Полезная информация

cc/td/doc/product/software/ios112/112cg_cr
hometocprevnextglossaryfeedbacksearchhelp
PDF

Table of Contents

Image and Configuration File Load Commands

Image and Configuration File Load Commands

This chapter provides detailed descriptions of the commands used to load and copy system images, microcode images, and configuration files. System images contain the system software. Microcode images contain microcode to be downloaded to various hardware devices. Configuration files contain commands entered to customize the function of the Cisco IOS software.


Note Commands in this chapter that have been replaced by new commands continue to perform their normal functions in the current release, but are no longer documented. Support for these commands will cease in a future release. Table 8 maps the old commands with their replacements.


Table 8: Mapping Old Commands to New Commands
Old Command New Command
configure network copy rcp running-config (for an rcp server)

copy tftp running-config (for a TFTP server)

configure overwrite-network copy rcp startup-config (for an rcp server)

copy tftp startup-config (for a TFTP server)

copy erase flash erase flash
copy verify or copy verify flash verify flash (on all systems except Cisco 7500)

verify (on Cisco 7000 and Cisco 7500)

copy verify bootflash verify bootflash
show configuration show startup-config
tftp-server system tftp-server
write erase erase startup-config
write memory copy running-config startup-config
write network copy running-config rcp (for an rcp server)

copy running-config tftp (for a TFTP server)

write terminal show running-config

For configuration information and examples, refer to the "Loading System Images, Microcode Images, and Configuration Files" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Configuration Guide.

async-bootp

To configure extended BOOTP requests for asynchronous interfaces as defined in RFC 1084, use the async-bootp global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default.

async-bootp tag [:hostname] data
no async-bootp

Syntax Description
tag Item being requested; expressed as filename, integer, or IP dotted-decimal address. See Table 9 for possible keywords.
:hostname (Optional) This entry applies only to the host specified. The argument :hostname accepts both an IP address and a logical host name.
data List of IP addresses entered in dotted-decimal notation or as logical host names, a number, or a quoted string.


Table 9: Async-BOOTP Tag Keywords
Keyword Description
bootfile Specifies use of a server boot file from which to download the boot program. Use the optional :hostname and data arguments to specify the filename.
subnet-mask mask Dotted-decimal address specifying the network and local subnetwork mask (as defined by RFC 950).
time-offset offset Signed 32-bit integer specifying the time offset of the local subnetwork in seconds from Universal Coordinated Time (UTC).
gateway address Dotted-decimal address specifying the IP addresses of gateways for this subnetwork. A preferred gateway should be listed first.
time-server address Dotted-decimal address specifying the IP address of time servers (as defined by RFC 868).
IEN116-server address Dotted-decimal address specifying the IP address of name servers (as defined by IEN 116).
nbns-server address Dotted-decimal address specifying the IP address of Windows NT servers.
DNS-server address Dotted-decimal address specifying the IP address of domain name servers (as defined by RFC 1034).
log-server address Dotted-decimal address specifying the IP address of an MIT-LCS UDP log server.
quote-server address Dotted-decimal address specifying the IP address of Quote of the Day servers (as defined in RFC 865).
lpr-server address Dotted-decimal address specifying the IP address of Berkeley UNIX Version 4 BSD servers.
impress-server address Dotted-decimal address specifying the IP address of Impress network image servers.
rlp-server address Dotted-decimal address specifying the IP address of Resource Location Protocol (RLP) servers (as defined in RFC 887).
hostname name The name of the client, which may or may not be domain qualified, depending upon the site.
bootfile-size value A two-octet value specifying the number of 512-octet (byte) blocks in the default boot file.
Default

If no extended BOOTP commands are entered, the Cisco IOS software generates a gateway and subnet mask appropriate for the local network.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use the EXEC command show async-bootp to list the configured parameters. Use the no async-bootp command to clear the list.

Examples

The following example illustrates how to specify different boot files: one for a PC, and one for a Macintosh. With this configuration, a BOOTP request from the host on 172.30.1.1 results in a reply listing the boot filename as pcboot. A BOOTP request from the host named mac results in a reply listing the boot filename as macboot.

async-bootp bootfile :172.30.1.1 "pcboot"
async-bootp bootfile :mac "macboot"

The following example specifies a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0:

async-bootp subnet-mask 255.255.0.0

The following example specifies a negative time offset of the local subnetwork of -3600 seconds:

async-bootp time-offset -3600

The following example specifies the IP address of a time server:

async-bootp time-server 128.128.1.1
Related Command

show async-bootp

boot

To boot the router manually from the prompt, use the boot ROM monitor command.

This manual reload is only used for troubleshooting purposes, and the options directly depend upon hardware possibilities.

The rom monitor prompt is either ">" or for newer platforms "rommon x>". Enter only lowercase commands.

These commands work only if there is a valid image to boot. Also, from the rommon monitor prompt, issuing a prior reset command is necessary for the boot to be always successful.

boot
boot
filename [ip-address]
boot flash
[filename]
boot flash
[partition-number:] [filename]

boot
[flash] [device:filename] (Cisco 7000/7010 with 11.x roms only)
boot
device:[filename] (Cisco 4500, 7000, and 7500 series)
Syntax Description
filename When used in conjunction with the ip-address argument, the filename argument is the name of the system image file to boot from a network server. The filename is case sensitive.

(Optional) When used in conjunction with the flash keyword, the filename argument is the name of the system image file to boot from Flash memory. On all platforms except the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the system obtains the image file from internal Flash memory. On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the device: argument specifies the Flash memory device from which to obtain the system image. See the device: argument later in this table for valid device values. The filename is case sensitive. Without filename, the first valid file in Flash memory is loaded.

ip-address (Optional) IP address of the TFTP server on which the system image resides. If omitted, this value defaults to the IP broadcast address of 255.255.255.255.
flash (Optional) Boots the router from Flash memory.
device: Only newer ROM monitors rommon prompt or 7000/7010 with 11.x roms support the device:filename format.
Specifying the device is optional for all platforms except the Cisco 7500 series.

If device: =
flash: - the flash on the board for the IOS image.

If device: =
bootflash: - the flash on the board for the xboot image as on the 7500, 4500, and upcoming platforms.

If device: =
slot0: - Used on the Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA) slot on the Cisco 7000 series Route Processor (RP) card or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7500 series Route Switch Processor (RSP) card.

If device: =
slot1: - Used on the second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7500 series RSP card.
partition-number: (Optional) Boots the router from Flash memory with the optional filename of the image you want loaded from the specified Flash partition. If you do not specify a filename, the first valid file in the specified partition of Flash memory is loaded. This option is relevant to platforms such as the 2500 where the flash may be partitioned.
Default

If you enter the boot command and press Return, the router boots from ROM by default.

If you enter the boot flash command without a filename, the first valid file in Flash memory is loaded.

For other defaults, see the Syntax Description section.

Command Mode

ROM monitor

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Use this command only when your router cannot find the configuration information needed in nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM). To get to the ROM monitor prompt (>), enter the reload EXEC command, and then press the Break key during the first 60 seconds of startup, or change the boot bits in the configuration register to zero, for manual booting, and then issue the reload command.

Refer to the Cisco 7000 Hardware Installation and Maintenance publication for the correct jumper settings for the Cisco 7000 series.

Examples

In the following example, a router is manually booted from ROM:

> boot
F3:
(ROM Monitor copyrights)

In the following example, a router boots the file routertest from a network server with the IP address 172.16.15.112:

> boot routertest 172.16.15.112
F3:
(ROM Monitor copyrights)

The following example shows the boot flash command without the filename argument.The first valid file in Flash memory is loaded.

> boot flash
F3: 1858656+45204+166896 at 0x1000
Booting gs7-k from flash memory RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR [OK - 1903912/13765276 bytes]
F3: 1858676+45204+166896 at 0x1000
(ROM Monitor copyrights)

In the following example, the boot flash command is used with the filename gs7-k. That is the file that will be loaded.

> boot flash gs7-k
F3: 1858656+45204+166896 at 0x1000
Booting gs7-k from flash memory RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRR [OK - 1903912/13765276 bytes]
F3: 1858676+45204+166896 at 0x1000
(ROM Monitor copyrights)

In the following example, the boot flash flash command boots the relocatable image file igs-bpx-l from partition 2 in Flash memory:

> boot flash flash:2:igs-bpx-l
F3: 3562264+98228+303632 at 0x30000B4

(ROM Monitor copyrights)

Use the following example if the rxboot image has been inadvertently erased. (The IOS is directly launched from the ROM monitor without the intermediate xboot stage. This startup requires less system memory.)

> boot flash:c4500-j-mz.103-7

In the following example, the 7000 with 11.0 roms accepts the flash keyword for compatibility but ignores it, and boots from slot0:

> boot flash slot0:gs7-k-mz.103-9
F3: 8468+3980384+165008 at 0x1000

In the following example, the new rommon requires new syntax.

rommon 8 > b flash flash:c4500-j-mz.103-12
boot of "flash flash:c4500-j-mz.103-12" using boot helper "bootflash:c4500-xboot.101-1" failed

In the following example, the command did not function because it must be entered in lowercase.

rommon 10 > BOOT
command "BOOT" not found
Related Command

continue

boot bootldr

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, to specify a Flash device and filename containing the rxboot image that ROM uses for booting, use the boot bootldr global configuration command. Use the no form of the command to remove this rxboot image specification.

boot bootldr device: filename
no boot bootldr

Syntax Description
device: Device containing the rxboot image that ROM uses. The colon (:) is required. Valid values are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7000 series.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series.

filename Name of the rxboot image file. The maximum filename length is 63 characters.
Default

There is no default Flash device or filename.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use this command only with the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series. The boot bootldr command sets the BOOTLDR environment variable in the current running configuration. You must specify both the device and the filename.


Note When you use this global configuration command, you affect only the running configuration. You must save the environment variable setting to your startup configuration to place the information under ROM monitor control and to have the environment variable function as expected. Use the copy running-config startup-config command to save the environment variable from your running configuration to your startup configuration.

The no form of the command sets the BOOTLDR environment variable to a null string. On the Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series, a null string causes the first image file in bootflash to be used as the rxboot image that ROM uses for booting.

Examples

In the following example, the internal Flash memory on a Cisco 7000 series contains the rxboot image:

boot bootldr flash:boot-image

The following example specifies that the Flash memory card inserted in slot 0 of the RP or RSP card contains the rxboot image:

boot bootldr slot0:boot-image
Related Commands

copy running-config startup-config
show boot
show flash

boot bootstrap

To configure the filename that is used to boot a secondary bootstrap image, use the boot bootstrap global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable booting from a secondary bootstrap image.

boot bootstrap flash [filename]
no boot bootstrap flash
[filename]

boot bootstrap mop
filename [mac-address] [interface]
no boot bootstrap mop
filename [mac-address] [interface]

boot bootstrap
[tftp] filename [ip-address]
no boot bootstrap
[tftp] filename [ip-address]
Syntax Description
flash Boots the router from Flash memory.
filename (Optional with flash.) Name of the system image to boot from a network server. If you omit the filename when booting from Flash, the router uses the first system image stored in Flash memory.
mop Boots the router from a system image stored on a DEC MOP server.
mac-address (Optional) MAC address of the MOP server on which the file resides. If the MAC address argument is not included, a broadcast message is sent to all MOP boot servers. The first MOP server to indicate that it has the file is the server from which the router gets the boot image.
interface (Optional) Interface out which the router should send MOP requests to reach the MOP server. The interface options are async, dialer, Ethernet, loopback, null, serial, and tunnel. If the interface argument is not specified, a request is sent on all interfaces that have MOP enabled. The interface from which the first response is received is the interface used to load the software.
tftp (Optional) Boots the router from a system image stored on a TFTP server.
ip-address (Optional) IP address of the TFTP server on which the system image resides. If omitted, this value defaults to the IP broadcast address of 255.255.255.255.
Default

No secondary bootstrap

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The boot bootstrap command causes the router to load a secondary bootstrap image over the network. The secondary bootstrap image then loads the specified system image file. The name of the secondary bootstrap file is boot-csc3 or boot-csc4, depending on the router model. See the appropriate hardware installation guide for details on the configuration register and secondary bootstrap filename.

Use this command when you have attempted to load a system image but have run out of memory even after compressing the system image. Secondary bootstrap allows you to load a larger system image through a smaller secondary image.

Example

In the following example, the system image file sysimage-2 will be loaded by using a secondary bootstrap image:

boot bootstrap sysimage-2

boot buffersize

To modify the buffer size used to load configuration files, use the boot buffersize global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to return to the default setting.

boot buffersize bytes
no boot buffersize

Syntax Description
bytes Specifies the size of the buffer to be used. There is no minimum or maximum size that can be specified.
Default

Buffer size of the NVRAM

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Normally, the Cisco IOS software uses a buffer the size of the system NVRAM to hold configuration commands read from the network. You can increase this size if you have a very complex configuration.

Example

The following example sets the buffer size to 64000 bytes:

configure terminal 
boot buffersize 64000

boot config

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, to specify the device and filename of the configuration file from which the router configures itself during initialization (startup), use the boot config global configuration command. Use the no form of the command to remove this specification.

boot config device:filename
no boot config
Syntax Description
device: Device containing the configuration file. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7000 series.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series.

· nvram--Nonvolatile random-access memory (NVRAM). If you specify NVRAM, omit the filename.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series.

filename Name of the configuration file. The configuration file must be an ASCII file. The maximum filename length is 63 characters.
Default

NVRAM (nvram:)

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use this command only with the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series. You set the CONFIG_FILE environment variable in the current running memory when you use the boot config command. This variable specifies the configuration file used for initialization (startup).


Note When you use this global configuration command, you affect only the running configuration. You must save the environment variable setting to your startup configuration to place the information under ROM monitor control and to have the environment variable function as expected. Use the copy running-config startup-config command to save the environment variable from your running configuration to your startup configuration.

If you specify nvram: as the device, and it contains only a distilled version of the configuration, the Cisco IOS software displays an error message and does not update the CONFIG_FILE environment variable. (A distilled configuration is one that does not contain access lists.) If you specify a configuration file in the filename argument that does not exist or is not valid, the software displays an error message and does not update the CONFIG_FILE environment variable.

The router uses the NVRAM configuration during initialization when the CONFIG_FILE environment variable does not exist or when it is null (such as at first-time startup). If the software detects a problem with NVRAM or the configuration it contains, the device enters setup mode. Refer to the "Setup Command" chapter in this publication for more information on the setup command facility.

When you use the no form of this command, the router returns to using the NVRAM configuration as the startup configuration.

Examples

In the following example, the first line specifies that a Cisco 7000 series router should use the configuration file router-config located in internal Flash memory to configure itself during initialization. The second line copies the specification to the startup configuration, ensuring that this specification will take effect upon the next reload:

Router (config)# boot config flash:router-config
^Z
Router# copy running-config startup-config

The following example instructs a Cisco 7500 series router to use the configuration file router-config located on the Flash memory card inserted in the second PCMCIA slot of the RSP card during initialization. The second line copies the specification to the startup configuration, ensuring that this specification will take effect upon the next reload:

Router (config)# boot config slot1:router-config
^Z
Router# copy running-config startup-config
Related Commands

copy running-config startup-config
show boot
show flash

boot host

To change the default name of the host configuration filename from which you want to load configuration commands, use the boot host global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the host configuration filename to the default.

boot host mop filename [mac-address] [interface]
no boot host mop
filename [mac-address] [interface]

boot host
[tftp | rcp] filename [ip-address]
no boot host
[tftp | rcp] filename [ip-address]
Syntax Description
mop Configures the router from a configuration file stored on a DEC MOP server.
filename Name of the file from which you want to load configuration commands.
mac-address (Optional) MAC address of the MOP server on which the file resides. If the MAC address argument is not included, a broadcast message is sent to all MOP boot servers. The first MOP server to indicate that it has the file is the server from which the router gets the boot image.
interface (Optional) Interface out which the router should send MOP requests to reach the MOP server. The interface options are async, dialer, ethernet, serial, and tunnel. If the interface argument is not specified, a request is sent on all interfaces that have MOP enabled. The interface from which the first response is received is the interface used to load the software.
tftp (Optional) Configures the router from a configuration file stored on a TFTP server.
rcp (Optional) Configures the router from a configuration file stored on an rcp server.
ip-address (Optional) IP address of the TFTP server on which the file resides. If omitted, this value defaults to the IP broadcast address of 255.255.255.255.
Default

The router uses its host name to form a host configuration filename. To form this name, the router converts its name to all lowercase letters, removes all domain information, and appends -confg.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use the service config command to enable the loading of the specified configuration file at reboot time. Without this command, the router ignores the boot host command and uses the configuration information in NVRAM. If the configuration information in NVRAM is invalid or missing, the service config command is enabled automatically.

The network server will attempt to load two configuration files from remote hosts. The first is the network configuration file containing commands that apply to all network servers on a network. The second is the host configuration file containing commands that apply to one network server in particular.

Example

The following example sets the host filename to wilma-confg at address 192.168.7.19:

boot host /usr/local/tftpdir/wilma-confg 192.168.7.19
Related Commands

boot network
service config

boot network

To change the default name of the network configuration file from which you want to load configuration commands, use the boot network global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the network configuration filename to the default.

boot network mop filename [mac-address] [interface]
no boot network mop
filename [mac-address] [interface]

boot network
[tftp | rcp] filename [ip-address]
no boot network [tftp | rcp] filename [ip-address]

Syntax Description
mop Configures the router to download the configuration file from a network server using the Digital Maintenance Operation Protocol (MOP) protocol.
filename Name of the file from which you want to load configuration commands. The default filename is network-config.
mac-address (Optional) If mop is specified, the MAC address of the network server on which the file resides. If the MAC address argument is not included, a broadcast message is sent to all MOP boot servers. The first server to indicate that it has the file is the server from which the router gets the boot image.
interface (Optional) If mop is specified, the interface out which the router should send MOP requests to reach the server. The interface options are async, dialer, ethernet, serial, and tunnel. If the interface argument is not specified, a request will be sent on all interfaces that have MOP enabled, and the interface from which the first response is received will be used to load the software.
tftp (Optional) Configures the router to download the configuration file from a network server using TFTP. If omitted and rcp is not specified, defaults to tftp.
rcp (Optional) Configures the router to download the configuration file from a network server using rcp. If omitted, defaults to tftp.
ip-address (Optional) If rcp or tftp is specified, the IP address of the network server on which the compressed image file resides. If the IP address is omitted, this value defaults to the IP broadcast address of 255.255.255.255.
Default

The default filename is network-config. The default transfer protocol type is TFTP, if neither tftp nor rcp is specified.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

When booting from a network server, routers ignore routing information, static IP routes, and bridging information. As a result, intermediate routers are responsible for handling rcp or TFTP requests. Before booting from a network server, verify that a server is available by using the ping command.

Use the service config command to enable the loading of the specified configuration file at reboot time. Without this command, the router ignores the boot network command and uses the configuration information in NVRAM. If the configuration information in NVRAM is invalid or missing, the service config command is enabled automatically.

The network server will attempt to load two configuration files from remote hosts. The first is the network configuration file containing commands that apply to all network servers on a network. Use the boot network command to identify the network configuration file.

The rcp software requires that a client send the remote username on each rcp request to the network server. When the boot network rcp command is executed, the Cisco IOS software sends the host name as the both the remote and local usernames. The rcp implementation searches for the configuration files to be used relative to the account directory of the remote username on the network server, if the server has a directory structure, for example, as do UNIX systems.


Note For rcp, if you do not explicitly specify a remote username by issuing the ip rcmd remote-username command and the host name is used, an account for the host name must be defined on the destination server. If the network administrator of the destination server did not establish an account for the host name, this command will not execute successfully.

If you copy the system image to a personal computer used as a file server, the remote host computer must support the remote shell (rsh) protocol.

