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Adding Data with INSERT

 Let's continue toward the goal of making a table exactly like the friends table in table [*]. We have the table created, but there is no data (friends) in it. You add data into a table with the INSERT command. CREATE TABLE had a specific format that had to be followed. INSERT has a specific format too. You can see the format in figure [*].

  
Figure: Insert
\begin{figure}\begin{list}{}{
\setlength{\rightmargin}{\leftmargin}
\raggedrigh...
...~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~19
\par test->~);
\par INSERT~18720~1\end{list}\par
\end{figure}

First, you have to use single quotes. Double quotes will not work. Spacing and capitalization are optional, except inside the single quotes. Inside them, the text is taken as literal, so any capitalization will be stored in the database exactly as you specify. If you type too many quotes, you can get to a point where your backslash commands don't work anymore, and your prompt will appear as test'>. Notice the single-quote before the greater-than sign. Just type another single quote to get out of this mode, use \r to clear the query buffer and start again. Notice that the 19 doesn't have quotes. It doesn't need them because the column is a numeric column, not a character column. When you do your inserts, be sure to match each piece of data to the receiving column. Use the INSERT query in figure [*] as a sample and complete the insertion the three friends shown in table [*].

POSTGRESQL supports more column types than just char() and integer. It supports a wide variety of column types, but for this chapter, we will use only these two. Section [*] and chapter [*] cover column types in more detail.


next up previous contents index
Next: Viewing Data with SELECT Up: Five Basic SQL Commands Previous: Creating Tables
Bruce Momjian
1999-11-21