPkts in RMON.

x multicast packets

Number of good packets received that were directed to a multicast address. Equivalent to etherStatsMulticastPkts in RMON.

x undersized

Number of packets received that were fewer than 64 octets long (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets) and were otherwise well formed. Equivalent to etherStatsUndersizedPkts in RMON.

x oversized packets

Number of packets received that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets) but were otherwise well formed. Equivalent to etherStatsOversizePkts in RMON.

x fragments

Total number of packets received that were fewer than 64 octets in length (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets), and had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error). Equivalent to etherStatsFragments in RMON.

x jabbers

Number of packets received that were longer than 1518 octets (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets), and had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error). Note that this definition of jabber is different than the definition in IEEE-802.3 section 8.2.1.5 (10BASE5) and section 10.3.1.4 (10BASE2). Equivalent to etherStatsJabbers in RMON.

x CRC alignment errors

Number of packets received that had a length (excluding framing bits but including FCS octets) from 64 to 1518 octets, inclusive, but had either a bad Frame Check Sequence (FCS) with an integral number of octets (FCS Error) or a bad FCS with a nonintegral number of octets (Alignment Error). Equivalent to etherStatsCRCAlignErrors in RMON.

x collisions

Best estimate of the total number of collisions on this Ethernet segment. Equivalent to etherHistoryCollisions in RMON.

# of dropped packet events (due to lack of resources):

Total number of events in which packets were dropped by the probe because of a lack of resources. Note that this number is not necessarily the number of packets dropped, it is just the number of times this condition has been detected. Equivalent to etherStatsDropEvents in RMON.

# of packets received of length (in octets):

Separates the received packets (good and bad) by packet size in the given ranges (64, 65 to 127,128 to 255, 256 to 511, 512 to 1023, 1024 to 1516).

Related Commands

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
show rmon

show rmon topn

Use the show rmon topn EXEC command to display the contents of the router's RMON Top-N host table.

show rmon topn
Syntax Description

This command has no keywords or arguments.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

For additional information, refer to the RMON MIB described in RFC 1757.

You must have first enabled RMON on the interface, and configured RMON events to display alarm information with the show rmon events command.

This command is available on the Cisco 2500 series and Cisco AS5200 only.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rmon topn command:

router#show rmon topn
Host Entry 1 of report 1 is active, owned by manager1
  The rate of change is based on hostTopNInPkts
  This report was last started at 00:00:00
  Time remaining in this report is 0 out of 0
  Hosts physical address is 00ad.beef.002b
  Requested # of hosts: 10, # of hosts granted: 10
Report # 1 of Top N hosts entry 1 is recording
Host 0000.0c02.5808 at a rate of 12

Table 104 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 104: Show RMON Top-N Field Descriptions
Field Description

Host Entry 1 of report 1 is active, owned by manager1

Unique index of the hostTopN entry, its current state, and the owner as defined in the hostTopNControlTable of RMON.

The rate of change is based on hostTopNInPkts

Variable for each host that the hostTopNRate variable is based on.

This report was last started at

Time the report was started.

Time remaining in this report is

Number of seconds left in the report currently being collected. Equivalent to hostTopNTimeRemaining in RMON.

out of

Number of seconds that this report has collected during the last sampling interval, or if this report is currently being collected, the number of seconds that this report is being collected during this sampling interval. Equivalent to hostTopNDuration in RMON.

Hosts physical address is

Host address.

Requested # of hosts:

Maximum number of hosts requested for the Top-N table. Equivalent to hostTopNRequestedSize in RMON.

# of hosts granted:

Maximum number of hosts granted for the Top-N table.Eqivalent to hostTopNGrantedSiz in RMON.

Report # 1 of Top N hosts entry 1 is recording

Report number and entry.

Host 0000.0c02.5808 at a rate of

Physical address of the host, and the amount of change in the selected variable during this sampling interval. Equivalent to hostTopNAddress and hostTopNRate in RMON.

Related Commands

rmon
rmon alarm
rmon event
show rmon

show rtr application

Use the show rtr application EXEC command to display global information about the response time reporter feature.

show rtr application [tabular | full]
Syntax Description

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value. This is the default.

Default

Full format

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the show rtr application command to display information such as supported operation types and supported protocols.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr application command in full format.

router# show rtr application 
        Response Time Reporter
Version: 1.0.0 Initial Round Trip Time MIB
Max Packet Data Size (ARR and Data): 16384
Time of Last Change in Whole RTR: *16:49:53.000 UTC Thu May 16 1996
System Max Number of Entries: 20
        Supported Operation Types
Type of Operation to Perform: echo
Type of Operation to Perform: pathEcho
        Supported Protocols
Protocol Type: ipIcmpEcho
Protocol Type: snaRUEcho
Protocol Type: snaLU0EchoAppl
Protocol Type: snaLU2EchoAppl
Related Command

show rtr configuration

show rtr collection-statistics

Use the show rtr collection-statistics EXEC command to display statistical errors for all response time reporter probes or the specified probe.

show rtr collection-statistics [probe] [tabular | full]
Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Number of the response time reporter probe to display.

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value. This is the default.

Default

Full format for all probes

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the show rtr collection-statistics command to display information such as the number of failed operations and the failure reason. You can also use the show rtr distribution-statistics and show rtr totals-statistics commands to display additional statistical information.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr collection-statistics command in full format.

router# show rtr collection-statistics 1 
        Collected Statistics
Entry Number: 1
Start Time Index: *17:15:41.000 UTC Thu May 16 1996
Path Index: 1
Hop in Path Index: 1
Number of Failed Operations due to a Disconnect: 0
Number of Failed Operations due to a Timeout: 0
Number of Failed Operations due to a Busy: 0
Number of Failed Operations due to a No Connection: 0
Number of Failed Operations due to an Internal Error: 0
Number of Failed Operations due to a Sequence Error: 0
Number of Failed Operations due to a Verify Error: 0
Target Address: 172.16.1.176
Related Commands

show rtr configuration
show rtr distribution-statistics
show rtr totals-statistics

show rtr configuration

Use the show rtr configuration EXEC command to display configuration values including all defaults for all response time reporter probes or the specified probe.

show rtr configuration [probe] [tabular | full]
Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Number of the response time reporter probe to display.

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value. This is the default.

Default

Full format for all probes

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr configuration command in full format:

router# show rtr configuration 1
        Complete Configuration Table (includes defaults)
Entry Number: 1
Owner: "Sample Owner"
Tag: "Sample Tag Group"
Type of Operation to Perform: echo
Reaction and History Threshold (milliseconds): 5000
Operation Frequency (seconds): 60
Operation Timeout (milliseconds): 5000
Verify Data: FALSE
Status of Entry (SNMP RowStatus): active
Protocol Type: ipIcmpEcho
Target Address: 172.16.1.176
Request Size (ARR data portion): 1
Response Size (ARR data portion): 1
Life (seconds): 3600
Next Start Time: Start Time already passed
Entry Ageout (seconds): 3600
Connection Loss Reaction Enabled: FALSE
Timeout Reaction Enabled: FALSE
Threshold Reaction Type: never
Threshold Falling (milliseconds): 3000
Threshold Count: 5
Threshold Count2: 5
Reaction Type: none
Number of Statistic Hours kept: 2
Number of Statistic Paths kept: 1
Number of Statistic Hops kept: 1
Number of Statistic Distribution Buckets kept: 1
Number of Statistic Distribution Intervals (milliseconds): 20
Number of History Lives kept: 0
Number of History Buckets kept: 50
Number of History Samples kept: 1
History Filter Type: none
Related Commands

show rtr application
show rtr collection-statistics
show rtr distribution-statistics
show rtr history
show rtr operational-state
show rtr reaction-trigger
show rtr totals-statistics

show rtr distribution-statistics

Use the show rtr distribution-statistics EXEC command to display statistic distribution information (captured response times) for all response time reporter probes or the specified probe.

show rtr distribution-statistics [probe] [tabular | full]
Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Number of the response time reporter probe to display.

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information. This is the default.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value.

Default

Tabular format for all probes

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The distributions statistics consist of:

You can also use the show rtr collection-statistics and show rtr totals-statistics commands to display additional statistical information.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr distributions-statistics command in tabular format.

router# show rtr distributions-statistics 
                Captured Statistics
               Multiple Lines per Entry
Line 1
Entry    = Entry Number
StartT   = Start Time of Entry (hundredths of seconds)
Pth      = Path Index
Hop      = Hop in Path Index
Dst      = Time Distribution Index
Comps    = Operations Completed
OvrTh    = Operations Completed Over Thresholds
SumCmp   = Sum of Completion Times (milliseconds)
Line 2
SumCmp2L = Sum of Completion Times Squared Low 32 Bits (milliseconds)
SumCmp2H = Sum of Completion Times Squared High 32 Bits (milliseconds)
TMax     = Completion Time Maximum (milliseconds)
TMin     = Completion Time Minimum (milliseconds)
Entry  StartT          Pth  Hop  Dst  Comps            OvrTh            SumCmp
    SumCmp2L      SumCmp2H      TMax              TMin
1          17417068      1      1      1      2                    0                      128
      8192            0                    64                  64
Related Commands

show rtr collection-statistics
show rtr configuration
show rtr totals-statistics

show rtr history

Use the show rtr history EXEC command to display history collected for all response time reporter probes or the specified probe.

show rtr history [probe] [tabular | full]
Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Number of the response time reporter probe to display.

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information. This is the default.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value.

Default

Tabular format for all probes

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The response return codes are listed in Table 105.


Table 105: Response Return Codes
Code Meaning

1

Okay.

2

Disconnected.

3

Over threshold.

4

Timeout.

5

Busy.

6

Not connected.

7

Dropped.

8

Sequence error.

9

Verify error.

10

Application specific.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr history command in tabular format:

router# show rtr history 
        Point by point History
          Multiple Lines per Entry
Line 1
Entry    = Entry Number
LifeI    = Life Index
BucketI    = Bucket Index
SampleI    = Sample Index
SampleT    = Sample Start Time
CompT    = Completion Time (milliseconds)
Sense    = Response Return Code
Line 2 has the Target Address
Entry  LifeI            BucketI        SampleI        SampleT        CompT            Sense
2          1                    1                    1                    17436548      16                    1
    AB 45 A0 16 
2          1                    2                    1                    17436551      4                      1
    AC 12 7    29 
2          1                    2                    2                    17436551      1                      1
    AC 12 5    22 
2          1                    2                    3                    17436552      4                      1
    AB 45 A7  22 
2          1                    2                    4                    17436552      4                      1
    AB 45 A0 16 
Related Command

show rtr configuration

show rtr operational-state

Use the show rtr operational-state EXEC command to display the operational state of all response time reporter probes or the specified probe.

show rtr operational-state [probe] [tabular | full]
Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Number of the response time reporter probe to display.

