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Understanding the User Interface

Understanding the User Interface

The Cisco Internetwork Operating System (Cisco IOS) user interface provides access to several different command modes. Each command mode provides a group of related commands. This chapter describes how to access and list the commands available in each command mode and explains the primary uses for each command mode. This chapter also describes the other features of the user interface.

Cisco IOS commands can be entered at a terminal connected to the access server or router using the command line interface (CLI). Commands may also be entered using the Cisco Web browser interface. All access servers and routers, running 11.0 or higher versions of the Cisco IOS software, have a home page. From this home page, you can access the Cisco Web browser interface which allows you to execute Cisco IOS commands. You can execute these commands by either clicking on them, as you would click on a hypertext link, or by entering them in the command field. This feature is described in the "Use the Cisco Web Browser Interface to Issue Commands" section later in this chapter.

The user interface also allows the creation and use of menus. Menus allow users to use routing features without needing to know anything about the underlying Cisco IOS user interface.

For security purposes, the Cisco IOS software provides two levels of access to commands: user and privileged. The unprivileged, user mode is called user EXEC mode. The privileged mode is called privileged EXEC mode and requires a password. The commands available in user EXEC mode are a subset of the commands available in privileged EXEC mode.

From the privileged level, you can access global configuration mode and a number of specific configuration modes. These modes are listed under the "Access Each Command Mode" section later in this chapter. In addition, if your router or access server does not find a valid system image, or if its configuration file is corrupted at startup, the system might enter read-only memory (ROM) monitor mode. Entering a question mark (?) at the system prompt allows you to obtain a list of commands available for each command mode.

Almost every configuration command also has a no form. In general, use the no form to disable a feature or function. Use the command without the keyword no to reenable a disabled feature or to enable a feature that is disabled by default. For example, IP routing is enabled by default. To disable IP routing, specify the no ip routing command and specify ip routing to reenable it. The Cisco IOS software command references provides the complete syntax for the configuration commands and describes what the no form of a command does.

The user interface also provides context-sensitive help on command syntax. This chapter describes how to use the help system. It also describes the command editing and command history features that enable you to recall and easily edit command entries.

For a complete description of the commands mentioned in this chapter, refer to the "User Interface Commands" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.

User Interface Task List

You can perform the tasks in the following sections to familiarize yourself with the Cisco IOS user interface:

Access Each Command Mode

This section describes how to access each of the Cisco IOS command modes.

The following lists the primary command modes:

The following lists the command modes accessible from global configuration mode:

Table 1 lists the command modes, how to access each mode, the prompt while in each mode, and how to exit each mode. The prompts listed assume that the default device name is "Router." Table 1 does not include all of the possible ways to access or exit each command mode.


Table 1: Summary of Command Modes
Command Mode Access Method Prompt Exit Method
User EXEC Log in. Router> Use the logout command.
Privileged EXEC From user EXEC mode, use the enable EXEC command. Router# To exit back to user EXEC mode, use the disable command.

To enter global configuration mode, use the configure privileged EXEC command.

Global configuration From privileged EXEC mode, use the configure privileged EXEC command. Router(config)# To exit to privileged EXEC mode, use the exit or end command or press Ctrl-Z.

To enter interface configuration mode, enter an interface configuration command.

Interface configuration From global configuration mode, enter by specifying an interface with an interface command. Router(config-if)# To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.

To exit to privileged EXEC mode, use the exit command or press Ctrl-Z.

To enter subinterface configuration mode, specify a subinterface with the interface command.

Subinterface configuration From interface configuration mode, specify a subinterface with an interface command. Router(config-subif)# To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.

To enter privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Controller configuration From global configuration mode, use the controller command to configure a channelized T1 interface. Router(config-controller)# To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.

To enter privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Hub configuration From global configuration mode, enter by specifying a hub with the hub command. Router(config-hub)# To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.

To enter privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Map-list configuration From global configuration mode, define a map list with the map-list command. Router(config-map-list)# To exit to map-class configuration mode, use the map-class command.

To enter privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Map-class configuration From global configuration mode, configure a map class with the map-class command. Router(config-map-class)# To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.

To enter privileged EXEC mode, press Ctrl-Z.

Line configuration From global configuration mode, enter by specifying a line with a line command. Router(config-line)# To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.

To enter privileged EXEC mode use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Router configuration From global configuration mode, enter by issuing a command that begins with router (such as router igrp). Router(config-router)# To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.

To enter privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

IPX-router configuration From global configuration mode, enter by issuing the ipx routing command, then a command that begins with ipx router (such as ipx router eigrp). Router(config-ipx-router)# To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.
Route-map configuration From global configuration mode, enter by specifying the route-map command. Router(config-route-map)# To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.

To enter privileged EXEC mode, press Ctrl-Z.

Key chain configuration From global configuration mode, use the key chain command. Router(config-keychain)# To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.
Key chain key configuration From key chain configuration mode, use the key command. Router(config-keychain-
key)#
To exit to key chain configuration mode, use the exit command.
Response time reporter configuration From global configuration mode, use the rtr command. Router(config-rtr)# To exit response time reporter configuration mode, use the exit command.
ROM monitor From privileged EXEC mode, use the reload EXEC command. Press Break during the first 60 seconds while the system is booting. > To exit to user EXEC mode, type continue.
LANE database configuration From global EXEC mode, use the lane database database name command. Router(config) To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.

To exit to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

APPN configuration From global EXEC mode, use the appn mode modename command. Router(appn)#

To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.

To exit to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Interface channel configuration From global EXEC mode, use the interface channel 1/2 command. Router(config) To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.
Internal LAN configuration From global EXEC mode, use the lan command. Router(config-if) To exit to interface configuration mode, use the exit command.

Internal adapter configuration From internal LAN configuration mode, enter the adapter command. Router(config-lan) To exit to Internal LAN configuration mode, use the exit command.
TN3270 server configuration From interface configuration mode, use the tn3270-server command. Router(tn3270-server) To exit TN3270 server configuration mode, use the exit command.
DLUR configuration From TN3270 configuration mode, use the dlur command. Router(tn3270-dlur) To exit DLUR configuration mode, use the exit command.

DLUR SAP configuration From DLUR configuration mode, use the sap command. Router(tn3270-dlur-sap) To exit to DLUR SAP configuration mode, use the exit command.
PU configuration From TN3270 server configuration mode or from DLUR configuration mode, use the PU command. Router(tn3270-pu)

Router(tn3270-dlur-pu)

To exit PU configuration mode, use the exit command.
Access-list configuration From global configuration mode, use the ip access-list command. Router(config-std-nacl)#
or
Router(config-ext-nacl)#
To exit to global configuration mode, use the exit command.
Hex input From global configuration mode, use the crypto public-key command. Router(config-pubkey)# To exit hex input mode, use the quit command.
Crypto map configuration From global configuration mode, use the crypto map command. Router(config-crypto-map)# To exit crypto map configuration mode, use the exit command.

User EXEC Mode

After you log in to the router or access server, you are automatically in user EXEC command mode. The EXEC commands available at the user level are a subset of those available at the privileged level. In general, the user EXEC commands allow you to connect to remote devices, change terminal settings on a temporary basis, perform basic tests, and list system information.

To list the user EXEC commands, complete the following task:

Task Command
List the user EXEC commands. ?

The user-level prompt consists of the host name followed by the angle bracket (>):

Router>

The default host name is Router unless it has been changed during initial configuration using the setup command. Refer to the product user guide for information on the setup facility. You can also change the host name using the hostname global configuration command described in the "System Management Commands" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.

To list the commands available in user EXEC mode, enter a question mark (?) as shown in the following example:

Router> ? 
Exec commands:
 <1-99>           Session number to resume
 connect          Open a terminal connection
 disconnect       Disconnect an existing telnet session
 enable           Turn on privileged commands
 exit             Exit from the EXEC
 help             Description of the interactive help system
 lat              Open a lat connection
 lock             Lock the terminal
 login            Log in as a particular user
 logout           Exit from the EXEC
 menu             Start a menu-based user interface
 mbranch          Trace multicast route for branch of tree
 mrbranch         Trace reverse multicast route to branch of tree
 mtrace           Trace multicast route to group
 name-connection Name an existing telnet connection
 pad              Open a X.29 PAD connection
 ping             Send echo messages
 resume           Resume an active telnet connection
 show             Show running system information
 systat           Display information about terminal lines
 telnet           Open a telnet connection
 terminal         Set terminal line parameters
 tn3270           Open a tn3270 connection
 trace            Trace route to destination
 where            List active telnet connections
 x3               Set X.3 parameters on PAD
 xremote          Enter XRemote mode

The list of commands might vary slightly from this example, depending on the software feature set and configuration of your Cisco routing product.

Privileged EXEC Mode

Because many of the privileged commands set operating parameters, privileged access should be password protected to prevent unauthorized use. The privileged command set includes those commands contained in user EXEC mode, as well as the configure command through which you can access the remaining command modes. Privileged EXEC mode also includes high-level testing commands, such as debug. For details on the debug commands, see the Debug Command Reference.

The privileged EXEC mode prompt consists of the devices's host name followed by the pound sign (#). (If the router or access server was named with the hostname command, that name would appear as the prompt instead of "Router.")

Router#

To access and list the privileged EXEC commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 Enter the privileged EXEC mode. enable
[password]
Step 2 List privileged EXEC commands. ?

To return from privileged EXEC mode to user EXEC mode, perform the following task:

Task Command
Move from privileged EXEC mode to user EXEC mode. disable

If the system administrator has set a password, you are prompted to enter it before being allowed access to privileged EXEC mode. The password is not displayed on the screen and is case sensitive. If an enable password has not been set, enable mode can be accessed only from the router console. The system administrator uses the enable password global configuration command to set the password that restricts access to privileged mode. This command is described in the "System Management Commands" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.

The following example shows how to access privileged EXEC mode and list privileged EXEC commands:

Router> enable
Password:
Router# ? 
Exec commands:
 bfe              For manual emergency modes setting
 clear            Reset functions
 clock            Manage the system clock
 configure        Enter configuration mode
 connect          Open a terminal connection
 copy             Copy a config file to or from a tftp server
 debug            Debugging functions
 disable          Turn off privileged commands
 disconnect       Disconnect an existing telnet session
 enable           Turn on privileged commands
 exit             Exit from the EXEC
 help             Description of the interactive help system
 lat              Open a lat connection
 llc2             Execute llc2 tests
 lock             Lock the terminal
 login            Log in as a particular user
 logout           Exit from the EXEC
 menu             Start a menu-based user interface
 name-connection  Name an existing telnet connection
 ping             Send echo messages
 reload           Halt and perform a cold restart
 resume           Resume an active telnet connection
 send             Send a message to other tty lines
 setup            Run the SETUP command facility
 show             Show running system information
 systat           Display information about terminal lines
 telnet           Open a telnet connection
 terminal         Set terminal line parameters
 test             Test subsystems, memory, and interfaces
 tn3270           Open a tn3270 connection
 trace            Trace route to destination
 where            List active telnet connections
 which-route      Do route table lookup and display results
 write            Write running configuration to memory, network, or terminal
 x3               Set X.3 parameters on PAD
 xremote          Enter XRemote mode

The list of commands might vary slightly from this example, depending on the software feature set and configuration of your Cisco routing product.

