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Index: C

C programming language
1.3. History of UNIX
23.2. Tips on Avoiding Security-related Bugs
-Wall compiler option : 23.2. Tips on Avoiding Security-related Bugs
C shell : (see csh)
C2 audit : 10.1. The Basic Log Files
cables, network
12.2.4.2. Network cables
12.3.1.5. Fiber optic cable
cutting : 25.1. Destructive Attacks
tampering detectors for : 12.3.1.1. Wiretapping
wiretapping : 12.3.1.1. Wiretapping
cache, nameserver : 16.3.2. Security and Nameservice
caching : 5.6. Device Files
Caesar Cipher : 6.4.3. ROT13: Great for Encoding Offensive Jokes
calculating costs of losses : 2.3.1. The Cost of Loss
call forwarding : 14.5.4. Physical Protection of Modems
Call Trace : 24.2.4. Tracing a Connection
CALLBACK= command : 15.5.2. Permissions Commands
callbacks
14.4.2.
14.6. Additional Security for Modems
BNU UUCP : 15.5.2. Permissions Commands
Version 2 UUCP : 15.4.1.5. Requiring callback
Caller-ID (CNID)
14.4.3. Caller-ID (CNID)
14.6. Additional Security for Modems
24.2.4. Tracing a Connection
Canada, export control in : 6.7.2. Cryptography and Export Controls
carbon monoxide : 12.2.1.2. Smoke
caret (^) in encrypted messages : 6.2. What Is Encryption?
case in usernames : 3.1. Usernames
cat command
3.2.2. The /etc/passwd File and Network Databases
15.4.3. L.cmds: Providing Remote Command Execution
-ve option : 5.5.4.1. The ncheck command
-v option : 24.4.1.7. Hidden files and directories
cat-passwd command : 3.2.2. The /etc/passwd File and Network Databases
CBC (cipher block chaining)
6.4.4.2. DES modes
6.6.2. des: The Data Encryption Standard
CBW (Crypt Breaker's Workbench) : 6.6.1.1. The crypt program
CCTA IT Security & Infrastructure Group : F.3.4.39. UK: other government departments and agencies
CD-ROM : 9.1.2. Read-only Filesystems
CDFs (context-dependent files)
5.9.2. Context-Dependent Files
24.4.1.7. Hidden files and directories
ceilings, dropped : 12.2.3.1. Raised floors and dropped ceilings
cellular telephones : 12.2.1.8. Electrical noise
CERCUS (Computer Emergency Response Committee for Unclassified Systems) : F.3.4.36. TRW network area and system administrators
Cerf, Vint : 16.2. IPv4: The Internet Protocol Version 4
CERN : E.4.1. CERN HTTP Daemon
CERT (Computer Emergency Response Team)
6.5.2. Using Message Digests
27.3.5. Response Personnel?
F.3.4.1. All Internet sites
CERT-NL (Netherlands) : F.3.4.25. Netherlands: SURFnet-connected sites
mailing list for : E.1.3.4. CERT-advisory
CFB (cipher feedback) : 6.4.4.2. DES modes
CGI (Common Gateway Interface) : 18.1. Security and the World Wide Web
scripts
18.2. Running a Secure Server
18.2.3. Writing Secure CGI Scripts and Programs
18.2.4.1. Beware mixing HTTP with anonymous FTP
cgi-bin directory : 18.2.2. Understand Your Server's Directory Structure
chacl command : 5.2.5.2. HP-UX access control lists
-f option : 5.2.5.2. HP-UX access control lists
-r option : 5.2.5.2. HP-UX access control lists
change detection
9.2. Detecting Change
9.3. A Final Note
character devices : 5.6. Device Files
chat groups, harassment via : 26.4.7. Harassment, Threatening Communication, and Defamation
chdir command
23.2. Tips on Avoiding Security-related Bugs
25.2.2.8. Tree-structure attacks
checklists for detecting changes
9.2.2. Checklists and Metadata
9.2.3. Checksums and Signatures
checksums
6.5.5.1. Checksums
9.2.3. Checksums and Signatures
Chesson, Greg : 15.2. Versions of UUCP
chfn command : 8.2. Monitoring File Format
chgrp command : 5.8. chgrp: Changing a File's Group
child processes : C.2. Creating Processes
chkey command : 19.3.1.1. Proving your identity
chmod command
5.2.1. chmod: Changing a File's Permissions
5.2.4. Using Octal File Permissions
8.3. Restricting Logins
-A option : 5.2.5.2. HP-UX access control lists
-f option : 5.2.1. chmod: Changing a File's Permissions
-h option : 5.2.1. chmod: Changing a File's Permissions
-R option : 5.2.1. chmod: Changing a File's Permissions
chokes : (see firewalls)
chown command
5.7. chown: Changing a File's Owner
23.2. Tips on Avoiding Security-related Bugs
chroot system call
8.1.5. Restricted Filesystem
8.1.5.2. Checking new software
11.1.4. Trojan Horses
23.4.1. Using chroot()
with anonymous FTP : 17.3.2.6. Setting up anonymous FTP with the standard UNIX FTP server
chrootuid daemon : E.4.2. chrootuid
chsh command : 8.7.1. Integrating One-time Passwords with UNIX
CIAC (Computer Incident Advisory Capability) : F.3.4.43. U.S. Department of Energy sites, Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), and DOE contractors
CIDR (Classless InterDomain Routing)
16.2.1.1. IP networks
16.2.1.3. CIDR addresses
cigarettes : 12.2.1.2. Smoke
cipher
6.4.3. ROT13: Great for Encoding Offensive Jokes
(see also cryptography; encryption)
block chaining (CBC)