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value. This is the default.

Default

Full format for all probes

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the show rtr operational-state command to determine whether a connection loss, timeout, and over threshold occurred; how much life the probe has left; whether the probe is active; and the completion time. It also displays the results of the latest operation attempt.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr operational-state command in full format:

router# show rtr operational-state 1 
        Current Operational State
Entry Number: 1
Modification Time: *17:15:41.000 UTC Thu May 16 1996
Diagnostics Text: 
Last Time this Entry was Reset: Never
Number of Octets in use by this Entry: 2438
Connection Loss Occurred: FALSE
Timeout Occurred: FALSE
Over Thresholds Occurred: FALSE
Number of Operations Attempted: 6
Current Seconds Left in Life: 3336
Operational State of Entry: active
Latest Completion Time (milliseconds): 60
Latest Operation Return Code: ok
Latest Operation Start Time: *17:19:41.000 UTC Thu May 16 1996
Latest Target Address: 172.16.1.176
Related Command

show rtr configuration

show rtr reaction-trigger

Use the show rtr reaction-trigger EXEC command to display the reaction trigger information for all response time reporter probes or the specified probe.

show rtr reaction-trigger [probe] [tabular | full]
Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Number of the response time reporter probe to display.

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value. This is the default.

Default

Full format for all probes

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the show rtr reaction-trigger command to display the configuration status and operational state of target probes that will be triggered as defined with the rtr reaction-configuration global command.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr reaction-trigger command in full format:

router# show rtr reaction-trigger 1
        Reaction Table
Entry Number: 1
Target Entry Number: 2
Status of Entry (SNMP RowStatus): active
Operational State: pending
Related Command

show rtr configuration

show rtr totals-statistics

Use the show rtr totals-statistics EXEC command to display the total statistical values (accumulation of error counts and completions) for all response time reporter probes or the specified probe.

show rtr totals-statistics [probe] [tabular | full]
Syntax Description

probe

(Optional) Number of the response time reporter probe to display.

tabular

(Optional) Display information in a column format reducing the number of screens required to display the information.

full

(Optional) Display all information using identifiers next to each displayed value. This is the default.

Default

Full format for all probes

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The total statistics consist of the following items:

You can also use the show rtr distribution-statistics and show rtr collection-statistics commands to display additional statistical information.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show rtr totals-statistics command in full format:

router# show rtr totals-statistics 
        Statistic Totals
Entry Number: 1
Start Time Index: *17:15:41.000 UTC Thu May 16 1996
Age of Statistics Entry (hundredths of seconds): 48252
Number of Initiations: 10
Related Commands

show rtr collection-statistics
show rtr configuration
show rtr distribution-statistics

show snmp

To check the status of communications between the SNMP agent and SNMP manager, use the show snmp EXEC command.

show snmp
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command provides counter information for RFC 1213 SNMP operations. It also displays the chassis ID string defined with the snmp-server chassis-id command.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show snmp command:

Router# show snmp
Chassis: SN#TS02K229
167 SNMP packets input
    0 Bad SNMP version errors
    0 Unknown community name
    0 Illegal operation for community name supplied
    0 Encoding errors
    167 Number of requested variables
    0 Number of altered variables
    0 Get-request PDUs
    167 Get-next PDUs
    0 Set-request PDUs
167 SNMP packets output
    0 Too big errors (Maximum packet size 484)
    0 No such name errors
    0 Bad values errors
    0 General errors
    167 Get-response PDUs
    0 SNMP trap PDUs
Related Command

snmp-server chassis-id

show sntp

Use the show sntp EXEC command on a Cisco 1003, Cisco 1004, or Cisco 1005 router to show information about the Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP).

show sntp
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show sntp command:

Router# show sntp
SNTP server     Stratum   Version    Last Receive
171.69.118.9       5         3        00:01:02 
172.21.28.34       4         3        00:00:36    Synced  Bcast
Broadcast client mode is enabled.

Table 106 describes the fields show in this display.


Table 106: Show SNTP Field Descriptions
Field Description

SNTP server

Address of the configured or broadcast NTP server.

Stratum

NTP stratum of the server. The stratum indicates how far away from an authoritative time source the server is.

Version

NTP version of the server.

Last Receive

Time since the last NTP packet was received from the server.

Synced

Indicates the server chosen for synchronization

Bcast

Indicates a broadcast server.

Related Commands

sntp broadcast client
sntp server

show stacks

Use the show stacks EXEC command to monitor the stack usage of processes and interrupt routines.

show stacks
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The display from this command includes the reason for the last system reboot. If the system was reloaded because of a system failure, a saved system stack trace is displayed. This information is of use only to your technical support representative in analyzing crashes in the field. It is included here in case you need to read the displayed statistics to an engineer over the phone.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show stacks command following a system failure:

Router# show stacks
Minimum process stacks:
Free/Size    Name
 652/1000    Router Init
 726/1000    Init
 744/1000    BGP Open
 686/1200    Virtual Exec
Interrupt level stacks:
Level    Called Free/Size    Name
    1           0 1000/1000    env-flash
    3         738    900/1000    Multiport Communications Interfaces
    5         178    970/1000    Console UART
System was restarted by bus error at PC 0xAD1F4, address 0xD0D0D1A
GS Software (GS3), Version 9.1(0.16), BETA TEST SOFTWARE
Compiled Tue 11-Aug-92 13:27 by jthomas
Stack trace from system failure:
FP: 0x29C158, RA: 0xACFD4
FP: 0x29C184, RA: 0xAD20C
FP: 0x29C1B0, RA: 0xACFD4
FP: 0x29C1DC, RA: 0xAD304
FP: 0x29C1F8, RA: 0xAF774
FP: 0x29C214, RA: 0xAF83E
FP: 0x29C228, RA: 0x3E0CA
FP: 0x29C244, RA: 0x3BD3C
Related Command

show processes

show subsys

To display the subsystem information, use the show subsys privileged EXEC command.

show subsys [class class | name name]
Syntax Description

class class

(Optional) Shows the subsystems of the specified class. Valid classes are driver, kernel, library, management, protocol, and registry.

name name

(Optional) Shows the specified subsystem. Use the asterisk character (*) as a wildcard at the end of the name to list all subsystems starting with the specified characters.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Use the show subsys command to confirm that all required features are in the running image.

Sample Display

The following example shows partial sample output from the show subsys command:

Router# show subsys
                                        Class         Version   Required Subsystems
serial              Kernel      1.000.001   
ether               Kernel      1.000.001   
tring               Kernel      1.000.001   
atm                 Kernel      1.000.001   
atm_arp             Kernel      1.000.001   atm,atmsig
static_map          Kernel      1.000.001   
fddi                Kernel      1.000.001   
oir                 Kernel      2.000.001   
slot                Kernel      1.000.001   
monvar              Kernel      1.000.001   
ipc                 Kernel      1.000.000   
arp                 Kernel      1.000.001   
ifmib_api           Kernel      1.000.000   
compress            Kernel      1.000.001   
ser_autodetect      Kernel      1.000.001   serial
ucode               Kernel      1.000.001   
chassismib          Kernel      1.000.000   
isdn                Library     1.000.001   
ip_addrpool_sys     Library     1.000.001   
dialer              Library     1.000.001   
...

Table 107 describes the fields shown in this display.


Table 107: Show Subsys Field Descriptions
Field Description

serial

Name of the subsystem.

Class

Class of the subsystem. Possible classes include Kernel, Library, Driver, Protocol, Management, Registry, and SystemInit.

Version

Version of the subsystem.

Required Subsystems

Subsystems required by this subsystem.

show tcp

Use the show tcp EXEC command to display the status of TCP connections.

show tcp [line-number]
Syntax Description

line-number

(Optional) Absolute line number of the line for which you want to display Telnet connection status.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show tcp command:

Router# show tcp
tty0, connection 1 to host cider
Connection state is ESTAB, I/O status: 1, unread input bytes: 0
Local host: 172.31.232.17, Local port: 11184
Foreign host: 172.31.1.137, Foreign port: 23
Enqueued packets for retransmit: 0, input: 0, saved: 0
Event Timers (current time is 67341276):
Timer:       Retrans   TimeWait    AckHold    SendWnd    KeepAlive
Starts:           30          0         32          0          0 
Wakeups:           1          0         14          0          0 
Next:              0          0          0          0          0 
iss:   67317172    snduna:   67317228    sndnxt:   67317228     sndwnd:   4096
irs: 1064896000    rcvnxt: 1064897597    rcvwnd:       2144    delrcvwnd:      0
SRTT: 317 ms, RTTO: 900 ms, RTV: 133 ms, KRTT: 0 ms
minRTT: 4 ms, maxRTT: 300 ms, ACK hold: 300 ms
Flags: higher precedence, idle user, retransmission timeout
Datagrams (max data segment is 536 bytes):
Rcvd: 41 (out of order: 0), with data: 34, total data bytes: 1596
Sent: 57 (retransmit: 1), with data: 35, total data bytes: 55

Table 108 describes the first 5 lines of output shown in the display:


Table 108: Show TCP Field Descriptions-First Section of Output
Field Description

tty0

Identifying number of the line.

connection 1

Number identifying the TCP connection.

to host xxx

Name of the remote host to which the connection has been made.

Connection state is ESTAB

A connection progresses through a series of states during its lifetime. These states follow in the order in which a connection progresses through them.

  • LISTEN-Waiting for a connection request from any remote TCP and port.

  • SYNSENT-Waiting for a matching connection request after having sent a connection request.

  • SYNRCVD-Waiting for a confirming connection request acknowledgment after having both received and sent a connection request.

  • ESTAB-Indicates an open connection; data received can be delivered to the user. This is the normal state for the data transfer phase of the connection.