Examples

The following example changes the network configuration filename to bridge_9.1 and uses the default broadcast address:

boot network bridge_9.1
service config 

The following example changes the network configuration filename to bridge_9.1, specifies that rcp is to be used as the transport mechanism, and gives 172.16.1.111 as the IP address of the server on which the network configuration file resides:

boot network rcp bridge_9.1 172.16.1.111
service config 
Related Commands

boot host
service config

boot system

To specify the system image that the router loads at startup, use one of the following boot system global configuration commands. Use a no form of this command to remove the startup system image specification.

boot system flash [device:][partition-number:][filename]
no boot system flash
[device:][partition-number:][filename]

boot system mop
filename [mac-address] [interface]
no boot system mop
filename [mac-address] [interface]

boot system rom
no boot system rom

boot system
[rcp | tftp] filename [ip-address]
no boot system
[rcp | tftp] filename [ip-address]

no boot system

Syntax Description
flash On all platforms except the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, this keyword boots the router from internal Flash memory. If you omit all arguments that follow this keyword, the system searches internal Flash for the first bootable image.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, this keyword boots the router from a Flash device, as specified by the device: argument. On the Cisco 7000 series, when you omit all arguments that follow this keyword, the system searches internal Flash and then the PCMCIA slots (starting with slot 0) for the first bootable image. On the Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series, when you omit all arguments that follow this keyword, the system searches the PCMCIA slot 0 for the first bootable image.

device: (Optional) Device containing the system image to load at startup. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory. Optionally, use this device on all platforms except the Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series. The flash option is the only valid device option for all platforms except the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series. For the Cisco 7000 series, this device is the default if you do not specify a device.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series. For the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, this device is the default if you do not specify a device.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series.

partition-number: Optional) Number of the Flash memory partition that boots the router with the image specified by the optional filename argument. If you do not specify a filename, the router loads the first valid file in the specified partition of Flash memory. This argument is not used with the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series.
filename (Optional when used with boot system flash.) Name of the system image to load at startup. It is case sensitive. If you do not specify a filename, the router loads the first valid file in the specified Flash device, the specified partition of Flash memory, or the default Flash device if you also omit the device: argument.
mop Boots the router from a system image stored on a Digital MOP server. Do not use this keyword with the Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series.
mac-address (Optional) Media Access Control (MAC) address of the MOP server containing the specified system image file. If you do not include the MAC address argument, the router sends a broadcast message to all MOP boot servers. The first MOP server to indicate that it has the specified file is the server from which the router gets the boot image.
interface (Optional) Interface the router uses to send out MOP requests to the MOP server. The interface options are async, dialer, ethernet, serial, and tunnel. If you do not specify the interface argument, the router sends a request out on all interfaces that have MOP enabled. The interface that receives the first response is the interface the router uses to load the software.
rom Boots the router from ROM. Do not use this keyword with the Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series.
rcp (Optional) Boots the router from a system image stored on a network server using rcp. If you omit this keyword, the transport mechanism defaults to tftp.
tftp (Optional) Boots the router from a system image stored on a TFTP server. This is the default when you do not specify any keyword (flash, mop, rom, tftp, or rcp).
ip-address (Optional) IP address of the TFTP server containing the system image file. If omitted, this value defaults to the IP broadcast address of 255.255.255.255.
Default

If you do not specify a system image file with the boot system command, the router uses the configuration register settings to determine the default system image filename for booting from a network server. The router forms the default boot filename by starting with the word cisco and then appending the octal equivalent of the boot field number in the configuration register, followed by a hyphen (-) and the processor type name (cisconn-cpu). See the appropriate hardware installation guide for details on the configuration register and default filename. See also the command config-register. See also the "Syntax Description" section preceding this section.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, if you omit a keyword (flash, mop, rom, rcp, or tftp) from the boot system command, the system defaults to booting from a system image stored on a TFTP server.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

For this command to work, the config-register command must be set properly.

Enter several boot system commands to provide a fail-safe method for booting your router. The router stores and executes the boot system commands in the order in which you enter them in the configuration file. If you enter multiple boot commands of the same type--for example, if you enter two commands that instruct the router to boot from different network servers--then the router tries them in the order in which they appear in the configuration file. Use the boot system rom command to specify use of the ROM system image as a backup to other boot commands in the configuration.

Each time you write a new software image to Flash memory, you must delete the existing filename in the configuration file with the no boot system flash filename command. Then add a new line in the configuration file with the boot system flash filename command.


Note The no boot system global configuration command disables all boot system configuration commands regardless of argument. Specifying the flash keyword or the filename argument with the no boot system command disables only the command specified by these arguments.

To force the router to stop booting and enter ROM monitor mode, press the Break key during the first 60 seconds of startup. This key will not work on the Cisco 7000 unless it has Cisco IOS Release 10 boot ROMs.

You can boot the router from a compressed image on a network server. When a network server boots software, both the image being booted and the running image must fit into memory. Use compressed images to ensure that enough memory is available to boot the router. You can compress a software image on any UNIX platform using the compress command. Refer to your UNIX platform's documentation for the exact usage of the compress command. (You can also uncompress data with the UNIX uncompress command.)

The rcp protocol requires that a client send the remote username in an rcp request to a server. When the router executes the boot system rcp command, the Cisco IOS software sends the host name as the both the remote and local usernames by default. The rcp software searches for the system image to boot from the remote server relative to the directory of the remote username (if the server has a directory structure as UNIX systems do, for example).

For the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the boot system command modifies the BOOT environment variable in the running configuration. The BOOT environment variable specifies a list of bootable images on various devices.

For the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, valid devices are flash and slot0. On the Cisco 7000 series, the following forms of the boot system command specify a list of bootable images in the BOOT environment variable:

You can omit the device flash: from the boot system flash flash:[filename] command because the default device on a Cisco 7000 series is flash. Therefore, boot system flash [filename] is the same as boot system flash flash:[filename].

For the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, valid devices are bootflash, slot0, slot1, and tftp. On the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, the following forms of the boot system command specify a list of bootable images in the BOOT environment variable:


Note When you use the boot system global configuration command on the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, you affect only the running configuration. You must save the BOOT environment variable settings to your startup configuration to place the information under ROM monitor control and to have the environment variable function as expected. Use the copy running-config startup-config command to save the environment variable from your running configuration to your startup configuration.

If an entry in the BOOT environment variable list does not specify a device, the router assumes the device is tftp. When tftp is the device, the router first loads the rxboot image to boot the system image file from a network server. If an entry in the BOOT environment variable list specifies an invalid device, the router skips that entry. To view the contents of the BOOT environment variable, use the show boot command.

To remove a single entry from the bootable image list, use the no form of a specific command. For example, to remove the entry that specifies a bootable image on a Flash memory card inserted in the second slot of the RSP card, use the no boot system flash  slot1:[filename] command. All other entries in the list remain.

To eliminate all entries in the bootable image list, use the no boot system command. Issuing this command sets the BOOT environment variable to a null string, wiping out all entries. At this point, you can redefine the list of bootable images using the previous boot system commands. Remember to save your changes to your startup configuration by issuing the copy running-config startup-config command.


Note If you want to rearrange the order of the entries in the BOOT environment variable, you must first issue the no boot system command and then redefine the list.

Examples

The following example illustrates a list specifying two possible internetwork locations for a system image, with the ROM software being used as a backup:

boot system cs3-rx.90-1 192.168.7.24
boot system cs3-rx.83-2 192.168.7.19
boot system rom

The following example boots the system boot relocatable image file igs-bpx-l from partition 2 of the Flash device:

boot system flash flash:2:igs-bpx-l

The following example instructs the router to boot from an image located on the Flash memory card inserted in slot 0 of the Cisco 7000 RP card, Cisco 7200 NPE card, or Cisco 7500 series RSP card:

boot system flash slot0:new-config
Related Commands

config-register
copy flash rcp
copy flash tftp
copy rcp flash
copy running-config startup-config
copy tftp flash
ip rcmd remote-username
show boot

cd

To set the default Flash device for the system, use the cd EXEC command.

cd [device:]
Syntax Description
device: (Optional) Default device. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7000 series. For the Cisco 7000 series, this device is the initial default device and the default device when you omit the device: argument.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series. For the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, this device is the initial default device and the default device when you omit the device: argument.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

Default

For the Cisco 7000 series, flash is the initial default device and the default device when you omit the device: argument.

For the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, slot0 is the initial default device and the default device when you omit the device: argument.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use this command only with the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series. For all EXEC commands that have an optional device: argument, the system uses the device specified by the cd command when you omit the optional device: argument. For example, the dir command contains an optional device: argument and displays a list of files on a Flash memory device. When you omit this device: argument, the system shows a list of the files on the Flash device specified by the cd command.

Example

The following example sets the default device to the Flash memory card inserted in the slot 0:

cd slot0:
Related Commands

copy
delete
dir
pwd
show flash
undelete

config-register

To change the configuration register settings, use the config-register global configuration command.

config-register value
Syntax Description
value Hexadecimal or decimal value that represents the 16-bit configuration register value that you want to use the next time the router is restarted. The value range is from 0x0 to 0xFFFF (0 to 65535 in decimal).
Default

For the router models without Flash memory, the default is 0x101, which causes the device to boot from ROM and the Break key to be ignored. For router with Flash memory, the default is 0x10F, which causes the device to boot from Flash memory and the Break key to be ignored.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This command applies only to the Cisco 2000 series, Cisco 3000 series, Cisco 4000 series, Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series. All other models use a hardware configuration register.

The lowest four bits of the configuration register (bits 3, 2, 1, and 0) form the boot field. The boot field determines if the router boots manually, from ROM, or from Flash or the network. Bit 8 controls the console Break key; when set to 1, it causes the Break key to be ignored. The remaining bits control other features of the router and are typically set to 0.

To change the boot field value and leave all other bits set to their default values, follow these guidelines:

For more information about the configuration register bit settings and default filenames, see the appropriate router hardware installation guide.

Example

In the following example, the configuration register is set to boot the system image from Flash memory:

config-register 0x010F
Related Commands

boot system
o
show version

configure

To enter global configuration mode, use the configure privileged EXEC command. You must be in global configuration mode to enter global configuration commands.

configure {terminal | memory | network}
Syntax Description
terminal Executes configuration commands from the terminal.
memory For all platforms except the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, executes the commands stored in NVRAM.

For the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, executes the configuration specified by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable.

network The copy rcp running-config or copy tftp running-config command replaces the configure network command. If you use rcp, see the copy rcp command for more information on copy rcp running-config. If you use TFTP, see the copy tftp command for more information on copy tftp running-config.
Default

For all platforms except the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, there is no default.

For the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the router uses the NVRAM configuration (if valid) when the CONFIG_FILE environment variable does not exist or is null (such as at first-time startup).

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If you do not specify terminal or memory, the Cisco IOS software prompts you for the source of configuration commands. If you specify terminal, the software executes the commands you enter at the system prompts.

On all platforms except the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, if you specify memory, the software executes the commands located in NVRAM. On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, if you specify memory, the router executes the commands pointed to by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable. The CONFIG_FILE environment variable specifies the device and filename of the configuration file that the router uses to configure itself during initialization. Possible devices are as follows:

When the CONFIG_FILE environment variable specifies NVRAM, the router executes the NVRAM configuration only if it is an entire configuration, not a distilled version. A distilled configuration is one that does not contain access lists.

To view the contents of the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the show boot command. To modify the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the boot config command and then save your changes by issuing the copy running-config startup-config command.

After you enter the configure command, the system prompt changes from <router-name># to <router-name>(config)#, indicating that you are in global configuration mode. To leave global configuration mode and return to the privileged EXEC prompt, press Ctrl-Z.


Note The commands configure net network and configure net host no longer clear line parameters.
Examples

In the following example, a router is configured from the terminal:

Router# configure
Configuring from terminal, memory, or network [terminal]?
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# 

In the following example, a Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, or Cisco 7500 series router executes the commands pointed to by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable:

configure memory
Related Commands

boot config
copy running-config startup-config
show boot
show running-config
show startup-config

configure overwrite-network

The copy rcp startup-config or copy tftp startup-config command replaces the configure overwrite-network command. If you use rcp, see the copy rcp command for more information on copy rcp startup-config. If you use TFTP, see the copy tftp command for more information on copy tftp startup-config.

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

continue

To return to the EXEC mode from ROM monitor mode, use the continue ROM monitor command.

continue
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

ROM monitor

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use this command when you are in ROM monitor mode, and you want to return to EXEC mode to use the system image instead of reloading. On most platforms, the angle bracket (>) indicates that you are in ROM monitor mode. On the Cisco 1003, Cisco 4500, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, rommon> is the default ROM monitor prompt. Typically, you are in ROM monitor mode when you manually load a system image or perform diagnostic tests. Otherwise, you will most likely never be in this mode.

 
Caution While in ROM monitor mode, the Cisco IOS system software is suspended until you issue either a reset or the continue command.
Example

In the following example, the continue command takes you from ROM monitor to EXEC mode:

> continue
Router#
Related Command

boot

copy

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, or the Cisco 7500 series, to copy any file from a Flash device or NVRAM to another destination, use the following copy EXEC command:

copy file-id {running-config | startup-config | file-id}
Syntax Description
file-id Specifies a device:filename as the source or destination of the copy operation. The device is optional; but when it is used, the colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory on the Cisco 7000 series.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· nvram--Router's NVRAM. If you specify NVRAM, omit the filename.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slavenvram--NVRAM of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA. If you specify the slave NVRAM, omit the filename.

The filename is the name of the source or destination file. You must always provide a source filename. You can omit the destination filename, in which case the system uses the source filename. Wildcards are not permitted. The maximum filename length is 63 characters.

running-config Specifies the currently running configuration as the destination of the copy operation.
startup-config Specifies the configuration used for initialization as the destination of the copy operation. (Note that the CONFIG_FILE environment variable specifies the startup configuration on a Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series.)
Default

If you omit the source or destination device, the Cisco IOS software uses the default device specified by the cd command. If you omit the destination filename, the software uses the source filename.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use this copy command with the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the copy commands generally copy a file from a source to a destination. Some invalid combinations exist. Specifically, you cannot copy a running configuration to a running configuration, a startup configuration to a startup configuration, or TFTP to rcp.

When the destination is specified by the CONFIG_FILE or BOOTLDR environment variable, the router prompts you for confirmation before proceeding with the copy. When the destination is the only valid image in the BOOT environment variable, the router also prompts you for confirmation before proceeding with the copy.

The CONFIG_FILE environment variable specifies the configuration used during router initialization. The BOOTLDR environment variable specifies the Flash device and filename containing the rxboot image that ROM uses for booting. The BOOT environment variable specifies a list of bootable images on various devices. To view the contents of environment variables, use the show boot command. To modify the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the boot config command. To modify the BOOTLDR environment variable use the boot bootldr command. To modify the BOOT environment variable, use the boot system command. To save your modifications, use the copy running-config startup-config command.

If you do not specify a source or destination device, the router uses the default device specified by the cd command.

High System Availability (HSA) refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

Examples

The following example copies the router-config1 file from the internal Flash memory of a Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series router to the router-backupconfig file on the Flash memory card inserted in the first slot:

copy bootflash:router-config1 slot0:router-backupconfig

The following example copies the router-image file from the Flash memory card inserted in the slot 0 on a Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, or Cisco 7500 series to the startup configuration:

copy slot0:router-image startup-config

The following example copies the NVRAM configuration file to the router-backupconfig file on the Flash memory card inserted in slot 0:

copy nvram: slot0:router-backupconfig

The following example copies the router-image file from the Flash memory card inserted in slot 1 of the master RSP card of a Cisco 7513 to slot 0 of the slave RSP card in the same Cisco 7513:

copy slot1:router-image slaveslot0:
Related Commands

boot config
copy running-config startup-config
delete
dir
show boot
slave auto-sync config
verify

copy bootflash

To copy a bootstrap image from Flash memory to a network server on the Cisco 4500 series, use the copy bootflash EXEC command.

copy bootflash {rcp | tftp}
Syntax Description
rcp Specifies a copy operation to a network server using rcp.
tftp Specifies a TFTP server as the destination of the copy operation.
Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Use this command only on the Cisco 4500 router. You can use the network server copy of the bootstrap image as a backup copy or to verify that the copy in Flash memory is the same as the original file.

Use the copy bootflash rcp command to copy a bootstrap image from Flash memory to a network server using rcp. The rcp protocol requires that a client send the remote username of an rcp request to the server. When you issue the copy bootflash rcp command, by default the Cisco IOS software sends the username associated with the current TTY, if that name is valid. For example, if the user is connected to the router through Telnet and the user was authenticated through the username command, then the software sends that username as the remote username.


Note For Cisco, TTY lines are commonly used for access services. The concept of TTY originated with UNIX. For UNIX systems, each physical device is represented in the file system. Terminals are called TTY devices, which stands for teletype, the original UNIX terminal.

If the TTY username is invalid, the software uses the router host name as the both the remote and local usernames. To specify a different remote username to be sent to the rcp server, use the ip rcmd remote-username command. The rcp software copies the bootstrap image to an appropriate remote server. You can also specify the path of an existing directory along with the remote username.

 
Caution The remote username must be associated with an account on the destination server. If you do not use the command to specify the name of a remote user associated with an account on the server, then the remote username associated with the current TTY process must be associated with an account on the server. If there is no username for the current TTY process, then the router host name must be associated with an account on the server. If the network administrator of the destination server did not establish accounts for the remote username used, this command will not execute successfully.

The rcp server must be properly configured to accept the rcp request from the user on the router. For UNIX systems, you must add an entry to the .rhosts file for the remote user on the rcp server. For example, if the router contains the following configuration lines:

hostname Rtr1
ip rcmd remote-username User0

and the router's IP address translates to Router1.company.com, then the .rhosts file for User0 on the rcp server should contain the following line:

Router1.company.com Rtr1

Refer to the documentation for your rcp server for more details.

If you copy the bootstrap image to a personal computer used as a file server, the remote host computer must support rcp.

Use the copy bootflash tftp command to copy a bootflash image from Flash memory to a TFTP server.

Examples

The following example shows how to use the copy bootflash rcp command on a Cisco 4500 router:

Router(config)# ip rcmd remote-username netadmin1
Router# copy bootflash rcp
System flash directory, partition 2:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   984      file1
[1048 bytes used, 8387560 available, 8388608 total]
Address or name of remote host [223.255.254.254]?
Source file name? file1
Destination file name [file1]? file1
Verifying checksum for 'file1' (file # 1)... OK
Copy 'file1' from Flash to server
  as 'file1'? [yes/no]y
!!!!...
Upload to server done
Flash copy took 0:00:00 [hh:mm:ss]

The exclamation point (!) indicates that the copy process is taking place. Each exclamation point (!) indicates that ten packets have been transferred successfully.

The following example illustrates how to use the copy bootflash tftp command on a Cisco 4500 router:

Router# copy bootflash tftp
System flash directory, partition 2:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   984      file1
[1048 bytes used, 8387560 available, 8388608 total]
Address or name of remote host [223.255.254.254]?
Source file name? file1
Destination file name [file1]? file1
Verifying checksum for 'file1' (file # 1)... OK
Copy 'file1' from Flash to server
  as 'file1'? [yes/no]y
-
Upload to server done
Flash copy took 0:00:00 [hh:mm:ss]
Related Commands

copy mop bootflash
copy rcp bootflash
copy tftp bootflash
erase bootflash
ip rcmd remote-username
show bootflash
verify bootflash

copy flash

To copy a file from Flash memory to another destination, use one of the following copy flash EXEC commands:

copy flash {rcp | tftp}
copy flash {rcp | tftp | file-id}
(Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series only)
Syntax Description
rcp Specifies a copy operation to a network server using rcp.
tftp Specifies a TFTP server as the destination of the copy operation.
file-id Specifies a device:filename as the destination of the copy operation. The device argument is optional; but when it is used, the colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory on the Cisco 7000 series.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· nvram--Router's NVRAM. If you specify NVRAM, omit the filename. The colon (:) is required.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slavenvram--NVRAM of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA. If you specify the slave NVRAM, omit the filename.

The filename argument is the name of the destination file. You must always provide a source filename. You can omit the destination filename, in which case the system uses the source filename. Wildcards are not permitted. The maximum filename length is 63 characters.

Default

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, if you omit the destination device, the router uses the default device specified by the cd command. If you omit the destination filename, the router uses the source filename.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

On all platforms except the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, the copy flash command copies from internal Flash memory.

On the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, the copy flash command copies from one of the three Flash memory devices. The system prompts you to enter a specific device and filename. You can enter one of the following as the source device on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series:

You must follow the source device with a colon (:) and a filename.

Use the copy flash rcp command to copy a system image from Flash memory to a network server using rcp. You can use the copy of the system image as a backup copy. You can also use it to verify that the copy in Flash memory is the same as the original file.

The rcp software requires that a client send the remote username on each rcp request to the server. When you issue the copy flash rcp command, by default the Cisco IOS software sends the remote username associated with the current TTY, if that name is valid. For example, if the user is connected to the router through Telnet and was authenticated through the username command, then the Cisco IOS software sends that username as the remote username.

If the TTY username is invalid, the Cisco IOS software uses the host name as the both the remote and local usernames.


Note For Cisco, TTY lines are commonly used for access services. The concept of TTY originated with UNIX. For UNIX systems, each physical device is represented in the file system. Terminals are called TTY devices, which stands for teletype, the original UNIX terminal.

To specify a different remote username to be sent to the server, use the ip rcmd remote-username command. You can also specify the path of an existing directory along with the remote username.

 The remote username must be associated with
Caution an account on the destination server. If you do not use the ip rcmd remote-username command to specify the name of a remote user associated with an account on the server, then the remote username associated with the current TTY process must be associated with an account on the server. If there is no username for the current TTY process, then the host name must be associated with an account on the server. If the network administrator of the destination server did not establish accounts for the remote username used, this command will not execute successfully when a default remote username is used.

The rcp server must be properly configured to accept the rcp request from the user on the router. For UNIX systems, you must add an entry to the .rhosts file for the remote user on the rcp server. For example, if the router contains the following configuration lines:

hostname Rtr1
ip rcmd remote-username User0

and the router's IP address translates to Router1.company.com, then the .rhosts file for User0 on the rcp server should contain the following line:

Router1.company.com Rtr1

Refer to the documentation for your rcp server for more details.

If you copy the system image to a personal computer used as a file server, the computer must support the rsh protocol.

Use the copy flash tftp command to copy a system image from Flash memory to a TFTP server. As with the copy flash rcp command, you can use the copy of the system image as a backup or to verify that the copy in Flash is the same as the original file.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the copy commands generally copy a file from a source to a destination. Some invalid combinations exist. Specifically, you cannot copy a running configuration to a running configuration, a startup configuration to a startup configuration, or TFTP to rcp. If you do not specify a source or destination device, the router uses the default device specified by the cd command.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, when the destination is also specified by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, the router prompts you for confirmation before proceeding with the copy. The CONFIG_FILE environment variable specifies the configuration used during router initialization. To view the contents of the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the show boot command. To modify the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the boot config command. To save your modifications to the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the copy running-config startup-config command.