From the privileged level, you can access global configuration mode. For instructions, see the "Global Configuration Mode" section, which follows this section.

Global Configuration Mode

Global configuration commands apply to features that affect the system as a whole. Use the configure privileged EXEC command to enter global configuration mode. When you enter this command, the system EXEC prompts you for the source of the configuration commands:

Configuring from terminal, memory, or network [terminal]?

You can then specify either the terminal, nonvolatile memory (NVRAM), or a file stored on a network server as the source of configuration commands (See the "System and Configuration File Load Commands" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference). The default is to enter commands from the terminal console. Pressing the Return key begins this configuration method.

Commands to enable a particular routing or bridging function are also global configuration commands. For information on protocol-specific global configuration commands, see the appropriate configuration guide in the Cisco IOS software documentation.

To access and list the global configuration commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 At the terminal, from the privileged EXEC mode, enter global configuration mode. configure1
<CR>
Step 2 List the global configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "System and Configuration File Load Commands" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.

The following example shows how to access global configuration mode and list global configuration commands:

Router# configure
Configuring from terminal, memory, or network [terminal]? <CR>
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)# ? 
Configure commands:
 access-list            Add an access list entry
 apollo                 Apollo global configuration commands
 appletalk              Appletalk global configuration commands
 arp                    Set a static ARP entry
 async-bootp            Modify system bootp parameters
 autonomous-system      Specify local AS number to which we belong
 banner                 Define a login banner
 boot                   Modify system boot parameters
 bridge                 Transparent bridging
 buffers                Adjust system buffer pool parameters
 busy-message           Display message when connection to host fails
 chat-script            Define a modem chat script
 clns                   Global CLNS configuration subcommands
 clock	                  Configure time-of-day clock
 decnet                 Global DECnet configuration subcommands
 default-value          Default character-bits values
 dialer-list            Create a dialer list entry
 enable                 Modify enable password parameters
 end                    Exit from configure mode
 exit                   Exit from configure mode
 frame-relay            Global frame relay configuration commands
 help                   Description of the interactive help system
 hostname               Set system's network name
 interface              Select an interface to configure
 ip                     Global IP configuration subcommands
 ipx                    Novell/IPX global configuration commands
 line                   Configure a terminal line
 lnm                    IBM Lan Manager
 locaddr-priority-list  Establish queueing priorities based on LU address
 logging                Modify message logging facilities
 login-string           Define a host-specific login string
 mop                    The DEC MOP Server
 netbios                NETBIOS access control filtering
 no                     Negate a command or set its defaults
 ntp                    Configure NTP
 priority-list          Build a priority list
 queue-list             Build a custom queue list
 rif                    Source-route RIF cache
 route-map              Create route-map or enter route-map command mode
 router                 Enable a routing process
 scheduler-interval     Maximum interval before running lowest priority process
 service                Modify use of network based services
 smt-queue-threshold    Set the max number of unprocessed SMT frames
 snmp-server            Modify SNMP parameters
 source-bridge          Source-route bridging ring groups
 stun                   STUN global configuration commands
 tacacs-server          Modify TACACS query parameters
 tftp-server            Provide TFTP service for netload requests
 tn3270                 tn3270 configuration command
 username               Establish User Name Authentication
 vines                  Vines global configuration commands
 x25                    X.25 Level 3
 xns                    XNS global configuration commands

The list of commands might vary slightly from this example, depending on the software feature set and configuration of your Cisco routing product.

To exit global configuration command mode and return to privileged EXEC mode, use one of the following commands:

Task Command
Exit global configuration mode. exit
end
Ctrl-Z

From global configuration mode, you can access a number of other command modes. These command modes are described in the sections that follow. For a complete list of these modes, check the bulleted list at the start of this section, "Access Each Command Mode."

ROM Monitor Mode

If your router or access server does not find a valid system image, or if you interrupt the boot sequence, the system might enter read-only memory (ROM) monitor mode. From ROM monitor mode, you can boot the device or perform diagnostic tests.

From the Cisco Series 2000, 2500, 3000, and 4000, you can also enter ROM monitor mode by entering the reload EXEC command and then pressing the Break key during the first 60 seconds of startup. To save changes to the configuration file, use the copy running-config startup-config command and then issue the reload command.

To access and list the ROM monitor configuration commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Enter ROM monitor mode from privileged EXEC mode. reload1
Press Break during the first 60 seconds while the system is booting.
List the ROM monitor commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "System and Configuration File Load Commands" chapter of the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.

The ROM monitor prompt is the angle bracket (>):

> ?
$ state      Toggle cache state (? for help)
B [filename] [TFTP Server IP address | TFTP Server Name]
             Load and execute system image from ROM or from TFTP server
C [address]  Continue execution [optional address]
D /S M L V   Deposit value V of size S into location L with modifier M
E /S M L     Examine location L with size S with modifier M
G [address]  Begin execution
H            Help for commands
I            Initialize
K            Stack trace
L [filename] [TFTP Server IP address | TFTP Server Name]
             Load system image from ROM or from TFTP server, but do not
             begin execution
O            Show configuration register option settings
P            Set the break point
S            Single step next instruction
T function   Test device (? for help)
Deposit and Examine sizes may be B (byte), L (long) or S (short).
Modifiers may be R (register) or S (byte swap).
Register names are: D0-D7, A0-A6, SS, US, SR, and PC

To return to user EXEC mode, type continue. To initialize the router or access server, enter the i command. The i command causes the bootstrap program to reinitialize the hardware, clear the contents of memory, and boot the system. (It is best to issue the i command before you run any tests or boot software.) To boot the system image file, use the b command (see the "System and Configuration File Load Commands" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference). For details on ROM monitor mode commands, refer to the appropriate hardware installation guide.

Interface Configuration Mode

Many features are enabled on a per-interface basis. Interface configuration commands modify the operation of an interface such as an Ethernet, FDDI, or serial port. Interface configuration commands always follow an interface global configuration command, which defines the interface type.

For details on interface configuration commands that affect general interface parameters, such as bandwidth, clock rate, and so on, see the "Interface Commands" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference. For protocol-specific commands, see the appropriate Cisco IOS software command reference.

To access and list the interface configuration commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From global configuration mode, enter interface configuration mode. interface type-number1
Step 2 List the interface configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "Interface Commands" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.

In the following example, serial interface 0 is about to be configured. The new prompt
Router(config-if)# indicates interface configuration mode. In this example, the user asks for help by requesting a list of commands.

Router(config)# interface serial 0 <CR>
Router(config-if)# ? 
Interface configuration commands:
 access-expression     Build a bridge boolean access expression
 apollo                Apollo interface subcommands
 appletalk             Appletalk interface subcommands
 arp                   Set arp type (arpa, probe, snap) or timeout
 backup                Modify dial-backup parameters
 bandwidth             Set bandwidth informational parameter
 bridge-group          Transparent bridging interface parameters
 clns                  CLNS interface subcommands
 clockrate             Configure serial interface clock speed
 custom-queue-list     Assign a custom queue list to an interface
 decnet                Interface DECnet config commands
 delay                 Specify interface throughput delay
 description           Interface specific description
 dialer                Dial-on-demand routing (DDR) commands
 dialer-group          Assign interface to dialer-list
 down-when-looped      Force looped serial interface down
 encapsulation         Set encapsulation type for an interface
 ethernet-transit-oui  Token-ring to Ethernet OUI handling
 exit                  Exit from interface configuration mode
 frame-relay           Set frame relay parameters
 hdh                   Set HDH mode
 help                  Description of the interactive help system
 hold-queue            Set hold queue depth
 ip                    Interface Internet Protocol config commands
 ipx                   Novell interface subcommands
 isis                  IS-IS commands
 iso-igrp              ISO-IGRP interface subcommands
 keepalive             Enable keepalive
 lapb                  X.25 Level 2 parameters (Link Access Procedure, Balanced)
 llc2                  LLC2 Interface Subcommands
 lnm                   IBM Lan Manager
 locaddr-priority      Assign a priority group
 loopback              Configure internal loopback on an interface
 mac-address           Manually set interface MAC address
 mop                   DEC MOP server commands
 mtu                   Set the interface Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU)
 netbios               Use a defined NETBIOS access list or enable name-caching
 no                    Negate a command or set its defaults
 ntp                   Configure NTP
 ppp                   Point-to-point protocol
 priority-group        Assign a priority group to an interface
 pulse-time            Enables pulsing of DTR during resets
 pup                   PUP interface subcommands
 sdlc                  SDLC commands
 sdllc                 Configure SDLC to LLC2 translation
 shutdown              Shutdown the selected interface
 smds                  Modify SMDS parameters
 source-bridge         Configure interface for source-route bridging
 stun                  STUN interface subcommands
 transmit-interface    Assign a transmit interface to a receive-only interface
 transmitter-delay     Set dead-time after transmitting a datagram
 tunnel                protocol-over-protocol tunneling
 tx-queue-limit        Configure card level transmit queue limit
 vines                 Vines interface subcommands
 xns                   XNS interface subcommands

The list of commands might vary slightly from this example, depending on the software feature set and configuration of your Cisco routing product.

To exit interface configuration mode and return to global configuration mode, enter the exit command. To exit configuration mode and return to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Subinterface Configuration Mode

You can configure multiple virtual interfaces (called subinterfaces) on a single physical interface. This feature is supported on serial interfaces with Frame Relay encapsulation.

Subinterfaces appear to be distinct physical interfaces to the various protocols. For example, Frame Relay networks provide multiple point-to-point links called permanent virtual circuits (PVCs). PVCs can be grouped under separate subinterfaces that in turn are configured on a single physical interface. From a bridging spanning-tree viewpoint, each subinterface is a separate bridge port, and a frame arriving on one subinterface can be sent out on a another subinterface.

Subinterfaces also allow multiple encapsulations for a protocol on a single interface. For example, a router or access server can receive an ARPA-framed IPX packet and forward the packet back out the same physical interface as a SNAP-framed IPX packet.

For detailed information on how to configure subinterfaces, see the appropriate module for a specific protocol in the Cisco IOS software documentation.

To access and list the subinterface configuration commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From interface configuration mode, configure a virtual interface. See the example that follows. For information on interface commands that allow subinterface implementation, see the protocol specific chapter later in this publication.
Step 2 List the subinterface configuration commands. ?

In the following example, a subinterface is configured for serial line 2, which is configured for Frame Relay encapsulation. The subinterface is called 2.1 to indicate that it is subinterface 1 of serial interface 2. The new prompt Router(config-subif)# indicates that you are in subinterface configuration mode. The subinterface can be configured to support one or more Frame Relay PVCs. To list the commands available in subinterface configuration mode, enter a question mark (?).