  • FINWAIT1-Waiting for a connection termination request from the remote TCP or an acknowledgment of the connection termination request previously sent.

  • FINWAIT2-Waiting for a connection termination request from the remote TCP host.

  • CLOSEWAIT-Waiting for a connection termination request from the local user.

  • CLOSING-Waiting for a connection termination request acknowledgment from the remote TCP host.

  • LASTACK-Waiting for an acknowledgment of the connection termination request previously sent to the remote TCP host.

  • TIMEWAIT-Waiting for enough time to pass to be sure the remote TCP host has received the acknowledgment of its connection termination request.

  • CLOSED-Indicates no connection state at all.

For more information, see RFC 793, Transmission Control Protocol Functional Specification.

I/O status:

Number describing the current internal status of the connection.

unread input bytes:

Number of bytes that the lower-level TCP processes have read, but the higher level TCP processes have not yet processed.

Local host:

IP address of the network server.

Local port:

Local port number, as derived from the following equation: line-number + (512 * random-number). (The line number uses the lower nine bits; the other bits are random.)

Foreign host:

IP address of the remote host to which the TCP connection has been made.

Foreign port:

Destination port for the remote host.

Enqueued packets for retransmit:

Number of packets waiting on the retransmit queue. These are packets on this TCP connection that have been sent but have not yet been acknowledged by the remote TCP host.

input:

Number of packets that are waiting on the input queue to be read by the user.

saved:

Number of received out-of-order packets that are waiting for all packets comprising the message to be received before they enter the input queue. For example, if packets 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 have been received, packets 1 and 2 would enter the input queue, and packets 4, 5, and 6 would enter the saved queue.

The following line of output shows the current time according to the system clock of the local host:

Event Timers (current time is 67341276):

The time shown is the number of milliseconds since the system started.

The following lines of output display the number of times that various local TCP timeout values were reached during this connection. In this example, the local host retransmitted 30 times because it received no response from the remote host, and it transmitted an acknowledgment many more times because there was no data on which to piggyback.

Timer:       Retrans   TimeWait    AckHold    SendWnd    KeepAlive
Starts:           30          0         32          0          0 
Wakeups:           1          0         14          0          0 
Next:              0          0          0          0          0 

Table 109 describes the fields in the preceding lines of output.


Table 109: Show TCP Field Descriptions-Second Section of Output
Field Description

Timer:

The names of the timers in the display.

Starts:

The number of times the timer has been started during this connection.

Wakeups:

Number of keepalives transmitted without receiving any response. (This field is reset to zero when a response is received.)

Next:

The system clock setting that will trigger the next time this timer will go off.

Retrans

The Retransmission timer is used to time TCP packets that have not been acknowledged and are waiting for retransmission.

TimeWait

The TimeWait timer is used to ensure that the remote system receive a request to disconnect a session.

AckHold

The Acknowledgment timer is used to delay the sending of acknowledgments to the remote TCP in an attempt to reduce network use.

SendWnd

The Send Window is used to ensure that there is no closed window due to a lost TCP acknowledgment.

KeepAlive

The KeepAlive timer is used to control the transmission of test messages to the remote TCP to ensure that the link has not been broken without the local TCP's knowledge.

The following lines of output display the sequence numbers that TCP uses to ensure sequenced, reliable transport of data. The local host and remote host each use these sequence numbers for flow control and to acknowledge receipt of datagrams. Table 110 describes the specific fields in these lines of output:

iss:   67317172    snduna:   67317228    sndnxt:   67317228     sndwnd:   4096
irs: 1064896000    rcvnxt: 1064897597    rcvwnd:       2144    delrcvwnd:      0


Table 110: Show TCP Field Descriptions-Sequence Number
Field Description

iss:

Initial send sequence number.

snduna:

Last send sequence number the local host sent but has not received an acknowledgment for.

sndnxt:

Sequence number the local host will send next.

sndwnd:

TCP window size of the remote host.

irs:

Initial receive sequence number.

rcvnxt:

Last receive sequence number the local host has acknowledged.

rcvwnd:

Local host's TCP window size.

delrcvwnd:

Delayed receive window-data the local host has read from the connection, but has not yet subtracted from the receive window the host has advertised to the remote host. The value in this field gradually increases until it is larger than a full-sized packet, at which point it is applied to the rcvwnd field.

The following lines of output display values that the local host uses to keep track of transmission times so that TCP can adjust to the network it is using. Table 111 describes the fields in the following line of output:

SRTT: 317 ms, RTTO: 900 ms, RTV: 133 ms, KRTT: 0 ms
minRTT: 4 ms, maxRTT: 300 ms, ACK hold: 300 ms
Flags: higher precedence, idle user, retransmission timeout


Table 111: Show TCP Field Descriptions-Line Beginning with SRTT
Field Description

SRTT:

A calculated smoothed round-trip timeout.

RTTO:

Round-trip timeout.

RTV:

Variance of the round-trip time.

KRTT:

New round-trip timeout (using the Karn algorithm). This field separately tracks the round-trip time of packets that have been retransmitted.

minRTT:

Smallest recorded round-trip timeout (hard wire value used for calculation).

maxRTT:

Largest recorded round-trip timeout.

ACK hold:

Time the local host will delay an acknowledgment in order to piggyback data on it.

Flags:

Properties of the connection.

For more information on these fields, refer to "Round Trip Time Estimation," P. Karn & C. Partridge, ACM SIGCOMM-87, August 1987.

Table 112 describes the fields in the following lines of output:

Datagrams (max data segment is 536 bytes):
Rcvd: 41 (out of order: 0), with data: 34, total data bytes: 1596
Sent: 57 (retransmit: 1), with data: 35, total data bytes: 55


Table 112: Show TCP Field Descriptions-Last Section of Output
Field Description

Rcvd:

Number of datagrams the local host has received during this connection (and the number of these datagrams that were out of order).

with data:

Number of these datagrams that contained data.

total data bytes:

Total number of bytes of data in these datagrams.

Sent:

Number of datagrams the local host sent during this connection (and the number of these datagrams that had to be retransmitted).

with data:

Number of these datagrams that contained data.

total data bytes:

Total number of bytes of data in these datagrams.

show tcp brief

To display a concise description of TCP connection endpoints, use the show tcp brief EXEC command.

show tcp brief [all]
Syntax Description

all

(Optional) Displays status for all endpoints. Without this keyword, endpoints in the LISTEN state are not shown.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show tcp brief command while a user has connected into the system via Telnet:

Router> show tcp brief
TCB       Local Address           Foreign Address        (state)
609789AC    Router.cisco.com.23     cider.cisco.com.3733   ESTAB

Table 113 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 113: Show TCP Brief Field Descriptions
Field Description

TCB

An internal identifier for the endpoint.

Local Address

The local IP address and port.

Foreign Address

The foreign IP address and port (at the opposite end of the connection).

(state)

The state of the connection. States are described in syntax description of the show tcp command.

show tech-support

To display general information about the router when reporting a problem, use the show tech-support privileged EXEC command.

show tech-support [page] [password]
Syntax Description

page

(Optional) Causes the output to display a page of information at a time. Use the return key to display the next line of output or use the space bar to display the next page of information. If not used, the output scrolls (that is, does not stop for page breaks).

password

(Optional) Leaves passwords and other security information in the output. If not used, passwords and other security-sensitive information in the output are replaced with the word "<removed>" (this is the default).

Default

Display output without page breaks and remove passwords and other security information.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use this command to help collect general information about the router when you are reporting a problem. This command displays the equivalent of the following show commands:

For a sample display of the output of the show tech-support command, refer to these show commands.

Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

show buffers
show controllers

show controllers tech-support
show interfaces

show processes cpu
show processes memory
show running-config

show stacks
show version

show traffic-shape

Use the show traffic-shape EXEC command to display the current traffic-shaping configuration.

show traffic-shape [interface]
Syntax Description

interface

(Optional) Name of the interface.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

You must have first enabled traffic shaping using the traffic-shape rate, traffic-shape group, or frame-relay traffic-shaping command to display traffic-shaping information with the show traffic-shape command.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show traffic-shape command.

router#show traffic-shape
          access Target    Byte   Sustain   Excess    Interval  Increment Adapt
I/F       list   Rate      Limit  bits/int  bits/int  (ms)       (bytes)  Active
Et0       101    1000000   23437  125000    125000    63        7813      -
Et1              5000000   87889  625000    625000    16        9766      -

Table 114 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 114: Show Traffic-Shape Field Descriptions
Field Description

I/F

Interface.

access list

Number of the access list.

Target Rate

Rate that traffic is shaped to in bps.

Byte Limit

Maximum number of bytes transmitted per internal interval.

Sustain bits/int

Configured sustained bits per interval.

Excess bits/int

Configured excess bits in the first interval.

Interval (ms)

Interval being used internally. This interval may be smaller than the Committed Burst divided by the committed information rate if the router determines that traffic flow will be more stable with a smaller configured interval.

Increment (bytes)

Number of bytes that will be sustained per internal interval.

Adapt Active

Contains "BECN" if Frame Relay has BECN Adaptation configured.

Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

frame-relay traffic-shaping
show traffic-shape statistics
traffic-shape adaptive
traffic-shape group
traffic-shape rate

show traffic-shape statistics

Use the show traffic-shape statistics EXEC command to display the current traffic-shaping statistics.

show traffic-shape statistics [interface]
Syntax Description

interface

(Optional) Name of the interface.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

You must have first enabled traffic shaping using the traffic-shape rate, traffic-shape group, or frame-relay traffic-shaping command to display traffic-shaping information with the show traffic-shape statistics command.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show traffic-shape statistics command.

router#show traffic-shape statistics
          Access Queue     Packets   Bytes     Packets   Bytes     Shaping
I/F       List   Depth                         Delayed   Delayed   Active
Et0       101    0         2         180       0         0         no
Et1              0         0         0         0         0         no

Table 115 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 115: Show Traffic-Shape Statistics Field Descriptions
Field Description

I/F

Interface.

Access List

Number of the access list.

Queue Depth

Number of messages in the queue.

Packets

Number of packets sent through the interface.

Bytes

Number of bytes sent through the inteface.

Packets Delayed

Number of packets sent through the interface that were delayed in the traffic shaping queue.

Bytes Delayed

Number of bytes sent through the interface that were delayed in the traffic shaping queue.