6.4.4.2. DES modes
6.6.2. des: The Data Encryption Standard
ciphertext
6.2. What Is Encryption?
8.6.1. The crypt() Algorithm
feedback (CFB) : 6.4.4.2. DES modes
CISCO : F.3.4.8. CISCO Systems
civil actions (lawsuits) : 26.3. Civil Actions
classified data and breakins
26.1. Legal Options After a Break-in
26.2.2. Federal Jurisdiction
Classless InterDomain Routing (CIDR)
16.2.1.1. IP networks
16.2.1.3. CIDR addresses
clear text : 8.6.1. The crypt() Algorithm
Clear to Send (CTS) : 14.3. The RS-232 Serial Protocol
client flooding : 16.3.2. Security and Nameservice
client/server model : 16.2.5. Clients and Servers
clients, NIS : (see NIS)
clock, system
5.1.5. File Times
17.3.14. Network Time Protocol (NTP) (UDP Port 123)
for random seeds : 23.8. Picking a Random Seed
resetting : 9.2.3. Checksums and Signatures
Secure RPC timestamp : 19.3.1.3. Setting the window
clogging : 25.3.4. Clogging
CMW (Compartmented-Mode Workstation) : "Secure" Versions of UNIX
CNID (Caller-ID)
14.4.3. Caller-ID (CNID)
14.6. Additional Security for Modems
24.2.4. Tracing a Connection
CO2 system (for fires) : 12.2.1.1. Fire
COAST (Computer Operations, Audit, and Security Technology)
E.3.2. COAST
E.4. Software Resources
code breaking : (see cryptography)
codebooks : 8.7.3. Code Books
CodeCenter : 23.2. Tips on Avoiding Security-related Bugs
cold, extreme : 12.2.1.6. Temperature extremes
command shells : (see shells)
commands
8.1.3. Accounts That Run a Single Command
(see also under specific command name)
accounts running single : 8.1.3. Accounts That Run a Single Command
in addresses : 15.7. Early Security Problems with UUCP
editor, embedded : 11.5.2.7. Other initializations
remote execution of
15.1.2. uux Command
15.4.3. L.cmds: Providing Remote Command Execution
17.3.17. rexec (TCP Port 512)
running simultaneously
23.2. Tips on Avoiding Security-related Bugs
(see also multitasking)
commands in <Directory> blocks : 18.3.2. Commands Within the <Directory> Block
COMMANDS= command : 15.5.2. Permissions Commands
commenting out services : 17.3. Primary UNIX Network Services
comments in BNU UUCP : 15.5.1.3. A Sample Permissions file
Common Gateway Interface : (see CGI)
communications
modems : (see modems)
national telecommunications : 26.2.2. Federal Jurisdiction
threatening : 26.4.7. Harassment, Threatening Communication, and Defamation
comparison copies
9.2.1. Comparison Copies
9.2.1.3. rdist
compress program : 6.6.1.2. Ways of improving the security of crypt
Compressed SLIP (CSLIP) : 16.2. IPv4: The Internet Protocol Version 4
Computer Emergency Response Committee for Unclassified Systems (CERCUS) : F.3.4.36. TRW network area and system administrators
Computer Emergency Response Team : (see CERT)
Computer Incident Advisory Capability (CIAC) : F.3.4.43. U.S. Department of Energy sites, Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), and DOE contractors
computer networks : 1.4.3. Add-On Functionality Breeds Problems
Computer Security Institute (CSI) : F.1.3. Computer Security Institute (CSI)
computers
assigning UUCP name : 15.5.2. Permissions Commands
auxiliary ports : 12.3.1.4. Auxiliary ports on terminals
backing up individual : 7.2.1. Individual Workstation
contacting administrator of : 24.2.4.2. How to contact the system administrator of a computer you don't know
cutting cables to : 25.1. Destructive Attacks
failure of : 7.1.1.1. A taxonomy of computer failures
hostnames for
16.2.3. Hostnames
16.2.3.1. The /etc/hosts file
modems : (see modems)
multiple screens : 12.3.4.3. Multiple screens
multiple suppliers of : 18.6. Dependence on Third Parties
non-citizen access to : 26.4.1. Munitions Export
operating after breakin : 24.6. Resuming Operation
portable : 12.2.6.3. Portables
remote command execution : 17.3.17. rexec (TCP Port 512)
running NIS+ : 19.5.5. NIS+ Limitations
screen savers : 12.3.5.2. X screen savers
security
culture of : D.1.10. Understanding the Computer Security "Culture"