Router(config)# interface serial 2
Router(config-if)# encapsulation frame-relay
Router(config-if)# interface serial 2.1
Router(config-subif)# ?
Interface configuration commands:
 apollo        Apollo interface subcommands
 appletalk     Appletalk interface subcommands
 bandwidth     Set bandwidth informational parameter
 bridge-group  Transparent bridging interface parameters
 clns          CLNS interface subcommands
 decnet        Interface DECnet config commands
 delay         Specify interface throughput delay
 description   Interface specific description
 exit          Exit from interface configuration mode
 frame-relay   Set frame relay parameters
 ip            Interface Internet Protocol config commands
 ipx           Novell interface subcommands
 isis          IS-IS commands
 iso-igrp      ISO-IGRP interface subcommands
 no            Negate a command or set its defaults
 ntp           Configure NTP
 shutdown      Shutdown the selected interface

The list of commands might vary slightly from this example, depending on the software feature set and configuration of your Cisco routing product.

To exit subinterface configuration mode and return to global configuration mode, enter the exit command. To exit configuration mode and return to privileged EXEC mode, press Ctrl-Z.

Controller Configuration Mode

You can configure channelized T1 in the controller configuration mode.

To access and list the controller configuration commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From global configuration mode, configure channelized T1. controller t1 slot/port 1
Step 2 List the controller configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "Interface Commands" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.

In the following example, channelized T1 is being configured on interface 0/0. The new prompt Router(config-controller)# indicates controller configuration mode.

Router(config)# controller t1 0/0
Router(config-controller)# ?
Controller configuration commands:
  channel-group  Specify the timeslots to channel-group mapping for an
                 interface
  clocksource    Specify the clock source for a DS1 link
  exit           Exit from controller configuration mode
  framing        Specify the type of Framing on a DS1 link
  help           Description of the interactive help system
  linecode       Specify the line encoding method for a DS1 link
  loopback       Put the entire T1 line into loopback
  no             Negate a command or set its defaults
  shutdown       Shut down a DS1 link (send Blue Alarm)

Note  The controller configuration mode applies only to the Cisco 7000 series MultiChannel Interface Processor (MIP) that has one or two CxBus Channelized T1 (CxCT1) port adaptor modules attached.

To exit controller configuration mode and return to global configuration mode, enter the exit command. To exit configuration mode and return to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Hub Configuration Mode

Hub configuration commands configure hub functionality for an Ethernet interface on the
Cisco 2500. They always follow a hub global configuration command. To access and list the hub configuration commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From global configuration mode, use the hub command. hub number port [port] 1
Step 2 List the hub configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "Interface Commands" chapter in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.

The following example shows how to enter hub configuration mode and list the hub configuration commands. In this example, the new prompt Router(config-hub)# indicates hub configuration mode.

Router(config)# hub ethernet 0 1 3
Router(config-hub)# ?
Hub configuration commands:
  auto-polarity   Enable automatic receiver polarity reversal
  exit            Exit from hub configuration mode
  help            Description of the interactive help system
  link-test       Enable Link Test Function of Hub port
  no              Negate or set default values of a command
  shutdown        Shutdown the selected port
  source-address  Enable Source Address control for Hub port

To exit hub configuration mode and return to global configuration mode, enter the exit command. To exit configuration mode and return to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Map-List Configuration Mode

Cisco IOS ATM and Frame Relay software supports static mapping schemes that identify the protocol addresses of remote hosts or routers. For a listing of which Cisco platforms support ATM and Frame Relay, see the "Platform Support" appendix in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference.

Map-list configuration commands configure a map list. They always follow a map-list global configuration command. To access and list the map list configuration commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From global configuration mode, use the map-list command. map-list name 1
Step 2 List the map-list configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "ATM Commands" chapter in the Wide-Area Networking Command Reference.

The following example shows how to enter map-list configuration mode and list the map list configuration commands. The following ATM example shows the static map-list configuration commands. The new prompt Router(config-map-list)# indicates map-list configuration mode.

Router(config)#map-list atm
Router(config-map-list)#?
Static maps list configuration commands:
  A.B.C.D              Protocol specific address
  aarp                 AppleTalk ARP
  apollo               Apollo Domain
  appletalk            AppleTalk
  arp                  IP ARP
  bridge               Bridging
  bstun                Block Serial Tunnel
  cdp                  Cisco Discovery Protocol
  clns                 ISO CLNS
  clns_es              ISO CLNS End System
  clns_is              ISO CLNS Intermediate System
  cmns                 ISO CMNS
  compressedtcp        Compressed TCP
  decnet               DECnet
  decnet_node          DECnet Node
  decnet_prime_router  DECnet Prime Router
  decnet_router-l1     DECnet Router L1
  decnet_router-l2     DECnet Router L2
  default              Set a command to its defaults
  dlsw                 Data Link Switching
  exit-class           Exit from static map class configuration mode
  help                 Description of the interactive help system
  ip                   IP
  ipx                  Novell IPX
  llc2                 llc2
  no                   Negate a command or set its defaults
  pad                  PAD links
  qllc                 qllc protocol
  rsrb                 Remote Source-Route Bridging
  snapshot             Snapshot routing support
  stun                 Serial Tunnel
  vines                Banyan VINES
  xns                  Xerox Network Services

The list of commands might vary slightly from this example, depending on the software feature set and configuration of your Cisco routing product.

To exit map-list configuration mode and return to global configuration mode, enter the exit command. To exit configuration mode and return to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Map-Class Configuration Mode

Cisco IOS software allows you to specify Quality of Service (QOS) parameters that control the traffic that the source router will send over a switched virtual circuit (SVC).

To define QOS parameters that are associated with a static map for an SVC, use the map-class global configuration command.

Task Command
Step 1 From global configuration mode, configure a map class. map-class {atm | dialer | frame-relay} class-name1
Step 2 List the map-class configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the Wide-Area Networking Fundamentals Command Reference.

In the following example, the static map-class configuration commands are listed. The prompt Router(config-map-class)# indicates map-class configuration mode.

Router(config)#map-class atm aaa
Router(config-map-class)#?
Static maps class configuration commands:
  atm          Configure atm static map class
  default      Set a command to its defaults
  dialer       Configure dialer static map class
  exit-class   Exit from static map class configuration mode
  frame-relay  Configure Map parameters
  help         Description of the interactive help system
  no           Negate a command or set its defaults

The list of commands might vary slightly from this example, depending on the software feature set and configuration on your Cisco routing product.

To exit map-class configuration mode and return to global configuration mode, enter the exit command. To exit configuration mode and return to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Line Configuration Mode

Line configuration commands modify the operation of a terminal line. Line configuration commands always follow a line command, which defines a line number. These commands are generally used to connect to remote routers or access servers, change terminal parameter settings either on a line-by-line basis or for a range of line, and set up the auxiliary port modem configuration to support dial-on-demand routing (DDR). (See the "DDR Commands" chapter in the Wide-Area Networking Command Reference.)

To access and list the console port, auxiliary port, physical terminal (if installed), and virtual terminal line configuration commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From global configuration mode, configure an auxiliary, console, or virtual terminal line. line {aux | con | tty | vty} line-number [ending-line-number]1
Step 2 List the line configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "Terminal Lines and Modem Support Commands" chapter in the Access Services Command Reference.

The following example shows how to enter line configuration mode for virtual terminal line 3 and list the line configuration commands. The new prompt Router(config-line)# indicates line configuration mode.

Router(config)# line vty 0 4<CR>
Router(config-line)# ? 
Line configuration commands:
 access-class            Filter connections based on an IP access list
 activation-character    Define the activation character
 autobaud                Set line to autobaud
 autocommand             Automatically execute an EXEC command
 autohangup              Automatically hangup when last connection closes
 autohost                Automatically connect to a host
 cts-required            Require CTS on line
 data-character-bits     Size of characters being handled
 databits                Set number of data bits per character
 disconnect-character    Define the disconnect character
 dispatch-character      Define the dispatch character
 dispatch-timeout        Set the dispatch timer
 editing                 Enable command line editing
 escape-character        Change the current line's escape character
 exec                    Start an EXEC process
 exec-banner             Enable the display of the EXEC banner
 exec-character-bits     Size of characters to the command exec
 exec-timeout            Set the EXEC timeout
 exit                    Exit from line configuration mode
 flowcontrol             Set the flow control
 help                    Description of the interactive help system
 history                 Enable the command history function
 hold-character          Define the hold character
 length                  Set number of lines on a screen
 location                Enter terminal location description
 lockable                Allow users to lock a line
 login                   Enable password checking
 modem                   Configure the Modem Control Lines
 monitor                 Copy debug output to the current terminal line
 no                      Negate a command or restore its defaults
 notify                  Inform users of output from concurrent sessions
 padding                 Set padding for a specified output character
 parity                  Set terminal parity
 password                Set a password
 private                 Configuration options that user can set will remain in effect
                         between terminal sessions
 refuse-message          	Define a refuse banner
 rotary                  Add line to a rotary group
 rxspeed                 Set the receive speed
 session-limit           Set maximum number of sessions
 session-timeout            Set interval for closing connection when there is no input traffic
 special-character-bits  Size of the escape (and other special) characters
 speed                   Set the transmit and receive speeds
 start-character         Define the start character
 stop-character          Define the stop character
 stopbits                Set async line stop bits
 telnet                  Telnet protocol-specific configuration
 telnet transparent      Send a CR as a CR followed by a NULL instead of a CR followed 
                         by a LF
 terminal-type           Set the terminal type
 transport               Define transport protocols for line
 txspeed                 Set the transmit speeds
 vacant-message          Define a vacant banner
 width                   Set width of the display terminal

The list of commands might vary slightly from this example, depending on the software feature set and configuration of your Cisco routing product.

To exit line configuration mode and return to global configuration mode, use the exit command. To exit configuration mode and return to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Router Configuration Mode

Router configuration commands configure an IP routing protocol and always follow a router command. To access and list the router configuration commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From global configuration mode, enter router configuration mode. router [keyword]1
See the list in the example for keywords.
Step 2 List the router configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "IP Routing Protocols Commands" chapter in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.

To list the available router configuration keywords, enter the router command followed by a space and a question mark (?) at the global configuration prompt:

Router(config)# router ?
 bgp       Border Gateway Protocol (BGP)
 egp       Exterior Gateway Protocol (EGP)
 igrp      Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP)
 isis      ISO IS-IS
 iso-igrp  IGRP for OSI networks
 ospf      Open Shortest Path First (OSPF)
 rip       Routing Information Protocol (RIP)
 static    Static CLNS Routing

In the following example, a router is configured to support the Routing Information Protocol (RIP). The new prompt is Router(config-router)#.