Shaping Active

Contains "yes" when timers indicate that traffic shaping is occurring and "no" if traffic shaping is not occurring.

Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

frame-relay traffic-shaping
show traffic-shape
traffic-shape adaptive
traffic-shape group
traffic-shape rate

snmp-server access-policy

To create or update an access policy, use the snmp-server access-policy global configuration command. To remove the specified access policy, use the no form of this command.

snmp-server access-policy destination-party source-party context privileges
no snmp-server access-policy destination-party source-party context

Syntax Description

destination-party

Name of a previously defined party identified as the destination party or target for this access policy. This name serves as a label used to reference a record defined for this party through the snmp-server party command.

source-party

Name of a previously defined party identified as the source party or subject for this access policy. This name serves as a label used to reference a record defined for this party through the snmp-server party command.

context

Name of a previously defined context that defines the resources for the access policy. This name serves as a label used to reference a record defined for this context through the snmp-server context command.

privileges

Bit mask representing the access privileges that govern the management operations that the source party can ask the destination party to perform.

Default

None

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

An access policy defines the management operations the destination party can perform in relation to resources defined by the specified context when requested by the source party. A destination party performs management operations that are requested by a source party. A source party sends communications to a destination party requesting the destination party to perform management operations. A context identifies object resources accessible to a party.

Access policies are defined for communications from the manager to the agent; in this case, the agent is the destination party and the manager is the source party. Access policies can also be defined for response message and trap message communications from the agent to the manager; in this case, the manager is the destination party and the agent is the source party.

The privileges argument specifies the types of SNMP operations allowed between the two parties. There are seven types of SNMP operations.You specify the privileges as a bit mask representing the access privileges that govern the management operations that the source party can ask the destination party to perform. In other words, the bit mask identifies the commands that the source party can send to the destination party.

You use decimal or hexadecimal format to specify privileges as a sum of values in which each value specifies an SNMP PDU type that the source party can use to request an operation. The decimal values are defined as follows:

To remove an access-policy entry, all three arguments specified as command arguments must match exactly the values of the entry to be deleted. A difference of one value constitutes a different access policy.

The first snmp-server command that you enter enables both versions of SNMP.

Examples

The following example configures an access policy providing the manager with read-only access to the agent:

snmp-server access-policy agt1 mgr1 ctx1 0x23

The following example configures an access policy providing the manager with read-write access to the agent:

snmp-server access-policy agt2 mgr2 ctx2 43

The following example configures an access policy that allows responses and SNMP v.2 traps to be sent from the agent to a management station:

snmp-server access-policy mgr1 agt1 ctx1 132

The following example removes the access policy configured for the destination party named agt1, the source party named mgr1, and the source party context named ctx1:

no snmp-server access-policy agt1 mgr1 ctx1
Related Commands

snmp-server context
snmp-server party

snmp-server chassis-id

To provide a message line identifying the SNMP server serial number, use the snmp-server chassis-id global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default value, if any.

snmp-server chassis-id text
no snmp-server chassis-id

Syntax Description

text

Message you want to enter to identify the chassis serial number.

Default

On hardware platforms where the serial number can be machine read, the default is the serial number. For example, a Cisco 7000 has a default value of its serial number.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The Cisco MIB provides a chassis MIB variable that enables the SNMP manager to gather data on system card descriptions, chassis type, chassis hardware version, chassis ID string, software version of ROM monitor, software version of system image in ROM, bytes of processor RAM installed, bytes of NVRAM installed, bytes of NVRAM in use, current configuration register setting, and the value of the configuration register at the next reload. The following installed card information is provided: type of card, serial number, hardware version, software version, and chassis slot number.

The chassis ID message can be seen with show snmp command.

Example

In the following example, the chassis serial number specified is 1234456:

snmp-server chassis-id 1234456
Related Command

show snmp

snmp-server community

To set up the community access string to permit access to the SNMPv1 protocol, use the snmp-server community global configuration command. The no form of this command removes the specified community string.

snmp-server community string [view view-name] [ro | rw] [number]
no snmp-server community string

Syntax Description

string

Community string that acts like a password and permits access to the SNMP protocol.

view view-name

(Optional) Name of a previously defined view. The view defines the objects available to the community.

ro

(Optional) Specifies read-only access. Authorized management stations are only able to retrieve MIB objects.

rw

(Optional) Specifies read-write access. Authorized management stations are able to both retrieve and modify MIB objects.

number

(Optional) Integer from 1 to 99 that specifies an access list of IP addresses that are allowed to use the community string to gain access to the SNMP v.1 agent.

Default

By default, an SNMP community string permits read-only access to all objects.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The no snmp-server command disables both versions of SNMP (SNMPv1 and SNMPv2).

The first snmp-server command that you enter enables both versions of SNMP.

Examples

The following example assigns the string comaccess to SNMPv1 allowing read-only access and specifies that IP access list 4 can use the community string:

snmp-server community comaccess ro 4

The following example assigns the string "mgr" to SNMPv1 allowing read-write access to the objects in the "restricted" view:

snmp-server community mgr view restricted rw

The following example removes the community "comaccess."

no snmp-server community comaccess

The following example disables both versions of SNMP:

no snmp-server 
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

access-list
snmp-server party
snmp-server view

snmp-server contact

To set the system contact (sysContact) string, use the snmp-server contact global configuration command. Use the no form to remove the system contact information.

snmp-server contact text
no snmp-server contact

Syntax Description

text

String that describes the system contact information.

Default

No system contact string is set.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following is an example of a system contact string:

snmp-server contact Dial System Operator at beeper # 27345
Related Command

snmp-server location

snmp-server context

To create or update a context record, use the snmp-server context global configuration command. To remove a specific context entry, use the no form of this command.

snmp-server context context-name context-oid view-name
no snmp-server context context-name

Syntax Description

context-name

Name of the context to be created or updated. This name serves as a label used to reference a record for this context.

context-oid

Object identifier to assign to the context. Specify this value in dotted decimal notation, with an optional text identifier; for example, 1.3.6.1.6.3.3.1.4.192.180.45.11.1(== initialContextId.192.180.45.11.1).

view-name

Name of a previously defined view. The view defines the objects available to the context.

Default

None

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

A context record identifies object resources accessible to a party. A context record is one of the components that make up an access policy. Therefore, you must configure a context record before you can create an access policy that includes the context. Context records and party records further codify MIB views.

To remove a context entry, specify only the name of the context. The name identifies the context to be deleted.

The first snmp-server command that you enter enables both versions of SNMP.

Example

The following example shows how to create a context that includes all objects in the MIB-II subtree using a previously defined view named mib2:

snmp-server context mycontext initialContextId.192.180.24.56.3 mib2
Related Command

snmp-server view

snmp-server enable

To enable the router to send SNMP traps, use the snmp-server enable global configuration command. The no form of this command disables sending SNMP traps.

snmp-server enable traps [trap-type] [trap-option]
no snmp-server enable traps [trap-type] [trap-option]
Syntax Description

traps

Enables all traps.

trap-type

(Optional) Type of trap to enable. If no type is specified, all traps are sent (including envmon and repeater). It can be one of the following values:

· bgp-Send Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) state change traps.

· config-Send configuration traps.

· frame-relay-Send Frame Relay traps.

· isdn-Send ISDN traps.

· envmon-Send Cisco enterprise-specific environmental monitor traps when an environmental threshold is exceeded. When envmon is selected, you can specify a trap-option.

· repeater-Send Ethernet hub repeater traps. When repeater is selected, you can specify a trap-option.

· rtr-Send response time reporter (RTR) traps.

· syslog-Send error message traps (Cisco Syslog MIB). Specify the level of messages to be sent with the logging history level command.

trap-option

(Optional) When envmon is used, you can enable a specific environmental trap type, or accept all trap types from the environmental monitor system. If no option is specified, all environmental types are enabled. It can be one or more of the following values: voltage, shutdown, supply, fan, and temperature.

When repeater is used, you can specify the repeater option. If no option is specified, all repeater types are enabled. It can be one or more of the following values:

· health-enable IETF Repeater Hub MIB (RFC 1516) health trap.

· reset-enable IETF Repeater Hub MIB (RFC 1516) reset trap.

Defaults

No traps are enabled.

If you enter this command with no keywords, the default is to enable all trap types.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

This command is useful for disabling traps which are generating a large amount of uninteresting or useless noise.

If you do not enter an snmp-server enable command, no traps are sent. In order to configure the router to send SNMP traps, you must enter at least one snmp-server enable command. If you enter the command with no keywords, all trap types are enabled. If you enter the command with a keyword, only the trap type related to that keyword is enabled. In order to enable multiple types of traps, you must issue a separate snmp-server enable command for each trap type and trap option.

The snmp-server enable command is used in conjuction with the snmp-server host command. Use the snmp-server host command to specify which host or hosts receive SNMP traps. In order to send traps, you must configure at least one snmp-server host command.

For a host to receive a trap, both the snmp-server enable command and the snmp-server host command for that host must be enabled.

The trap types used in this command all have an associated MIB object that allows them to be globally enabled or disabled. Not all of the traps types available in the snmp-server host command have notificationEnable MIB objects, so some of these cannot be controlled using the snmp-server enable command.

Examples

The following example enables the router to send all traps to all hosts

snmp-server enable traps
snmp-server host

The following example enables the router to send Frame Relay and environmental monitor traps.

snmp-server enable trap frame-relay
snmp-server enable trap envmon temperature
snmp-server host

The following example will not send traps to any host. The BGP traps are enabled for all hosts, but the only traps enabled to be sent to a host are ISDN traps.

snmp-server enable traps bgp
snmp-server host bob public isdn
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

snmp-server host
snmp-server trap-source
snmp trap illegal-address

snmp-server host

To specify the recipient of an SNMP trap operation, use the snmp-server host global configuration command. The no form of this command removes the specified host.

snmp-server host host community-string [trap-type]
no snmp-server host host community-string [trap-type]
Syntax Description

host

Name or Internet address of the host.

community-string

Password-like community string to send with the trap operation.

trap-type

(Optional) Type of trap to be sent to the trap receiver host. If no type is specified, all traps are sent. It can be one or more of the following values:

· bgp-Send Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) state change traps.

· config-Send configuration traps.

· dspu-Send downstream physical unit (DSPU) traps.