High System Availability (HSA) refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

Examples

The following example shows how to use the copy flash rcp command on a Cisco 4500 router:

Router# configure terminal
Router# ip rcmd remote-username netadmin1
Ctrl-Z
Router# copy flash rcp
System flash directory, partition 2:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   984      file1
[1048 bytes used, 8387560 available, 8388608 total]
Address or name of remote host [223.255.254.254]?
Source file name? file1
Destination file name [file1]? file1
Verifying checksum for 'file1' (file # 1)... OK
Copy 'file1' from Flash to server
  as 'file1'? [yes/no] y
!!!!...
Upload to server done
Flash copy took 0:00:00 [hh:mm:ss]

The exclamation point (!) indicates that the copy process is taking place. Each exclamation point (!) indicates that ten packets have been transferred successfully.

The following example illustrates how to use the copy flash rcp command:

Router# copy flash rcp
IP address of remote host [255.255.255.255]? 172.16.13.110
Name of file to copy? gsxx
writing gsxx - copy complete

The following example illustrates how to use the copy flash rcp command when copying from a particular partition of Flash memory:

Router# copy flash rcp
System flash partition information:
Partition   Size     Used    Free    Bank-Size   State       Copy-Mode
    1       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read Only   RXBOOT-FLH
    2       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read/Write  Direct
[Type ?<number> for partition directory; ? for full directory; q to abort]
Which partition? [default = 1]

The system will prompt if there are two or more partitions. If the partition entered is not valid, the process terminates. You have the option to enter a partition number, a question mark (?) for a directory display of all partitions, or a question mark and a number (?number) for a directory display of a particular partition. The default is the first partition.

System flash directory, partition 2:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   3459720  master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
[3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
Address or name of remote host [ABC.CISCO.COM]?
Source file name? 

The file will be copied from the partition given by the user earlier:

Destination file name [default = source name]?
Verifying checksum for 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' (file # 1)... OK
Copy 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' from Flash to server
as 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3'? [yes/no] yes

The following example illustrates how to use the copy flash tftp command:

Router# copy flash tftp
IP address of remote host [255.255.255.255]? 172.16.13.110
Name of file to copy? gsxx
writing gsxx - copy complete

The following example illustrates how to use the copy flash tftp command when copying from a particular partition of Flash memory:

Router# copy flash tftp
System flash partition information:
Partition   Size     Used    Free    Bank-Size   State       Copy-Mode
    1       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read Only   RXBOOT-FLH
    2       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read/Write  Direct
[Type ?<number> for partition directory; ? for full directory; q to abort]
Which partition? [default = 1]

The system will prompt if there are two or more partitions. If the partition entered is not valid, the process terminates. You have the option to enter a partition number, a question mark (?) for a directory display of all partitions, or a question mark and a number (?number) for a directory display of a particular partition. The default is the first partition.

System flash directory, partition 2:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   3459720  master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
[3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
Address or name of remote host [ABC.CISCO.COM]?
Source file name? 

The file will be copied from the partition given by the user earlier:

Destination file name [default = source name]?
Verifying checksum for  'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' (file # 1)... OK
Copy 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' from Flash to server
as 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3'? [yes/no] yes

The following example shows how to use the copy flash command on the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, or Cisco 7500 series:

copy flash slot0:new-config
Related Commands

boot config
boot system flash
cd
copy running-config startup-config
ip rcmd remote-username
show boot

copy mop

To copy a file from a MOP server to the router, use one of the following the copy mop EXEC commands:

copy mop bootflash (Cisco 4500 series only)

copy mop flash

Syntax Description
bootflash Specifies to copy a bootstrap image from a MOP server to internal Flash memory on a Cisco 4500 series.
flash Specifies internal Flash memory as the destination of the copy operation.
Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

The Cisco 7500 series does not support the copy mop command.

Use the copy mop bootflash command to copy a bootstrap image from a MOP server to the internal Flash memory on a Cisco 4500 series router. The router prompts for the name of the image file. It provides an option to erase the existing boot image in Flash before writing the new image into Flash. If no free space is available, or if files have never been written to Flash memory, you must erase Flash memory before copying the MOP image.

You do not need to specify the address of a MOP server. The Cisco IOS software automatically solicits a MOP boot server for the specified file by sending a multicast file-request message.

The copying process takes several minutes; the actual time differs from network to network.

Before booting from Flash memory, verify that the checksum of the image in Flash memory matches the checksum listed in the README file that was distributed with the boot software image. The checksum of the boot image in Flash memory is displayed when the copy mop bootflash command completes. The README file was copied to the MOP server automatically when you installed the boot software image.

 
Caution If the checksum values do not match, do not reboot the router. Instead, reissue the copy mop bootflash command and compare the checksums again. If the checksum is repeatedly wrong, copy the original boot software image back into Flash memory before you reboot the router from Flash memory.

Use the copy mop flash command to copy a system image from a MOP server to internal Flash memory. MOP must be enabled on the relevant interfaces before you can use this command.

The router prompts for the MOP filename. It provides an option to erase existing Flash memory before writing onto it. The entire copying process takes several minutes and will differ from network to network.

Before booting from Flash memory, verify that the checksum of the image in Flash memory matches the checksum listed in the README file that was distributed with the system software image. The checksum of the image in Flash memory is displayed at the bottom of the screen when you issue the copy mop flash command.

 
Caution If the checksum value is not correct according to the value in the README file, do not reboot the router. Issue the copy mop flash command and compare the checksums again. If the checksum is repeatedly wrong, copy the original system software image back into Flash memory before you reboot the router from Flash memory. If you have a corrupted image in Flash memory and try to boot from Flash memory, the router will start the system image contained in ROM (assuming booting from a network server is not configured). If ROM does not contain a fully functional system image, the router might not function and will have to be reconfigured through a direct console port connection.
Examples

The following example shows a sample output from the copy mop flash command. In this example, a newer version of the system image file1, which already exists in Flash memory, is copied to Flash memory, and there is enough memory to copy the file without erasing any existing files.

Router# copy mop flash
System flash directory:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   984      file1 [deleted]
  2   984      file1
[2096 bytes used, 8386512 available, 8388608 total]
Source file name? file1
Destination file name [file1]?
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure you want to erase? [confirm]
Copy 'file1' from server
  as 'file1' into Flash WITH erase? [yes/no] yes
Erasing device... eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee...erased
Loading file1 from 1234.5678.9abc via Ethernet0: !
[OK - 984/8388608 bytes]
Verifying checksum... OK (0x14B3)
Flash copy took 0:00:01 [hh:mm:ss]

The following example shows sample output resulting from copying a system image into a partition of Flash memory. The system will prompt only if there are two or more read/write partitions or one read-only and one read/write partition and dual Flash bank support in boot ROMs. If the partition entered is not valid, the process terminates. You have the option to enter a partition number, a question mark (?) for a directory display of all partitions, or a question mark and a number (?number) for a directory display of a particular partition. The default is the first read/write partition.

Router# copy mop flash
System flash partition information:
Partition   Size     Used    Free    Bank-Size   State       Copy-Mode
    1       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read Only   RXBOOT-FLH
    2       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read/Write  Direct
[Type ?<no> for partition directory; ? for full directory; q to abort]
Which partition? [default = 2]

If the partition is read-only and has dual Flash bank support in boot ROMs, the session continues as follows:

                               **** NOTICE ****
Flash load helper v1.0
This process will accept the copy options and then terminate
the current system image to use the ROM based image for the copy.
Routing functionality will not be available during that time.
If you are logged in via telnet, this connection will terminate.
Users with console access can see the results of the copy operation.
                               ---- ******** ----
Proceed? [confirm]
System flash directory, partition 1:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   3459720  master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
[3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
Source file name? master/igs-bfpx-100.4.3
Destination file name [default = source name]?

The file will be copied into the partition given by the user earlier:

Loading master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3 from 172.16.1.111: !
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure? [confirm]
Copy 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' from MOP server
as 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' into Flash WITH erase? [yes/no] yes

If the partition is read-write, the session continues as follows:

System flash directory, partition 2:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   3459720  master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
[3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
Source file name? master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
Destination file name [default = source name]? 

The file will be copied into the partition given by the user earlier:

Loading master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3 from 172.16.1.111: !
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure? [confirm]
Copy 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' from MOP server
as 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' into Flash WITH erase? [yes/no] yes

The following example shows how to use the copy mop bootflash command to copy the bootstrap image file1:

Router# copy mop bootflash
System flash directory:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   984      file1 [deleted]
  2   984      file1
[2096 bytes used, 8386512 available, 8388608 total]
Source file name? file1
Destination file name [file1]?
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure you want to erase? [confirm]
Copy 'file1' from server
  as 'file1' into Flash WITH erase? [yes/no] yes
Erasing device... eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee...erased
Loading file1 from 1234.5678.9abc via Ethernet0: !
[OK - 984/8388608 bytes]
Verifying checksum... OK (0x14B3)
Flash copy took 0:00:01 [hh:mm:ss]
Related Commands

boot config
boot system flash
cd
copy bootflash tftp
copy flash tftp
copy tftp bootflash
delete
dir
erase bootflash
show boot
show bootflash
verify
verify bootflash
verify flash

copy rcp

To copy a file from a network server to the router or to another destination using rcp, use one of the following copy rcp EXEC commands. The copy rcp running-config command replaces the configure network command. The copy rcp startup-config command replaces the configure overwrite-network command.

copy rcp bootflash (Cisco 4500 series only)
copy rcp {flash | running-config | startup-config}

copy rcp {flash | running-config | startup-config | file-id} (Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series only)

Syntax Description
bootflash Specifies to copy a bootstrap image from a network server to Flash memory on a Cisco 4500 series using rcp.
flash Specifies internal Flash memory as the destination of the copy operation. The Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series cannot use this keyword; all other platforms can.
running-config Specifies the currently running configuration as the destination of the copy operation.
startup-config Specifies the configuration used for initialization as the destination of the copy operation.
file-id Specifies a device:filename as the destination of the copy operation. The device argument is optional; but when it is used, the colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory on the Cisco 7000 series.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series.

· nvram--Router's NVRAM. If you specify NVRAM, omit the filename. The colon (:) is required. The Cisco 7000 series cannot use this keyword.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slavenvram--NVRAM of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA. If you specify the slave NVRAM, omit the filename.

The filename argument is the name of the destination file. You must always provide a source filename. You can omit the destination filename, in which case the system uses the source filename. Wildcards are not permitted. The maximum filename length is 63 characters.
Default

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, if you omit the destination device, the router uses the default device specified by the cd command. If you omit the destination filename, the router uses the source filename.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

The copy rcp bootflash command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.
The copy rcp {flash | running-config | startup-config} command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0. (The file_id argument first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.)

The rcp protocol requires that a client send the remote username of an rcp request to the server. When you issue one of the copy rcp commands, by default the Cisco IOS software sends the username associated with the current TTY, if that name is valid. For example, if the user is connected to the router through Telnet and the user was authenticated through the username command, then the software sends that username as the remote username.


Note For Cisco, TTY lines are commonly used for access services. The concept of TTY originated with UNIX. For UNIX systems, each physical device is represented in the file system. Terminals are called TTY devices, which stands for teletype, the original UNIX terminal.

If the TTY username is invalid, the software uses the host name as the both the remote and local usernames. To specify a different remote username to be sent to the rcp server, use the ip rcmd remote-username command. You can also specify the path of an existing directory along with the remote username.

 
Caution The remote username must be associated with an account on the destination server. If you do not use the ip rcmd remote-username command to specify the name of a remote user associated with an account on the server, then the remote username associated with the current TTY process must be associated with an account on the server. If there is no username for the current TTY process, then the host name must be associated with an account on the server. If the network administrator of the destination server did not establish accounts for the remote username used, this command will not execute successfully when a default remote username is used.

If you copy a bootstrap image, system image, or configuration file from a personal computer used as a file server, the remote host computer must support rsh protocol.

Use the copy rcp bootflash command to copy a bootstrap image from a network server to Flash memory on a Cisco 4500 router using rcp. The router prompts for the name or address of the server and the name of the file to be copied. It provides an option to erase existing Flash memory before writing onto it, and allows you to confirm the erasure. The entire copying process takes several minutes and differs from network to network.

Before loading the router from Flash memory, verify that the checksum of the bootstrap image in Flash memory matches the checksum listed in the README file that was distributed with the system software image.

The checksum of the bootstrap image in Flash memory is displayed at the bottom of the screen when you issue the copy rcp bootflash command. The README file was copied to the server automatically when you installed the system software.

 
Caution If the checksum value does not match the value in the README file, do not reboot the router. Reissue the copy rcp bootflash command and compare the checksums again. If the checksum is repeatedly wrong, copy the original bootstrap image back into Flash memory before you reboot the router from Flash memory. If you have a corrupted image in Flash memory and try to boot from Flash, the router starts the system image contained in ROM (assuming booting from a network server is not configured).

Use the copy rcp flash to copy a system image from a network server to the router's internal Flash memory using rcp. The Cisco IOS software prompts for the address of the rcp server and rcp filename. When you issue this command, the system provides an option to erase existing Flash memory before writing onto it. The entire copying process takes several minutes and differs from network to network.

Before booting from Flash memory, verify that the checksum of the image in internal Flash memory matches the checksum listed in the README file that was distributed with the system software image. The checksum of the image in Flash memory is displayed at the bottom of the screen when you issue the copy rcp flash command. The README file was copied to the rcp server automatically when you installed the system software image.

 
Caution If the checksum value does not match the value in the README file, do not reboot the router. Reissue the copy rcp flash command and compare the checksums again. If the checksum is repeatedly wrong, copy the original system software image back into Flash memory before you reboot the router from Flash memory. If you have a corrupted image in Flash memory and try to boot from Flash, the router starts the system image contained in ROM (assuming booting from a network server is not configured). If ROM does not contain a fully functional system image, the router cannot function and must be reconfigured through a direct console port connection.

Use the copy rcp running-config command to copy a configuration file from a network server to the router's running configuration environment using rcp. You can copy either a host configuration file or a network configuration file. Accept the default value of host to copy and load a host configuration file containing commands that apply to one network server in particular. Enter network to copy and load a network configuration file containing commands that apply to all network servers on a network.


Note When using rcp, the copy rcp running-config command replaces the configure network command.

Use the copy rcp startup-configuration command to copy a configuration file from a network server to the router's startup configuration environment using rcp.

On all platforms except the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the copy rcp startup-config command copies a configuration file from the network server to NVRAM. On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the command copies a configuration file from the network server to the location specified by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable. The CONFIG_FILE environment variable specifies the configuration used during initialization.


Note When using rcp, the copy rcp startup-config command replaces the configure overwrite-network command.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the copy commands generally copy a file from a source to a destination. Some invalid combinations exist. Specifically, you cannot copy a running configuration to a running configuration, a startup configuration to a startup configuration, or TFTP to rcp.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the copy rcp command generally copies a file from a network server to another destination using rcp. If you do not specify a source or destination device, the router uses the default device specified by the cd command.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, when the destination is also specified by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, the router prompts you for confirmation before proceeding with the copy. To view the contents of the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the show boot command. To modify the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the boot config command. To save your modifications, use the copy running-config startup-config command.

High System Availability (HSA) refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

On a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA, the copy rcp startup-configuration command used with automatic synchronization disabled causes the system to ask you if you also want to copy the file to the slave's startup configuration. The default answer is yes. If automatic synchronization is enabled, the system automatically copies the file to the slave's startup configuration each time you use this command.

Examples

The following example shows how to use the copy rcp bootflash command on a Cisco 4500 router:

Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# ip rcmd remote-username netadmin1
Router(config)# Ctrl-Z
Router# copy rcp bootflash 
Boot flash directory:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   2622607  c4500-xboot
[2622672 bytes used, 1571632 available, 4194304 total]
Address or name of remote host [255.255.255.255]? 223.255.254.254
Source file name? c4500-xboot.101
Destination file name [c4500-xboot.101]? 
Accessing file 'c4500-xboot.101' on 223.255.254.254... 
Loading c4500-xboot.101 from 223.255.254.254 (via Ethernet0): -[OK]
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure you want to erase? [confirm]
Copy 'c4500-xboot.101' from TFTP server into
     bootflash as 'c4500-xboot.101' WITH erase? [yes/no] yes
Erasing device... eeeeeeeeeeeeeeee...erased
Loading c4500-xboot.101 from 223.255.254.254 (via Ethernet0):!!!!...
[OK - 2622607/4194304 bytes]
Verifying checksum... OK (0xE408)
Flash copy took 0:00:10 [hh:mm:ss]

The exclamation point (!) indicates that the copy process is taking place. Each exclamation point (!) indicates that ten packets have been transferred successfully.

The following example shows how to use the copy rcp flash command on a Cisco 4500 system. The interface might differ slightly on other systems. This example copies a system image named file1 from the netadmin1 directory on the remote server named SERVER1.CISCO.COM with an IP address of 172.16.101.101 to Flash memory. To ensure that enough Flash memory is available to accommodate the system image to be copied, the Cisco IOS software allows you to erase the contents of Flash memory first.

Router1# configure terminal
Router1(config)# rcmd remote-username netadmin1
Router(config)# Ctrl-Z
Router# copy rcp flash 
System flash directory, partition 2:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   984      file1 [deleted]
  2   984      file1
[2096 bytes used, 8386512 available, 8388608 total]
Address or name of remote host [255.255.255.255]? 172.16.101.101
Source file name? file1
Destination file name [file1]?
Accessing file 'file1' on 172.16.101.101...
Loading dirt/ssangiah/file1 .from 172.16.101.101 (via Ethernet0): ! [OK]
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure you want to erase? [confirm]
Copy 'file1' from server
  as 'file1' into Flash WITH erase? [yes/no] yes
Erasing device... eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee...erased
Loading file1 from 172.16.101.101 (via Ethernet0): !
[OK - 984/8388608 bytes]
Verifying checksum... OK (0x14B3)
Flash copy took 0:00:01 [hh:mm:ss]

The following example shows sample output resulting from copying a system image into a partition of Flash memory. The system prompts only if there are two or more read/write partitions or one read-only and one read/write partition and dual Flash bank support in boot ROMs. If the partition entered is not valid, the process terminates. You have the option to enter a partition number, a question mark (?) for a directory display of all partitions, or a question mark and a number (?number) for a directory display of a particular partition. The default is the first read/write partition.

Router# copy rcp flash
System flash partition information:
Partition   Size     Used    Free    Bank-Size   State       Copy-Mode
    1       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read Only   RXBOOT-FLH
    2       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read/Write  Direct
[Type ?<no> for partition directory; ? for full directory; q to abort]
Which partition? [default = 2]

If the partition is read-only and has dual Flash bank support in boot ROM, the session continues as follows:

                               **** NOTICE ****
Flash load helper v1.0
This process will accept the copy options and then terminate
the current system image to use the ROM based image for the copy.
Routing functionality will not be available during that time.
If you are logged in via telnet, this connection will terminate.
Users with console access can see the results of the copy operation.
                               ---- ******** ----
Proceed? [confirm]
System flash directory, partition 1:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   3459720  master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
[3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
Address or name of remote host [255.255.255.255]? 172.16.1.1
Source file name? master/igs-bfpx-100.4.3
Destination file name [default = source name]?

The file will be copied into the partition given by the user earlier:

Loading master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3 from 172.16.1.111: !
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure? [confirm]
Copy 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' from TFTP server
as 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' into Flash WITH erase? [yes/no] yes

If the partition is read-write, the session continues as follows:

System flash directory, partition 2:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   3459720  master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
[3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
Address or name of remote host [255.255.255.255]? 172.16.1.1
Source file name? master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
Destination file name [default = source name]?

The file will be copied into the partition given by the user earlier:

Accessing file 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' on ABC.CISCO.COM...
Loading master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3 from 172.16.1.111: !
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure? [confirm]
Copy 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' from TFTP server
as 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' into Flash WITH erase? [yes/no] yes

The following example shows how to use the copy rcp running-config command on a Cisco 4500 system. The interface might differ slightly on other systems. This example specifies a remote username of netadmin1. Then it copies and runs a host configuration filename host1-confg from the netadmin1 directory on the remote server with an IP address of 172.16.101.101.

Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# ip rcmd remote-username netadmin1
Router(config)# Ctrl-Z
Router# copy rcp running-config 
Host or network configuration file [host]?
Address of remote host [255.255.255.255]? 172.16.101.101
Name of configuration file [Router-confg]? host1-confg
Configure using host1-confg from 172.16.101.101? [confirm]
Connected to 172.16.101.101
Loading 1112 byte file host1-confg:![OK]
Router#
%SYS-5-CONFIG: Configured from host1-config by rcp from 172.16.101.101

The following example shows how to use copy rcp startup-config command on a Cisco 4000 system. The interface might differ slightly on other systems. This example specifies a remote username of netadmin1. Then it copies and stores a host configuration file host2-confg from the netadmin1 directory on the remote server with an IP address of 172.16.101.101.

Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# ip rcmd remote-username netadmin1
Router(config)# Ctrl-Z
Router# copy rcp startup-config 
Address of remote host [255.255.255.255]? 172.16.101.101
Name of configuration file[rtr2-confg]? host2-confg
Configure using rtr2-confg from 172.16.101.101?[confirm]
Connected to 172.16.101.101
Loading 1112 byte file rtr2-confg:![OK]
[OK]
Router#
%SYS-5-CONFIG_NV:Non-volatile store configured from rtr2-config by 
rcp from 172.16.101.101

The following example uses the copy rcp file-id command to copy the router-image file from a network server using rcp to the Flash memory card inserted in slot 0:

copy rcp slot0:router-image
Related Commands

boot config
boot system flash
cd
copy flash rcp
copy running-config rcp
copy running-config startup-config
copy startup-config rcp
ip rcmd remote-username
show boot
verify flash

copy running-config

To copy the running configuration file to another destination, use one of the following copy running-config EXEC commands. The copy running-config startup-config command replaces the write memory command. The copy running-config rcp or copy running-config tftp command replaces the write network command.

copy running-config {rcp | startup-config | tftp}
copy running-config {rcp | startup-config | tftp | file-id} (Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series only)

Syntax Description
rcp Specifies a copy operation to a network server using rcp.
startup-config Specifies the configuration used for initialization as the destination of the copy operation. The Cisco 4500 series cannot use this keyword.
tftp Specifies a TFTP server as the destination of the copy operation.
file-id Specifies a device:filename as the destination of the copy operation. The device argument is optional; but when it is used, the colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory on the Cisco 7000 series.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· nvram--Router's NVRAM. If you specify NVRAM, omit the filename. The colon (:) is required. The Cisco 7000 series cannot use this keyword.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slavenvram--NVRAM of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA. If you specify NVRAM, omit the filename.

The filename argument is the name of the destination file. You must always provide a source filename. You can omit the destination filename, in which case the system uses the source filename. Wildcards are not permitted. The maximum filename length is 63 characters.

Default

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, if you omit the destination device, the router uses the default device specified by the cd command. If you omit the destination filename, the router uses the source filename.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

The copy running-config rcp command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0. (The startup-config and tftp commands and the file_id argument first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.)

Use the copy running-config {rcp | tftp} command to copy the current configuration file to a network server using rcp or TFTP. The configuration file copy can serve as a backup copy. You are prompted for a destination host and filename.

The rcp protocol requires that a client send the remote username of an rcp request to the server. When you issue the copy running-config rcp command, the Cisco IOS software defaults to sending the username associated with the current TTY, if that name is valid. For example, if the user is connected to the router through Telnet and the user was authenticated through the username command, then the software sends that username as the remote username.

If the TTY username is invalid, the software uses the host name as the both the remote and local usernames.


Note For Cisco, TTY lines are commonly used for access services. The concept of TTY originated with UNIX. For UNIX systems, each physical device is represented in the file system. Terminals are called TTY devices, which stands for teletype, the original UNIX terminal.

To specify a different remote username to be sent to the server, use the ip rcmd remote-username command. You can also specify the path of an existing directory along with the remote username.

 
Caution The remote username must be associated with an account on the destination server. If you do not use the ip rcmd remote-username command to specify the name of a remote user associated with an account on the server, then the remote username associated with the current TTY process must be associated with an account on the server. If there is no username for the current TTY process, then the host name must be associated with an account on the server. If the network administrator of the destination server did not establish accounts for the remote username used, this command will not execute successfully when a default remote username is used.

The rcp server must be properly configured to accept the rcp request from the user on the router. For UNIX systems, you must add an entry to the .rhosts file for the remote user on the rcp server. For example, if the router contains the following configuration lines:

hostname Rtr1
ip rcmd remote-username User0

and the router's IP address translates to Router1.company.com, then the .rhosts file for User0 on the rcp server should contain the following line:

Router1.company.com Rtr1

Refer to the documentation for your rcp server for more details.

If you copy the configuration file to a personal computer used as a file server, the computer must support the rsh protocol.

To run this command, the router must contain Flash memory.

On all platforms except the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the copy running-config startup-config command copies the currently running configuration to NVRAM. Use this command in conjunction with the reload command to restart the router with the configuration information stored in NVRAM.

If you issue the copy running-config startup-config command from a bootstrap system image, you receive a warning instructing you to indicate whether you want your previous NVRAM configuration to be overwritten and configuration commands lost. This warning does not appear if NVRAM contains an invalid configuration or if the previous configuration in NVRAM was generated by a bootstrap system image.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the copy commands generally copy a file from a source to a destination. Some invalid combinations exist. Specifically, you cannot copy a running configuration to a running configuration, a startup configuration to a startup configuration, or TFTP to rcp.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the copy running-config startup-config command copies the currently running configuration to the location specified by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable. This variable specifies the device and configuration file used for initialization. When the CONFIG_FILE environment variable points to NVRAM or when this variable does not exist (such as at first-time startup), the software writes the current configuration to NVRAM. If the current configuration is too large for NVRAM, the software displays a message and stops executing the command. Use this command in conjunction with the reload command to restart the router with the configuration information stored in the CONFIG_FILE environment variable.

When the CONFIG_FILE environment variable specifies a valid device other than nvram: (that is, flash, bootflash, slot0, or slot1), the software writes the current configuration to the specified device and filename and stores a distilled version of the configuration in NVRAM. A distilled version of the configuration is one that does not contain access list information. If NVRAM already contains a copy of a complete configuration, the router prompts you to confirm the copy.

To view the contents of the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the show boot command. To modify the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the boot config command. To save your modifications to the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the copy running-config startup-config command.

High System Availability (HSA) refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

Examples

The following example shows how to use the copy running-config rcp command on a Cisco 4500 system. The interface may differ slightly on other systems. This example specifies a remote username of netadmin1. Then it copies the running configuration file, named Rtr2-confg to the netadmin1 directory on the remote host with an IP address of 172.16.101.101.

Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# ip rcmd remote-username netadmin1
Router(config)# Ctrl-Z
Router# copy running-config rcp
Remote host[]? 172.16.101.101
Name of configuration file to write [Rtr2-confg]?
Write file rtr2-confg on host 172.16.101.101?[confirm]
Building configuration...[OK]
Connected to 172.16.101.101

The following example shows the copy running-config startup-config command and the warning the system provides if you are trying to save configuration information from bootstrap into the system:

Router(boot)# copy running-config startup-config 
Warning: Attempting to overwrite an NVRAM configuration written
by a full system image. This bootstrap software does not support
the full configuration command set. If you perform this command now,
some configuration commands may be lost.
Overwrite the previous NVRAM configuration?[confirm]

Enter no to escape writing the configuration information to memory.

In the following example, a Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, or Cisco 7500 series router copies the running configuration to the startup configuration specified by the CONFIG_FILE variable:

copy running-config startup-config

The following example copies the running configuration to a file named router-confg1 on the Flash memory card inserted in slot 0 on a Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, or Cisco 7500 series:

copy running-config slot0:router-confg1
Related Commands

boot config
cd
copy rcp running-config
copy rcp startup-config
copy startup-config
ip rcmd remote-username
reload
show boot

copy startup-config

To copy a startup configuration file to another destination, use one of the following copy startup-config EXEC commands:

copy startup-config {rcp | running-config | tftp}
copy startup-config {rcp | running-config | tftp | file-id} (Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series only)

Syntax Description
rcp Specifies a copy operation to a network server using rcp.
running-config Specifies the currently running configuration as the destination of the copy operation.
tftp Specifies a TFTP server as the destination of the copy operation.
file-id Specifies a device:filename as the destination of the copy operation. The device argument is optional; but when it is used, the colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory on the Cisco 7000 series.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· nvram--Router's NVRAM. If you specify NVRAM, omit the filename. The colon (:) is required. The Cisco 7000 series cannot use this keyword.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slavenvram--NVRAM of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA. If you specify the slave NVRAM, omit the filename.

The filename argument is the name of the destination file. You must always provide a source filename. You can omit the destination filename, in which case the system uses the source filename. Wildcards are not permitted. The maximum filename length is 63 characters.

Default

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, if you omit the destination device, the router uses the default device specified by the cd command. If you omit the destination filename, the router uses the source filename.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

The copy startup-config rcp command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3. (The running-config command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0, the tftp command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3, and the file_id argument first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.)

On all platforms except the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, this command copies the contents of the configuration file in NVRAM to a network server or to the currently running configuration.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the copy commands generally copy a file from a source to a destination. Some invalid combinations exist. Specifically, you cannot copy a running configuration to a running configuration, a startup configuration to a startup configuration, or TFTP to rcp.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the command copies the configuration file pointed to by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable to another destination. To view the contents of the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the show boot command. To modify the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the boot config command. To save your modifications to the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use this copy running-config startup-config command.

The rcp protocol requires that a client send the remote username of an rcp request to the server. When you issue the copy startup-config rcp command, by default the Cisco IOS software sends the username associated with the current TTY, if that name is valid. For example, if the user is connected to the router through Telnet and the user was authenticated through the username command, then the Cisco IOS software sends that username as the remote username.

If the TTY username is invalid, the software uses the host name as the both the remote and local usernames.


Note For Cisco, TTY lines are commonly used for access services. The concept of TTY originated with UNIX. For UNIX systems, each physical device is represented in the file system. Terminals are called TTY devices, which stands for teletype, the original UNIX terminal.

To specify a different remote username to be sent to the server, use the ip rcmd remote-username command. You can also specify the path of an existing directory along with the remote username.

 
Caution The remote username must be associated with an account on the destination server. If you do not use the ip rcmd remote-username command to specify the name of a remote user associated with an account on the server, then the remote username associated with the current TTY process must be associated with an account on the server. If there is no username for the current TTY process, then the host name must be associated with an account on the server. If the network administrator of the destination server did not establish accounts for the remote username used, this command will not execute successfully when a default remote username is used.

The rcp server must be properly configured to accept the rcp request from the user on the router. For UNIX systems, you must add an entry to the .rhosts file for the remote user on the rcp server. For example, if the router contains the following configuration lines:

hostname Rtr1
ip rcmd remote-username User0

and the router's IP address translates to Router1.company.com, then the .rhosts file for User0 on the rcp server should contain the following line:

Router1.company.com Rtr1

Refer to the documentation for your rcp server for more details.

If you copy the configuration file to a personal computer used as a server, the computer must support the rsh protocol.

High System Availability (HSA) refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

Examples

The following example shows how to use the copy startup-config rcp command on a Cisco 4500 router. The interface might differ slightly on other systems.

Router# configure terminal
Router(config)# ip rcmd remote-username netadmin2
Router(config)# Ctrl-Z
Router# copy startup-config rcp
Remote host[]? 172.16.101.101
Name of configuration file to write [rtr2-confg]? <cr>
Write file rtr2-confg on host 172.16.101.101?[confirm] <cr>
![OK]

On a Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, or Cisco 7500 series, the following example uses the copy startup-config command to copy the startup configuration file (specified by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable) to a Flash memory card inserted in slot 0:

copy startup-config slot0:router-confg
Related Commands

boot config
copy rcp startup-config
copy running-config
ip rcmd remote-username
show boot

copy tftp

To copy a file from a TFTP server to the router or to another destination, use one of the following copy tftp EXEC commands. The copy tftp running-config command replaces the configure network command. The copy tftp startup-config command replaces the configure overwrite-network command.

copy tftp bootflash (Cisco 4500 series only)
copy tftp {flash | running-config | startup-config}

copy tftp {flash | running-config | startup-config | file-id} (Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series only)

Syntax Description
bootflash Specifies to copy a bootstrap image from a TFTP server to internal Flash memory on a Cisco 4500 series.
flash Specifies internal Flash memory as the destination of the copy operation. The Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series cannot use this keyword; all other platforms can.
running-config Specifies the currently running configuration as the destination of the copy operation.
startup-config Specifies the configuration used for initialization as the destination of the copy operation.
file-id Specifies a device:filename as the destination of the copy operation. The device argument is optional; but when it is used, the colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory on the Cisco 7000 series.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· nvram--Router's NVRAM. If you specify NVRAM, omit the filename. The colon (:) is required.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slavenvram--NVRAM of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA. If you specify the slave NVRAM, omit the filename.

The filename argument is the name of the destination file. You must always provide a source filename. You can omit the destination filename, in which case the system uses the source filename. Wildcards are not permitted. The maximum filename length is 63 characters.
Default

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, if you omit the destination device, the router uses the default device specified by the cd command. If you omit the destination filename, the router uses the source filename.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The system prompts for the address of the TFTP server and TFTP filename if you do not provide them at the command line. When copying to internal Flash memory, the system provides an option to erase existing internal Flash memory before writing onto it. The entire copying process takes several minutes and differs from network to network.

Table 10 describes the characters that you may see during processing of the copy tftp command.


Table 10: Copy TFTP Character Descriptions
Character Description
! An exclamation point indicates that the copy process is taking place. Each exclamation point indicates that ten packets (512 bytes each) have been successfully transferred.
. A period indicates the copy process timed out. Many periods in a row typically mean that the copy process may fail.
O An uppercase O indicates a packet was received out of order and the copy process may fail.
e A lowercase e indicates a device is being erased.
E An uppercase E indicates an error and the copy process may fail.
V A series of uppercase Vs indicates the progress during the verification of the image checksum.

Before booting from Flash memory, verify that the checksum of the image in Flash memory matches the checksum listed in the README file that was distributed with the system software image. The checksum of the image in Flash memory is displayed at the bottom of the screen when you issue the copy tftp flash command. The README file was copied to the TFTP server automatically when you installed the system software image.

 
Caution If the checksum value is not correct according to the value in the README file, do not reboot the router. Issue the copy tftp flash command and compare the checksums again. If the checksum is repeatedly wrong, copy the original system software image back into Flash memory before you reboot the router from Flash memory. If you have a corrupted image in Flash memory and try to boot from Flash, the router starts the system image contained in ROM (assuming booting from a network server is not configured). If ROM does not contain a fully functional system image, the router cannot function and must be reconfigured through a direct console port connection.

Note When using TFTP, the copy tftp running-config command replaces the configure network command and the copy tftp startup-config command replaces the configure overwrite-network command.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the copy commands generally copy a file from a source to a destination. Some invalid combinations exist. Specifically, you cannot copy a running configuration to a running configuration, a startup configuration to a startup configuration, or TFTP to rcp.

High System Availability (HSA) refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

Examples

The following example shows how to use the copy tftp bootflash command:

Router# copy tftp bootflash
Boot flash directory:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   2622607  c4500-xboot
[2622672 bytes used, 1571632 available, 4194304 total]
Address or name of remote host [255.255.255.255]? 223.255.254.254
Source file name? c4500-xboot.101
Destination file name [c4500-xboot.101]? 
Accessing file 'c4500-xboot.101' on 223.255.254.254... 
Loading c4500-xboot.101 from 223.255.254.254 (via Ethernet0): ! [OK]
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure you want to erase? [confirm]
Copy 'c4500-xboot.101' from TFTP server into
     bootflash as 'c4500-xboot.101' WITH erase? [yes/no] yes
Erasing device... eeeeeeeeeeeeeeee...erased
Loading c4500-xboot.101 from 223.255.254.254 (via Ethernet0):!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
[OK - 2622607/4194304 bytes]
Verifying checksum... OK (0xE408)
Flash copy took 0:00:10 [hh:mm:ss]

The following example shows sample output of copying a system image named file1 into Flash memory:

Router# copy tftp flash
System flash directory, partition 2:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   984      file1 [deleted]
  2   984      file1
[2096 bytes used, 8386512 available, 8388608 total]
Address or name of remote host [255.255.255.255]? 223.255.254.254
Source file name? file1
Destination file name [file1]?
Accessing file 'file1' on 223.255.254.254...
Loading dirt/ssangiah/file1 .from 223.255.254.254 (via Ethernet0): - [OK]
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure you want to erase? [confirm]
Copy 'file1' from server
  as 'file1' into Flash WITH erase? [yes/no] yes
Erasing device... eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee...erased
Loading file1 from 223.255.254.254 (via Ethernet0):!!!!...
[OK - 984/8388608 bytes]
Verifying checksum... OK (0x14B3)
Flash copy took 0:00:01 [hh:mm:ss]

The exclamation point (!) indicates that the copy process is taking place. Each exclamation point (!) indicates that ten packets have been transferred successfully. A series of "V" characters indicates that a checksum verification of the image is occurring after the image is written to Flash memory.

The following example shows sample output resulting from copying a system image into a partition of Flash memory. The system will prompt only if there are two or more read/write partitions or one read-only and one read/write partition and dual Flash bank support in boot ROMs. If the partition entered is not valid, the process terminates. You can enter a partition number, a question mark (?) for a directory display of all partitions, or a question mark and a number (?number) for directory display of a particular partition. The default is the first read/write partition.

Router# copy tftp flash
System flash partition information:
Partition   Size     Used    Free    Bank-Size   State       Copy-Mode
    1       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read Only   RXBOOT-FLH
    2       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read/Write  Direct
[Type ?<no> for partition directory; ? for full directory; q to abort]
Which partition? [default = 2]

If the partition is read-only and has dual Flash bank support in boot ROM, the session continues as follows:

                               **** NOTICE ****
Flash load helper v1.0
This process will accept the copy options and then terminate
the current system image to use the ROM based image for the copy.
Routing functionality will not be available during that time.
If you are logged in via telnet, this connection will terminate.
Users with console access can see the results of the copy operation.
                               ---- ******** ----
Proceed? [confirm]
System flash directory, partition 1:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   3459720  master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
[3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
Address or name of remote host [255.255.255.255]? 172.16.1.1
Source file name? master/igs-bfpx-100.4.3
Destination file name [default = source name]?

The file will be copied into the partition given by the user earlier:

Loading master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3 from 172.16.1.111: !
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure? [confirm]
Copy 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' from TFTP server
as 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' into Flash WITH erase? [yes/no] yes

If the partition is read-write, the session continues as follows:

System flash directory, partition 2:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   3459720  master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
[3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
Address or name of remote host [255.255.255.255]? 172.16.1.1
Source file name? master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
Destination file name [default = source name]?

The file will be copied into the partition given by the user earlier:

Accessing file 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' on ABC.CISCO.COM...
Loading master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3 from 172.16.1.111: !
Erase flash device before writing? [confirm]
Flash contains files. Are you sure? [confirm]
Copy 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' from TFTP server
as 'master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3' into Flash WITH erase? [yes/no] yes
Related Commands

boot config
boot system flash
copy flash tftp
show boot
verify
verify flash

copy verify

The verify or verify flash command replaces this command. Refer to the descriptions of the verify and verify flash commands for more information.

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

copy verify bootflash

The verify bootflash command replaces this command. Refer to the description of the verify bootflash command for more information.

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

delete

To delete any file on a Flash memory device of the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, use the delete EXEC command.

delete [device:]filename
Syntax Description
device: (Optional) Device containing the file to be deleted. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7000 series. This device is the initial default device.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series. For the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, this device is the initial default device.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

filename Name of the file to be deleted. The maximum filename length is 63 characters.
Default

For the Cisco 7000 series, the initial default device is flash:. For the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, the initial default device is slot0:. Otherwise, the default device is that specified by the cd command.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use this command only with the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series.

If you omit the device, the Cisco IOS software uses the default device specified by the cd command.

If you attempt to delete the configuration file specified by the CONFIG_FILE or BOOTLDR environment variable, the system prompts you to confirm the deletion. Also, if you attempt to delete the last valid system image specified in the BOOT environment variable, the system prompts you to confirm the deletion. When you delete a file, the software simply marks the file as deleted, but does not erase the file. This feature allows you to later recover a "deleted" file using the undelete command. You can delete and undelete a file up to 15 times. To permanently delete all "deleted" files on a Flash memory device, use the squeeze command.


Note With the Cisco 7000 series, you can only use the undelete and squeeze commands on the Flash memory card inserted in the PCMCIA slot (slot0) of the RP card. You cannot use this command on a Cisco 7000's internal Flash memory.
Example

The following example deletes the router-backupconfig file from the Flash card inserted in slot 0:

delete slot0:router-backupconfig
Related Commands

cd
dir
show boot
squeeze
undelete

dir

To display a list of files on a Flash memory device of the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, use the dir EXEC command.

dir [/all | /deleted | /long] [device:][filename]
Syntax Description
/all (Optional) Lists deleted files, undeleted files, and files with errors.
/deleted (Optional) Lists only the deleted files.
/long (Optional) Lists only valid files. Valid files are those that are undeleted and without errors.
device: (Optional) Device containing the file(s) to list. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7000 series. This device is the initial default device.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series. For the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, this device is the initial default device.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

filename (Optional) Name of the file(s) to display on a specified device. The files can be of any type. You can use wildcards in the filename. A wildcard character (*) matches all patterns. Strings after a wildcard are ignored.
Default

For the Cisco 7000 series, the initial default device is flash:. For the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, the initial default device is slot0:. Otherwise, the default device is that specified by the cd command. When you omit all keywords and arguments, the Cisco IOS software displays only undeleted files for the default device specified by the cd command in short format.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use this command only with the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series. If you omit the device, the software uses the default device specified by the cd command.

When you use one of the keywords (/all, /deleted, /long), the system displays file information in long format. The long format includes the following categories:

When you omit all keywords (/all, /deleted, /long), the system displays file information in short format. Short format includes the following categories:

Examples

The following example instructs a router to list undeleted files for the default device specified by the cd command. Notice that the router displays the information in short format because no keywords are used.