Router(config)# router rip
Router(config-router)# ?
router configuration commands:
  default-information  Control distribution of default information
  default-metric       Set metric of redistributed routes
  distance             Define an administrative distance
  distribute-list      Filter networks in routing updates
  exit                 Exit from routing protocol configuration mode
  help                 Description of the interactive help system
  neighbor             Specify a neighbor router
  network              Enable routing on an IP network
  no                   Negate or set default values of a command
  offset-list          Add or subtract offset from IGRP, RIP, or HELLO metrics
  passive-interface    Suppress routing updates on an interface
  redistribute         Redistribute information from another routing protocol
  timers               Adjust routing timers                                   

The list of commands might vary slightly from this example, depending on the software feature set and configuration of your Cisco routing product.

To exit router configuration mode and return to global configuration mode, enter the exit command. To exit configuration mode and return to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or
press Ctrl-Z.

IPX-Router Configuration Mode

Internet Packet Exchange (IPX) is a Novell network-layer protocol. To access and list the IPX routing configuration commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From global configuration mode, enter IPX-router configuration mode. ipx router [keyword]1
Step 2 List the IPX-router configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "Novell IPX Commands" chapter in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 2.

In the following example, IPX RIP routing is configured. The new prompt is Router(config-ipx-router)#.

Router(config)# ipx router rip <CR>
Router(config-ipx-router)# ? 
Novell router configuration commands:
  distribute-list  Filter networks in routing updates
  exit             Exit from IPX routing protocol configuration mode
  help             Description of the interactive help system
  network          Enable routing on an IPX network
  no               Negate or set default values of a command
  redistribute     Enable routing protocol redistribution

To exit IPX-router configuration mode and return to global configuration mode, enter the exit command. To exit configuration mode and return to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Route-Map Configuration Mode

Use the route-map configuration mode to configure routing table and source and destination information. To access and list the route-map configuration commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From global configuration mode, enter route-map configuration mode. route-map [map-tag]1
Step 2 List the route-map configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "IP Routing Protocols Commands" chapter in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.

In the following example, a route map named arizona1 is configured. The new prompt is        Router(config-route-map)#. Enter a question mark (?) to list route-map configuration commands.

Router(config)# route-map arizona1 <CR>
Router(config-route-map)# ? 
Route Map configuration commands:
 exit   Exit from route-map configuration mode
 help   Description of the interactive help system
 match  Match values from routing table
 no     Negate or set default values of a command
 set    Set values in destination routing protocol

To exit route-map configuration mode and return to global configuration mode, enter the exit command. To exit configuration mode and return to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Key Chain Configuration Mode

From key chain configuration mode, you can manage authentication keys. To enter this configuration mode and use Key Chain configuration commands, you must first enable RIP authentication. For details on how to enable RIP authentication, consult the "Configuring IP Routing Protocols" chapter of the Network Protocols Configuration Guide, Part 1.

Key management controls the authentication keys that routing protocols use. To enter key chain configuration mode, identify or define a key chain using the keychain command. From key chain configuration mode, you can identify or define key numbers.

To access and list the key chain configuration commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From global configuration mode, enter key chain configuration mode. keychain name-of-chain1
Step 2 List the key chain configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "IP Routing Protocols Commands" chapter in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.

To exit the key chain configuration mode and return to global configuration mode, enter the exit command. To exit configuration mode and return to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Key Chain Key Configuration Mode

Once you define a key chain, use the key chain key configuration mode to configure the keys on the key chain.

To access and list the key chain key configuration commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From key chain configuration mode, enter key chain key configuration mode. key number1
Step 2 List the key chain key configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "IP Routing Protocols Commands" chapter in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.

To exit the key chain key configuration mode and return to key chain configuration mode, enter the exit command. To exit the key chain configuration mode and return to global configuration mode, enter the exit command. To exit configuration mode and return to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

Response Time Reporter Configuration Mode

To access and list the response time reporter configuration mode commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From global configuration mode, enter response time reporter configuration mode. rtr probe1
Step 2 List the response time reporter configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the Configuration Fundamentals Command Reference in the "System Management Commands" chapter.

The following example shows the terminal prompt you will see while in response time reporter configuration mode.

Router(config-rtr)#

To exit to global configuration mode, enter the exit command.

LANE Database Configuration Mode

LAN emulation (LANE) clients consult the LANE configuration server for information such as the location of the LANE server. The configuration server looks up the configuration information in its name database.

A LANE database contains entries that bind an emulated LAN name to the ATM address of the LANE server, bind LANE client MAC addresses to an emulated LAN name, and bind LANE client ATM address templates to an emulated LAN name.

In LANE database configuration mode, you can use the client-atm-address name, default name, mac-address name, and name server-atm-address commands to create entries in the specified database.

To enter LANE database configuration mode, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 Enter LANE database configuration mode from global EXEC mode. lane database [database name]1
Step 2 List the LANE database configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "LAN Emulation Commands" chapter of the Wide-Area Networking Command Reference.

To exit LANE database configuration mode and return to global configuration mode, enter the exit command. To exit LANE database configuration mode and return to privileged EXEC mode, use the end command or press Ctrl-Z.

APPN Command Modes

Advanced Peer-to-Peer Networking (APPN) is the second generation of SNA. APPN provides support for client/server applications and offers more dynamics than traditional hierarchical SNA, such as dynamic directory and routing services.

APPN allows you to define attributes of the APPN network that can become quite complex. To easily manage the details of APPN, special configuration command modes and conventions have been developed.

Because APPN offers a large number of configuration options, specific configuration dialogs are used for each major APPN configuration item. When you define the major item, you will automatically enter the detailed configuration mode for that item. There are two options to exit the detailed configuration mode. Use the complete command to exit the detailed configuration mode and updates the APPN subsystem with the changes. Use the exit command to leave the definition in "no complete" state without updating the APPN subsystem.

The following sections describe these APPN modes and how to start and stop them:

Define an APPN Control Point

An APPN control point definition is required to use APPN. This definition enhances the fully qualified control point name for the node, which is a combination of a network identifier and a control point (CP) name. The network identifier (NETID) must be the same as other network nodes in the APPN subnetwork attached to this node. The CP name identifies this node uniquely within the particular subnetwork.

To enter APPN Control point mode, follow these tasks.

Task Command
Define an APPN Control Point. appn control-point netid.cpname1

1 This command is documented in the "APPN Configuration Commands" chapter in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Using the appn control-point command takes you from global configuration mode into APPN CONTROL POINT mode. From this mode, you can perform any of the following optional definition tasks to identify various capabilities and attributes of the control point.

The following commands allow for the addition, removal, or completion of configuration items within the APPN Control Point mode.

Task Command
Negate or restore the default value for a command mode. no command
Complete the APPN command mode, return to global configuration mode, and update the APPN subsystem. complete
Allow modifications to a previously completed APPN command modes. no complete
Exit APPN command mode dialog without completing the definition and without updating the APPN subsystem. exit

Define an APPN Port

If you plan to use APPN over a serial interface, the interface must be configured to a serial encapsulation type supported by APPN. The following encapsulations are supported: SDLC, Frame Relay, and X25.

An APPN port definition associates APPN capabilities that a specific APPN interface will use. Each interface used for APPN communications requires an APPN port definition statement. A port can be associated with a specific interface by performing the following configuration task:

Task Command
Define an APPN Port associated with an interface. appn port portname {interface | rsrb | vdlc}1

1 This command is documented in the "APPN Configuration Commands" chapter in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Performing this task takes you from global configuration mode into APPN Port mode.

To exit APPN Port configuration, see the exit commands under the section, "Define an APPN Control Point" in this chapter.

Define an APPN Link Station

A link station is a representation of the connection or potential connection to another node.You must define a link station if you want the node to initiate APPN connections with other nodes. In addition, you can define a link station to specify attributes of an APPN connection regardless of which node initiates the connection.

Task Command
Define an APPN Logical Link. appn link-station linkname1

1 This command is documented in the "APPN Configuration Commands" chapter in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Performing this task takes you from global configuration mode into APPN Logical Link mode.

To exit APPN Link Station configuration, see the exit commands under the section, "Define an APPN Control Point" in this chapter.

Define an APPN Connection Network

An APPN connection network allows nodes on the same shared media to connect directly, even if there is no APPN link defined between them. Connection networks provide any-to-any connectivity on a shared media without defining any-to-any link station connectivity. When a route is calculated through a connection network, a dynamic link station is built, and a connection is established between the nodes on each side of the connection network. You must configure the same connection network name for each node that participates in the connection network.

To indicate that a node is a member of a specific connection network, perform the following task from global configuration mode:

Task Command
Define an APPN connection network. appn connection-network netid.cnname1

1 This command is documented in the "APPN Configuration Commands" chapter in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Performing this task takes you from global configuration mode into APPN Connection
Network mode.

To exit APPN Connection Network configuration, see the exit commands under the section, "Define an APPN Control Point" in this chapter.

Define an APPN Class of Service

Cisco provides standard predefined APPN class of service definitions that are commonly used in APPN networks. These are #BATCH, #BATCHSC, #CONNECT, #INTER, #INTERSC, SNASVCMG, CPSVCMG. You can define an APPN class of service or modify the predefined definitions. Each class of services definition must have between 1 and 8 node rows, between 1 and 8 tg rows, and have a transmission priority that is used for the class of service.

To define a class of service issue the appn class-of-service command from global configuration mode.

Task Command
Define an APPN Class of Service. appn class-of-service cosname1

1 This command is documented in the "APPN Configuration Commands" chapter in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Performing this task takes you from global configuration mode into APPN Class of Service mode.

To exit APPN Class of Service configuration, see the exit commands under the section, "Define an APPN Control Point" in this chapter.

Define an APPN Mode

An APPN mode definition is used by a network node to associate a node name received from an APPN search or session request with a class of service. Most APPN nodes supply the class of service to their network node server, so mode definition might not be required in many APPN networks.

If this node is providing network node services to an end node that does not supply a class of service, or this node is providing network node services for a low-entry Networking (LEN) node, mode definitions might be required for each mode that the partner node uses.

The Cisco IOS software provides standard predefined mode definitions for modes that are commonly used in an APPN network. The predefined mode names are the blank mode, #BATCH, #BATCHSC, #INTER, #INTERSC, CPSVCMG, SNASVCMG. You can change a predefined mode or define a new mode. To define an APPN mode, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Define an APPN Mode. appn mode modename1

1 This command is documented in the "APPN Configuration Commands" chapter in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Performing this task takes you from global configuration mode into APPN MODE configuration mode. Within this mode, you must assign a class of service to the mode definition.

To exit APPN Mode configuration, see the exit commands in the section, "Define an APPN Control Point" in this chapter.

Define an APPN Partner LU Location

The APPN directory stores names of resources and their owners. Usually this information is learned dynamically via APPN searches. However, you may wish to define the location of specific resources manually. Doing so can improve network performance because it allows directed APPN searches to travel straight to the owning CP, without the need for an initial broadcast search for the resource. However, APPN is known for its dynamic capabilities, not its need for system definition. For this reason, and for easier manageability, it is good practice to define location names only when necessary.

To define a partner LU location, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Specify the partner resource name. appn partner-lu-location netid.name1

1 This command is documented in the "APPN Configuration Commands" chapter in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Performing this task takes you from the global configuration mode into the APPN Partner LU Location mode.