· envmon-Send Cisco enterprise-specific environmental monitor traps when an environmental threshold is exceeded.

· frame-relay-Send Frame Relay traps.

· isdn-Send ISDN traps.

· llc2-Send Logical Link Control, type 2 (LLC2) traps.

· rptr-Send standard repeater (hub) traps.

· rsrb-Send remote source route bridging (RSRB) traps.

· rtr-Send response time reporter (RTR) traps.

· sdlc-Send Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) traps.

· sdllc-Send SDLLC traps.

· snmp-Send SNMP traps defined in RFC 1157.

· stun-Send serial tunnel (STUN) traps.

· syslog-Send error message traps (Cisco Syslog MIB). Specify the level of messages to be sent with the logging history level command.

· tty-Send Cisco enterprise-specific traps when a TCP connection closes.

· x25-Send X.25 event traps.

Defaults

Traps are not sent to any host.

If you enter this command with no keywords, the default is to send all trap types.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If you do not enter an snmp-server host command, traps are not sent to any host. In order to configure the router to send SNMP traps to hosts, you must enter at least one snmp-server host command. If you enter the command with no keywords, all hosts are enabled for all traps types. If you enter the command for one host, only traps to that host are enabled. In order to enable multiple hosts, you must issue a separate snmp-server host command for each host. You can specify multiple traps types in the command for each host.

When multiple snmp-server host commands are given for the same host, the community string in the last command is used, and in general, the trap types set in the last command will be used to filter the SNMP trap messages sent to that host.

The snmp-server host command is used in conjuction with the snmp-server enable command. Use the snmp-server enable command to specify which SNMP traps are sent globally. In order to send traps, you must configure at least one snmp-server enable command.

For a host to receive a trap, both the snmp-server enable command and the snmp-server host command for that host must be enabled.

A trap-type option's availability depends on the router type and Cisco IOS software features supported on the router. For example, the envmon trap-type is available only if the environmental monitor is part of the system.

Examples

The following example sends the SNMP traps defined in RFC 1157 to the host specified by the name cisco.com. The community string is defined as comaccess.

snmp-server enable traps
snmp-server host cisco.com comaccess snmp

The following example sends the SNMP and Cisco environmental monitor enterprise-specific traps to address 172.30.2.160:

snmp-server enable traps
snmp-server host 172.30.2.160 snmp envmon

The following example enables the router to send all traps to all hosts:

snmp-server enable traps
snmp-server host

The following example will not send traps to any host. The BGP traps are enabled for all hosts, but the only ISDN traps are enabled to be sent to a host.

snmp-server enable traps bgp
snmp-server host bob public isdn
Related Commands

snmp-server enable
snmp-server trap-source
snmp-server trap-timeout

snmp-server location

To set the system location string, use the snmp-server location global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove the location string.

snmp-server location text
no snmp-server location

Syntax Description

text

String that describes the system location information.

Default

No system location string is set.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example illustrates a system location string:

snmp-server location Building 3/Room 214
Related Command

snmp-server contact

snmp-server packetsize

To establish control over the largest SNMP packet size permitted when the SNMP server is receiving a request or generating a reply, use the snmp-server packetsize global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default value.

snmp-server packetsize byte-count
no snmp-server packetsize

Syntax Description

byte-count

Integer byte count from 484 to 8192. The default is 1500 bytes.

Default

1500 bytes

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example establishes a packet filtering of a maximum size of 1024 bytes:

snmp-server packetsize 1024
Related Command

snmp-server queue-length

snmp-server party

To create or update a party record, use the snmp-server party global configuration command. To remove a specific party entry, use the no form of this command.

snmp-server party party-name party-oid [protocol-address] [packetsize size]
[local | remote] [authentication {md5 key [clock clock]
[lifetime lifetime] | snmpv1 string]
no snmp-server party party-name

Syntax Description

party-name

Name of the party characterized by the contents of the record. This name serves as a label used to reference the party record that you are creating or modifying.

party-oid

Object identifier to assign to the party. Specify this value in dotted decimal notation, with an optional text identifier; for example, 1.3.6.1.6.3.3.1.3.192.180.34.54.1 (= initialPartyId.192.180.34.54.1).

protocol-address

(Optional) Address of the protocol that the party record pertains to. Currently the only supported protocol is UDP, so this value specifies a UDP address in the format a.b.c.d port.

In future releases, additional protocols will be supported.

This value is used to specify the destination of trap messages.

packetsize size

(Optional) Maximum size in bytes of a message that this party is able to receive. By default, the packet size set through the snmp-server packetsize command is used.

local | remote

(Optional) Indicates that the party is local or remote. If neither local nor remote is specified, a default value of local is assumed.

authentication

(Optional) Indicates that the party uses an authentication protocol. If specified, either md5 or snmpv1 is required.

md5 key

(Optional) Indicates that the party uses the Message Digest algorithm MD5 for message authentication. If md5 is specified, you must also specify a 16-byte hexadecimal ASCII string representing the MD5 authentication key for the party. All messages sent to this party will be authenticated using the SNMP v2 MD5 authentication method with the key specified by key.

clock clock

(Optional) Initial value of the authentication clock.

lifetime lifetime

(Optional) Lifetime, in seconds, that represents the upper bound on acceptable delivery delay for messages generated by the party.

snmpv1 string

(Optional) Community string. The keyword snmpv1 indicates that the party uses community-based authentication. All messages sent to this party will be authenticated using the SNMP v1community string specified by string instead of MD5.

Defaults

If neither local nor remote is specified to indicate the location of the party, the party is assumed to be local.

If you do not specify a packet size, the packet size set through the snmp-server packetsize command is used.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

You define parties to identify managers and agents. An SNMP v2 party identity is unique; it includes the logical network location of the party, characterized by the transport protocol domain and transport addressing information, and, optionally, an authentication method and its arguments.The authentication protocol reliably identifies the origin of all messages sent by the party. The authentication protocol also ensures the integrity of the messages; in other words, it ensures that the message received is the message that was sent.

Specifying md5 as the authentication method implies that this party record pertains to an SNMPv2 party.

Specifying snmpv1 as the authentication method implies that this party record pertains to an SNMPv1 party. Instead of using the snmp-server community command, you can use the snmp-server party command with the snmpv1 keyword to define an SNMP v.1 party to be used to communicate with an SNMP v.1 management station.

If authentication is not specified, the party record pertains to an SNMPv2 party, and no authentication will be performed for messages sent to this party.

To remove a party record, specify only the name of the party. The name identifies the party to be deleted.

The first snmp-server command that you enter enables both versions of SNMP.

Examples

The following example configures a remote unauthenticated party:

snmp-server party mgr1 initialPartyId.192.180.45.32.3 udp 192.180.45.76 162

The following example configures a local MD5-authenticated party with a large maximum packet size. You enter this command as a single line:

snmp-server party agt1 initialPartyId.192.180.45.32.4 packetsize 1500 local
authentication md5 23de457623900ac3ef568fcb236589 lifetime 400

The following example configures an SNMP v.1 proxy party for the community public:

snmp-server party proxyv1 initialPartyId.192.180.45.32.100 authentication snmpv1 public

The following example removes the party named mgr1:

no snmp-server party mgr1 
Related Command

snmp-server community

snmp-server queue-length

To establish the message queue length for each trap host, use the snmp-server queue-length global configuration command.

snmp-server queue-length length
Syntax Description

length

Integer that specifies the number of trap events that can be held before the queue must be emptied.

Default

10 events

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command defines the length of the message queue for each trap host. Once a trap message is successfully transmitted, software will continue to empty the queue, but never faster than at a rate of four trap messages per second.

Example

The following example establishes a message queue that traps four events before it must be emptied:

snmp-server queue-length 4
Related Command

snmp-server packetsize

snmp-server system-shutdown

To use the SNMP message reload feature, the router configuration must include the snmp-server system-shutdown global configuration command. The no form of this command prevents an SNMP system-shutdown request (from an SNMP manager) from resetting the Cisco agent.

snmp-server system-shutdown
no snmp-server system-shutdown

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

This command is not included in the configuration file.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example illustrates how to include the SNMP message reload feature in the router configuration:

snmp-server system-shutdown

snmp-server tftp-server-list

To limit the TFTP servers used via SNMP-controlled TFTP operations (saving and loading configuration files) to the servers specified in an access list, use the snmp-server tftp-server-list global configuration command. To disable this feature, use the no form of this command.

snmp-server tftp-server-list number
no snmp-server tftp-server-list

Syntax Description

number

Standard IP access list number from 1 to 99.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.2.

Example

The following example limits the TFTP servers that can be used for configuration file copies via SNMP to the servers in access list 44.

snmp-server tftp-server-list 44

snmp-server trap-authentication

To establish trap message authentication, use the snmp-server trap-authentication global configuration command. To remove message authentication, use the no form of this command.

snmp-server trap-authentication [snmpv1 | snmpv2]
no snmp-server trap-authentication [snmpv1 | snmpv2]
Syntax Description

snmpv1

(Optional) Indicates that SNMP authentication traps will be sent to SNMPv1 management stations only.

snmpv2

(Optional) Indicates that SNMP authentication traps will be sent to SNMPv2 management stations only.

Defaults

Specifying the snmp-server trap-authentication command without a keyword turns on trap message authentication. In this case, messages are sent to the host that is specified though the snmp-server host command and to any SNMP stations configured through access policies to receive trap messages.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Specify the snmpv1 or snmpv2 keyword to indicate the type of management stations to send the trap messages to.

This command enables the router as an agent to send a trap message when it receives an SNMPv1 packet with an incorrect community string or an SNMPv2 packet with an incorrect MD5 authentication key.

The SNMP specification requires that a trap message be generated for each packet with an incorrect community string or authentication key; however, because this action can result in a security breach, the router (as an agent) by default does not send a trap message when it receives an incorrect community string or authentication key.

The community string or key is checked before any access list that may be set, so it is possible to get spurious trap messages. In other words, if you have issued an snmp-server community command with a specified access list, you might receive messages that come from someone that is not on the access list; in this case, an authentication trap is issued.The only workarounds are to disable trap authentication or to configure an access list on a router between the SNMP agent and the SNMP manager to prevent packets from getting to the SNMP agent.

To turn off all message authentication traps, use the no snmp-server trap-authentication without a keyword. To turn off message authentication traps only for SNMPv1 stations or only for SNMPv2 stations, give the negative form of the command with the appropriate keyword.

