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Index: S

safe, storing security information in : 12.2.6. Secure Shell
SATAN tool : 12.4.3.2. SATAN
saturated networks : (see network)
scaling well
2.4. Internet Routing Architecture
3.3. Domain Name Service
4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address
7.5.1. Exterior Gateway Protocol
scp (secure copy) : 12.2.6. Secure Shell
script files
1.7. Application Layer
6.1.5.1. Enabling and disabling the interface
(see also startup script)
(see also UNIX, systems)
debugging tips : 6.4.4. Troubleshooting Serial Connections
invoking dialup IP (dip) : A.1. Dial-Up IP
scriptfile : A.3. chat
scripting language : 6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP
search entry, in resolv.conf : 8.2.1. The Resolver Configuration File
secondary nameservers
3.3.4. BIND, resolver, and named
4.4.1. Obtaining a Domain Name
8.1.1. BIND Configurations
C.2. named.boot Configuration Commands
configuring : 8.3.1.2. Primary and secondary server configurations
secrecy
defined : 12.1.1. Assessing the Threat
keys for : 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security
secure copy (scp) : 12.2.6. Secure Shell
SECURE points : 12.4.3.1. COPS
secure shell (ssh) : 12.2.6. Secure Shell
daemon (sshd) : 12.2.6. Secure Shell
SECURE_USERS variable : 12.4.3.1. COPS
security
1.7. Application Layer
(see also intruders)
(see also printers)
attacks
1.7. Application Layer
4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address
importance of notifying others
12.4.2. Looking for Trouble
12.4.2.2. Checking login activity
mechanisms included within applications : 12.2.5. Secure the r Commands
monitoring : 12.4. Security Monitoring
planning : 12.1. Security Planning
policy : 12.1. Security Planning
writing : 12.1.3. Writing a Security Policy
for printers : 4.5.2. Print servers
publications, list of : 12.8. Words to the Wise
risks
4.1. Connected and Non-Connected Networks
4.2.2. Defining the Subnet Mask
5.3.1.1. Options
5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
5.4. The Internet Daemon
9.1.2.1. The share command
13.2.1. Creating an FTP Server
sources of information : 12.1.2.2. Use mailing lists to distribute information
segments : 1.3. TCP/IP Protocol Architecture
format : 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
header : 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
semicolon (;)
comment character : C.3.1. Standard Resource Records
ending gated configuration statements
7.7.1.1. A host configuration
B.2. The gated Configuration Language
sender addresses : (see addresses)
sendmail
UNIX Versions
4.5.3. Planning Your Mail System
10. sendmail
aliases in : 10.3. sendmail Aliases
classes, listed : E.4.1. sendmail Classes
command : E.2. The sendmail Command
arguments, listed : E.2. The sendmail Command
compiling : E.1. Compiling sendmail
configuring : 10.5. sendmail Configuration
internal macros, listed : 10.5.2. The Define Macro Command
mailer flags, listed : E.4.3. sendmail Mailer Flags
options : E.4.2. sendmail Options
running as a daemon : 10.2. Running sendmail as a Daemon
testing and debugging arguments : 10.8. Testing sendmail.cf
tools reference : E. A sendmail Reference
using key files in : 10.8.2. Using Key Files in sendmail
using most recent release
10.8.2. Using Key Files in sendmail
E.1. Compiling sendmail
Version 8 : Preface
sendmail startup script : 10.2. Running sendmail as a Daemon
sendmail.cf file : 10.4. The sendmail.cf File
commands, listed : 10.5. sendmail Configuration
define class command (C and F) : 10.5.3. The Define Class Command
define macro command (D) : 10.5.2. The Define Macro Command
define mail headers command (H) : 10.5.7. Defining Mail Headers
define mail precedence command (P) : 10.5.6. Defining Mail Precedence
define mailers command (M) : 10.5.8. Defining Mailers
define trusted users command (T) : 10.5.5. Defining Trusted Users
examining comments in : 10.4.2. General sendmail.cf Structure
modifying : 10.7. Modifying a sendmail.cf File
local information : 10.7.1. Modifying Local Information
options : 10.7.2. Modifying Options
options and flags : E.4. More sendmail.cf
rewrite rules (R, S, and K commands) : 10.6. Rewriting the Mail Address
pattern matching : 10.6.1. Pattern Matching
transforming the address : 10.6.2. Transforming the Address
sample of, locating : 10.4.1. Locating a Sample sendmail.cf File
set option command (O) : 10.5.4. The Set Option Command
structure of : 10.4.2. General sendmail.cf Structure
testing : 10.8. Testing sendmail.cf
commands, listed : 10.8.1. Testing Rewrite Rules
rewrite rules : 10.8.1. Testing Rewrite Rules
version level command (V) : 10.5.1. The Version Level Command
sendmail.tar file : 10.4.1. Locating a Sample sendmail.cf File
Sequence Number field : 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
serial
communications packages : 6.4.4. Troubleshooting Serial Connections
devices, adding manually : 6.4.4. Troubleshooting Serial Connections
interfaces : 6.2. TCP/IP Over a Serial Line
lines
load balancing : 5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
multiple, using simultaneously : 5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
protocols
choosing
6.2.2. Choosing a Serial Protocol
A.1.1. The dip Script File
debugging : 6.4.4. Troubleshooting Serial Connections
Serial Line IP : (see SLIP)
Serial Line IP (SLIP)
1.7. Application Layer
(see also PLIP (Parallel Line IP))
server
1.7. Application Layer
(see also remote, servers)
cache, dumping : 11.6.2. The data is here and the server can't find it!