Router# dir
-#- -length- -----date/time------ name
1   620      May 4  1993 21:38:04 config1
2   620      May 4  1993 21:38:14 config2
7993896 bytes available (1496 bytes used)

The following example displays the long version of the same device:

Router# dir /long
-#- ED --type-- --crc--- -seek-- nlen -length- -----date/time------ name
1   .. 1        37CEC52E 202EC   7    620      May 4  1993 21:38:04 config1
2   .. 1        37CEC52E 205D8   7    620      May 4  1993 21:38:14 config2
7993896 bytes available (1496 bytes used)
Related Commands

cd
delete
undelete

erase

To erase a saved configuration, use one of the following erase EXEC commands. The erase startup-config command replaces the write erase command.

erase startup-config
erase
[device:]filename (Cisco 7000 series only)
Syntax Description
startup-config On all platforms except the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, erases the startup configuration in NVRAM.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, erases or deletes the configuration pointed to by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable.

device: (Optional) Device containing the file to delete. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7000 series. This device is the initial default device.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series RP card.

filename Name of the file to delete. The files can be of any type. This command does not support wildcards in the filename.
Default

For the Cisco 7000 series, the initial default device is flash:. Otherwise, the default device is that specified by the cd command.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use the erase startup-config command on all platforms to erase the startup configuration. On all platforms except the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, this command erases the configuration stored in NVRAM.

When you use the erase startup-config command on the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and the Cisco 7500 series, the router erases or deletes the configuration pointed to by CONFIG_FILE environment variable. The CONFIG_FILE environment variable specifies the configuration file used for initialization. If the CONFIG_FILE environment variable points to NVRAM, the router erases NVRAM. If the CONFIG_FILE environment variable specifies a Flash memory device and configuration filename, the Cisco IOS software deletes the configuration file. That is, the software marks the file as "deleted."

Use the erase [device:]filename command only with the Cisco 7000 series. This command functions like the delete command. That is, when you erase a specific file, the system marks the file as deleted, allowing you to later undelete an erased file. See the delete and undelete commands for more information. If you omit the device, the software uses the default device specified by the cd command.

If you attempt to erase the configuration file specified by the CONFIG_FILE or BOOTLDR environment variable, the system prompts you to confirm the deletion. Also, if you attempt to erase the last valid system image specified in the BOOT environment variable, the system prompts you to confirm the deletion.


Note On the Cisco 7000 series, the erase [device:]filename command differs from the erase flash command. The erase [device:]filename command erases a specified file located in internal Flash or on the Flash memory card inserted in the PCMCIA slot. The erase flash command erases internal Flash memory.
Examples

The following example illustrates how to erase the configuration located in NVRAM or specified by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable:

erase startup-config

The following example deletes the myconfig file from a Flash memory card inserted in the slot 0:

erase slot0:myconfig
Related Commands

boot config
delete
show boot
show startup-config
undelete

erase bootflash

To erase the boot image in Flash memory on the Cisco 4500, use the erase bootflash EXEC command.

erase bootflash
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

You can use this command only on routers that have two banks of Flash memory: one bank for the boot image and the second bank for the system image.

Example

The following example erases the boot image in Flash memory:

erase bootflash
Related Commands

copy bootflash tftp
copy mop bootflash
copy tftp bootflash
show bootflash
verify bootflash

erase flash

To erase internal Flash memory, use the erase flash EXEC command. This command replaces the copy erase flash command.

erase flash
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

The Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series do not support this command.

Example

The following example illustrates how to use this command. Note that this example reflects the dual Flash bank feature available only on low-end systems (the AccessPro PC card, Cisco 2500 series, Cisco 3000 series, and Cisco 4000 series).

Router# erase flash
System flash partition information:
Partition   Size     Used    Free    Bank-Size   State       Copy-Mode
    1       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read Only   RXBOOT-FLH
    2       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read/Write  Direct
[Type ?<no> for partition directory; ? for full directory; q to abort]
Which partition? [default = 2]

The system will prompt only if there are two or more read/write partitions. If the partition entered is not valid or is the read-only partition, the process terminates. You can enter a partition number, a question mark (?) for a directory display of all partitions, or a question mark and a number (?number) for directory display of a particular partition. The default is the first read/write partition.

System flash directory, partition 2:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   3459720  master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
[3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
Erase flash device, partition 2? [confirm] <Return>

format

To format Flash memory on the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, use the format EXEC command.

format [spare spare-number] device1: [[device2:][monlib-filename]]
 
Caution The following formatting procedure erases all information in the Flash memory. To prevent the loss of important data, proceed carefully.
Syntax Description
spare (Optional) Reserves spare sectors as specified by the spare-number argument when formatting a device.
spare-number (Optional) Number of the spare sectors to reserve on formatted device. Valid values are 0 to 16. The default value is zero.
device1: Device to format. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

device2: (Optional) Device containing the monlib file to use for formatting device1. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series. For the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, this device is the initial default device.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

monlib-filename (Optional) Name of the ROM monitor library file (monlib file) to use for formatting device1. The default monlib file is the one bundled with the system software.

When used with HSA and you do not specify the monlib-filename, the system takes ROM monitor library file from the slave image bundle. If you specify the monlib-filename, the system assumes that the files reside on the slave devices.

Default

The default monlib file is the one bundled with the system software.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use this command with the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series. On the Cisco 7000 series, use the format command to format your Flash memory card inserted in slot 0 of the RP card. On the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, use the format command to format internal Flash memory (bootflash) or your Flash memory cards.

In some cases, you might need to insert a new PCMCIA Flash memory card and load images or backup configuration files onto it. Before you can use a new Flash memory card, you must format it.

Flash memory cards have sectors that can fail. On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, you can reserve certain Flash memory sectors as "spares" for use when other sectors fail. Use the format command to specify between 0 and 16 sectors as spares. If you reserve a small number of spare sectors for emergencies, you do not waste space because you can use most of the Flash memory card. If you specify zero spare sectors and some sectors fail, you must reformat the Flash memory card and thereby erase all existing data.

The monlib file is the ROM monitor library. The ROM monitor uses the monlib file to access files in the Flash file system. The Cisco IOS Release 11.0 system software contains a monlib file.

In the command syntax, device1 is the device to format and device2 contains the monlib file to use. When you omit the [[device2:][monlib-filename]] argument, the system formats device1 using the monlib that is bundled with the system software. When you omit device2 from the [[device2:][monlib-filename]] argument, the system formats device1 using the named monlib file from the device specified by the cd command. When you omit monlib-filename from the [[device2:][monlib-filename]] argument, the system formats device1 using device2's monlib file. When you specify the whole [[device2:][monlib-filename]] argument, the system formats device1 using the specified monlib file from the specified device. Note that you can specify device1's own monlib file in this argument. When the system cannot find a monlib file, the system terminates the formatting process.

 
Caution You can read from or write to Flash memory cards formatted for Cisco 7000 series Route Processor (RP) cards in your Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, but you cannot boot the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series from a Flash memory card that is formatted for the Cisco 7000 series. Similarly, you can read from or write to Flash memory cards formatted for the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series in your Cisco 7000 series, but you cannot boot the Cisco 7000 series from a Flash memory card that is formatted for the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.
Example

The following example shows the format command that formats a Flash memory card inserted in slot 0:

Router# format slot0:
Running config file on this device, proceed? [confirm]y
All sectors will be erased, proceed? [confirm]y
Enter volume id (up to 31 characters): <Return>
Formatting sector 1 (erasing)
Format device slot0 completed

When the Cisco IOS software returns you to the EXEC prompt, the new Flash memory card is successfully formatted and ready for use.

Related Commands

copy
delete
dir
show file
show flash
squeeze
undelete

ip rarp-server

Use the ip rarp-server interface configuration command to enable the router to act as a Reverse Address Resolution Protocol (RARP) server. Use the no form of this command to restore the interface to the default of no RARP server support.

ip rarp-server ip-address
no ip rarp-server ip-address

Syntax Description
ip-address IP address that is to be provided in the source protocol address field of the RARP response packet. Normally, this is set to whatever address you configure as the primary address for the interface.
Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Interface configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

This feature makes diskless booting of clients possible between network subnets where the client and server are on separate subnets.

RARP server support is configurable on a per interface basis, so that the router does not interfere with RARP traffic on subnets that do not need RARP assistance.

The Cisco IOS software answers incoming RARP requests only if both of the following two conditions are met:

Use the show ip arp EXEC command to display the contents of the IP ARP cache.

Sun Microsystems, Inc. makes use of RARP and UDP-based network services to facilitate network-based booting of SunOS on their workstations. By bridging RARP packets and using both the ip helper-address interface configuration command and the ip forward-protocol global configuration command, the Cisco IOS software should be able to perform the necessary packet switching to enable booting of Sun workstations across subnets. Unfortunately, some Sun workstations assume that the sender of the RARP response, in this case the router, is the host that the client can contact to TFTP load the bootstrap image. This causes the workstations to fail to boot.

By using the ip rarp-server feature, the Cisco IOS software can be configured to answer these RARP requests, and the client machine should be able to reach its server by having its TFTP requests forwarded through the router that acts as the RARP server.

In the case of RARP responses to Sun workstations attempting to diskless boot, the IP address specified in the ip rarp-server interface configuration command should be the IP address of the TFTP server. In addition to configuring RARP service, the Cisco IOS software must also be configured to forward UDP-based Sun portmapper requests to completely support diskless booting of Sun workstations. This can be accomplished using configuration commands of the form:

ip forward-protocol udp 111
interface interface name
ip helper-address target-address

RFC 903 documents the Reverse Address Resolution Protocol.

Examples

The following partial example configures a router to act as a RARP server. The router is configured to use the primary address of the specified interface in its RARP responses.

arp 172.30.2.5 0800.2002.ff5b arpa
interface ethernet 0
ip address 172.30.3.100 255.255.255.0
ip rarp-server 172.30.3.100

In the following example, a router is configured to act as a RARP server, with TFTP and portmapper requests forwarded to the Sun server:

! Allow the router to forward broadcast portmapper requests
ip forward-protocol udp 111
! Provide the router with the IP address of the diskless sun
arp 172.30.2.5 0800.2002.ff5b arpa
interface ethernet 0
! Configure the router to act as a RARP server, using the Sun Server's IP
! address in the RARP response packet.
ip rarp-server 172.30.3.100
! Portmapper broadcasts from this interface are sent to the Sun Server.
ip helper-address 172.30.3.100
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

ip forward-protocol +
ip helper-address +

ip rcmd domain-lookup

Use the ip rcmd domain-lookup global configuration command to enable Domain Name System (DNS) security for rcp and rsh. To bypass DNS security for rcp and rsh, use the no form of this command.

ip rcmd domain-lookup
no ip rcmd domain-lookup

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

If you do not want to use DNS for rcmd queries, but DNS has been enabled with the ip domain-lookup command, use the no ip rcmd domain-lookup command.

This command will turn off DNS lookups for rsh and rcp only. The no ip domain-lookup command takes precedence over the ip rcmd domain-lookup command. If ip domain-lookup is disabled with the no ip domain-lookup command, DNS will be bypassed for rcp and rsh, even if ip rcmd domain-lookup is enabled.


Note Cisco IOS Release 10.3 added the ip keyword to rcmd commands. If you are upgrading from Release 10.2 to Release 10.3 or later, this keyword is automatically added to any rcmd commands you have in your Release 10.2 configuration files.
Example

In the following example, DNS security is enabled for rcp and rsh:

ip rcmd domain-lookup
Related Command

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

ip domain-lookup +

ip rcmd rcp-enable

To configure the Cisco IOS software to allow remote users to copy files to and from the router, use the ip rcmd rcp-enable global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable a router that is enabled for rcp.

ip rcmd rcp-enable
no ip rcmd rcp-enable

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

To ensure security, the router is not enabled for rcp by default.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

To allow a remote user to execute rcp commands on the router, you must also create an entry for the remote user in the local authentication database.

The no ip rcmd rcp-enable command does not prohibit a local user from using rcp to copy system images and configuration files to and from the router.

To protect against unauthorized users copying the system image or configuration files, the router is not enabled for rcp by default.


Note Cisco IOS Release 10.3 added the ip keyword to rcmd commands. If you are upgrading from Release 10.2 to Release 10.3 or later, this keyword is automatically added to any rcmd commands you have in your Release 10.2 configuration files.
Example

The following example shows how to enable the router for rcp:

rcp-enable
Related Command

ip rcmd remote-host

ip rcmd remote-host

To create an entry for the remote user in a local authentication database so that remote users can execute commands on the router using rsh or rcp, use the ip rcmd remote-host global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to remove an entry for a remote user from the local authentication database.

ip rcmd remote-host local-username {ip-address | host} remote-username [enable [level]]
no ip rcmd remote-host
local-username {ip-address | host} remote-username [enable [level]]
Syntax Description
local-username Name of the user on the local router. You can specify the router host name as the username. This name needs to be communicated to the network administrator or the user on the remote system. To be allowed to remotely execute commands on the router, the remote user must specify this value correctly.
ip-address IP address of the remote host from which the local router will accept remotely executed commands. Either the IP address or the host name is required.
host Name of the remote host from which the local router will accept remotely executed commands. Either the host name or the IP address is required.
remote-username Name of the user on the remote host from which the router will accept remotely executed commands.
enable level (Optional) Enables the remote user to execute privileged EXEC commands using rsh or to copy files to the router using rcp. The range is 1 to 15. The default is 15. For information on the enable level, refer to the privilege level global configuration command in the Security Module Command Reference.
Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

A TCP connection to a router is established using an IP address. Using the host name is valid only when you are initiating an rcp or rsh command from a local router. The host name is converted to an IP address using DNS or host-name aliasing.

To allow a remote user to execute rcp or rsh commands on a local router, you must create an entry for the remote user in the local authentication database. You must also enable the router to act as an rsh or rcp server.

To enable the router to act as an rsh server, issue the ip rcmd rsh-enable command. To enable the router to act as an rcp server, issue the ip rcmd rcp-enable command.The router cannot act as a server for either of these protocols unless you explicitly enable the capacity.

A local authentication database, which is similar to a UNIX .rhosts file, is used to enforce security on the router through access control. Each entry that you configure in the authentication database identifies the local user, the remote host, and the remote user. To permit a remote user of rsh to execute commands in privileged EXEC mode or to permit a remote user of rcp to copy files to the router, specify the enable keyword and level. For information on the enable level, refer to the privilege level global configuration command in the Security Module Command Reference.

An entry that you configure in the authentication database differs from an entry in a UNIX .rhost file in the following aspect. Because the .rhosts file on a UNIX system resides in the home directory of a local user account, an entry in a UNIX .rhosts file does not need to include the local username; the local username is determined from the user account. To provide equivalent support on a router, specify the local username along with the remote host and remote username in each authentication database entry that you configure.

For a remote user to be able to execute commands on the router in its capacity as a server, the local username, host address or name, and remote username sent with the remote client request must match values configured in an entry in the local authentication file.

A remote client host should be registered with DNS. The Cisco IOS software uses DNS to authenticate the remote host's name and address. Because DNS can return several valid IP addresses for a host name, the Cisco IOS software checks the address of the requesting client against all of the IP addresses for the named host returned by DNS. If the address sent by the requester is considered invalid, that is, it does not match any address listed with DNS for the host name, then the software will reject the remote-command execution request.

Note that if no DNS servers are configured for the router, then that device cannot authenticate the host in this manner. In this case, the Cisco IOS software sends a broadcast request to attempt to gain access to DNS services on another server. If DNS services are not available, you must use the no ip domain-lookup command to disable the attempt to gain access to a DNS server by sending a broadcast request.

If DNS services are not available and, therefore, you bypass the DNS security check, the software will accept the request to remotely execute a command only if all three values sent with the request match exactly the values configured for an entry in the local authentication file.


Note Cisco IOS Release 10.3 added the ip keyword to rcmd commands. If you are upgrading from Release 10.2 to Release 10.3 or later, this keyword is automatically added to any rcmd commands you have in your Release 10.2 configuration files.
Example

The following example allows the remote user netadmin3 on a remote host with the IP address 172.16.101.101 to execute commands on router1 using the rsh or rcp protocol. User netadmin3 is allowed to execute commands in privileged EXEC mode.

ip rcmd remote-host router1 172.16.101.101 netadmin3 enable
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

ip rcmd rcp-enable
ip rcmd rsh-enable
no ip domain-lookup
+

ip rcmd remote-username

To configure the remote username to be used when requesting a remote copy using rcp, use the ip rcmd remote-username global configuration command. To remove from the configuration the remote username, use the no form of this command.

ip rcmd remote-username username
no ip rcmd remote-username username

 
Caution The remote username must be associated with an account on the destination server.
Syntax Description
username Name of the remote user on the server. This name is used for rcp copy requests. All files and images to be copied are searched for or written relative to the directory of the remote user's account, if the server has a directory structure, for example, as do UNIX systems.
Default

If you do not issue this command, the Cisco IOS software sends the remote username associated with the current TTY process, if that name is valid, for rcp copy commands. For example, if the user is connected to the router through Telnet and the user was authenticated through the username command, then the software sends that username as the remote username.

If the username for the current TTY process is not valid, the Cisco IOS software sends the host name as the remote username. For rcp boot commands, the Cisco IOS software sends the access server host name by default.


Note For Cisco, TTY lines are commonly used for access services. The concept of TTYs originated with UNIX. For UNIX systems, each physical device is represented in the file system. Terminals are called TTY devices (which stands for teletype, the original UNIX terminal).
Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

The rcp protocol requires that a client send the remote username on an rcp request to the server. Use this command to specify the remote username to be sent to the server for an rcp copy request. If the server has a directory structure, as do UNIX systems, all files and images to be copied are searched for or written relative to the directory of the remote user's account.


Note Cisco IOS Release 10.3 added the ip keyword to rcmd commands. If you are upgrading from Release 10.2 to Release 10.3 or later, this keyword is automatically added to any rcmd commands you have in your Release 10.2 configuration files.
Example

The following example shows how to use this command:

configure terminal
ip rcmd remote-username netadmin1
^Z
Related Commands

boot network rcp
boot system rcp
copy
copy flash rcp
copy rcp bootflash
copy rcp flash
copy rcp running-config
copy rcp startup-config
copy running-config rcp
copy startup-config rcp

ip rcmd rsh-enable

To configure the router to allow remote users to execute commands on it using rsh, use the ip rcmd rsh-enable global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to disable a router that is enabled for rsh.

ip rcmd rsh-enable
no ip rcmd rsh-enable

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

To ensure security, the router is not enabled for rsh by default.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Use this command to enable the router to receive rsh requests from remote users. In addition to issuing this command, you must create an entry for the remote user in the local authentication database to allow a remote user to execute rsh commands on the router.

The no ip rcmd rsh-enable command does not prohibit a local user of the router from executing a command on other routers and UNIX hosts on the network using rsh. It disables a router that is enabled for rsh.


Note Cisco IOS Release 10.3 added the ip keyword to rcmd commands. If you are upgrading from Release 10.2 to Release 10.3 or later, this keyword is automatically added to any rcmd commands you have in your Release 10.2 configuration files.
Example

The following example shows how to enable a router as an rsh server:

ip rcmd rsh-enable
Related Command

ip rcmd remote-host

microcode

To specify the location of the microcode that you want to download from Flash memory into the writable control store (WCS) on a Cisco 7000 series or Cisco 7500 series, use the microcode global configuration command.

microcode interface [flash filename [slot] | rom [slot] | system [slot]] (Cisco 7000 series only)
no microcode
interface [flash filename [slot] | rom [slot] | system [slot]] (Cisco 7000 series only)
microcode interface [flash file-id [slot] | system [slot]] (Cisco 7500 series only)
no microcode interface [flash file-id [slot] | system [slot]] (Cisco 7500 series only)

Syntax Description
interface One of the following interface processor names: aip, cip, eip, feip, fip, fsip, hip, mip, sip, sp, ssp, trip, vip, or vip2.
flash (Optional) If the flash keyword is specified, a filename or file-id argument is required, unless you are using the no microcode interface flash command.
filename (Optional) Filename of the microcode in Flash memory that you want to download. This argument is only used with the flash keyword. If you use the flash keyword, the name of the microcode file in Flash is required unless the command is no microcode interface flash. (This command results in the same default condition as the command microcode interface rom, which indicates that the card should be loaded from its onboard ROM microcode.)
file-id Specifies a device:filename of the microcode file to download. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--First PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7500 series RSP card.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7500 series RSP card.

Slave devices such as slaveslot0 are invalid. The slave's file system is not available during microcode reloads.

The filename is the name of the microcode file.

[slot] Number of the slot. Range is 0 to 15.
rom (Optional) If the rom keyword is specified, the router loads the microcode from the onboard ROM microcode. For example, the command microcode fip rom specifies that all FDDI Interface Processors (FIPs) should be loaded from their onboard ROM microcode. This onboard ROM microcode is not the same as the eight ROMs on the RP that contain the system image.
system (Optional) If system is specified, the router loads the microcode from the microcode bundled into the system image you are running for that interface type.
Default

The default is to load from the microcode bundled in the system image.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0. The file_id argument first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

When using HSA for simple hardware backup, ensure that the master and slave RSP card contain the same microcode image in the same location when the router is to load the interface processor microcode from a flash file-id. Thus, if the slave RSP becomes the master, it will be able to find the microcode image and download it to the interface processor.