The first snmp-server command that you enter enables both versions of SNMP.

Example

The following example illustrates how to enter the command that establishes trap message authentication:

snmp-server trap-authentication
Related Commands

snmp-server community
snmp-server host

snmp-server trap-source

To specify the interface (and hence the corresponding IP address) that an SNMP trap should originate from, use the snmp-server trap-source global configuration command. Use the no form of the command to remove the source designation.

snmp-server trap-source interface
no snmp-server trap-source

Syntax Description

interface

Interface from which the SNMP trap originates. The argument includes the interface type and number in platform-specific syntax.

Default

No interface is specified.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When an SNMP trap is sent from a Cisco SNMP server, it has a trap address of whatever interface it happened to go out of at that time. Use this command if you want to use the trap address to trace particular needs.

Examples

The following example specifies that the IP address for interface Ethernet 0 is the source for all traps:

snmp-server trap-source ethernet 0

The following example specifies that the IP address for interface Ethernet 2/1 on a Cisco 7000 is the source for all traps:

snmp-server trap-source ethernet 2/1
Related Commands

snmp-server enable
snmp-server host

snmp-server trap-timeout

To define how often to try resending trap messages on the retransmission queue, use the snmp-server trap-timeout global configuration command.

snmp-server trap-timeout seconds
Syntax Description

seconds

Integer that sets the interval, in seconds, for resending the messages.

Default

30 seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Before the Cisco IOS software tries to send a trap, it looks for a route to the destination address. If there is no known route, the trap is saved in a retransmission queue. The server trap-timeout command determines the number of seconds between retransmission attempts.

Example

The following example sets an interval of 20 seconds to try resending trap messages on the retransmission queue:

snmp-server trap-timeout 20
Related Commands

snmp-server host
snmp-server queue-length

snmp-server view

To create or update a view entry, use the snmp-server view global configuration command. To remove the specified SNMP server view entry, use the no form of this command.

snmp-server view view-name oid-tree {included | excluded}
no snmp-server view view-name
Syntax Description

view-name

Label for the view record that you are updating or creating. The name is used to reference the record.

oid-tree

Object identifier of the ASN.1 subtree to be included or excluded from the view. To identify the subtree, specify a text string consisting of numbers, such as 1.3.6.2.4, or a word, such as system. Replace a single subidentifier with the asterisk (*) wildcard to specify a subtree family; for example 1.3.*.4.

included | excluded

Type of view. You must specify either included or excluded.

Default

None

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Other SNMP commands require a view as an argument. You use this command to create a view to be used as arguments for other commands that create records including a view.

Two standard predefined views can be used when a view is required, instead of defining a view. One is everything, which indicates that the user can see all objects. The other is restricted, which indicates that the user can see three groups: system, snmpStats, and snmpParties. The predefined views are described in RFC 1447.

The first snmp-server command that you enter enables both versions of SNMP.

Examples

The following example creates a view that includes all objects in the MIB-II subtree:

snmp-server view mib2 mib-2 included

The following example creates a view that includes all objects in the MIB-II system group and all objects in the Cisco enterprise MIB:

snmp-server view phred system included
snmp-server view phred cisco included

The following example creates a view that includes all objects in the MIB-II system group except for sysServices (System 7) and all objects for interface 1 in the MIB-II interfaces group:

snmp-server view agon system included
snmp-server view agon system.7 excluded
snmp-server view agon ifEntry.*.1 included
Related Command

snmp-server community
snmp-server context

snmp trap link-status

To enable SNMP link trap generation, use the snmp trap link-status command. To disable SNMP link traps, use the no form of this command.

snmp trap link-status
no snmp trap link-status

Syntax Description:

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

SNMP link traps are sent when an interface goes up or down.

Command Mode

Interface Configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command appeared before Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

By default, SNMP link traps are sent when an interface goes up or down. For interfaces expected to go up and down during normal usage, such as ISDN interfaces, the output generated by these traps may not be useful. The no form of this command disables these traps.

Example

This example disables the sending of SNMP link traps related to the ISDN BRI 0 interface. This will stop all SNMP %LINK-UPDOWN messages from being sent for this interface.

interface bri 0
  no snmp trap link-status

sntp broadcast client

Use the sntp broadcast client global configuration command to configure a Cisco 1003, Cisco 1004, or Cisco 1005 router to use the Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) to accept Network Time Protocol (NTP) traffic from any broadcast server. The no form of the command prevents the router from accepting broadcast traffic.

sntp broadcast client
no sntp broadcast client

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

The router does not accept SNTP traffic from broadcast servers.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

SNTP is a compact, client-only version of the Network Time Protocol (NTP). SNMP can only receive the time from NTP servers; it cannot be used to provide time services to other systems.

SNTP typically provides time within 100 milliseconds of the accurate time, but it does not provide the complex filtering and statistical mechanisms of NTP. In addition, SNTP does not authenticate traffic, although you can configure extended access lists to provide some protection.

You must configure the router with either this command or the sntp server command in order enable SNTP.

Example

The following example enables the router to accept broadcast NTP packets and shows sample show sntp command output:

Router(config)# sntp broadcast client
Router(config)# end
Router# 
%SYS-5-CONFIG: Configured from console by console
Router# show sntp
SNTP server     Stratum   Version    Last Receive
172.21.28.34       4         3        00:00:36    Synced  Bcast
Broadcast client mode is enabled.
Related Commands

show sntp
sntp server

sntp server

Use the sntp server global configuration command to configure a Cisco 1003, Cisco 1004, or Cisco 1005 router to use the Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) to request and accept Network Time Protocol (NTP) traffic from a time server. The no form of the command removes a server from the list of NTP servers.

sntp server {address | hostname} [version number]
no sntp server {address | hostname}
Syntax Description

address

IP address of the time server.

hostname

Hostname of the time server.

version number

(Optional) Version of NTP to use. The default is 1.

Default

The router does not accept SNTP traffic from a time server.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

SNTP is a compact, client-only version of the Network Time Protocol (NTP). SNMP can only receive the time from NTP servers; it cannot be used to provide time services to other systems.

SNTP typically provides time within 100 milliseconds of the accurate time, but it does not provide the complex filtering and statistical mechanisms of NTP. In addition, SNTP does not authenticate traffic, although you can configure extended access lists to provide some protection.

Enter this command once for each NTP server.

You must configure the router with either this command or the sntp broadcast client command in order enable SNTP.

Example

The following example enables the router to request and accept NTP packets from the server at 172.21.118.9 and shows sample show sntp command output:

Router(config)# sntp server 172.21.118.9
Router(config)# end
Router# 
%SYS-5-CONFIG: Configured from console by console
Router# show sntp
SNTP server     Stratum   Version    Last Receive
172.21.118.9       5         3        00:01:02        Synced 
Related Commands

show sntp
sntp broadcast client

statistics-distribution-interval

To set the time interval for each statistics distribution kept for the response time reporter, use the statistics-distribution-interval response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

statistics-distribution-interval milliseconds
no statistics-distribution-interval

Syntax Description

milliseconds

Number of milliseconds used for each statistics distribution kept. The default is 20 ms.

Default

20 ms

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

In most situations, you do not need to change the statistical distribution interval or size. Only change the interval or size when distributions are needed, for example, when performing statistical modeling of your network. To set the statistical distributions size, use the distributions-of-statistics-kept response time reporter configuration command.

Example

In the following example, the distribution is set to five and the distribution interval is set to 10 ms. This means that the first distribution will contain statistics from 0 to 9 ms, the second distribution will contain statistics from 10 to 19 ms, the third distribution will contain statistics from 20 to 29 ms, the fourth distribution will contain statistics from 30 to 39 ms, and the fifth distribution will contain statistics from 40 ms to infinity.

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.28.161.21
  distribution-of-statistics-kept 5
  statistics-distribution-interval 10
Related Commands

distributions-of-statistics-kept
hops-of-statistics-kept
hours-of-statistics-kept
paths-of-statistics-kept
rtr

tag

To create a user-specified identifier for a response time reporter probe, use the tag response time reporter configuration command. It is normally used to logically link probes in a group. Use the no form of this command to remove a tag from a probe.

tag text
no tag

Syntax Description

text

Name of a group that this probe belongs to. From 0 to 16 ASCII characters.

Default

None

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Tags can be used to support automation (for example, by using the same tag for two different probes on two different routers echoing the same target).

Example

In the following example, probe 1 is tagged with the label bluebell:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.176
  tag bluebell
Related Command

rtr

test flash

To test Flash memory on MCI and envm Flash EPROM interfaces, use the test flash EXEC command.

test flash
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

The following example illustrates how to begin the interface test:

test flash
Related Commands

test interfaces
test memory

test interfaces

To test the system interfaces on the modular router, use the test interfaces EXEC command.

test interfaces
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The test interfaces EXEC command is intended for the factory checkout of network interfaces. It is not intended for diagnosing problems with an operational router. The test interfaces output does not report correct results if the router is attached to a "live" network. For each network interface that has an IP address that can be tested in loopback (MCI and ciscoBus Ethernet and all serial interfaces), the test interfaces command sends a series of ICMP echoes. Error counters are examined to determine the operational status of the interface.

Example

The following example illustrates how to begin the interface test:

test interfaces
Related Commands

test flash
test memory

test memory

To perform a test of Multibus memory (including nonvolatile memory) on the modular router, use the test memory EXEC command. The memory test overwrites memory.

test memory
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Caution The memory test overwrites memory. If you use the test memory command, you will need to rewrite nonvolatile memory. For example, if you test Multibus memory, which is the memory used by the CSC-R 4-Mbps Token Ring interfaces, you will need to reload the system before the network interfaces will operate properly. The test memory command is intended primarily for use by Cisco personnel.
Example

The following example illustrates how to begin the memory test:

test memory
Related Commands

test flash
test interfaces

threshold

To set the rising threshold (hysteresis) that generates a reaction event and stores history information for the response time reporter probe, use the threshold response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

threshold millisecond
no threshold

Syntax Description

millisecond

Number of milliseconds required for a rising threshold to be declared. The default value is 5000 ms.

Default

5000 ms

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

The value specified for the threshold command must not exceed the value specified for the timeout response time reporter configuration command.

