Berkeley DB: Building the Test Suite: FAQ
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Building the Test Suite: FAQ

  1. Berkeley DB was configured using --enable-test, but it fails to build.

    Unfortunately, there is no single location in which to find the Tcl include file () or the Tcl library (libtcl.a) on different platforms. DB configuration does not do anything special to locate the Tcl include file, and adds "-ltcl -lm" to attempt to find the Tcl library. If your Tcl include file is not in one of the standard places checked by your compiler, then you will have to add ADDCPPFLAGS and/or ADDLIBS and ADDLDFLAGS to your environment and reconfigure. For example:

    See Building for UNIX platforms for more information.

    You may also need to add additional libraries in order to get the Tcl test suite to load. Linux systems often require linking "libtcl.a" to "libtcl#.#.a" or adding "-ldl" to the load line. Solaris systems often require adding "-lsocket" and sometimes "-lnsl -ldl" to the load line. These changes are most simply done by editing the Makefile in your build directory explicitly.

    Alternatively, you can download Tcl from the Scriptics Corporation web site. build it locally, and simply add "-I../../tcl.7.4" to the CFLAGS line, and "-L../../tcl.7.4" to the load line for the dbtest program, in your build directory's Makefile. (Note, if you download a different version than 7.4, use the version number from the one you downloaded!)


  2. Berkeley DB was built using --enable-test, but I get an error message about "TCL_LIBRARY" when I run dbtest.

    If the Tcl library with which you loaded was not located in the "/usr/local/lib" directory, you will need to set the "TCL_LIBRARY" environment variable to the library directory below the path where it was found, e.g., "../../tcl.7.4/library".


  3. Berkeley DB was built using --enable-test, but it fails to pass the test suite.

    Check to make sure that TESTDIR is not on a NFS mounted filesystem. The Berkeley DB architecture does not support placing the shared memory regions on remote filesystems, e.g., the Network File System (NFS) and the Andrew File System (AFS). For this reason, the shared memory regions (normally located in a database home directory) must reside on a local filesystem.