command : 8.4. Using nslookup
configuration statement : B.8.10. The routerdiscovery Statement
master : 8.1.1. BIND Configurations
multiple : 9.1.4. NFS Automounter
program, pathname of : 5.4. The Internet Daemon
service-list : 12.5.1.1. tcpd access control files
services file
5.4. The Internet Daemon
9.3. Network Information Service
9.4. A BOOTP Server
9.7.1. POP Server
9.7.2. IMAP Server
Session Layer : 1.2. A Data Communications Model
set debug command : 8.4. Using nslookup
set domain command : 8.4. Using nslookup
set ruleset (S) command : 10.6.3. The Set Ruleset Command
set type command : 11.6.4. dig: An Alternative to nslookup
setgid permission, avoiding : 12.4.2.1. Checking files
setuid : 9.1.3.2. The vfstab and fstab files
shadow file : 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File
shadow password file : 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File
share command
9.1.2.1. The share command
9.1.5. NFS Authentication Server
sharing
directories : 9.1. The Network File System
filesystems : 9.1.2. Sharing Filesystems
common reasons for : 9.1.2. Sharing Filesystems
sharp sign (#) for comments
3.2. The Host Table
5.4. The Internet Daemon
7.7.1.1. A host configuration
9.1.4. NFS Automounter
9.2.1. The printcap File
9.4. A BOOTP Server
A.1.1. The dip Script File
D.3. The dhcpd.conf Configuration File
shell scripts : 12.4.2.1. Checking files
showmount command
4.5.1. File servers
9.1.3. Mounting Remote Filesystems
SIGHUP signal
9.4. A BOOTP Server
11.6.3. Cache corruption
A.2. The PPP Daemon
A.2.1. Signal processing
B.1.1. Signal Processing
C.1.1. Signal Processing
SIGINT signal
11.6.3. Cache corruption
A.2.1. Signal processing
B.1.1. Signal Processing
C.1.1. Signal Processing
signal processing
in gated : B.1.1. Signal Processing
in named : C.1.1. Signal Processing
in pppd : A.2.1. Signal processing
SIGTERM signal
B.1.1. Signal Processing
D.2. The dhcpd Command
silently discarding datagrams : (see datagrams)
SILO overflows : 6.1.5.4. Maximum transmission unit
Simple Gateway Management Protocol (SGMP) : 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol : (see SMTP)
Simple Network Management ProtocolNMP : (see SNMP)
single threaded mail deliver : E.3.1. define
Slackware 96 : 4.7. netconfig
slattach command : 6.4.1. slattach
slave command : C.2. named.boot Configuration Commands
SLIP (Serial Line IP)
5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
6.2.1. The Serial Protocols
installing : 6.4. Installing SLIP
server configuration : 6.4.3. SLIP Server Configuration
SLIP END character : 6.2.1. The Serial Protocols
SLIP ESC character : 6.2.1. The Serial Protocols
slow convergence : 7.4.1.1. Running RIP with routed
SMI (Structure of Management Information) : 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol)
1.7. Application Layer
3.4.1. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
commands, listed : 3.4.1. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
ESMTP (Extended SMTP)
3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
10.8. Testing sendmail.cf
private extensions to : 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
sendmail and : 10.1. sendmail's Function
service extensions to : 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
standardizing on : 4.5.3. Planning Your Mail System
SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) : 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
statement (in gated) : B.8.7. The snmp Statement
snoop
11.2. Diagnostic Tools
11.7. Analyzing Protocol Problems
detailed analysis with : 11.3. Testing Basic Connectivity
SOA records
8.3.2. Standard Resource Records
8.3.4. The named.local File
8.3.5. The Reverse Domain File
8.3.6. The named.hosts File
11.6.1. Some systems work, others don't
C.3.1.1. Start of Authority record
socket
1.2. A Data Communications Model
2.7.3. Sockets
pairs : 2.7.3. Sockets
types of : 5.4. The Internet Daemon
SOCKS : 12.7.1. Functions of the firewall
software
keeping updated : 12.3.2. Keep Software Updated
outdated, security problems with : 12.2. User Authentication
removing unnecessary : 12.3.1. Remove Unnecessary Software
Solaris systems
UNIX Versions
2.5. The Routing Table
2.7.1. Protocol Numbers
3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
3.5.1. Reverse Address Resolution Protocol
5.1. Kernel Configuration
10.2. Running sendmail as a Daemon
ifconfig command on
6.1.2. Checking the Interface with ifconfig