The threshold value is used by the rtr reaction-configuration and filter-for-history commands.

Example

In the following example, probe 1's threshold is set to 2500 ms:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.176
  threshold 2500
Related Commands

filter-for-history
rtr
rtr reaction-configuration

timeout

To set the amount of time the response time reporter probe waits for a response from its request packet, use the timeout response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

timeout millisecond
no timeout

Syntax Description

millisecond

Number of milliseconds the probe waits to receive a response from its request packet. The default is 5000 ms.

Default

5000 ms

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Use the timeout command to set how long the probe waits to receive a response, and use the frequency command to set the rate at which the probe starts a response time report operation.

The value specified for the timeout command cannot be greater than the value specified for the frequency response time reporter configuration command.

Example

In the following example, the timeout is set for 2500 ms:

rtr 1
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.176
  timeout 2500
Related Commands

frequency
rtr

trace (privileged)

Use the trace privileged EXEC command to discover the routes that packets will actually take when traveling to their destination.

trace [protocol] [destination]
Syntax Description

protocol

(Optional) Protocols that can be used are appletalk, clns, ip and vines.

destination

(Optional) Destination address or host name on the command line. The default parameters for the appropriate protocol are assumed and the tracing action begins.

Default

The protocol argument is based on the Cisco IOS software's examination of the format of destination. For example, if the software finds a destination argument in IP format, the protocol value defaults to ip.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The trace command works by taking advantage of the error messages generated by routers when a datagram exceeds its time-to-live (TTL) value.

The trace command starts by sending probe datagrams with a TTL value of one. This causes the first router to discard the probe datagram and send back an error message. The trace command sends several probes at each TTL level and displays the round-trip time for each.

The trace command sends out one probe at a time. Each outgoing packet may result in one or two error messages. A "time exceeded" error message indicates that an intermediate router has seen and discarded the probe. A "destination unreachable" error message indicates that the destination node has received the probe and discarded it because it could not deliver the packet. If the timer goes off before a response comes in, trace prints an asterisk (*).

The trace command terminates when the destination responds, when the maximum TTL is exceeded, or when the user interrupts the trace with the escape sequence. By default, to invoke the escape sequence, type Ctrl-^ X-by simultaneously pressing and releasing the Ctrl, Shift, and 6 keys, and then pressing the X key.

To use nondefault parameters and invoke an extended trace test, enter the command without a destination argument. You will be stepped through a dialog to select the desired parameters.

Common Trace Problems

Due to bugs in the IP implementation of various hosts and routers, the IP trace command may behave in odd ways.

Not all destinations will respond correctly to a probe message by sending back an "ICMP port unreachable" message. A long sequence of TTL levels with only asterisks, terminating only when the maximum TTL has been reached, may indicate this problem.

There is a known problem with the way some hosts handle an "ICMP TTL exceeded" message. Some hosts generate an "ICMP" message but they reuse the TTL of the incoming packet. Since this is zero, the ICMP packets do not make it back. When you trace the path to such a host, you may see a set of TTL values with asterisks (*). Eventually the TTL gets high enough that the ICMP message can get back. For example, if the host is six hops away, trace will time out on responses 6 through 11.

Sample Display Showing Trace IP Routes

The following display shows sample IP trace output when a destination host name has been specified:

Router# trace ABA.NYC.mil
Type escape sequence to abort. Tracing the route to ABA.NYC.mil (26.0.0.73) 1 DEBRIS.CISCO.COM (192.180.1.6) 1000 msec 8 msec 4 msec 2 BARRNET-GW.CISCO.COM (192.180.16.2) 8 msec 8 msec 8 msec 3 EXTERNAL-A-GATEWAY.STANFORD.EDU (192.42.110.225) 8 msec 4 msec 4 msec 4 BB2.SU.BARRNET.NET (192.200.254.6) 8 msec 8 msec 8 msec 5 SU.ARC.BARRNET.NET (192.200.3.8) 12 msec 12 msec 8 msec 6 MOFFETT-FLD-MB.in.MIL (192.52.195.1) 216 msec 120 msec 132 msec 7 ABA.NYC.mil (26.0.0.73) 412 msec 628 msec 664 msec

Table 116 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 116: Trace Field Descriptions
Field Description

1

Indicates the sequence number of the router in the path to the host.

DEBRIS.CISCO.COM

Host name of this router.

192.180.1.6

Internet address of this router.

1000 msec 8 msec 4 msec

Round-trip time for each of the three probes that are sent.

Sample Display Showing Extended IP Trace Dialog

The following display shows a sample trace session involving the extended dialog of the trace command.

Router# trace
Protocol [ip]:
Target IP address: mit.edu
Source address:
Numeric display [n]:
Timeout in seconds [3]:
Probe count [3]:
Minimum Time to Live [1]:
Maximum Time to Live [30]:
Port Number [33434]:
Loose, Strict, Record, Timestamp, Verbose[none]:
Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to MIT.EDU (18.72.2.1)
    1 ICM-DC-2-V1.ICP.NET (192.108.209.17) 72 msec 72 msec 88 msec
    2 ICM-FIX-E-H0-T3.ICP.NET (192.157.65.122) 80 msec 128 msec 80 msec
    3 192.203.229.246 540 msec 88 msec 84 msec
    4 T3-2.WASHINGTON-DC-CNSS58.T3.ANS.NET (140.222.58.3) 84 msec 116 msec 88 msec
    5 T3-3.WASHINGTON-DC-CNSS56.T3.ANS.NET (140.222.56.4) 80 msec 132 msec 88 msec
    6 T3-0.NEW-YORK-CNSS32.T3.ANS.NET (140.222.32.1) 92 msec 132 msec 88 msec
    7 T3-0.HARTFORD-CNSS48.T3.ANS.NET (140.222.48.1) 88 msec 88 msec 88 msec
    8 T3-0.HARTFORD-CNSS49.T3.ANS.NET (140.222.49.1) 96 msec 104 msec 96 msec
    9 T3-0.ENSS134.T3.ANS.NET (140.222.134.1) 92 msec 128 msec 92 msec
 10 W91-CISCO-EXTERNAL-FDDI.MIT.EDU (192.233.33.1) 92 msec 92 msec 112 msec
 11 E40-RTR-FDDI.MIT.EDU (18.168.0.2) 92 msec 120 msec 96 msec
 12 MIT.EDU (18.72.2.1) 96 msec 92 msec 96 msec    	

Table 117 describes the fields that are unique to the extended trace sequence, as shown in the display.


Table 117: Trace Field Descriptions
Field Description

Target IP address

You must enter a host name or an IP address. There is no default.

Source address

One of the interface addresses of the router to use as a source address for the probes. The router will normally pick what it feels is the best source address to use.

Numeric display

The default is to have both a symbolic and numeric display; however, you can suppress the symbolic display.

Timeout in seconds

The number of seconds to wait for a response to a probe packet. The default is 3 seconds.

Probe count

The number of probes to be sent at each TTL level. The default count is 3.

Minimum Time to Live [1]

The TTL value for the first probes. The default is 1, but it can be set to a higher value to suppress the display of known hops.

Maximum Time to Live [30]

The largest TTL value that can be used. The default is 30. The trace command terminates when the destination is reached or when this value is reached.

Port Number

The destination port used by the UDP probe messages. The default is 33434.

Loose, Strict, Record, Timestamp, Verbose

IP header options. You can specify any combination. The trace command issues prompts for the required fields. Note that trace will place the requested options in each probe; however, there is no guarantee that all routers (or end nodes) will process the options.

Loose

Allows you to specify a list of nodes that must be traversed when going to the destination.

Strict

Allows you to specify a list of nodes that must be the only nodes traversed when going to the destination.

Record

Allows you to specify the number of hops to leave room for.

Timestamp

Allows you to specify the number of time stamps to leave room for.

Verbose

If you select any option, the verbose mode is automatically selected and trace prints the contents of the option field in any incoming packets. You can prevent verbose mode by selecting it again, toggling its current setting.

Table 118 describes the characters that can appear in trace output.


Table 118: IP Trace Text Characters
Char Description

nn msec

For each node, the round-trip time in milliseconds for the specified number of probes.

*

The probe timed out.

?

Unknown packet type.

A

Administratively unreachable. Usually, this output indicates that an access list is blocking traffic.

H

Host unreachable.

N

Network unreachable.

P

Protocol unreachable.

Q

Source quench.

U

Port unreachable.

Related Command

trace (user)

trace (user)

Use the trace EXEC command to discover the IP routes that packets will actually take when traveling to their destination.

trace [protocol] [destination]
Syntax Description

protocol

(Optional) Protocols that can be used are appletalk, clns, ip and vines.

destination

(Optional) Destination address or host name on the command line. The default parameters for the appropriate protocol are assumed and the tracing action begins.

Default

The protocol argument is based on the Cisco IOS software examination of the format of the destination argument. For example, if the software finds a destination in IP format, the protocol defaults to ip.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The trace command works by taking advantage of the error messages generated by routers when a datagram exceeds its time-to-live (TTL) value.

The trace command starts by sending probe datagrams with a TTL value of one. This causes the first router to discard the probe datagram and send back an error message. The trace command sends several probes at each TTL level and displays the round-trip time for each.

The trace command sends out one probe at a time. Each outgoing packet may result in one or two error messages. A "time exceeded" error message indicates that an intermediate router has seen and discarded the probe. A "destination unreachable" error message indicates that the destination node has received the probe and discarded it because it could not deliver the packet. If the timer goes off before a response comes in, trace prints an asterisk (*).

The trace command terminates when the destination responds, when the maximum TTL is exceeded, or when the user interrupts the trace with the escape sequence. By default, to invoke the escape sequence, type Ctrl-^ X by simultaneously pressing and releasing the Ctrl, Shift, and 6 keys, and then pressing the X key.

Common Trace Problems

Due to bugs in the IP implementation of various hosts and routers, the IP trace command may behave in odd ways.

Not all destinations will respond correctly to a probe message by sending back an "ICMP port unreachable" message. A long sequence of TTL levels with only asterisks, terminating only when the maximum TTL has been reached, may indicate this problem.

There is a known problem with the way some hosts handle an "ICMP TTL exceeded" message. Some hosts generate an ICMP message but they reuse the TTL of the incoming packet. Since this is zero, the ICMP packets do not make it back. When you trace the path to such a host, you may see a set of TTL values with asterisks (*). Eventually the TTL gets high enough that the "ICMP" message can get back. For example, if the host is six hops away, trace will time out on responses 6 through 11.