To exit APPN Partner LU Location configuration, see the exit commands under the section, "Define an APPN Control Point" in this chapter.

Start the APPN Subsystem

The APPN subsystem can be started from within global configuration mode or privileged EXEC mode.

Task Command
Start the APPN subsystem from global configuration mode. After this configuration is saved, the APPN subsystem will start each time the device is booted. appn routing1
Start the APPN subsystem from privileged EXEC mode without affecting the current configuration. appn start1

1 This command is documented in the "APPN Configuration Commands" chapter in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Stop the APPN Subsystem

The APPN subsystem can be stopped from within global configuration mode or privileged EXEC mode.

Task Command
Deactivate APPN routing from global configuration mode and remove it from the current configuration. no appn routing1
Deactivate APPN routing from privileged EXEC mode without affecting the current configuration. appn stop1

1 This command is documented in the "APPN Configuration Commands" chapter in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

IBM Channel Attach Command Modes

The Cisco 7000 series configured with a Channel Interface Processor (CIP), supports the IBM channel attach feature. This configuration is an ideal connectivity hub for large corporate networks that provide routing services between mainframes and LANs.

Interface Configuration Mode

Before you configure your channel attach interface, you must select an interface. The following mode is valid only for port 2 on a CIP board. Ports 0 and 1 represent real, physical ports. Port 2 is an internal, virtual port.

To select a channel attach interface, complete the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
From global configuration mode enter interface configuration mode. interface channel slot/port 1

1 This command is documented in the "IBM Channel Attach Commands" chapter in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Performing this task takes you from global configuration mode into interface configuration mode.

Internal LAN Configuration Mode

Use the IBM channel internal LAN configuration mode to configure Cisco Systems Network Architecture (CSNA) parameters.

To configure an internal LAN on a CIP interface, complete the following task in interface configuration mode:

Task Command
From interface configuration mode enter internal LAN configuration mode. lan [ethernet | tokenring | fddi] lan-id 1

1 This command is documented in the "IBM Channel Attach Commands" chapter in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Performing this task takes you from interface configuration mode into internal LAN configuration mode.

The following example shows the internal LAN configuration prompt and how to list the command available in this mode:

Router(cfg-lan-Ether 10)# ?
CIP internal LAN configuration commands:
  adapter        Configure CIP internal LAN Adapter
  bridge-group   Configure CIP internal LAN for transparent bridging
  exit           Exit from CIP internal LAN configuration mode
  no             Negate or set default values of a command
  source-bridge  Configure CIP internal LAN for source-route bridging

Internal Adapter Configuration Mode

Internal adapter commands allow you to configure the link characteristics for the internal LAN adapter and name the internal LAN adapter.

To configure an internal adapter interface on an internal LAN, complete the following task in internal LAN configuration mode:

Task Command
From internal LAN configuration mode enter internal adapter configuration mode. adapter adapter-number mac-address1

1 This command is documented in the "IBM Channel Attach Commands" chapter in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

The following example shows how to enter internal adapter configuration mode and list the available commands:

Router(cfg-lan-Ether 10)# adapter 1 4.5.6
Celebes(cfg-adap-Ether 10-1)# ?
CIP internal LAN Adapter configuration commands:
  exit  Exit from CIP internal LAN Adapter configuration mode
  llc2  CIP internal LAN Adapter LLC2 values
  name  CIP internal LAN Adapter Name
  no    Negate or set default values of a command

To configure an internal adapter interface, you must first use the bridge-group internal LAN configuration command or the source-bridge internal LAN configuration command to configure bridging type. These commands are documented in the "Source-Route Bridging Commands" chapter of the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

TN3270 Server Command Modes

The TN3270 server provides a set of command modes. TN3270 server can be configured only on Port 2, the internal LAN port, of a Channel Interface Processor (CIP) card.

TN3270 Server Configuration Mode

To access the TN3270 server configuration commands, complete the following task:

Task Command
From interface configuration mode enter TN3270 server configuration mode. tn3270-server1

1 This command is documented in the "TN3270 Server Commands" chapter, in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Performing this task takes you from interface configuration mode to TN3270 server configuration mode.

DLUR Configuration Mode

To access the DLUR configuration commands, complete the following task:

Task Command
From TN3270 server configuration mode enter DLUR configuration mode. dlur1

1 This command is documented in the "TN3270 Server Commands" chapter, in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Performing this task takes you from TN3270 server configuration mode to DLUR configuration mode.

DLUR SAP Configuration Mode

To access DLUR SAP configuration mode, complete the following task:

Task Command
From DLUR server configuration mode enter DLUR SAP configuration mode. sap1

1 This command is documented in the "TN3270 Server Commands" chapter, in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Performing this task takes you from DLUR server configuration mode to DLUR SAP configuration mode.

PU Configuration Mode

The PU configuration mode may be accessed from two different TN3270 configuration modes: TN3270 server configuration mode and DLUR configuration mode. The types of arguments the PU command might have depending on which command mode it was accessed from. Complete one of the following tasks to enter PU configuration mode:

Task Command
From TN3270 configuration mode enter PU configuration mode. pu pu-name idblk-idnum ip-address type adapno lsap [rmac rmac] [rsap rsap] [lu-seed lu-name-stem]1

From DLUR configuration mode enter PU configuration mode. pu pu-name idblk-idnum ip-address1

1 This command is documented in the "TN3270 Server Commands" chapter, in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference

The following example shows the PU configuration mode prompt:

tn3270-pu> 
tn3270-dlur-pu> 

Commands Allowed across Multiple TN3270 Command Modes

The following commands are valid in TN3270 configuration mode, or in either variation of PU configuration mode:

tcp-port port-nbr

idle-time num-of-minutes

keepalive num-of-minutes

unbind-action {keep | disconnect}

generic-pool {permit | deny}


Note These commands are documented in the "TN3270 Server Commands" chapter, in the Bridging and IBM Networking Command Reference.

Access-List Configuration Mode

All IP access lists can be identified by a number; standard IP access lists are numbered 1 to 99, extended IP access lists are numbered 100 to 199. Alternatively, some IP access lists can be identified by a name. Use access-list configuration mode when you are creating a named IP access list.

To access and list the access-list configuration mode commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From global configuration mode enter access-list configuration mode. ip access-list {standard | extended} name1
Step 2 List the access-list configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "IP Commands" chapter in the Network Protocols Command Reference, Part 1.

In the following example, an IP access list named flag is created and the commands available in access-list configuration mode are listed.

Router(config)# ip access-list extended flag
Router(config-ext-nacl)# ?
Ext Access List configuration commands:
  deny     Specify packets to reject
  dynamic  Specify a DYNAMIC list of PERMITs or DENYs
  exit     Exit from access-list configuration mode
  no       Negate or set default values of a command
  permit   Specify packets to forward

For information on creating a named IP access list, refer to the "Configuring IP" chapter in the Network Protocols Configuration Guide, Part 1.

Hex Input Mode

Use hex input mode to enter a public key for an encrypting peer router. The public key data is entered in hexadecimal form, and it will take more than one command line to enter. To continue entering the public key data on a new line, press Return. When the public key is completely entered, press Return to get a new line, then type quit to return to the global configuration mode.

To access and list the hex input mode commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From global configuration mode enter hex input mode. crypto public-key key-name serial number1
Step 2 List the hex input commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "Network Data Encryption and Router Authentication Commands" chapter in the Security Command Reference.

In the following example, hex input mode is entered and the commands available in the mode are listed:

Router(config)#crypto public-key test 01709644
Enter a public key as a hexadecimal number ....
Router(config-pubkey)#?
Hex input mode:
  Hex-data  Hex data to append to parse buffer
  quit      Exit data entry mode
Router(config-pubkey)#

In the following example, hex input mode is entered and hex data is entered:

Router(config)# crypto public-key BananaCryptoEngine 01709644
Enter a public key as a hexadecimal number ....
Router(config-pubkey)#C31260F4 BD8A5ACE 2C1B1E6C 8B0ABD27 01493A50
Router(config-pubkey)#2E90AF19 8B29122B 2D479B15 437A0F7C BCBE5300
Router(config-pubkey)#29859ED7 EAA2848E A31D7FD6 C8911D9A 9701CA00
Router(config-pubkey)#A6A66946
Router(config-pubkey)#quit
Router(config)#

Crypto Map Configuration Mode

Use crypto map configuration mode to create or alter the definition of a crypto-map. Crypto-maps are part of an authentication/encryption router configuration.

To access and list the crypto map configuration mode commands, complete the following tasks:

Task Command
Step 1 From global configuration mode enter crypto map configuration mode. crypto map map-name [seq-num]1
Step 2 List the crypto map configuration commands. ?

1 This command is documented in the "Network Data Encryption and Router Authentication Commands" chapter in the Security Command Reference.

In the following example, crypto map configuration mode is entered and the commands available in that mode are listed:

Router(config)# crypto map test 10
Router(config-crypto-map)#?
Crypto Map configuration commands:
  exit   Exit from crypto map configuration mode
  match  Match values.
  no     Negate or set default values of a command
  set    Set values for encryption/decryption
Router(config-crypto-map)#

In the following example, crypto map configuration mode is entered and the commands available in crypto map configuration mode are used:

Router(config)# crypto map Research 10
Router(config-crypto-map)# set peer otherRouterEPA.HQ
Router(config-crypto-map)# set algorithm des cfb-8
Router(config-crypto-map)# set algorithm 40-bit-des cfb-8
Router(config-crypto-map)# match address 101
Router(config-crypto-map)# exit
Router(config)#

Get Context-Sensitive Help

The previous sections described the first level of help available with the user interface. Entering a question mark (?) at the system prompt displays a list of commands available for each command mode. You can also get a list of any command's associated keywords and arguments with the context-sensitive help feature.

To get help specific to a command mode, a command, a keyword, or arguments, perform one of the following tasks:

Task Command
Obtain a brief description of the help system in any command mode. help
Configure a line or lines to receive help for the full set of user-level commands when a user presses ?. full-help
Configure a line to receive help for the full set of user-level commands for this exec session. terminal full-help1
Obtain a list of commands that begin with a particular character string. abbreviated-command-entry?
Complete a partial command name. abbreviated-command-entry<Tab>
List all commands available for a particular command mode. ?
List a command's associated keywords. command ?
List a keyword's associated arguments. command keyword ?

1 This command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter in the Access Services Command Reference.

When using context-sensitive help, the space (or lack of a space) before the question mark (?) is significant. To obtain a list of commands that begin with a particular character sequence, type in those characters followed immediately by the question mark (?). Do not include a space. This form of help is called word help, because it completes a word for you.

To list keywords or arguments, enter a question mark (?) in place of a keyword or argument. Include a space before the ?. This form of help is called command syntax help, because it reminds you which keywords or arguments are applicable based on the command, keywords, and arguments you already have entered.

You can abbreviate commands and keywords to the number of characters that allow a unique abbreviation. For example, you can abbreviate the show command to sh.