Examples

In the following example, all FIP cards will use their onboard ROM microcode:

microcode fip rom

In the following example, all FIP cards will be loaded with the microcode found in Flash memory file fip.v141-7 when the system is booted, when a card is inserted or removed, or when the microcode reload global configuration command is issued. The configuration is then written to the startup configuration file.

microcode fip flash fip.v141-7
^Z
copy running-config startup-config
Related Command

microcode reload

microcode reload

To signal to the Cisco 7000 series or Cisco 7500 series that all microcode configuration commands have been entered and the processor cards should be reloaded, use the microcode reload global configuration command.

microcode reload
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Example

In the following example, all controllers are reset, the specified microcode is loaded, and the CxBus complex is reinitialized according to the microcode configuration commands that have been written to memory:

microcode reload
Related Command

microcode

mop device-code

To identify the type of device sending MOP sysid messages and request program messages, use the mop device-code global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to set the identity to the default value.

mop device-code {cisco | ds200}
no mop device-code {cisco | ds200}

Syntax Description
cisco Denotes a Cisco device code.
ds200 Denotes a DECserver 200 device code.
Default

Cisco device code

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The sysid messages and request program messages use the identity information indicated by this command.

Example

The following example identifies a DECserver 200 device as sending MOP sysid and request program messages:

mop device-code ds200
Related Command

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

mop sysid +

mop retransmit-timer

To configure the length of time that the Cisco IOS software waits before retransmitting boot requests to a MOP server, use the mop retransmit-timer global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to reinstate the default value.

mop retransmit-timer seconds
no mop retransmit-timer

Syntax Description
seconds Sets the length of time, in seconds, that the software waits before retransmitting a message. The value is a number from 1 to 20.
Default

4 seconds

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

By default, when the software transmits a request that requires a response from a MOP boot server and the server does not respond, the message is retransmitted after 4 seconds. If the MOP boot server and router are separated by a slow serial link, it might take longer than 4 seconds for the software to receive a response to its message. Therefore, you might want to configure the software to wait longer than 4 seconds before retransmitting the message if you are using such a link.

Example

In the following example, if the MOP boot server does not respond within 10 seconds after the router sends a message, the server will retransmit the message:

mop retransmit-timer 10
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

mop device-code
mop retries
mop enabled
+

mop retries

To configure the number of times the Cisco IOS software will retransmit boot requests to a MOP server, use the mop retries global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to reinstate the default value.

mop retries count
no mop retries

Syntax Description
count Indicates the number of times the software will retransmit a MOP boot request. The value is a number from 3 to 24.
Default

8 times

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Example

In the following example, the software will attempt to retransmit a message to an unresponsive host 11 times before declaring a failure:

mop retries 11
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

mop device-code
mop retransmit-timer
mop enabled
+

o

To list the value of the boot field (bits 0-3) in the configuration register, use the ROM monitor o command. To reset the value of the boot field so that the router boots from ROM, use the ROM monitor o/r command.

o
o/r

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Refer to the appropriate hardware installation guide for default values.

Command Mode

ROM monitor

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

To get to the ROM monitor prompt at a Cisco 2000, Cisco 2500, Cisco 3000, Cisco 4000, or Cisco 7000 series, use the reload EXEC command if the configuration register has a boot value of 0. (For systems with a software configuration register, a value can be included on the o/r command line.) Use the i command in conjunction with the o/r command to initialize the router. (The i command is documented in the hardware installation and maintenance publication for your product.) The o/r command resets the configuration register to 0x141, which disables the Break key, ignores the NVRAM configuration, and boots the default system image from ROM.

Examples

The following is a sample display from the o command:

> o
Bit#   Configuration register option settings:
15     Diagnostic mode disabled
14     IP broadcasts do not have network numbers
13     Do not boot default ROM software if network boot fails
12-11  Console speed is 9600 baud
10     IP broadcasts with ones
09     Do not use secondary bootstrap
08     Break enabled
07     OEM disabled
06     Ignore configuration disabled
03-00  Boot to ROM monitor
>

The following is an example of the o/r and i commands used to reset and boot the default system image from ROM:

> o/r
> i
Related Command

config-register

partition flash

To separate Flash memory into two partitions, use the partition flash global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to undo partitioning, and restore Flash memory to one partition.

partition flash partitions [size1 size2]
no partition flash

Syntax Description
partitions Number of partitions in Flash memory. Can be 1 or 2.
size1 (Optional) Size of the first partition in megabytes.
size2 (Optional) Size of the second partition in megabytes.
Default

Flash memory consists of one partition.

If this command is entered but partition size is not specified, two partitions of equal size will be created.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

Although the software supports up to eight partitions, current hardware allows only two. To undo partitioning, use either the partition flash 1 or no partition flash command. If one or more files exist in the second partition, you must manually erase the second partition with the erase flash command before reverting to a single partition.

When creating two partitions, you must not truncate a file or cause the spillover of a file into the second partition.

Example

The following example creates two partitions of 4 MB each in Flash memory:

partition flash 2 4 4

pwd

To show the current setting of the cd command on the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, use the pwd EXEC command.

pwd
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

This command has no default.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use this command with the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series.

Use the pwd command to show what device is specified as the system's default device by the cd command. For all EXEC commands that have an optional device: argument, the system uses the device specified by the cd command when you omit the optional device: argument.

For example, the dir command contains an optional device: argument and displays a list of files on a Flash memory device. When you omit this device: argument, the system shows a list of the files on the Flash device specified by the cd command.

Examples

The following example shows that the present working device specified by the cd command is slot 0:

Router> pwd
slot0

The following example uses the cd command to change the present working device to slot 1 and then uses the pwd command to display that present working device:

Router> cd slot1:
Router> pwd
slot1

Similarly, the following example uses the cd command on the Cisco 7500 series to change the present working device to bootflash and then uses the pwd command to display that present working device:

Router> cd bootflash: 
Router> pwd
bootflash
Related Command

cd

reload

To reload the operating system, use the reload EXEC command.

reload [text] | [in [hh:]mm [text]] | [at hh:mm [month day | day month] [text]] | [cancel]
Syntax Description
text (Optional) Reason for the reload, 1 to 255 characters long.
in [hh:]mm (Optional) Schedule a reload of the software to take effect in the specified minutes or hours and minutes. The reload must take place within approximately 24 days.
at hh:mm (Optional) Schedule a reload of the software to take place at the specified time (using a 24-hour clock). If you specify the month and day, the reload is scheduled to take place at the specified time and date. If you do not specify the month and day, the reload takes place at the specified time on the current day (if the specified time is later than the current time), or on the next day (if the specified time is earlier than the current time). Specifying 00:00 schedules the reload for midnight. The reload must take place within approximately 24 days.
month (Optional) Name of the month, any number of characters in a unique string.
day (Optional) Number of the day in the range 1 to 31.
cancel (Optional) Cancel a scheduled reload.
Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

The reload command halts the system. If the system is set to restart on error, it reboots itself. Use the reload command after configuration information is entered into a file and saved to the startup configuration.

You cannot reload from a virtual terminal if the system is not set up for automatic booting. This prevents the system from dropping to the ROM monitor and thereby taking the system out of the remote user's control.

If you modify your configuration file, the system prompts you to save the configuration. During a save operation, the system asks you if you want to proceed with the save if the CONFIG_FILE environment variable points to a startup configuration file that no longer exists. If you say "yes" in this situation, the system goes to setup mode upon reload.

When you schedule a reload to occur at a later time, it must take place within approximately 24 days.

The at keyword can only be used if the system clock has be set on the router (either through NTP, the hardware calendar, or manually). The time is relative to the configured time zone on the router. To schedule reloads across several routers to occur simultaneously, the time on each router must be synchronized with NTP.

To display information about a scheduled reload, use the show reload command.

Examples

The following example illustrates how to use the reload command to immediately reload the software on the router:

router# reload

The following example illustrates how to use the reload command to reload the software on the router in 10 minutes:

router# reload in 10
router# Reload scheduled for 11:57:08 PDT Fri Apr 21 1996 (in 10 minutes)
Proceed with reload? [confirm]
router#

The following example illustrates how to use the reload command to reload the software on the router at 1:00 p.m. today:

router# reload at 13:00
router# Reload scheduled for 13:00:00 PDT Fri Apr 21 1996 (in 1 hour and 2 minutes)
Proceed with reload? [confirm]
router#

The following example illustrates how to use the reload command to reload the software on the router on April 20 at 2:00 a.m.:

router# reload at 02:00 apr 20
router# Reload scheduled for 02:00:00 PDT Sat Apr 20 1996 (in 38 hours and 9 minutes)
Proceed with reload? [confirm]
router#

The following example illustrates how to use the reload command to cancel a pending reload:

router# reload cancel
%Reload cancelled.
Related Commands

copy running-config startup-config
show reload

rsh

To execute a command remotely on a remote rsh host, use the rsh privileged EXEC command.

rsh {ip-address | host} [/user username] remote-command
Syntax Description
ip-address IP address of the remote host on which to execute the rsh command. Either the IP address or the host name is required.
host Name of the remote host on which to execute the command. Either the host name or the IP address is required.
/user username (Optional) Remote username.
remote-command Command to be executed remotely. This is a required parameter.
Default

If you do not specify the /user keyword and argument, the Cisco IOS software sends a default remote username. As the default value of the remote username, the software sends the username associated with the current TTY process, if that name is valid. For example, if the user is connected to the router through Telnet and the user was authenticated through the username command, then the software sends that username as the remote username. If the TTY username is invalid, the software uses the host name as the both the remote and local usernames.


Note For Cisco, TTY lines are commonly used for access services. The concept of TTY originated with UNIX. For UNIX systems, each physical device is represented in the file system. Terminals are called TTY devices, which stands for teletype, the original UNIX terminal.
Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Use the rsh command to execute commands remotely. The host on which you remotely execute the command must support the rsh protocol, and the .rhosts files on the rsh host must include an entry that permits you to remotely execute commands on that host.

For security reasons, the software does not default to a remote login if no command is specified, as does UNIX. Instead, the router provides Telnet and connect services that you can use rather than rsh.

Example

The following command specifies that user sharon attempts to remotely execute the UNIX ls command with the -a argument on the remote host mysys.cisco.com. The command output resulting from the remote execution follows the command example:

Router1# rsh mysys.cisco.com /user sharon ls -a
.
..
.alias
.cshrc
.emacs
.exrc
.history
.login
.mailrc
.newsrc
.oldnewsrc
.rhosts
.twmrc
.xsession
jazz

service compress-config

To compress configuration files on the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 4000 series, and Cisco 3000 series routers, use the service compress-config global configuration command. To disable compression, use the no form of this command.

service compress-config
no service compress-config

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

If the file compression completes successfully, the following message is displayed:

Compressing configuration from configuration-size to compressed-size
[OK]

If the boot ROMs do not recognize a compressed configuration, the following message is displayed:

Boot ROMs do not support NVRAM compression Config NOT written to NVRAM

If the file compression fails, the following message is displayed:

Error trying to compress nvram

One way to determine whether a configuration file will compress enough to fit into NVRAM is to use a text editor to enter the configuration, then use the UNIX compress command to check the compressed size. To get a closer approximation of the compression ratio, use the UNIX command compress -b12.

Once the configuration file has been compressed, the router functions normally. A show startup-config command would uncompress the configuration before displaying it. At boot time, the system would recognize that the configuration file was compressed, uncompress it, and proceed normally.

To disable compression of the configuration file, enter configuration mode and specify the no service compress-config command. Then enter the copy running-config startup-config command. The router displays an OK message if it is able to successfully write the uncompressed configuration to NVRAM. Otherwise, the router displays an error message indicating that the configuration is too large to store. If the configuration file is larger than the physical NVRAM, the following message is displayed:

##Configuration too large to fit uncompressed in NVRAM Truncate configuration? [confirm]

To truncate and save the configuration, type Y. To not truncate and not save the configuration, type N.

Example

In the following example, the configuration file is compressed:

service compress-config
Related Command

show startup-config

service config

To enable autoloading of configuration files from a network server, use the service config global configuration command. Use the no form of this command to restore the default.

service config
no service config

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Disabled, except on systems without NVRAM or with invalid or incomplete information in NVRAM. In these cases, autoloading of configuration files from a network server is enabled automatically.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Usually, the service config command is used in conjunction with the boot host or boot network command. You must enter the service config command to enable the router to automatically configure the system from the file specified by the boot host or boot network command.

The service config command can also be used without the boot host or boot network command. If you do not specify host or network configuration filenames, the router uses the default configuration files. The default network configuration file is network-confg. The default host configuration file is host-confg, where host is the host name of the router. If the Cisco IOS software cannot resolve its host name, the default host configuration file is router-confg.

Example

In the following example, a router is configured to autoload the default host configuration file:

boot host 
service config
Related Commands

boot host
boot network

show async-bootp

To display the extended BOOTP request parameters that have been configured for asynchronous interfaces, use the show async-bootp privileged EXEC command.

show async-bootp
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is a sample output of the show async-bootp command:

Router# show async-bootp
The following extended data will be sent in BOOTP responses:
bootfile (for address 192.168.1.1) "pcboot"
bootfile (for address 172.16.1.111) "dirtboot"
subnet-mask 255.255.0.0
time-offset -3600
time-server 192.168.1.1

Table 11 describes significant fields shown in the display.


Table 11: Show Async-BOOTP Field Descriptions
Field Description
bootfile... "pcboot" Boot file for address 192.168.1.1 is named pcboot.
subnet-mask 255.255.0.0 Subnet mask.
time-offset -3600 Local time is one hour (3600 seconds) earlier than UTC time.
time-server 192.168.1.1 Address of the time server for the network.
Related Command

async-bootp

show boot

To display the contents of the BOOT environment variable, the name of the configuration file pointed to by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, the contents of the BOOTLDR environment variable, and the configuration register setting, use the show boot EXEC command.

show boot
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use this command with the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series. The show boot command allows you to view the current settings for the following environment variables:

The BOOT environment variable specifies a list of bootable images on various devices. The CONFIG_FILE environment variable specifies the configuration file used during system initialization. The BOOTLDR environment variable specifies the Flash device and filename containing the rxboot image that ROM uses for booting. You set these environment variables with the boot system, boot config, and boot bootldr commands, respectively.

When you use this command on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for High System Availability (HSA), this command also shows you the environment variable settings for both the master and slave RSP card.

HSA refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show boot command:

Cyclone# show boot
BOOT variable =
CONFIG_FILE variable = nvram:
Current CONFIG_FILE variable = slot0:router-config
BOOTLDR variable not exist
Configuration register is 0x0
Cyclone#

In the sample output, the BOOT environment variable contains a null string. That is, a list of bootable images is not specified.

The CONFIG_FILE environment variable points to the configuration file in NVRAM as the startup (initialization) configuration. The run-time value for the CONFIG_FILE environment variable points to the router-config file on the Flash memory card inserted in the first slot of the RSP card. That is, during the run-time configuration, you have modified the CONFIG_FILE environment variable using the boot config command, but you have not saved the run-time configuration to the startup configuration. To save your run-time configuration to the startup configuration, use the copy running-config startup-config command. If you do not save the run-time configuration to the startup configuration, then the system reverts back to the saved CONFIG_FILE environment variable setting for initialization information upon reload. In this sample, the system reverts back to NVRAM for the startup configuration file.

The BOOTLDR environment variable does not yet exist. That is, you have not created the BOOTLDR environment variable using the boot bootldr command.

The following example is output from the show boot command for a Cisco 7513 configured for HSA:

Router# show boot
BOOT variable =
CONFIG_FILE variable =
Current CONFIG_FILE variable =
BOOTLDR variable does not exist
Configuration register is 0x0
current slave is in slot 7
BOOT variable =
CONFIG_FILE variable =
BOOTLDR variable does not exist
Configuration register is 0x0
Router#
Related Commands

boot bootldr
boot config
boot system
show version

show bootflash

To verify boot Flash memory on the Cisco 4500, use the show bootflash EXEC command.

show bootflash
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

You can use this command only on routers that have two banks of Flash: one bank for the boot image and the second bank for the system image.

The show bootflash command displays the type of boot Flash memory present, any files that may currently exist in boot Flash memory, and the amount of boot Flash memory used and remaining.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show bootflash command:

Router# show bootflash
Boot flash directory:
File  name/status
  1   c4500-xboot
[1387336 bytes used, 2806968 bytes available]

Table 12 describes the fields shown in the output.


Table 12: Show Bootflash Field Descriptions
Field Description
Boot File Number of the boot file.
flash directory: name/status Name and status of the boot file. The status is displayed if appropriate and can be one of the following:

  • [deleted]--File has been deleted.

  • [invalid checksum]--File has an incorrect checksum.

show configuration

The show startup-config command replaces this command. Refer to the description of the
show startup-config command for more information.

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

show file

To display the configuration stored in a specified file on the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, use the show file EXEC command.

show file [device:] filename
Syntax Description
device: (Optional) Device containing the configuration file. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7000 series. This device is the initial default device.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series. For the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series, this device is the initial default device.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· nvram--Router's NVRAM. If you specify NVRAM, omit the filename. The colon (:) is required.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slavenvram--NVRAM of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA. If you specify the slave NVRAM, omit the filename.

If you omit the device: argument, the system uses the default device specified by the cd command.

filename Name of the file. The file can be of any type. The maximum filename length is 63 characters.
Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use this command for the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series. When showing the configuration, the Cisco IOS software informs you whether the displayed configuration is a complete configuration or a distilled version. A distilled configuration is one that does not contain access lists.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show file command:

Router# show file slot0:router-config
Using 534 out of 129016 bytes
!
version 10.3
!
hostname Cyclops
!
enable-password xxxx
service pad
!
boot system dross-system 172.16.13.111
boot system dross-system 172.16.1.111
!
exception dump 172.16.13.111
!
no ip ipname-lookup
!
decnet routing 13.1
decnet node-type area
decnet max-address 1023
!
interface Ethernet 0
ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 172.31.1.0
ip accounting
ip gdp
decnet cost 3
!
ip domain-name CISCO.COM
ip name-server 255.255.255.255
!
end
Related Commands

boot bootldr
cd
configure
dir

show flash

To display the layout and contents of Flash memory, use one of the following show flash EXEC commands:

show flash [all | chips | detailed | err | partition number [all | chips | detailed | err] | summary]
show flash [all | chips | filesys] [device:] (Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series only)
Syntax Description
all (Optional) On all platforms except the Cisco 7000 series PCMCIA slot, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, all shows complete information about Flash memory, including information about the individual ROM devices in Flash memory and the names and sizes of all system image files stored in Flash memory, including those that are invalidated.

On the Cisco 7000 series PCMCIA slot, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, all shows the following information:

· The same information as that displayed by the dir command when you use the /all and /long keywords together.

· The same information as that displayed by the filesys keyword.

· The same information as that displayed by the chips keyword.

chips (Optional) Shows information per partition and per chip, including which bank the chip is in plus its code, size, and name.
detailed (Optional) Shows detailed file directory information per partition, including file length, address, name, Flash checksum, computer checksum, bytes used, bytes available, total bytes, and bytes of system Flash memory.
err (Optional) Shows write or erase failures in the form of number of retries.
partition number (Optional) Shows output for the specified partition number. If you specify the partition keyword, you must specify a partition number. You can use this keyword only when Flash memory has multiple partitions.
summary (Optional) Shows summary information per partition, including the partition size, bank size, state, and method by which files can be copied into a particular partition. You can use this keyword only when Flash memory has multiple partitions.
filesys (Optional) Shows the Device Info Block, the Status Info, and the Usage Info.
device: (Optional) Specifies the device about which to show Flash information. The device is optional; but when it is used, the colon (:) is required. When it is omitted, the default device is that specified by the cd command. Valid devices are as follows:

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

The show flash all command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0. The remaining commands, such as chips and detailed, first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.)

The show flash command displays the type of Flash memory present, any files that might currently exist in Flash memory, and the amounts of Flash memory used and remaining.

For the Cisco 7000 series PCMCIA slot, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, when you specify a PCMCIA slot as the device, the router displays the layout and contents of the Flash memory card inserted in the specified slot of the RP or RSP card. When you omit the device: argument, the router displays the default device specified by the cd command. Use the pwd command to show the current default device.

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show flash command on the Cisco 3000 and Cisco 7000 series:

Router# show flash
4096K bytes of flash memory sized on embedded flash.
File   name/status
 0     ahp4/gs7-k
 1     micro/eip1-0
 2     micro/sp1-3
 3     micro/trip1-1
 4     micro/hip1-0
 5     micro/fip1-1
 6     flyspecked
 7     spucode
 8     tripucode
 9     fipucode
 10    eipucode
 11    hipucode
 12    sipucode
 13    sp_q160-1
 14    ahp4/sp160-3 [deleted]
 15    ahp4/sp160-3
[682680/4194304 bytes free/total]

Table 13 describes the show flash display fields for the Cisco 3000 series and the internal Flash memory of the Cisco 7000 series.


Table 13: Show Flash Field Descriptions
Field Description
File Number of file in Flash memory.
name/status Files that currently exist in Flash memory.
bytes free Amount of Flash memory remaining.
[deleted] Flag indicating that another file exists with the same name or that the process has been abnormally terminated.

As the display shows, the Flash memory can store and display multiple, independent software images for booting itself or for TFTP server software for other products. This feature is useful for storing default system software. These images can be stored in compressed format (but cannot be compressed by the router).

To eliminate any files from Flash memory (invalidated or otherwise) and free up all available memory space, the entire Flash memory must be erased; individual files cannot be erased from Flash memory.

The following is a sample output from the show flash command on a router that has Flash memory partitioned:

Router# show flash
System flash directory, partition 1:
  File  Length   Name/status
    1   3459720  master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
  [3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read Only)
System flash directory, partition 2:
  File  Length   Name/status
    1   3459720  igs-kf
  [3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
  4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)

The following is a sample output from the show flash all command on the Cisco 3000 series and the internal Flash memory of the Cisco 7000 series. The format of the display is different on different router models. The format of your display might differ.