Sample Display Showing Trace IP Routes

The following display shows sample IP trace output when a destination host name has been specified:

Router# trace ip ABA.NYC.mil
Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to ABA.NYC.mil (26.0.0.73)
    1 DEBRIS.CISCO.COM (192.180.1.6) 1000 msec 8 msec 4 msec
    2 BARRNET-GW.CISCO.COM (192.180.16.2) 8 msec 8 msec 8 msec
    3 EXTERNAL-A-GATEWAY.STANFORD.EDU (192.42.110.225) 8 msec 4 msec 4 msec
    4 BB2.SU.BARRNET.NET (192.200.254.6) 8 msec 8 msec 8 msec
    5 SU.ARC.BARRNET.NET (192.200.3.8) 12 msec 12 msec 8 msec
    6 MOFFETT-FLD-MB.in.MIL (192.52.195.1) 216 msec 120 msec 132 msec
    7 ABA.NYC.mil (26.0.0.73) 412 msec 628 msec 664 msec

Table 119 describes the fields shown in the display.


Table 119: Trace Field Descriptions
Field Description

1

Indicates the sequence number of the router in the path to the host.

DEBRIS.CISCO.COM

Host name of this router.

192.180.1.61

Internet address of this router.

1000 msec 8 msec 4 msec

Round-trip time for each of the three probes that are sent.

Table 120 describes the characters that can appear in trace output.


Table 120: IP Trace Text Characters
Char Description

nn msec

For each node, the round-trip time in milliseconds for the specified number of probes.

*

The probe timed out.

?

Unknown packet type.

A

Administratively unreachable. Usually, this output indicates that an access list is blocking traffic.

H

Host unreachable.

N

Network unreachable.

P

Protocol unreachable.

Q

Source quench.

U

Port unreachable.

Related Command

trace (privileged)

traffic-shape adaptive

To configure a Frame Relay subinterface to estimate the available bandwidth when backward explicit congestion notifications (BECNs) are received, use the traffic-shape adaptive interface configuration command. Use the no form of this command to stop adapting to congestion signals.

traffic-shape adaptive [bit-rate]
no traffic-shape adaptive
Syntax Description

bit-rate

(Optional) Lowest bit rate that traffic is shaped to in bps. The default is half the value specified for the traffic-shape rate or traffic-shape group bit-rate option.

Default

No available bandwidth is estimated when BECNs are received.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

You must enable traffic shaping on the interface with the traffic-shape rate command before you can use the traffic-shape adaptive command.

The bit rate specified for the traffic-shape rate command is the upper limit, and the bit rate specified for the traffic-shape adaptive command is the lower limit to which traffic is shaped when BECNs are received on the interface. The rate actually shaped to will be between these two rates. The traffic-shape adaptive command should be configured at both ends of the link, as it also configures the device at the flow end to reflect forward explicit congestion notification (FECN) signals as BECNs, enabling the router at the high-speed end to detect and adapt to congestion even when traffic is flowing primarily in one direction.

Example

The following example configures traffic shaping on interface 0.1 with an upper limit of 128 kbps and a lower limit of 64 kbps. This allows the link to run from 64 to 128 kbps, depending on the congestion level.

interface serial 0
  encapsulation-frame-relay
interface serial 0.1
  traffic-shape rate 128000
  traffic-shape adaptive 64000
Related Commands

traffic-shape group
traffic-shape rate

traffic-shape group

To enable traffic shaping based on a specific access list for outbound traffic on an interface, use the traffic-shape group interface configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable traffic shaping on the interface for the access list.

traffic-shape group access-list bit-rate [burst-size [excess-burst-size]]
no traffic-shape group access-list
Syntax Description

access-list

Number of the access list that controls the packets that traffic shaping is applied to on the interface.

bit-rate

Bit rate that traffic is shaped to in bps. This is the access bit rate that you contract with your service provider or the service level you intend to maintain.

burst-size

(Optional) Sustained number of bits that can be transmitted per interval. On Frame Relay interfaces, this is the committed burst size contracted with your service provider. The default is the bit-rate divided by 8.

excess-burst-size

(Optional) Maximum number of bits that can exceed the burst size in the first interval in a congestion event. On Frame Relay interfaces, this is the excess burst size contracted with your service provider. The default is equal to the burst-size.

Default

Traffic shaping is disabled.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.


Note Traffic shaping is not supported with optimum, distributed, or flow switching. If you enable this command, all interfaces will revert to fast switching.

Traffic shaping uses queues to limit surges that can congest a network. Data is buffered and then sent into the network in regulated amounts to ensure that traffic will fit within the promised traffic envelope for the particular connection.

The traffic-shape group command allows you to specify one or more previously defined access list to shape traffic to on the interface. You must specify one traffic-shape group command for each access list on the interface.

You would use traffic shaping if you have a network with differing access rates or if you are offering a subrate service. You can configure the values according to your contract with your service provider or service levels you intend to maintain.

An interval is calculated as follows:

Traffic shaping is supported on all media and encapsulation types on the router. To perform traffic shaping on Frame Relay virtual circuits, you can also use the frame-relay traffic-shaping command. For more information on Frame Relay traffic shaping, refer to the "Configuring Frame Relay" chapter in the Wide-Area Network Configuration Guide.

If traffic shaping is performed on a Frame Relay network with the traffic-shape rate command, you can also use the traffic-shape adaptive command to specify the minimum bit-rate the traffic is shaped to.

Example

The following example enables traffic that matches access list 101 to be shaped to a certain rate and traffic matching access list 102 to be shaped to another rate on the interface:

interface serial 1 
  traffic-shape rate 128000 16000 8000 group 101
  traffic-shape rate 130000 10000 1000 group 102
Related Commands

A dagger () indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

access-list
traffic-shape adaptive
traffic-shape rate

traffic-shape rate

To enable traffic shaping for outbound traffic on an interface, use the traffic-shape rate interface configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable traffic shaping on the interface.

traffic-shape rate bit-rate [burst-size [excess-burst-size]]
no traffic-shape rate
Syntax Description

bit-rate

Bit rate that traffic is shaped to in bps. This is the access bit rate that you contract with your service provider or the service level you intend to maintain.

burst-size

(Optional) Sustained number of bits that can be transmitted per interval. On Frame Relay interfaces, this is the committed burst size contracted with your service provider. The default is the bit-rate divided by 8.

excess-burst-size

(Optional) Maximum number of bits that can exceed the burst size in the first interval in a congestion event. On Frame Relay interfaces, this is the excess burst size contracted with your service provider. The default is equal to the burst-size.

Default

Traffic shaping is disabled.

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.


Note Traffic shaping is not supported with optimum, distributed, or flow switching. If you enable this command, all interfaces will revert to fast switching.

Traffic shaping uses queues to limit surges that can congest a network. Data is buffered and then sent into the network in regulated amounts to ensure that traffic will fit within the promised traffic envelope for the particular connection.

You would use traffic shaping if you have a network with differing access rates or if you are offering a subrate service. You can configure the values according to your contract with your service provider or service levels you intend to maintain.

An interval is calculated as follows:

Traffic shaping is supported on all media and encapsulation types on the router. To perform traffic shaping on Frame Relay virtual circuits, you can also use the frame-relay traffic-shaping command. For more information on Frame Relay traffic shaping, refer to the "Configuring Frame Relay" chapter in the Wide-Area Network Configuration Guide.

If traffic shaping is performed on a Frame Relay network with the traffic-shape rate command, you can also use the traffic-shape adaptive command to specify the minimum bit-rate the traffic is shaped to.

Example

The following example enables traffic shaping on a serial interface using the bandwidth required by the service provider:

interface serial 0
  traffic-shape rate 128000 16000 8000
Related Commands

traffic-shape adaptive
traffic-shape group

type

To configure the type of response time reporter probe, use the type response time reporter configuration command. You must configure the probe's type before you can configure any of the other characteristics of the probe. Use the no form of this command to remove all response time reporter configuration information for a probe and return all other response time reporter configuration commands to their default values.

type {echo | pathEcho} protocol type type-target
no rtr probe
Syntax Description

echo

Perform end-to-end response time reporter operations only.

pathEcho

Perform response time reporter operations by using a route discovery algorithm to find a path to the destination and echo each device on the path.

protocol type type-target

Protocol used by the probe. Type can be one of the following keywords (whether the keyword is available depends on the Cisco IOS software features installed on your router) followed by the required type parameter:

· ipIcmpEcho {ip-address | ip-host-name}-IP/ICMP Echo that requires a destination IP address or IP host name.

· snaRUEcho sna-host-name-SNA's SSCP Native Echo that requires the host name defined for the SNA's Physical Unit connection to VTAM.

· snaLU0EchoAppl sna-host-name [sna-application] [sna-mode]-An SNA LU Type 0 connection to Cisco's NSPECHO host application that requires the host name defined for the SNA's Physical Unit connection to VTAM. Optionally specify the host application name (the default is NSPECHO) and SNA mode to access the application.

· snaLU2EchoAppl sna-host-name [sna-application] [sna-mode]-An SNA LU Type 2 connection to Cisco's NSPECHO host application that requires the host name defined for the SNA's Physical Unit connection to VTAM. Optionally specify the host application name (the default is NSPECHO), and SNA mode to access the application.

Default

None

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Support of echo to a protocol and pathEcho to a protocol is dependent on the protocol type and implementation. In general most protocols support echo and few protocols support pathEcho.


Note Keywords are not case sensitive and are shown in mixed case for readability only.
Example

In the following example, probe 10 is created and configured as echo using the IP/ICMP Echo protocol and the destination IP address 172.16.1.175:

rtr 10
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.175
Related Command

rtr

verify-data

To cause the response time reporter probe to check each response for corruption, use the verify-data response time reporter configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default value.

verify-data
no verify-data

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Response time reporter configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

Only use the verify-data command when corruption may be an issue.

Caution Do not enable this feature during normal operation because it causes unnecessary overhead.
Example

In the following example, probe 5 is configured to verify the data for each response:

rtr 5
  type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho 172.16.1.174
  response-data-size 2
  verify-data
Related Command

rtr


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