6.1.5.3. Metric
Line Printer (LP) print service in : 9.2.2. Solaris Line Printer Service
remounting filesystems on : 9.1.3.2. The vfstab and fstab files
sharing directories on : 9.1.2.1. The share command
obtaining information about : 9.1.3. Mounting Remote Filesystems
sortlist command, in resolv.conf : 8.2.1. The Resolver Configuration File
Source Code Control System (SCCS) format : 10.4.1.1. Building a sendmail.cf with m4 macros
Source Port number
1.6.1. User Datagram Protocol
1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
Source Quench Message : 1.5.2. Internet Control Message Protocol
source routing : 5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
sourcegateways : B.8.2. The rip Statement
SPF protocol
7.4. Interior Routing Protocols
7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First
calculation : 7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First
split horizon rule : 7.4.1.1. Running RIP with routed
spoofing addresses : (see addresses)
ssh (secure shell) : 12.2.6. Secure Shell
command : 12.2.6. Secure Shell
daemon (sshd) : 12.2.6. Secure Shell
.ssh/identity.pub : 12.2.6. Secure Shell
.ssh/known_hosts file : 12.2.6. Secure Shell
ssh-keygen : 12.2.6. Secure Shell
stack : (see protocol, stack)
staff limitations : 4.2.2. Defining the Subnet Mask
standard resource records (RRs) : 8.3.2. Standard Resource Records
in named : C.3.1. Standard Resource Records
start of authority : (see SOA records)
startup script
7.3.1.1. Installing static routes at startup
8.3.6.1. Starting named
static
assignment of addresses : 4.2.1.1. Assigning host addresses
circumstances favoring : 4.3. Planning Routing
routing
4.3. Planning Routing
7.1. Common Routing Configurations
12.7.2. Routing control
adding routes : 7.3.1. Adding Static Routes
building tale for : 7.3. Building a Static Routing Table
installing routes at startup : 7.3.1.1. Installing static routes at startup
statements (in gated) : B.9. static Statements
status monitor daemon : 9.1.1. NFS Daemons
store and forward protocols : 3.4.1. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
stream : 1.3. TCP/IP Protocol Architecture
sockets : 5.4. The Internet Daemon
string values, in printcap parameters : 9.2.1. The printcap File
Structure of Management Information (SMI) : 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
stub areas
7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First
B.8.1. The ospf Statement
subdomains
3.3.2. Creating Domains and Subdomains
8.3.5. The Reverse Domain File
subnets
2.3. Subnets
3.3.2. Creating Domains and Subdomains
administration of : 12.1.2.1. Use subnets to distribute control
enterprise : (see enterprise)
for distributing control : 12.1.2.1. Use subnets to distribute control
mask (sm)
2.3. Subnets
4. Getting Started
6.1. The ifconfig Command
assigning
6.1.3. Assigning a Subnet Mask
A.1.1. The dip Script File
defining : 4.2.2. Defining the Subnet Mask
misconfigured : 11.4.1. Troubleshooting with the ifconfig Command
parameter : 9.4. A BOOTP Server
movement among : 3.6.1. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
reasons for : 4.2.2. Defining the Subnet Mask
statements, in dhcpd : 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf
subscribing : 13.5. Mailing Lists
subtypes : 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
Sun Microsystems
UNIX Versions
3.3.5. Network Information Service
3.7.1. File Sharing
9.3. Network Information Service
10.6.1. Pattern Matching
NIS+ on : 9.3.2. NIS+
supernetting : 2.2.2. Classless IP Addresses
superuser privileges
8.3.3. The Cache Initialization File
9.3. Network Information Service
B.1. The gated Command
switches
1.7. Application Layer
(see also packet)
asymmetric : 11.4.4. Subdividing an Ethernet
symmetric encryption : 12.6. Encryption
SYN (synchronize sequence numbers) bit : 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
synchronization : 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
synchronize sequence numbers (SYN) bit : 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
synchronous modems : (see modems)
synchronous PPP, support for : 5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
syslogd
3.2. The Host Table
A.2. The PPP Daemon
A.3. chat
system : (see network)
system file : 5.1. Kernel Configuration
Systems file : 9.2.2. Solaris Line Printer Service


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