Router# show flash all
4096K bytes of flash memory sized on embedded flash.
    Chip    socket   code      bytes     name
     0       U63     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
     1       U62     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
     2       U61     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
     3       U60     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
     4       U48     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
     5       U47     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
     6       U46     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
     7       U45     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
     8       U30     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
     9       U29     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
    10       U28     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
    11       U27     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
    12       U17     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
    13       U16     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
    14       U15     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020
    15       U14     89BD   0x040000   INTEL 28F020

Flash file directory:
File  name/status
addr          length        fcksum    ccksum
0  gs7-k
0x12000080    2601100       0x4015    0x4015
1  micro/eip1-0
0x1227B14C    53364         0x0       0x0
2  micro/sp1-3
0x12288200    55418         0x0       0x0
3  micro/trip1-1
0x12295ABC    105806        0x0       0x0
4  micro/hip1-0
0x122AF84C    35528         0x0       0x0
5  micro/fip1-1
0x122B8354    97070         0x0       0x0
6  fsipucode
0x122CFEC4    6590          0x0       0x0
7  spucode
0x122D18C4    55418         0x0       0x0
8  tripucode 
0x122DF180    105806        0x0       0x0
9  fipucode
0x122F8F10    97070         0x0       0x0
10  eipucode
0x12310A80    53330         0x60A1    0x60A1
11  hipucode
0x1231DB14    35528         0x0       0x0
12  sipucode
0x1232661C    54040         0x0       0x0
13  sp_q160-1
0x1233974    42912          0x0       0x0
14  ahp4/sp160-3 [deleted]
0x1233E154    55730         0x0       0x0
15  ahp4/sp160-3
0x1234BB48    55808         0x0       0x0
[682680/4194304 bytes free/total]

Table 14 describes the show flash all display fields for the Cisco 3000 series and the Cisco 7000 series internal Flash memory.


Table 14: Show Flash All Field Descriptions
Field Description
bytes of flash memory sized on embedded flash Total amount of Flash memory present.
Chip Identifies the ROM unit.
socket Location of the ROM unit.
code Vendor code identifying the vendor of the ROM unit.
bytes Size of the ROM unit (in hex bytes).
name (in row beginning with Chip) Vendor name and chip part number of the ROM unit.
security jumper, flash memory Security jumper is/is not installed. Flash memory is programmable or read-only. If the security jumper is not installed, you will see the show flash display with a message indicating that the jumper is not installed.
File Number of the system image file. If no filename is specified in the boot system flash command, the router boots the system image file with the lowest file number.
name/status Filename and status of a system image file. The status [invalidated] appears when a file has been rewritten (recopied) into Flash memory. The first (now invalidated) copy of the file is still present within Flash memory, but it is rendered unusable in favor of the newest version. The [invalidated] status can also indicate an incomplete file that results from the user abnormally terminating the copy process, a network timeout, or a Flash memory overflow.
addr Address of the file in Flash memory.
length Size of the system image file (in bytes).
fcksum Checksum recorded in Flash memory.
ccksum Computer checksum.
[deleted] Flag indicating that another file exists with the same name or that process has been abnormally terminated.
bytes free/total Amount of Flash memory used/total amount of Flash memory.

In the following example, the security jumper is not installed and you cannot write to Flash memory until the security jumper is installed:

Router# show flash all
4096K bytes of flash memory on embedded flash (in RP1).
 security jumper(12V) is not installed,
flash memory is read-only.
file     offset       length       name
0        0xDCD0       1903892      gs7-k [deleted]
1        0x1DEA24     1903912      gs7-k
 [329908/4194304 bytes free]

The following is sample output for the show flash all command on a Cisco 3000 that has Flash memory partitioned:

Router# show flash all
System flash partition information:
Partition   Size    Used       Free     Bank-Size     State         Copy-Mode
    1       4096K    3459K     637K     4096K         Read Only     RXBOOT-FLH
    2       4096K    3224K     872K     4096K         Read/Write    Direct
System flash directory, partition 1:
File     Length     Name/status
        addr     fcksum     ccksum
  1     3459720     master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3
        0x40     0x3DE1     0x3DE1
[3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read ONLY)
   Chip    Bank     Code      Size      Name
    1      1        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
    2      1        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
    3      1        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
    4      1        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
Executing current image from System flash [partition 1]
 
 System flash directory, partition2:
File     Length     Name/status
        addr     fcksum     ccksum
  1     3224008     igs-kf.100
        0x40     0xEE91     0xEE91
[3224072 bytes used, 970232 available, 4194304 total]
4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)
   Chip    Bank     Code      Size      Name
    1      2        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
    2      2        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
    3      2        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
    4      2        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA

Table 15 describes the additional fields in the display.


Table 15: Show Flash All Fields for Partitioned Flash Memory
Field Description
Partition Partition number in Flash memory.
Size Size of partition in bytes.
Used Number of bytes used in partition.
Free Number of bytes free in partition.
Bank-Size Size of bank in bytes.
State State of the partition. It can be one of the following values:

  • Read-Only indicates the partition that is being executed from.

  • Read/Write is a partition that can be copied to.

Copy-Mode

Method by which the partition can be copied to:

  • RXBOOT-FLH indicates copy via Flash load helper.

  • Direct indicates user can copy directly into Flash memory.

  • None indicates that it is not possible to copy into that partition.

Chip

Chip number.
Bank Bank number.
Code Code number.
Size Size of chip.
Name Name of chip.

The following is sample output for the show flash chips command on a router that has Flash memory partitioned:

Router# show flash chips
System flash partition 1:
4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read ONLY)
  Chip    Bank    Code      Size      Name
   1      1       89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
   2      1       89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
   3      1       89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
   4      1       89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
Executing current image from System flash [partition 1]
System flash partition 2:
4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)
  Chip    Bank    Code      Size      Name
   1      2       89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
   2      2       89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
   3      2       89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA
   4      2       89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA

The following is sample output for the show flash detailed command on a router that has Flash memory partitioned:

Router# show flash detailed
System flash directory, partition 1:
File  Length   Name/status
        addr      fcksum  ccksum
  1   3224008  igs-kf.100
        0x40      0xEE91  0xEE91
[3224072 bytes used, 970232 available, 4194304 total]
4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)
System flash directory, partition 2:
File  Length   Name/status
        addr      fcksum  ccksum
  1   3224008  igs-kf.100
        0x40      0xEE91  0xEE91
[3224072 bytes used, 970232 available, 4194304 total]
4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)

The following is sample output for the show flash err command on a Cisco 3000 that has Flash memory partitioned:

Router# show flash err
System flash directory, partition 1:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   37376    master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3  [invalid checksum]
[37440 bytes used, 4156864 available, 4194304 total]
4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)
   Chip    Bank     Code      Size      Name                erase  write
    1      1        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA      0      0
    2      1        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA      0      0
    3      1        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA      0      0
    4      1        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA      0      0
Executing current image from System flash [partition 1]
System flash directory, partition 2:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   37376    master/igs-bfpx.100-4.3  [invalid checksum]
[37440 bytes used, 4156864 available, 4194304 total]
4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read/Write)
   Chip    Bank     Code      Size      Name                erase  write
    1      2        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA      0      0
    2      2        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA      0      0
    3      2        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA      0      0
    4      2        89A2      1024KB    INTEL 28F008SA      0      0

The following is sample output for the show flash summary command on a router that has Flash memory partitioned. The partition that indicates a state of Read Only is the partition that is being executed from.

Router# show flash summary
System flash partition information:
Partition   Size     Used      Free    Bank-Size   State       Copy-Mode
    1       4096K    2048K     2048K   2048K       Read Only   RXBOOT-FLH
    2       4096K    2048K     2048K   2048K       Read/Write  Direct

The following are possible values for Copy-Mode:

The following sample output shows the show flash command on a Cisco 7000 series PCMCIA slot, Cisco 7200 series, or Cisco 7500 series:

Router# cd slot1:
Router# show flash
-#- ED --type-- --crc--- -seek-- nlen -length- -----date/time------ name
1   .. 1        46A11866 2036C   4    746      May 16 1995 16:24:37 test

If you do not use the cd command to change the present working device to slot 1, you can display the same sample output with the following command:

Router# show flash slot1:
-#- ED --type-- --crc--- -seek-- nlen -length- -----date/time------ name
1   .. 1        46A11866 2036C   4    746      May 16 1995 16:24:37 test

The following is sample output for the show flash filesys command on a Cisco 7000 series PCMCIA slot, Cisco 7200 series, or Cisco 7500 series:

Cyclops# show flash filesys slot1:
-------- F I L E   S Y S T E M   S T A T U S --------
  Device Number = 1
DEVICE INFO BLOCK: test
  Magic Number          = 6887635   File System Vers = 10000    (1.0)
  Length                = 800000    Sector Size      = 20000
  Programming Algorithm = 4         Erased State     = FFFFFFFF
  File System Offset    = 20000     Length = 7A0000
  MONLIB Offset         = 100       Length = A140
  Bad Sector Map Offset = 1FFF8     Length = 8
  Squeeze Log Offset    = 7C0000    Length = 20000
  Squeeze Buffer Offset = 7E0000    Length = 20000
  Num Spare Sectors     = 0
    Spares:
STATUS INFO:
  Writable
  NO File Open for Write
  Complete Stats
  No Unrecovered Errors
  Squeeze in progress
USAGE INFO:
  Bytes Used     = 36C     Bytes Available = 79FC94
  Bad Sectors    = 0       Spared Sectors = 0
  OK Files       = 1       Bytes = 2EC
  Deleted Files  = 0       Bytes = 0
  Files w/Errors = 0       Bytes = 0

The following is sample output for the show flash chips bootflash: command on a Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series:

Router# show flash chips bootflash:
******** RSP Internal Flash Bank -- Intel Chips ********
Flash SIMM Reg: 401
  Flash SIMM PRESENT
  2 Banks
  Bank Size = 4M
  HW Rev = 1
Flash Status Registers: Bank 0
  Intelligent ID Code: 89898989 A2A2A2A2
  Status Reg: 80808080
Flash Status Registers: Bank 1
  Intelligent ID Code: 89898989 A2A2A2A2
  Status Reg: 80808080
Router#

In the following example, the present working device is bootflash on a Cisco 7200 series or Cisco 7500 series. The sample output displays the show flash all output.

Router# cd bootflash:
Router# show flash all 
-#- ED --type-- --crc--- -seek-- nlen -length- -----date/time------ name
1   .. FFFFFFFF 49B403EE 3D0510  21   3736719  May 30 1995 17:47:54 dirt/yanke/m
3865328 bytes available (3736848 bytes used)
-------- F I L E   S Y S T E M   S T A T U S --------
  Device Number = 2
DEVICE INFO BLOCK: test
  Magic Number          = 6887635   File System Vers = 10000    (1.0)
  Length                = 800000    Sector Size      = 40000
  Programming Algorithm = 5         Erased State     = FFFFFFFF
  File System Offset    = 40000     Length = 740000
  MONLIB Offset         = 100       Length = A270
  Bad Sector Map Offset = 3FFFC     Length = 4
  Squeeze Log Offset    = 780000    Length = 40000
  Squeeze Buffer Offset = 7C0000    Length = 40000
  Num Spare Sectors     = 0
    Spares:
STATUS INFO:
  Writable
  NO File Open for Write
  Complete Stats
  No Unrecovered Errors
  Squeeze in progress
USAGE INFO:
  Bytes Used     = 390510 Bytes Available = 3AFAF0
  Bad Sectors    = 0       Spared Sectors = 0
  OK Files       = 1       Bytes = 390490
  Deleted Files  = 0       Bytes = 0
  Files w/Errors = 0       Bytes = 0
******** RSP Internal Flash Bank -- Intel Chips ********
Flash SIMM Reg: 401
  Flash SIMM PRESENT
  2 Banks
  Bank Size = 4M
  HW Rev = 1
Flash Status Registers: Bank 0
  Intelligent ID Code: 89898989 A2A2A2A2
  Status Reg: 80808080
Flash Status Registers: Bank 1
  Intelligent ID Code: 89898989 A2A2A2A2
  Status Reg: 80808080
Cyclops#show flash chips bootflash:
******** RSP Internal Flash Bank -- Intel Chips ********
Flash SIMM Reg: 401
  Flash SIMM PRESENT
  2 Banks
  Bank Size = 4M
  HW Rev = 1
Flash Status Registers: Bank 0
  Intelligent ID Code: 89898989 A2A2A2A2
  Status Reg: 80808080
Flash Status Registers: Bank 1
  Intelligent ID Code: 89898989 A2A2A2A2
  Status Reg: 80808080

show flash devices

To display the names of the Flash devices supported on the Cisco 7200 series, Cisco 7507, and Cisco 7513, use the show flash devices EXEC command.

show flash devices
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Use this command for the Cisco 7200 series or a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 that is configured for High System Availability (HSA). HSA refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

When you issue this command, the router returns a list of valid Flash devices supported on the NPE card (for a Cisco 7200 series) and both RSP cards (for a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513). Use this command to learn the names of the Flash devices that the NPE card or slave RSP supports.

Sample Display

In the following example, the Flash devices for a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 are displayed:

slot-10# show flash device
nvram, tftp, rcp, slot0, slot1, bootflash, slaveslot0,
slaveslot1, slavebootflash, slavenvram
slot-10#

show flh-log

To view the system console output generated during the Flash load helper operation, use the show flh-log privileged EXEC command.

show flh-log
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

If you are a remote Telnet user performing the Flash upgrade without a console connection, this command allows you to retrieve console output when your Telnet connection has terminated due to the switch to the ROM image. The output indicates what happened during the download, and is particularly useful if the download fails.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show flh-log command:

Router# show flh-log
%FLH: abc/igs-kf.914 from 172.16.1.111 to flash... 

System flash directory:
File  Length   Name/status
  1   2251320  abc/igs-kf.914 

[2251384 bytes used, 1942920 available, 4194304 total]
Accessing file 'abc/igs-kf.914' on 172.16.1.111...
Loading from 172.16.13.111: 

Erasing device...... erased
Loading from 172.16.13.111: 
- [OK - 
2251320/4194304 bytes]

Verifying checksum... OK (0x97FA)
Flash copy took 79292 msecs
%FLH: Re-booting system after download
Loading abc/igs-kf.914 at 0x3000040, size = 2251320 bytes [OK]

F3: 2183364+67924+259584 at 0x3000060


              Restricted Rights Legend

Use, duplication, or disclosure by the Government is
subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph
(c) of the Commercial Computer Software - Restricted
Rights clause at FAR sec. 52.227-19 and subparagraph
(c) (1) (ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer
Software clause at DFARS sec. 252.227-7013.

              cisco Systems, Inc.
              170 West Tasman Drive
              San Jose, California 95134


Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
Cisco IOS (tm) GS Software (GS7), Version 11.0
Copyright (c) 1986-1995 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Tue 06-Dec-94 14:01 by smith
Image text-base: 0x00001000, data-base: 0x005A9C94

cisco 2500 (68030) processor (revision 0x00) with 4092K/2048K bytes of 
memory.
Processor board serial number 00000000
DDN X.25 software, Version 2.0, NET2 and BFE compliant.
ISDN software, Version 1.0.
Bridging software.
Enterprise software set supported. (0x0)
1 Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interface.
2 Serial network interfaces.
 --More-- 

1 ISDN Basic Rate interface.
32K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.

4096K bytes of processor board System flash (Read ONLY)

show microcode

To show the microcode bundled into a Cisco 7000 series or Cisco 7500 series system, use the show microcode EXEC command.

show microcode
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show microcode command:

Router# show micro
Microcode bundled in system
Card    Microcode    Target Hardware    Description
Type    Version      Version
----    ---------    ---------------    -----------
SP         2.3            11.x          SP version 2.3
EIP        1.1             1.x          EIP version 1.1
TRIP       1.2             1.x          TRIP version 1.2
FIP        1.4             2.x          FIP version 1.4
HIP        1.1             1.x          HIP version 1.1
SIP        1.1             1.x          SIP version 1.1
FSIP       1.1             1.x          FSIP version 1.1

show reload

To display the reload status on the router, use the show reload EXEC command.

show reload
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.2.

You can use the show reload command to display a pending software reload. To cancel the reload, use the reload cancel privileged EXEC command.

Sample Display

The following sample output from the show reload command shows that a reload is schedule for 12:00 a.m. (midnight) on Saturday, April 20:

Router# show reload
Reload scheduled for 00:00:00 PDT Sat April 20 1996 (in 12 hours and 12 minutes)
Router#

show running-config

To display the configuration information currently running on the terminal, use the show running-config EXEC command. This command replaces the write terminal command.

show running-config
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use this command in conjunction with the show startup-config command to compare the information in running memory to the information stored in NVRAM or in a location specified by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable. On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, this variable specifies the configuration file used for initialization (startup). Use the boot config command in conjunction with the copy running-config startup-config command to set the CONFIG_FILE environment variable.

Example

The following example illustrates how to display the running configuration:

show running-config
Building configuration...
Related Commands

boot config
configure
copy running-config startup-config
show startup-config

show startup-config

To display the contents of NVRAM (if present and valid) or to show the configuration file pointed to by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, use the show startup-config EXEC command. This command replaces show configuration command.

show startup-config
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

NVRAM stores the configuration information on the network server in text form as configuration commands. For all platforms except the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and the Cisco 7500 series, the show startup-config command shows the version number of the software used when you last executed the copy running-config startup-config command.

For the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the show startup-config command shows the configuration file specified by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable. The Cisco IOS software informs you whether the displayed configuration is a complete configuration or a distilled version. A distilled configuration is one that does not contain access lists. If the CONFIG_FILE environment variable does not exist or is not valid, the software displays the NVRAM configuration (if it is a valid, complete configuration).

Sample Displays

The following is sample output from the show startup-config command, displaying the contents of NVRAM.

Router# show startup-config
Using 5057 out of 32768 bytes
!
version 10.3
!
enable-password xxxx
service pad
!
boot system dross-system 172.16.13.111
boot system dross-system 172.16.1.111
!
exception dump 172.16.13.111
!
no ip ipname-lookup
!
decnet routing 13.1
decnet node-type area
decnet max-address 1023
!
interface Ethernet 0
ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip helper-address 172.30.1.0
ip accounting
ip gdp
decnet cost 3
!
ip domain-name CISCO.COM
ip name-server 255.255.255.255
!
end

The following is partial sample output from the show startup-config command when the configuration file has been compressed:

Router# show startup-config
Using 21542 out of 65536 bytes, uncompressed size = 142085 bytes
!
version 9.22 
service compress-config
!
hostname rose
!
boot system flash gs7-k.sthormod_clean
boot system rom
Related Commands

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

configure
copy running-config startup-config
description
+
service compress-config
show boot
show running-config

show version

To display the configuration of the system hardware, the software version, the names and sources of configuration files, and the boot images, use the show version EXEC command.

show version
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

You can also use this command with a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured with High System Availability (HSA). HSA refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

When used with HSA, this command also displays the currently running slave RSP card and the Cisco IOS release that it is running.

Sample Display

The following is sample output from the show version command on a Cisco 7500 series router with an RSP2 and three VIP2s with a variety of interfaces.

Router# show version
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software
IOS (tm) GS Software (RSP-JV-M), Experimental Version 11.1(12816)
[getchell 108]
Copyright (c) 1986-1996 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Mon 03-Jun-96 11:39 by getchell
Image text-base: 0x600108A0, data-base: 0x60910000
ROM: System Bootstrap, Version 5.3(16645) [szhang 571], INTERIM SOFTWARE
Router uptime is 4 minutes
System restarted by reload
System image file is "slot0:dirt/vip2/master/rsp-jv-mz.960603", booted via tftp from 172.18.2.3
cisco RSP2 (R4600) processor with 24576K bytes of memory.
R4600 processor, Implementation 32, Revision 2.0
Last reset from power-on
G.703/E1 software, Version 1.0.
SuperLAT software copyright 1990 by Meridian Technology Corp).
Bridging software.
X.25 software, Version 2.0, NET2, BFE and GOSIP compliant.
TN3270 Emulation software (copyright 1994 by TGV Inc).
Primary Rate ISDN software, Version 1.0.
Chassis Interface.
1 CIP controller (3 IBM Channels).
1 CIP2 controller (3 IBM Channels).
1 EIP controller (6 Ethernet).
1 HIP controller (1 HSSI).
1 FSIP controller (8 Serial).
1 AIP controller (1 ATM).
1 TRIP controller (4 Token Ring).
1 FIP controller (1 FDDI).
1 MIP controller (2 T1).
3 VIP2 controllers (1 FastEthernet)(13 Ethernet)(4 Serial)(4 Token Ring)(1
Fddi).
1 FEIP controller (1 FastEthernet).
19 Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces.
2 FastEthernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces.
8 Token Ring/IEEE 802.5 interfaces.
12 Serial network interfaces.
1 HSSI network interface.
2 FDDI network interfaces.
1 ATM network interface.
2 Channelized T1/PRI ports.
125K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.
8192K bytes of Flash PCMCIA card at slot 0 (Sector size 128K).
8192K bytes of Flash PCMCIA card at slot 1 (Sector size 128K).
8192K bytes of Flash internal SIMM (Sector size 256K).
No slave installed in slot 7.
Configuration register is 0x0

Table 16 describes the fields in this display for Cisco 7500 series routers with an RSP2 route switch processor.


