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Development Leaves BERKELEY

In the summer of 1996, it became clear that the demand for an open source SQL database server was great, and a team was formed to continue development. MARC G. FOURNIER, Toronto, Canada, offered to host the mailing list, and provide a server to host the source tree. The 1,000 mailing list subscribers were moved to the new list, and a server was configured, giving a few people login accounts to apply patches to the source code using cvs.3.3.

JOLLY CHEN had stated, "This project needs a few people with lots of time, not many people with a little time." With 250,000 lines of C3.4 code, we understood what he meant. In the early days, there were four major people involved, Fournier, THOMAS LOCKHART in Pasadena, California, VADIM MIKHEEV in Krasnoyarsk, Russia, and myself in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We all had full-time jobs, so were doing this in our spare time. It certainly was a challenge.

Our first goal was to scour the old mailing list, evaluating patches that had been posted to fix various problems. The system was quite fragile then, and not easily understood. During the first six months of development, there was fear that a patch would break the system, and we would be unable to correct the problem. Many bug reports had us scratching our heads, trying to figure out not only what was wrong, but how the system even performed many functions.

We inherited a huge installed base. A typical bug report was, "When I do this, it crashes the database." We had a whole list of them. It became clear that some organization was needed. Most bug reports required significant research to fix, and many were duplicates, so our TODO list reported every buggy SQL query. It helped us identify our bugs, and made users aware of them too, cutting down on duplicate bug reports.

We had many eager developers, but the learning curve in understanding how the back-end worked was significant. Many developers got involved in the edges of the source code, like language interfaces or database tools, where things were easier to understand. Other developers focused on specific problem queries, trying to locate the source of the bug. It was amazing to see that many bugs were fixed with just one line of C code. Postgres had evolved in an academic environment, and had not been exposed to the full spectrum of real-world queries. During that period, there was talk of adding features, but the instability of the system made bug fixing our major focus.


next up previous contents index
Next: POSTGRESQL Global Development Team Up: History of POSTGRESQL Previous: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT
Bruce Momjian
1999-11-21