Enter the help command (which is available in any command mode) for a brief description of the help system:

Router# help
Help may be requested at any point in a command by entering
a question mark '?'. If nothing matches, the help list will
be empty and you must back up until entering a '?' shows the
available options.
Two styles of help are provided:
1. Full help is available when you are ready to enter a
   command argument (e.g. 'show ?') and describes each possible
   argument.
2. Partial help is provided when an abbreviated argument is entered
   and you want to know what arguments match the input
   (e.g. 'show pr?'.)

As described in the help command output, you can enter a partial command name and a question mark (?) to obtain a list of commands beginning with a particular character set. (See the section "Complete a Partial Command Name" later in this chapter for more details.)

Example

The following example illustrates how the context-sensitive help feature enables you to create an access list from configuration mode.

Enter the letters co at the system prompt followed by a question mark (?). Do not leave a space between the last letter and the question mark (?). The system provides the commands that begin with co.

Router# co?
configure  connect  copy

Enter the configure command followed by a space and a question mark (?) to list the command's keywords and a brief explanation:

Router# configure ?
  memory    Configure from NV memory
  network   Configure from a TFTP network host
  terminal  Configure from the terminal
  <cr>

Enter the terminal keyword to enter configuration mode from the terminal:

Router# configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#

Enter the access-list command followed by a space and a question mark (?) to list the command's keywords:

Router(config)# access-list ?
  <1-99>       IP standard access list
  <100-199>    IP extended access list
  <1000-1099>  IPX SAP access list
  <1100-1199>  Extended 48-bit MAC address access list
  <200-299>    Protocol type-code access list
  <300-399>    DECnet access list
  <400-499>    XNS standard access list
  <500-599>    XNS extended access list
  <600-699>    Appletalk access list
  <700-799>    48-bit MAC address access list
  <800-899>    IPX standard access list
  <900-999>    IPX extended access list

Enter the access list number 99 and then enter another question mark (?) to see the arguments that apply to the keyword and brief explanations:

Router(config)# access-list 99 ?
  deny    Specify packets to reject
  permit  Specify packets to forward

Enter the deny argument followed by a question mark (?) to list additional options:

Router(config)# access-list 99 deny ?
  A.B.C.D  Address to match

Enter the IP address followed by a question mark (?) to list additional options:

Router(config)# access-list 99 deny 131.108.134.0 ?
  A.B.C.D  Mask of bits to ignore
  <cr>

The <cr> symbol appears in the list to indicate that one of your options is to press Return to execute the command.

The other option is to add a wildcard mask. Enter the wildcard mask followed by a question mark (?) to list further options.

Router(config)# access-list 99 deny 131.108.134.0 0.0.0.255 ?
<cr>
Router(config)# access-list 99 deny 131.108.134.0 0.0.0.255 

The <cr> symbol by itself indicates there are no more keywords or arguments. Press Return to execute the command. The system adds an entry to access list 99 that denies access to all hosts on subnet 131.108.134.0.

Check Command Syntax

The user interface provides error isolation in the form of an error indicator, a caret symbol (^). The ^ symbol appears at the point in the command string where you have entered an incorrect command, keyword, or argument. The error location indicator and interactive help system allow you to find and correct syntax errors easily.

In the following example, suppose you want to set the clock. Use context-sensitive help to check the syntax for setting the clock.

Router# clock ?
  set  Set the time and date
Router# clock

The help output shows that the set keyword is required. Check the syntax for entering the time:

Router# clock set ?
hh:mm:ss   Current time
Router# clock set

Enter the current time:

Router# clock set 13:32:00
% Incomplete command.

The system indicates that you need to provide additional arguments to complete the command. Press Ctrl-P (See the next section, "Use the Command History Features") to automatically repeat the previous command entry. Then add a space and question mark (?) to reveal the additional arguments:

Router# clock set 13:32:00 ?
  <1-31>     Day of the month
  January    Month of the year
  February
  March
  April
  May
  June
  July
  August
  September
  October
  November
  December

Now you can complete the command entry:

Router# clock set 13:32:00 23 February 93
                                       ^
% Invalid input detected at '^' marker.

The caret symbol (^) and help response indicate an error at 93. To list the correct syntax, enter the command up to the point where the error occurred and then enter a question mark (?):

Router# clock set 13:32:00 23 February ?
  <1993-2035> Year
Router# clock set 13:32:00 23 February

Enter the year using the correct syntax and press Return to execute the command.

Router# clock set 13:32:00 23 February 1993

Use the Command History Features

With the current Cisco IOS release, the user interface provides a history or record of commands that you have entered. This feature is particularly useful for recalling long or complex commands or entries, including access lists. With the command history feature, you can complete the tasks in the following sections:

Set the Command History Buffer Size

By default, the system records 10 command lines in its history buffer. To set the number of command lines that the system will record during the current terminal session, complete the following task in EXEC mode:

Task Command
Enable the command history feature for the current terminal session. terminal history [size number-of-lines]1

1 This command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter in the Access Services Command Reference.

The terminal no history size command resets the number of lines saved in the history buffer to the default of 10 lines.

To configure the number of command lines the system will record, complete the following task in line configuration mode:

Task Command
Enable the command history feature. history [size number-of-lines]1

1 The no history command turns off command history for the line.

Recall Commands

To recall commands from the history buffer, perform one of the following tasks:

Task Key Sequence/Command
Recall commands in the history buffer, beginning with the most recent command. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively older commands. Press Ctrl-P or the up arrow key.1
Return to more recent commands in the history buffer after recalling commands with Ctrl-P or the up arrow key. Repeat the key sequence to recall successively more recent commands. Press Ctrl-N or the down arrow key.1
While in EXEC mode, list the last several commands you have just entered. show history

1 The arrow keys function only on ANSI-compatible terminals such as VT100s.

Disable the Command History Feature

The command history feature is automatically enabled. To disable it during the current terminal session, complete the following task in EXEC mode:

Task Command
Disable the command history feature for the current session. terminal no history1

1 This command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter in the Access Services Command Reference.

To configure a specific line so that the command history feature is disabled, complete the following task in line configuration mode:

Task Command
Configure the line so that the command history feature is disabled. no history

Use the Editing Features

The current software release includes an enhanced editing mode that provides a set of editing key functions similar to those of the Emacs editor.

You can enter commands in uppercase, lowercase, or a mix of both. Only passwords are case sensitive. You can abbreviate commands and keywords to the number of characters that allow a unique abbreviation. For example, you can abbreviate the show command to sh. After entering the command line at the system prompt, press the Return key to execute the command.

The following subsections are included in this section:

Enable Enhanced Editing Mode

Although enhanced editing mode is automatically enabled with the current Cisco IOS release, you can disable it and revert to the editing mode of previous Cisco IOS releases. (See the section "Disable Enhanced Editing Mode" later in this chapter.)

To reenable the enhanced editing mode for the current terminal session, complete the following task in EXEC mode:

Task Command
Enable the enhanced editing features for the current terminal session. terminal editing1

1 This command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter in the Access Services Command Reference.

To reconfigure a specific line to have enhanced editing mode, complete the following task in line configuration mode:

Task Command
Enable the enhanced editing features. editing

Move Around on the Command Line

Perform the following tasks to move the cursor around on the command line to make corrections or changes:

Task Keystrokes
Move the cursor back one character. Press Ctrl-B or
press the left arrow key.1
Move the cursor forward one character. Press Ctrl-F or
press the right arrow key.1
Move the cursor to the beginning of the command line. Press Ctrl-A.
Move the cursor to the end of the command line. Press Ctrl-E.
Move the cursor back one word. Press Esc B.
Move the cursor forward one word. Press Esc F.

1 The arrow keys function only on ANSI-compatible terminals such as VT100s.

Complete a Partial Command Name

If you cannot remember a complete command name, press the Tab key to allow the system to complete a partial entry. To do so, perform the following task:

Task Keystrokes
Complete a command name. Enter the first few letters and press the Tab key.

If your keyboard does not have a Tab key, press Ctrl-I instead.

In the following example, when you enter the letters conf and press the Tab key, the system provides the complete command:

Router# conf<Tab>
Router# configure

If you enter a set of characters that could indicate more than one command, the system beeps to indicate an error. Enter a question mark (?) to obtain a list of commands that begin with that set of characters. Do not leave a space between the last letter you enter and the question mark (?).

For example, there are three commands in privileged mode that start with co. To see what they are, type co? at the privileged EXEC prompt:

Router# co?
configure  connect  copy
Router# co 

Paste in Buffer Entries

The system provides a buffer that contains the last 10 items you deleted. To recall these items and paste them in the command line, perform the following task:

Task Keystrokes
Step 1 Recall the most recent entry in the buffer. Press Ctrl-Y.
Step 2 Recall the next buffer entry. Press Esc Y.

The buffer contains only the last 10 items you have deleted or cut. If you press Esc Y more than 10 times, you will cycle back to the first buffer entry.

Edit Command Lines that Wrap

The new editing command set provides a wraparound feature for commands that extend beyond a single line on the screen. When the cursor reaches the right margin, the command line shifts 10 spaces to the left. You cannot see the first ten characters of the line, but you can scroll back and check the syntax at the beginning of the command. To scroll back, perform the following task:

Task Keystrokes
Return to the beginning of a command line to verify that you have entered a lengthy command correctly. Press Ctrl-B or the left arrow key repeatedly until you scroll back to the beginning of the command entry, or press Ctrl-A to return directly to the beginning of the line.1

1 The arrow keys function only on ANSI-compatible terminals such as VT100s.

In the following example, the access-list command entry extends beyond one line. When the cursor first reaches the end of the line, the line is shifted 10 spaces to the left and redisplayed. The dollar sign ($) indicates that the line has been scrolled to the left. Each time the cursor reaches the end of the line, the line is again shifted 10 spaces to the left.

Router(config)# access-list 101 permit tcp 131.108.2.5 255.255.255.0 131.108.1
Router(config)# $ 101 permit tcp 131.108.2.5 255.255.255.0 131.108.1.20 255.25
Router(config)# $t tcp 131.108.2.5 255.255.255.0 131.108.1.20 255.255.255.0 eq
Router(config)# $108.2.5 255.255.255.0 131.108.1.20 255.255.255.0 eq 45 

When you have completed the entry, press Ctrl-A to check the complete syntax before pressing the Return key to execute the command. The dollar sign ($) appears at the end of the line to indicate that the line has been scrolled to the right:

Router(config)# access-list 101 permit tcp 131.108.2.5 255.255.255.0 131.108.1$

The Cisco IOS software assumes you have a terminal screen that is 80 columns wide. If you have a width other than that, use the terminal width command to set the width of your terminal.

Use line wrapping in conjunction with the command history feature to recall and modify previous complex command entries. See the section "Recall Commands" in this chapter for information about recalling previous command entries.