Table 16: Show Version Field Descriptions on Cisco 7500 Series Routers
Field Description
IOS (tm) GS Software, Version 11.1 Always specify the complete version number when reporting a possible software problem. In the example output, the version number is 11.1.
ROM: System Bootstrap, Version 5.3(16645) [szhang 571], INTERIM SOFTWARE Bootstrap version string.
Router uptime is...

System restarted by...

System image file is...

The amount of time the system has been up and running, how the system was restarted, and the name of the system image file.
System last reset by Also displayed is a log of how the system was last booted, both as a result of normal system startup and of system error. For example, information can be displayed to indicate a bus error that is generally the result of an attempt to access a nonexistent address, as follows:

System restarted by bus error at PC 0xC4CA, address 0x210C0C0

G.703/E1 software...

SuperLAT software...

Bridging software.

X.25 software...

TN3270 Emulation software...

Primary Rate ISDN software...

Software currently running.
cisco RSP2 (R4600) processor... The remaining output in each display shows the hardware configuration and any nonstandard software options. The configuration register contents are displayed in hexadecimal notation.

The following is sample output from the show version command from a Cisco 7000 series:

Router> show version
GS Software (GS7), Version 10.0
Copyright (c) 1986-1993 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Mon 11-Jan-93 14:44
System Bootstrap, Version 4.6(1)
Current date and time is Fri 2-26-1993 2:18:52
Boot date and time is Fri 1-29-1993 11:42:38
Router uptime is 3 weeks, 6 days, 14 hours, 36 minutes
System restarted by power-on
Running default software
Network configuration file is "Router", booted via tftp from 172.16.2.333
RP1 (68040) processor with 16384K bytes of memory.
X.25 software.
Bridging software.
1 CIP controller (3 IBM Channels).
1 CIP2 controller (3 IBM Channels).
1 Switch Processor.
1 TRIP controller (4 Token Ring).
4 Token Ring/IEEE 802.5 interface.
1 AIP controller (1(ATM)
1 ATM network interface
4096K bytes of flash memory on embedded flash (in RP1).
Configuration register is 0x0

Table 17 describes significant fields shown in these displays.


Table 17: Show Version Field Descriptions
Field Description
GS Software (GS7), Version 10.0 Always specify the complete version number when reporting a possible software problem. In the example output, the version number is 10.0.
System Bootstrap, Version Bootstrap version string.
Current date and time

Boot date and time

Router uptime is

Current date and time, the date and time the system was last booted, and uptime, or the amount of time the system has been up and running.
System restarted by power-on Also displayed is a log of how the system was last booted, both as a result of normal system startup and of system error. For example, information can be displayed to indicate a bus error that is generally the result of an attempt to access a nonexistent address, as follows:

System restarted by bus error at PC 0xC4CA, address 0x210C0C0

Running default software If the software was booted over the network, the Internet address of the boot host is shown. If the software was loaded from onboard ROM, this line reads "running default software." In addition, the names and sources of the host and network configuration files are shown.
RP1.... The remaining output in each display shows the hardware configuration and any nonstandard software options. The configuration register contents are displayed in hexadecimal notation.

The output of the show version EXEC command can also provide certain messages, such as bus error messages. If such error messages appear, report the complete text of this message to your technical support specialist.

The following is sample output of the show version command from a Cisco 7513. In this example, the current slave is processor slot 7.

Router# show version
Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software 
IOS (tm) GS Software (RSP-P-M), Experimental Version 11.1(5479) [dbath 119]
Copyright (c) 1986-1995 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Wed 08-Nov-95 17:51 by dbath
Image text-base: 0x600088A0, data-base: 0x603B6000
ROM: System Bootstrap, Version 5.3(18168) [mansonw 63], INTERIM SOFTWARE
Router uptime is 4 days, 31 minutes
System restarted by reload
System image file is "slot0:dirt/dbath/rsp-p-mz-ark-1", booted via tftp from 172.31.7.19
cisco RSP2 (R4600) processor with 16384K bytes of memory.
R4600 processor, Implementation 32, Revision 2.0 
Last reset from power-on
G.703/E1 software, Version 1.0.
Primary Rate ISDN software, Version 1.0.
Chassis Interface.
1 CIP controller (3 IBM Channels).
1 CIP2 controller (3 IBM Channels).
1 EIP controller (6 Ethernet).
1 FSIP controller (8 Serial).
1 AIP controller (1 ATM).
1 TRIP controller (4 Token Ring).
1 FIP controller (1 FDDI).
1 MIP controller (2 T1).
6 Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 interfaces.
4 Token Ring/IEEE 802.5 interfaces.
8 Serial network interfaces.
1 FDDI network interface.
1 ATM network interface.
2 Channelized T1/PRI ports.
125K bytes of non-volatile configuration memory.
8192K bytes of Flash PCMCIA card at slot 0 (Sector size 128K).
8192K bytes of Flash internal SIMM (Sector size 256K).
Slave in slot 7 is running Cisco Internetwork Operating System Software 
IOS (tm) GS Software (RSP-DW-M), Experimental Version 11.1(5479) [dbath 118]
Copyright (c) 1986-1995 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Compiled Wed 08-Nov-95 16:57 by dbath
Configuration register is 0x0
Related Command

reload

slave auto-sync config

To turn on automatic synchronization of configuration files for a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 that is configured for High System Availability (HSA), use the slave auto-sync config global configuration command. To turn off automatic synchronization, use the no form of the command.

slave auto-sync config
no slave auto-sync config

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

On

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Use this command for a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 that is configured for High System Availability (HSA). HSA refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

In automatic synchronization mode, when you issue a copy EXEC command that specifies the master's startup configuration (startup-config) as the target, the master also copies the same file to the slave's startup configuration (slave-startup-config). Use this command when implementing HSA for simple hardware backup or for software error protection to ensure that the master and slave RSP contain the same configuration files.

Example

The following example turns on automatic configuration file synchronization:

slave auto-sync config
copy running-config startup-config
Related Command

slave sync config

slave default-slot

To specify the default slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513, use the slave default-slot global configuration command.

slave default-slot processor-slot-number
Syntax Description
processor-slot-number Number of processor slot that contains the default slave RSP. On the Cisco 7507, valid values are 2 or 3. On the Cisco 7513, valid values are 6 or 7. The default is the higher number processor slot.
Default

The default slave is the RSP card located in the higher number processor slot. On the Cisco 7507, processor slot 3 contains the default slave RSP. On the Cisco 7513, processor slot 7 contains the default slave RSP.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Use this command for a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 that is configured for High System Availability (HSA). HSA refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

The router uses the default slave information when booting:

Example

The following example sets the default slave RSP to processor slot 2 on a Cisco 7507 and copies the configuration file with the copy EXEC command:

slave default-slot 2
copy running-config startup-config
Related Command

reload

slave image

To specify the image that the slave RSP runs on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513, use the slave image global configuration command.

slave image {system | flash file-id}
Syntax Description
system (Optional) Loads the slave image that is bundled with the master system image. This is the default.
flash (Optional) Loads the slave image from the Flash device specified by the file-id argument.
file-id Specifies a device:filename of the slave image file to download. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series RP card or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7500 series RSP card.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7500 series RSP card.

The filename argument is the name of a file on the specified Flash device. The file can be of any type. The maximum filename length is 63 characters. The first file on the specified device is the default file.

Default

The default is to load the image from the system bundle.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Use this command for a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 that is configured for High System Availability (HSA). HSA refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

Use the slave image command to override the slave image that is bundled with the master image.

When using HSA for simple hardware backup, ensure that the slave image is in the same location on the master and the slave RSP card. Thus, if the slave RSP card becomes the master, it will be able to find the slave image and download it to the new slave.

Example

The following example specifies that the slave RSP run the rsp-dw-mz.ucode.111-3.2 image from slot 0.

slave image slot0:rsp-dw-mz.ucode.111-3.2
Related Command

slave reload

slave reload

To force a reload of the image that the slave RSP card is running on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513, use the slave reload global configuration command.

slave reload
Command Syntax

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Use this command for a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 that is configured for High System Availability (HSA). HSA refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

After using the slave image global configuration command to specify the image that the slave RSP runs on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513, use the slave reload command to reload the slave with the new image. The slave reload command can also be used to force the slave to reboot its existing image.

Example

The following example reloads an inactive slave RSP card:

slave reload
Related Command

slave image

slave sync config

To manually synchronize configuration files on the master and slave RSP cards of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513, use the slave sync config privileged EXEC command.

slave sync config
Command Syntax

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Automatic synchronization is turned on.

Command Mode

Privileged EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Use this command for a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 that is configured for High System Availability (HSA). HSA refers to how quickly your router returns to an operational status after a failure occurs. On the Cisco 7507 and Cisco 7513, you can install two RSP cards in a single router to improve system availability.

This command allows you to synchronize the configuration files of the master and slave RSP cards on a case-by-case basis when you do not have automatic synchronization turned on. This command copies the master's configuration file to the slave RSP card.


Note You must use this command when you insert a new slave RSP card into a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 for the first time to ensure the new slave is configured consistently with the master.
Example

The following example synchronizes the configuration files on the master and slave RSP card:

slave sync config
Related Command

slave auto-sync config

slave terminal

To enable access to the slave RSP console, use the slave terminal global configuration command. The no form of this command disables access to the slave RSP console.

slave terminal
no slave terminal

Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Default

Enabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

The slave console does not have enable password protection. Thus, an individual connected to the slave console port can enter privileged EXEC mode and view or erase the configuration of the router. Use the no slave terminal command to disable slave console access and prevent security problems. When the slave console is disabled, users cannot enter commands.

If slave console access is disabled, the following message appears periodically on the slave console:

%%Slave terminal access is disabled. Use "slave terminal" command in master RSP configuration mode to enable it.
Example

The following example disables console access to the slave RSP:

no slave terminal

squeeze

To permanently delete Flash files on the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, use the squeeze EXEC command.

squeeze device:
Syntax Description
device: Flash device from which to permanently delete files. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

Default

This command has no default.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.1.

Use this command with the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series.


Note With the Cisco 7000 series, you can use the squeeze command only on the Flash memory card inserted in the PCMCIA slot (slot0:) of the RP card. You cannot use this command on the Cisco 7000 internal Flash memory.

When Flash memory is full, you might need to rearrange the files so that the space used by the "deleted" files can be reclaimed. When you issue the squeeze command, the router copies all valid files to the beginning of Flash memory and erases all files marked "deleted." At this point, you cannot recover "deleted" files and you can write to the reclaimed Flash memory space.

In addition to removing deleted files, the squeeze command removes any files that the system has marked as error. An error file is created when a file write fails (for example, because the device is full) and is automatically deleted. To remove error files, you must use the squeeze command.


Note The squeeze operation might take as long as several minutes because it can involve erasing and rewriting almost an entire Flash memory space.
Example

The following example instructs the router to permanently erase the files marked "deleted" from the Flash memory card inserted in slot 1:

squeeze slot1:
Related Commands

delete
dir
undelete

tftp-server

To specify that the router operate as a TFTP server or to specify that a Flash device on the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series operates as a TFTP server, use one of the following tftp-server global configuration commands. This command replaces the tftp-server system command. To remove a previously defined filename, use the no tftp-server command with the appropriate filename.

tftp-server flash [partition-number:]filename1 [alias filename2] [access-list-number]

tftp-server rom alias
filename1 [access-list-number]

no tftp-server {flash [partition-number:]filename1 | rom alias filename2}

tftp-server flash device:filename (Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series)
no tftp-server flash
device:filename
Syntax Description
flash Specifies TFTP service of a file in Flash memory.
rom Specifies TFTP service of a file in ROM.
filename1 Name of a file in Flash or in ROM that the TFTP server uses in answering TFTP Read Requests.
alias Specifies an alternate name for the file that the TFTP server uses in answering TFTP Read Requests.
filename2 Alternate name of the file that the TFTP server uses in answering TFTP Read Requests. A client of the TFTP server can use this alternate name in its Read Requests.
access-list-number (Optional) Basic IP access-list number. Valid values are 0 to 99.
partition-number: (Optional) Specifies TFTP service of a file in the specified partition of Flash memory. If the partition number is not specified, the file in the first partition is used.
device: Specifies TFTP service of a file on a Flash memory device in the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory on the Cisco 7000 series.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

filename Name of the file on a Flash memory device that the TFTP server uses in answering a TFTP Read Request. Use this argument only with the Cisco 7000 series or Cisco 7500 series.
Default

Disabled

Command Mode

Global configuration

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

You can specify multiple filenames by repeating the tftp-server command. The system sends a copy of the system image contained in ROM or one of the system images contained in Flash memory to any client that issues a TFTP Read Request with this filename.

If the specified filename1 or filename2 exists in Flash memory, a copy of the Flash image is sent. On systems that contain a complete image in ROM, the system sends the ROM image if the specified filename1 or filename2 is not found in Flash memory.

Images that run from ROM cannot be loaded over the network. Therefore, it does not make sense to use TFTP to offer the ROMs on these images.

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, the system sends a copy of the file contained on one of the Flash memory devices to any client that issues a TFTP Read Request with its filename.

Examples

In the following example, the system uses TFTP to send a copy of the version-10.3 file located in Flash memory in response to a TFTP Read Request for that file. The requesting host is checked against access list 22.

tftp-server flash version-10.3 22

In the following example, the system uses TFTP to send a copy of the ROM image gs3-k.101 in response to a TFTP Read Request for the gs3-k.101 file:

tftp-server rom alias gs3-k.101

In the following example, the system uses TFTP to send a copy of the version-11.0 file in response to a TFTP Read Request for that file. The file is located on the Flash memory card inserted in slot 0.

tftp-server flash slot0:version-11.0
Related Command

A dagger (+) indicates that the command is documented outside this chapter.

access-list +

undelete

To recover a deleted file on a specified device of the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, use the undelete EXEC command.

undelete index [device:]
Syntax Description
index Number that indexes the file in the dir command output.
device: (Optional) Device to contain the recovered configuration file. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

Default

The default device is the one specified by the cd command.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use this command with the Cisco 7000 series and the Cisco 7500 series.


Note With the Cisco 7000 series, you can use the undelete command only on the Flash memory card inserted in the PCMCIA slot (slot0:) of the RP card. You cannot use this command on a Cisco 7000's internal Flash memory.

When you delete a file, the Cisco IOS software simply marks the file as deleted, but does not erase the file. This command allows you to recover a "deleted" file on a specified Flash memory device. You must undelete a file by its index because you could have multiple deleted files with the same name. For example, the "deleted" list could contain multiple configuration files with the name router-config. You undelete by index to indicate which of the many router-config files from the list to undelete. Use the dir command to learn the index number of the file you want to undelete.

You cannot undelete a file if a valid (undeleted) one with the same name exists. Instead, you first delete the existing file and then undelete the file you want. For example, if you had an undeleted version of the router-config file and you wanted to use a previous, deleted version instead, you could not simply undelete the previous version by index. You would first delete the existing router-config file and then undelete the previous router-config file by index. You can delete and undelete a file up to 15 times.

If you try to recover the configuration file pointed to by the CONFIG_FILE environment variable, the system prompts you to confirm recovery of the file. This prompt reminds you that the CONFIG_FILE environment variable points to an undeleted file. To permanently delete all "deleted" files on a Flash memory device, use the squeeze command. If you try to recover a file that has the same name as an existing valid file, the system displays an error message.

Example

The following example recovers the deleted file whose index number is 1 to the Flash memory card inserted in slot 0:

undelete 1 slot0:
Related Commands

delete
dir
squeeze

verify

On the Cisco 7000 series, Cisco 7200 series, and Cisco 7500 series, to verify the checksum of a file on a Flash device, use the verify EXEC command. This command replaces the copy verify and copy verify flash commands.

verify [device:] filename
Syntax Description
device: (Optional) Device containing the file whose checksum is being verified. The colon (:) is required. Valid devices are as follows:

· flash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7000 series.

· bootflash--Internal Flash memory in the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot0--PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7000 series or the first PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slot1--Second PCMCIA slot on the Cisco 7200 series and Cisco 7500 series.

· slavebootflash--Internal Flash memory on the slave RSP card of a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot0--First PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

· slaveslot1--Second PCMCIA slot of the slave RSP card on a Cisco 7507 or Cisco 7513 configured for HSA.

When you omit this argument, the system verifies the checksum of the specified file on the current working device.

filename Name of a file on the specified Flash device. The file can be of any type. The maximum filename length is 63 characters.
Default

The current working device is the default device.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

Use the verify command to verify the checksum of a file before using it. When you omit the device: argument, the system verifies the checksum of the specified file on the current working device.


Note On the Cisco 7000 series, the verify [device:]filename command differs from the verify flash command. The verify [device:]filename command verifies a specified file located in internal Flash or on the Flash memory card inserted in the PCMCIA slot. The verify flash command verifies internal Flash memory.
Example

The following example verifies the gsxx file on the Flash memory card inserted in slot 0:

verify slot0:gsxx
Related Commands

cd
copy flash
ip rcmd remote-username
pwd
show flash

verify bootflash

To verify the checksum of a boot image in Flash memory on the Cisco 4500, use the verify bootflash EXEC command. This command replaces the copy verify bootflash command.

verify bootflash
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 11.0.

You can use this command only on routers that have two banks of Flash: one bank for the boot image and the second bank for the system image.

Each boot software image that is distributed on disk uses a single checksum for the entire image. This checksum is displayed only when the image is copied into Flash memory; it is not displayed when the image file is copied from one disk to another.

The README file, which is included with the image on the disk, lists the name, file size, and checksum of the image. Review the contents of the README file before loading or duplicating the new image so that you can verify the checksum when you copy it into Flash memory or onto a server.

To display the contents of Flash memory, use the show flash command. The Flash contents listing does not include the checksum of individual files. To recompute and verify the image checksum after the image has been copied into Flash memory, use the verify bootflash command. When you enter the command, the system prompts you for the filename to verify. By default, it prompts for the last file (most recent) in Flash. Press Return to recompute the default file checksum, or enter the name of a different file at the prompt.

Example

The following example illustrates how to use this command:

Router# verify bootflash
Boot flash directory:
File  name/status
  1   c4500-xboot
[1387336 bytes used, 2806968 bytes available]
Name of file to verify? c4500-xboot
Verifying checksum for 'c4500-xboot' (file # 1)... [OK]
Related Commands

copy bootflash tftp
copy mop bootflash
copy tftp bootflash
erase bootflash
show bootflash

verify flash

To verify the checksum of Flash memory, use the verify flash EXEC command. This command replaces the copy verify and copy verify flash commands.

verify flash
Syntax Description

This command has no arguments or keywords.

Command Mode

EXEC

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.3.

The verify flash command works on the Cisco 2500 series, Cisco 3000 series, Cisco 4000 series, Cisco 7000 series, and Cisco 7200 series only. The Cisco 7500 series does not support this command.

On the Cisco 7000 series, this command works only on internal Flash memory. This command does not verify the checksums of files on the Flash memory card inserted in the PCMCIA slot. To verify the Flash memory card, use the verify command.

Each system software or microcode image that is distributed on disk uses a single checksum for the entire image. This checksum is displayed only when the image is copied into Flash memory; it is not displayed when the image file is copied from one disk to another.

The README file (which is included with the image on the disk) lists the name, file size, and checksum of the image. Review the contents of the README file before loading or duplicating the new image so that you can verify the checksum when you copy it into the Flash memory or onto a TFTP server.

To display the contents of Flash memory, use the show flash command. The Flash content listing does not include the checksum of individual files. To recompute and verify the image checksum after the image file is copied into Flash memory, use the verify command. When you enter the command, the screen prompts you for the filename to verify. By default, it prompts for the last file in Flash (most recent). Press Return to recompute the default file checksum, or enter the filename of a different file at the prompt.

Examples

The following example illustrates how to use this command:

Router# verify flash

Name of file to verify [gsxx]?
Verifying via checksum...
vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv

Flash verification successful. Length = 1923712, checksum = 0xA0C1
Router#

The following example illustrates how to use the verify flash command when more than one Flash memory partition exists:

Router# verify flash
System flash partition information:
Partition   Size     Used    Free    Bank-Size   State       Copy-Mode
    1       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read Only   RXBOOT-FLH
    2       4096K    2048K   2048K   2048K       Read/Write  Direct
[Type ?<no> for partition directory; ? for full directory; q to abort]

The system will prompt only if there are two or more read/write partitions. If the partition entered is not valid, the process terminates. You can enter a partition number, a question mark (?) for a directory display of all partitions, or a question mark and a number (?number) for directory display of a particular partition. The default is the first partition.

File  Length   Name/status
  1   3459720  master/igs-j.111.1.0
[3459784 bytes used, 734520 available, 4194304 total]
Name of file to verify? master/igs-j.111.1.0
Verifying checksum for 'master/igs-j.111.1.0' (file # 1)... OK
Related Commands

show flash
verify

write erase

The erase startup-config command replaces this command. Refer to the description of the erase command for more information on erase startup-config.

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

write memory

The copy running-config startup-config command replaces this command. Refer to the description of the copy running-config command for more information on copy running-config startup-config.

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

write network

The copy running-config rcp or copy running-config tftp command replaces this command. Refer to the description of the copy running-config command for more information on copy running-config rcp or copy running-config tftp.

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

write terminal

The show running-config command replaces this command. Refer to the description of
show running-config for more information.

Usage Guidelines

This command first appeared in Cisco IOS Release 10.0.

hometocprevnextglossaryfeedbacksearchhelp
Copyright 1989-1998 © Cisco Systems Inc.