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Index: D

daemons
3.2. The Host Table
5.4. The Internet Daemon
uid : 5.4. The Internet Daemon
DATA command, in SMTP : 3.4.1. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
data communications model : 1.2. A Data Communications Model
data compression, not provided in SLIP : 6.2.1. The Serial Protocols
Data Link Layer
1.2. A Data Communications Model
5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
6.1.1. Determining the Interface Name
in PPP : 6.2.1. The Serial Protocols
Data Terminal Ready (DTR) modem control line : A.2. The PPP Daemon
data terminology : 1.3. TCP/IP Protocol Architecture
databases in sendmail
arguments passed : 10.6.2.1. Transforming with a database
defining (K command) : 10.6.2.1. Transforming with a database
datagrams
1.3. TCP/IP Protocol Architecture
1.5.1.1. The datagram
1.7. Application Layer
(see also IP datagrams)
(see also User Datagram Protocol)
connectionless delivery of : 1.6. Transport Layer
converting source address of : 4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address
forwarding : 5.3.1.1. Options
fragmented
1.5.1.3. Fragmenting datagrams
5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
headers
2.7.1. Protocol Numbers
2.7.2. Port Numbers
marking end of : 6.2.1. The Serial Protocols
routing : 1.5.1.2. Routing datagrams
silently discarding : 11.8. Protocol Case Study
DCD (Data Carrier Detect) modem control line : A.2. The PPP Daemon
DDN Protocol Handbook : 1.3. TCP/IP Protocol Architecture
DDN security bulletins : 12.1.2.2. Use mailing lists to distribute information
debugging
8.2.1. The Resolver Configuration File
C.1.1. Signal Processing
decentralizing management : 2.3. Subnets
decryption : 12.6. Encryption
dedicated connections
6.3.1. The PPP Daemon
6.4. Installing SLIP
default
domain
3.3.3. Domain Names
8.2.1. The Resolver Configuration File
how used : 3.3.3. Domain Names
gateway
2.5. The Routing Table
4.3. Planning Routing
address : 4. Getting Started
mask : 2.2.2. Classless IP Addresses
passwords : 12.2. User Authentication
route
2.2.2.1. Final notes on IP addresses
2.5. The Routing Table
7.3. Building a Static Routing Table
defining : 7.4.1.1. Running RIP with routed
values : 3.6.1. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
defaultdomain file : 9.3. Network Information Service
defaultroute option : 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon
Defense Communications Agency (DCA) : 1.1. TCP/IP and the Internet
define macro (in sendmail)
E.3. m4 sendmail Macros
E.3.1. define
definition statements (in gated) : B.7. Definition Statements
delays, inserting
6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP
6.4.4. Troubleshooting Serial Connections
demultiplexing : 2.7. Protocols, Ports, and Sockets
denial of service, threat of : 12.1.1. Assessing the Threat
dequote database : 10.7.1. Modifying Local Information
DES-encrypted authentication : (see authentication)
designated router : 7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First
destination
1.7. Application Layer
(see also unreachable destinations, detecting)
fields : 2.5. The Routing Table
host : 2.5. The Routing Table
Destination Address
1.5.1.1. The datagram
2.2. The IP Address
Destination Port number
1.6.1. User Datagram Protocol
1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
Destination Unreachable Message : 1.5.2. Internet Control Message Protocol
/dev directory : 6.4.4. Troubleshooting Serial Connections
device statement : 5.3.1.3. Devices
dfstab file
9.1.2.1. The share command
9.1.5.1. NFS print services
dgram sockets : 5.4. The Internet Daemon
DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol)
Preface
3.6.1. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
backwards-compatible : 9.5. DHCP
based on Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) : 9.4.2. BOOTP extensions
benefits of : 9.5. DHCP
daemon (dhcpd) : 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf
command : D.2. The dhcpd Command
compiling : D.1. Compiling dhcpd
configuring : D.3. The dhcpd.conf Configuration File
tools reference : D. A dhcpd Reference
using latest versions of : D. A dhcpd Reference
interoperability and : 3.6.1. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
options available with : D.3.3. DHCP Options
commonly used : D.3.3.1. Commonly used options
others : D.3.3.2. Other options
dhcpd.conf file : 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf
dhcpd.pid file : D.2. The dhcpd Command
diagnostic tools : 11.2. Diagnostic Tools
dial-up connections : 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon
dial-up IP (dip)
6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP
6.4.2. Dial-Up IP
script file : A.1.1. The dip Script File
sample : A.1.1.1. A sample dip script
for SLIP : 6.4.2. Dial-Up IP
special variables, listed : A.1.1. The dip Script File
tools reference : A.1. Dial-Up IP
dial-up PPP : 6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP
dictionary guessing : 12.2. User Authentication
dig
11.2. Diagnostic Tools
11.3. Testing Basic Connectivity
11.6.4. dig: An Alternative to nslookup
query types : 11.6.4. dig: An Alternative to nslookup
digest multipart subtype : 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
digital signature system : 12.6. Encryption
Dijkstra Shortest Path First (SPF) algorithm : 7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First
dip (dial-up IP)
6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP
6.4.2. Dial-Up IP
script file : A.1.1. The dip Script File
sample : A.1.1.1. A sample dip script
for SLIP : 6.4.2. Dial-Up IP
tools reference : A.1. Dial-Up IP
diphosts file : 6.4.3. SLIP Server Configuration
diplogin command : 6.4.3. SLIP Server Configuration
direct delivery : 3.4.1. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol
directive statements (in gated) : B.3. Directive Statements
directory
requirement for mounting : 9.1.3. Mounting Remote Filesystems
statement : 8.3.1.2. Primary and secondary server configurations
disaster recovery plans
11.10. Summary
12.1.1. Assessing the Threat
12.1.3. Writing a Security Policy
12.8. Words to the Wise
disclosure of information, threat of : 12.1.1. Assessing the Threat
dismounting directories, by booting : 9.1.3.1. The mount command
Distfile : 9.6.1. rdist
distributed
architecture : 7.5.1. Exterior Gateway Protocol
control : 12.1.2. Distributed Control
servers, managing : 9.6. Managing Distributed Servers
Distributed File System (DFS) : 3.7.1. File Sharing
distributing public keys : 12.6. Encryption
dividing problem into manageable pieces : 11.1.1. Troubleshooting Hints
DMBDEF variable : E.4.4. The sendmail K Command
dmesg command : 6.1.1. Determining the Interface Name
DNS (Domain Name Service)
1.7. Application Layer
3.1. Names and Addresses
3.3. Domain Name Service
(see also name service)
benefits of
3.3. Domain Name Service
3.3.4. BIND, resolver, and named
querying : 10.7.1. Modifying Local Information
starting : 5.4. The Internet Daemon
docs/warnings file : 12.4.3.1. COPS
documentation
historical, of problems : 11.1.1. Troubleshooting Hints
using : 4.6. Informing the Users
domain
1.7. Application Layer
(see also domain)
administration
3.3.4. BIND, resolver, and named
8.1. BIND: UNIX Name Service
contacting : 13.6. The White Pages
allocating : (see Network Information Center)
creating : 3.3.2. Creating Domains and Subdomains
downloading an entire : 8.4. Using nslookup
entry, in resolv.conf : 8.2.1. The Resolver Configuration File
hierarchy
3.3.1. The Domain Hierarchy
8.1. BIND: UNIX Name Service
name (dn)
3.3.3. Domain Names
4. Getting Started
application form : 4.4.1. Obtaining a Domain Name
fully qualified : 3.3.3. Domain Names
in NIS : 9.3. Network Information Service
obtaining : 4.4.1. Obtaining a Domain Name
parameter : 9.4. A BOOTP Server
name servers : 4.2.1.1. Assigning host addresses
parameter : 9.4. A BOOTP Server
organizational : 3.3.1. The Domain Hierarchy
DOMAIN macro (in sendmail) : E.3. m4 sendmail Macros
Domain Name Pointer records : (see PTR resource records)
Domain Name Service : (see DNS)
DOMAIN source file (in sendmail)
E.3.2. FEATURE
E.3.4. DOMAIN
mail relay defines, listed : E.3.4. DOMAIN
domain/named.root : 11.6.3. Cache corruption
domainname command : 9.3. Network Information Service
domaintable database : 10.7.1. Modifying Local Information
dots (..) for domain name : C.3.1. Standard Resource Records
dotted decimal notation : 2.3. Subnets
ds.internic.net : 13.4. Retrieving RFCs
dummy interface : 5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
dump : 7.7.2. Testing the Configuration
dynamic
assignment of addresses
3.6.1. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
4.2.1.1. Assigning host addresses
automatic under DHCP : 9.5. DHCP
circumstances favoring : 4.3. Planning Routing
routing : 7.1. Common Routing Configurations
routing table : 4.3. Planning Routing
Dynamic DNS : 3.6.1. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol : (see DHCP)
dynamic-bootp flag : D.3.2. Configuration Parameters
dynamic-bootp-lease-cutoff parameter : 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf
dynamic-bootp-lease-length parameter : 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf
dynamically allocated ports : 2.7.3. Sockets


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