Delete Entries

Perform any of the following tasks to delete command entries if you make a mistake or change your mind:

Task Keystrokes
Erase the character to the left of the cursor. Press the Delete or Backspace key.
Delete the character at the cursor. Press Ctrl-D.
Delete all characters from the cursor to the end of the command line. Press Ctrl-K.
Delete all characters from the cursor to the beginning of the command line. Press Ctrl-U or Ctrl-X.
Delete the word to the left of the cursor. Press Ctrl-W.
Delete from the cursor to the end of the word. Press Esc D.

Scroll Down a Line or a Screen

When you use the help facility to list the commands available in a particular mode, the list is often longer than the terminal screen can display. In such cases, a ---More--- prompt is displayed at the bottom of the screen. To view the next line or screen, complete the following tasks:

Task Keystrokes
Scroll down one line. Press the Return key.
Scroll down one screen. Press the Space bar.

Note The ---More--- prompt is used for any output that has more lines than can be displayed on the terminal screen, including show command output. You can use the keystrokes listed above whenever you see the ---More--- prompt.

Redisplay the Current Command Line

If you are entering a command and the system suddenly sends a message to your screen, you can easily recall your current command line entry. To do so, perform the following task:

Task Keystrokes
Redisplay the current command line. Press Ctrl-L or Ctrl-R.

Transpose Mistyped Characters

If you have mistyped a command entry, you can transpose the mistyped characters by performing the following task:

Task Keystrokes
Transpose the character to the left of the cursor with the character located at the cursor. Press Ctrl-T.

Control Capitalization

You can capitalize or lowercase words or capitalize a set of letters with simple keystroke sequences. To do so, perform the following task:

Task Keystrokes
Capitalizes at the cursor. Press Esc C.
Change the word at the cursor to lowercase. Press Esc L.
Capitalize letters from the cursor to the end of the word. Press Esc U.

Designate a Keystroke as a Command Entry

Sometimes you might want to use a particular keystroke as an executable command, perhaps as a shortcut. Complete the following task to insert a system code for this purpose:

Task Keystrokes
Insert a code to indicate to the system that the keystroke immediately following should be treated as a command entry, not an editing key. Press Ctrl-V or Esc Q.

Disable Enhanced Editing Mode

To disable enhanced editing mode and revert to the editing mode of software releases before 9.21, perform the following task in EXEC mode:

Task Command
Disable the enhanced editing features for the local line. terminal no editing1

1 This command is documented in the "Connection Commands" chapter in the Access Services Command Reference.

You might want to disable enhanced editing if you have prebuilt scripts, such as scripts that do not interact well when enhanced editing is enabled. You can reenable enhanced editing mode with the terminal editing command.

The editing keys and functions of software releases before 9.21 are listed in Table 2.


Table  2:
Editing Keys and Functions for Software Release 9.1 and Earlier
Key Function
Delete or Backspace Erases the character to the left of the cursor.
Ctrl-W Erases a word.
Ctrl-U Erases a line.
Ctrl-R Redisplays a line.
Ctrl-Z Ends configuration mode and returns to the EXEC prompt.
Return Executes single-line commands.

End a Session

After using the setup command or other configuration commands, exit the user interface and quit the session.

To end a session, perform the following steps:

Task Command
Enter the quit EXEC command. quit

Refer to the "Connection Commands" chapter in the Access Services Command Reference for more information on exiting sessions and closing connections.

Create Menus

A menu is a displayed list of actions from which you can select without having to know anything about the underlying command-level details. A menu system effectively controls which functions a user can access. Figure 3 illustrates the parts that make up a typical menu.


Figure 3: Typical Menu Example


Anyone who can enter configuration mode can create these menus. Keep the following guidelines in mind when you create menus:

To create menus, perform the tasks in the following sections:

Specify the Menu Title

You can specify an identifying title for the menu. To specify the menu title, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Specify the title for the menu. menu name title delimiter title delimiter

The following example specifies the title that is displayed when the OnRamp menu is selected. Four main elements create the title:

The following example shows the command used to create the title for the menu shown in Figure 3, at the beginning of this section:

Router(config)# menu OnRamp title /^[[H^[[J
               Welcome to OnRamp Internet Services
       
        Type a number to select an option;
              Type 9 to exit the menu.

You can position the title of the menu horizontally by preceding the title text with blank characters. You can also add lines of space above and below the title by pressing Return.

In this example, the title text consists of a:

Title text must be enclosed within text delimiter characters--the slash character (/) in this example. Title text delimiters are characters that do not ordinarily appear within the text of a title, such as slash (/), double quote ("), or tilde (~). You can use any character that is not likely to be used within the text of the title as delimiter characters. Ctrl-C is reserved for special use and should not be used in the text of the title.

This title text example also includes an escape character sequence to clear the screen before displaying the menu. In this case the string ^[[H^[[J is an escape string used by many VT100-compatible terminals to clear the screen. To enter it, you must enter Ctrl-V before each escape character.

You can also use the clear-screen option of the menu command to clear the screen before displaying menus and submenus, instead of embedding a terminal-specific string in the menu title. This option uses a terminal-independent mechanism based on termcap entries defined in the router and the terminal type configured for the user's terminal. The clear-screen option allows the same menu to be used on multiple types of terminals instead of having terminal-specific strings embedded within menu titles. If the termcap entry does not contain a clear string, the menu system inserts 24 new lines, causing all existing text to scroll off the top of the terminal screen.

To add the clear-screen option to a menu, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Specify screen clearing before displaying menus and submenus. menu name clear-screen

The following example specifies the clear-screen option for the OnRamp menu:

Router(config)# menu OnRamp clear-screen

The terminal screen will be cleared before each menu or submenu is displayed.

Specify the Menu Item Text

Each displayed menu entry consists of the selection number and the text describing the action to be performed. You can specify descriptive text for a maximum of 18 menu items. Because each menu entry represents a single user interface command, you must specify the menu item text one entry at a time. To specify the menu item text, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Specify the text for the menu item. menu name text number text

The following example specifies the text that is displayed for the three entries in the OnRamp menu:

Router(config)# menu OnRamp text 1 Read email
Router(config)# menu OnRamp text 2 UNIX Internet Access
Router(config)# menu OnRamp text 9 Exit menu system

You can provide access to context-sensitive help by creating a "help server" host and use a menu entry to make a connection to that host.

Menu selection numbers do not need to be contiguous. You can provide consistency across menus by assigning a particular number to a special function--such as Help or Exit--regardless of the number of menu entries in a given menu. For example, menu entry 1 could be reserved for help across all menus, and the last menu entry (for example, 9) could be reserved for the exit.

When more than 9 menu items are defined in a menu, the line-mode and single-space options to the menu command are activated automatically, but also can be configured explicitly for menus of 9 items or less. For more information on these commands, refer to the section "Specify Menu Display Configuration Options" later in this chapter.

Specify the Underlying Command for the Menu Item

Each displayed menu entry executes a user interface command when the user enters its number. Each menu entry can have only a single command associated with it. To specify the menu item command, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Specify the command to be performed when the menu item is selected. menu name command number command

The following example specifies the commands that are associated with the three entries in the OnRamp menu:

Router(config)# menu OnRamp command 1 rlogin mailsys
Router(config)# menu OnRamp command 2 rlogin unix.cisco.com
Router(config)# menu OnRamp command 9 menu-exit

The menu-exit command is available only from within menus. This command provides a way to return to a higher-level menu or to exit the menu system.

When a menu item allows connections (their normal use), the menu item should also contain entries that can be used to resume connections; otherwise, when a user escapes from a connection and returns to the menu, there is no way to resume the session and it will sit idle until the user logs off.

You can build the resume connection EXEC command into a menu entry so that the user can resume a connection, or you can configure the line using the escape-char none command to prevent users from escaping their sessions.

To specify connection resumption as part of the menu item command, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Specify the command to be performed when the menu item is selected. menu name command number resume [connection]
/connect [connect string]

Embedding the resume command within the menu command permits a user to resume the named connection or make another connection using the specified name, if there is no active connection by that name. As an option, you can also supply the connect string needed to connect initially. When you do not supply this connect string, the command uses the specified connection name.

You can use the resume command in a menu to perform the following functions:

In the following example, the resume command is embedded in the menu command so that selecting menu item either starts the specified connection session (if one is not already open) or resumes the session (if one is already open):

Router(config)# menu Duluth text 1 Read email
Router(config)# menu Duluth command 1 resume mailsys /connect rlogin mailsys

In the following example, the resume command is used in a separate menu entry (entry 3) to resume a specific connection:

Router(config)# menu Duluth text 3 Resume UNIX Internet Access
Router(config)# menu Duluth command 3 resume unix.cisco.com

You use the resume/next command to resume the next open connection in the user's list of connections. This command allows you to create a single menu entry that steps through all of the user's connections. To specify resume/next connection resumption as part of the menu item command, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Specify resume/next connection resumption. menu name command number resume /next

The following example shows a menu entry (entry 6) created to step through all of the user's connections:

Router(config)# menu Duluth text 6 Resume next connection
Router(config)# menu Duluth command 6 resume /next

Create a Submenu

To create submenus that are opened by selecting a higher-level menu entry, use the menu command to invoke a menu in a line menu entry. To specify a submenu item command, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Step 1 Specify the menu item that invokes the submenu. menu name text number [text]
Step 2 Specify the command to be performed when the menu item is selected. menu name command number command
Step 3 Specify the title for the submenu. menu name title delimiter title delimiter
Step 4 Specify the submenu item. menu name text number [text]
Step 5 Specify the commands to be performed when the submenu item is selected. menu name command number [command]

The following example specifies that the menu item (entry 8) activates the submenu in the OnRamp menu:

Router(config)# menu OnRamp text 8 Set terminal type

The following example specifies the command that is performed when the menu item (entry 8) is selected in the OnRamp menu:

Router(config)# menu OnRamp command 8 menu Terminals

The following example specifies the title for the Terminals submenu:

Router(config)# menu Terminals title /
                     Supported Terminal Types
       
        Type a number to select an option;
       Type 9 to return to the previous menu.

The following example specifies the submenu items for the Terminals submenu:

Router(config)# menu Terminals text 1 DEC VT420 or similar
Router(config)# menu Terminals text 2 Heath H-19
Router(config)# menu Terminals text 3 IBM 3051 or equivalent
Router(config)# menu Terminals text 4 Macintosh with gterm emulator
Router(config)# menu Terminals text 9 Return to previous menu

The following example specifies the commands associated with the items in the Terminals submenu:

Router(config)# menu Terminals command 1 term terminal-type vt420
Router(config)# menu Terminals command 2 term terminal-type h19
Router(config)# menu Terminals command 3 term terminal-type ibm3051
Router(config)# menu Terminals command 4 term terminal-type gterm
Router(config)# menu Terminals command 9 menu-exit

When you select entry 8 on the main menu, the Terminals submenu appears:

      Supported Terminal Types
  Type a number to select an option;
Type 9 to return to the previous menu.
1     DEC VT420 or similar
2     Heath H-19
3     IBM 3051 or equivalent
4     Macintosh with gterm emulator
9     Return to previous menu

Note If you nest too many levels of menus, the system prints an error message on the terminal and returns to the previous menu level.

Create Hidden Menu Entries

A hidden menu entry is a menu item that contains a selection number but no associated text describing the action to be performed. Include this type of menu entry to aid system administrators who help users. The normal procedure is to specify a menu command but omit specifying any text for the item. To specify a hidden menu item, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Specify the command to be performed when the hidden menu entry is selected. menu name command number command

The following example shows the command associated with the submenu entry in the OnRamp menu:

Router(config)# menu OnRamp command 7 show whoami

The show whoami command displays information about the current user's terminal line, including hostname, line number, line speed, and location. This command can be included in menus to aid system administrators who help users. To display line information, perform the following task at the EXEC prompt:

Task Command
Display line information. show whoami text

If text is included as an argument in the command, that text is displayed as part of the additional data about the line, and helps identify exactly which menu or submenu the user is accessing. Because the show whoami command is hidden inside the menu entry, this information might not be otherwise available. For example, the hidden menu entry

show whoami Terminals submenu of OnRamp Internet Access menu

might display information similar to the following:

show whoami Terminals submenu of OnRamp Internet Access menu
Comm Server "cs101", Line 0 at 0 bps. Location "Second floor, West"
Additional data: Terminals submenu of OnRamp Internet Access menu

To prevent the information from being lost if the menu display clears the screen, this command always displays a ---More--- prompt before returning.

Specify Menu Display Configuration Options

In addition to the clear-screen option in the menu command, described in the section "Specify the Menu Title," there are three other menu command options that define menu functions:

Using Line Mode in Menus

In a menu of 9 or fewer items, you ordinarily select a menu item by entering the item number. In line mode, you select a menu entry by entering the item number and pressing Return. The line mode allows you to backspace over the selected number and enter another before pressing Return to perform the command. This function allows you to change the selection number before you invoke the command.

To invoke the line-mode option, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Specify line-mode operation. menu name line-mode

The line-mode option is invoked automatically when more than 9 menu items are defined, but it can also be configured explicitly for menus of 9 items or less.

Displaying Single-Spaced Menus

If there are nine or fewer menu items, the Cisco IOS software ordinarily displays the menu items double-spaced. In a menu of more than nine items, the single-space option is activated automatically to fit the menu into a normal 24-line terminal screen. However, the single-space option also can be configured explicitly for menus of nine or fewer items.

To invoke the single-space option, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Specify single-space operation. menu name single-space

Displaying an Informational Status Line

The status-line option displays a line of status information about the current user at the top of the terminal screen before the menu title is displayed. This status line includes the router's host name, the user's line number, and the current terminal type and keymap type (if any).

To display the status-line option, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Display a status line when using a menu. menu name status-line

Invoke the Menu

To invoke the menu, perform the following task at the EXEC prompt:

Task Command
Invoke the menu by specifying the name of the menu. menu name

You can define menus containing privileged EXEC commands, but users must have privileged access when they start up the menu.

To ensure that a menu is automatically invoked on a line, make sure the menu does not have any exit paths that leave users in an interface they cannot operate, then configure that line with the command autocommand menu menu_name.

Menus also can be invoked on a per-user basis by defining an autocommand for that local username.

The following example invokes the OnRamp menu:

Router> menu OnRamp
      Welcome to OnRamp Internet Services
                                
       Type a number to select an option;
            Type 9 to exit the menu.

1     Read email
2     UNIX Internet access
3     Resume UNIX connection
6     Resume next connection
9     Exit menu system

Delete the Menu from the Configuration

To delete the menu from the configuration, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Delete the menu by specifying the menu name. no menu name

The following example deletes the OnRamp menu from the configuration:

Router(config)# no menu OnRamp

Display the Commands that Set Local Terminal Parameters

To see a list of the commands for setting terminal parameters, perform the following task in user exec mode:

Task Command
List the commands for setting terminal parameters. terminal ?

The following example shows the type of output terminal ? could generate:

Router> terminal ?

databits  5|6|7|8
download
escape-character  <decimal-number>|<control-char>
flowcontrol  none|hardware|software  [in|out]
hold-character  <decimal-number>|<control-char>
length  <length>
width <width>
monitor
notify
padding <decimal-number>  <count>
parity  none|even|odd|space|mark
transport preferred telnet|pad|lat|rlogin|none
speed  300|600|1200|2400|4800|9600|19200|38400
start-character  <decimal-number>|<control-char>
stop-character  <decimal-number>|<control-char>
stopbits  1|1.5|2
telnet transparent
terminal-type  <string>

Terminal commands may also be preceded by "no".

Display Help for All User-Level Commands

To get help for the full set of user-level commands, perform the following task in user exec mode:

Task Command
Get help for the full set of user-level commands. terminal full-help

The terminal full-help command enables (or disables) a display of all help messages available from the terminal. It is used with the show command.

The following example is output for show? with terminal full-help enabled:

Router> terminal full-help 
Router> show?
access expression List access expression
access lists List access lists
apollo Apollo network information
appletalk AppleTalk information
arp ARP table
async Information on terminal lines used as access server interfaces
...

Using Menus

A menu is a displayed list of actions from which you can select without having to know anything about the underlying command-level details. One typical menu use is making connections and switching between connections, but there are many varied operations that an administrator can build into menus.

Your administrator will notify you if menus have been created for your use.

Invoking a Menu

To invoke the menu, perform the following task at the EXEC prompt:

Task Command
Specify the name of the menu to be invoked. menu name

The following example invokes the OnRamp menu:

cs101> menu OnRamp
      Welcome to OnRamp Internet Services
                                
1     Read email
2     UNIX Internet access
8     Set terminal type
9     Exit menu system

Understanding the Parts of a Menu

A typical menu usually consists of a "banner" or title and up to nine menu entries.

The menu title is the identifying name for the menu. The menu title can be one or more lines of text that identify the menu, plus any other brief information about the use of the menu.

Each displayed menu entry consists of the selection number for that line and the text describing the action to be performed. To perform an operation listed in the menu, type the selection number listed to the left of the operation and press the Return key.

Menu selection numbers do not need to be contiguous. For the sake of consistency across menus, a particular number might be reserved for a special function (Help, Exit, etc.), regardless of the number of menu entries in a given menu. For example, menu entry 1 might be reserved for help across all menus, while menu entry 9 might be reserved as the exit.

Some menus contain submenus that are opened by selecting a higher-level menu entry. For example, menu entry 8 in the OnRamp menu example invokes the following submenu:

1     DEC VT420 or similar
2     Heath H-19
3     IBM 3051 or equivalent
4     Macintosh with gterm emulator
9     Return to previous menu

Use the Cisco Web Browser Interface to Issue Commands

You can issue most of the Cisco IOS commands using a Web browser. This Cisco IOS feature is accessed by using the Cisco Web browser interface, which is accessed from the router's home page. (All Cisco routers and access servers loaded with the latest version of Cisco IOS software have a home page, which is password protected.)

From the router's home page, you click on a hypertext link titled "Monitor the Router." This link takes you to a Web page that has a "Command" field. You can type commands in this field as if you were entering commands at a terminal connected to the router. The page also displays a list of commands. You can execute these commands by clicking on them, as if you were clicking on hypertext links.

Use the Cisco Web Browser Interface to Issue Commands Task List

To use the Cisco Web browser interface to issue commands, perform the tasks in the following list:

Configure the Cisco Web Browser Interface

You can enable the Cisco Web browser interface on any router running Cisco IOS Release 11.0(6) or later software. Once enabled, you will be able to issue Cisco IOS commands to your router using a Web browser.

The Web browser interface is automatically enabled when you use ClickStart to configure a Cisco 1003, Cisco 1004, or Cisco 1005 router.

If you have any other Cisco router, you must enable the Web browser interface by altering the routers' configuration. To do this, perform the tasks in the following list. The first task is required; the remaining are optional.

Enable the Cisco Web Browser Interface

To enable a Cisco router to be configured from a browser using the Cisco Web browser interface, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Enable a router to be reconfigured using the Cisco Web browser interface. ip http server

Now that the Cisco Web browser interface is enabled, you can perform any of the optional tasks or proceed to configure a router using the Cisco Web browser interface.

Change the Cisco Web Browser Interface Port Number

By default, the Cisco Web browser interface uses port 80 on the router. To assign the Cisco Web browser interface to a different port, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Assign a port number to be used by the Cisco Web browser interface. ip http port number

Control Access to the Cisco Web Browser Interface

To control which hosts can access the http server used by the Cisco Web browser interface, perform the following task in global configuration mode:

Task Command
Control access to the http server used by the Cisco Web browser interface. ip http access-class {access-list-number | name}

Use the Correct Hardware and Software

To use the Cisco Web browser interface, your computer must have a World Wide Web browser. The Cisco Web browser interface works with most browsers, including Netscape Navigator. Your Web browser must be able read and submit forms. The original versions of Mosaic might have problems using the Cisco Web browser interface, because they either cannot submit forms or have difficulty doing so.

The computer must be connected to the same network that the router or access server is on.

Access Your Router's Home Page

Perform the following steps to access the home page for your router or access server:

Step 1 Enter the name of the router or access server in the URL field of your Web browser and press return. The browser prompts you for the password for the router or access server.

Step 2 Enter the password.


Note The name and password for your router and access server are designated in their configuration. Contact your network administrator if you do not have this information.

The browser should display the home page for your router or access server.

The router's home page looks something like the Cisco 7200 home page shown in Figure 4.


Figure 4: Example of a Home Page for a Cisco 7200


Issue Commands Using the Cisco Web Browser Interface

To issue commands using the Cisco Web browser interface, click the link "Monitor the router" in the first list of hypertext links on the home page. This displays the Web page shown in Figure 5.


Figure 5: The "Command" Field Web Page for a Router Named "example"


Enter Commands Using Hypertext Links

To enter a command using hypertext links, scroll through the commands listed at the bottom of the screen and click the one you want to execute. If the link is a complete command, it is executed. If the command has more parameters, another list of command hypertext links is displayed. Scroll through this second list and click the one you want to execute.

If the command is a request for information, like a show command, the information is displayed in the Web browser window.

If the command requires a variable, a form in which you can enter the variable is displayed.

Enter Commands Using the Command Field

Entering the command in the command field is just like entering it at a terminal console. Enter the command using the syntax documented in the Cisco IOS command reference. If you are uncertain of the options available for a particular command, type a ?.

For example, entering show ? in the command field displays the parameters for the show command. The Cisco Web browser interface displays the parameters as hypertext links. To select a parameter, you can either click on one of the links, or you can enter the parameter in the command field.

Enter Commands Using the URL Window

You can issue a command using the URL window for the Web browser.

For example, to execute a show configuration command on a router named "example," you would enter the following in the URL window:

http://example/exec/show/configuration  

The Web browser then displays the configuration for the "example" router. To save effort, modify the URL in the URL window in the browser control bar instead of retyping the entire URL.

The difference between entering a command in the command field and entering a command in the URL window is that in the URL window command modes and options should be separated by slashes, not spaces.


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