four steps toward : 2.4.4.7. Defend in depth
physical : 12.2.6.1. Physically secure your computer
references for : D.1.7. General Computer Security
resources on : D.1.1. Other Computer References
seized as evidence : 26.2.4. Hazards of Criminal Prosecution
transferring files between : 15.1.1. uucp Command
trusting
27.1. Can you Trust Your Computer?
27.1.3. What the Superuser Can and Cannot Do
unattended
12.3.5. Unattended Terminals
12.3.5.2. X screen savers
unplugging : 24.2.5. Getting Rid of the Intruder
vacuums for : 12.2.1.3. Dust
vandalism of : (see vandalism)
virtual : (see Telnet utility)
computing base (TCB) : 8.5.3.2. Trusted computing base
conf directory : 18.2.2.1. Configuration files
conf/access.conf : (see access.conf file)
conf/srm.conf file : 18.3.1. The access.conf and .htaccess Files
confidentiality : (see encryption; privacy)
configuration
errors : 9.1. Prevention
files : 11.5.3. Abusing Automatic Mechanisms
logging : 10.7.2.2. Informational material
MCSA web server : 18.2.2.1. Configuration files
UUCP version differences : 15.2. Versions of UUCP
simplifying management of : 9.1.2. Read-only Filesystems
connections
hijacking : 16.3. IP Security
laundering : 16.1.1.1. Who is on the Internet?
tracing
24.2.4. Tracing a Connection
24.2.4.2. How to contact the system administrator of a computer you don't know
unplugging : 24.2.5. Getting Rid of the Intruder
connectors, network : 12.2.4.3. Network connectors
consistency of software : 2.1. Planning Your Security Needs
console device : 5.6. Device Files
CONSOLE variable : 8.5.1. Secure Terminals
constraining passwords : 8.8.2. Constraining Passwords
consultants : 27.3.4. Your Consultants?
context-dependent files (CDFs)
5.9.2. Context-Dependent Files
24.4.1.7. Hidden files and directories
control characters in usernames : 3.1. Usernames
cookies
17.3.21.4. Using Xauthority magic cookies
18.2.3.1. Do not trust the user's browser!
COPS (Computer Oracle and Password System)
19.5.5. NIS+ Limitations
E.4.3. COPS (Computer Oracle and Password System)
copyright
9.2.1. Comparison Copies
26.4.2. Copyright Infringement
26.4.2.1. Software piracy and the SPA
notices of : 26.2.6. Other Tips
CORBA (Common Object Request Broker Architecture) : 19.2. Sun's Remote Procedure Call (RPC)
core files
23.2. Tips on Avoiding Security-related Bugs
C.4. The kill Command
cost-benefit analysis
2.3. Cost-Benefit Analysis
2.3.4. Convincing Management
costs of losses : 2.3.1. The Cost of Loss
cp command : 7.4.1. Simple Local Copies
cpio program
7.3.2. Building an Automatic Backup System
7.4.2. Simple Archives
crack program
8.8.3. Cracking Your Own Passwords
18.3.3. Setting Up Web Users and Passwords
cracking
backing up because of : 7.1.1.1. A taxonomy of computer failures
passwords
3.6.1. Bad Passwords: Open Doors
3.6.4. Passwords on Multiple Machines
8.6.1. The crypt() Algorithm
8.8.3. Cracking Your Own Passwords
8.8.3.2. The dilemma of password crackers
17.3.3. TELNET (TCP Port 23)
logging failed attempts : 10.5.3. syslog Messages
responding to
24. Discovering a Break-in
24.7. Damage Control
using rexecd : 17.3.17. rexec (TCP Port 512)
crashes, logging : 10.7.2.1. Exception and activity reports
CRC checksums : (see checksums)
Cred table (NIS+) : 19.5.3. NIS+ Tables
criminal prosecution
26.2. Criminal Prosecution
26.2.7. A Final Note on Criminal Actions
cron file
9.2.2.1. Simple listing
11.5.1.4. Filename attacks
11.5.3.1. crontab entries
automating backups : 7.3.2. Building an Automatic Backup System
cleaning up /tmp directory : 25.2.4. /tmp Problems
collecting login times : 10.1.1. lastlog File
symbolic links in : 10.3.7. Other Logs
system clock and : 17.3.14. Network Time Protocol (NTP) (UDP Port 123)
uucp scripts in : 15.6.2. Automatic Execution of Cleanup Scripts
crontab file : 15.6.2. Automatic Execution of Cleanup Scripts
Crypt Breaker's Workbench (CBW) : 6.6.1.1. The crypt program
crypt command/algorithm
6.4.1. Summary of Private Key Systems
6.6.1. UNIX crypt: The Original UNIX Encryption Command
6.6.1.3. Example
8.6. The UNIX Encrypted Password System
18.3.3. Setting Up Web Users and Passwords
crypt function
8.6. The UNIX Encrypted Password System
8.6.1. The crypt() Algorithm
8.8.7. Algorithm and Library Changes
23.5. Tips on Using Passwords
crypt16 algorithm : 8.6.4. Crypt16() and Other Algorithms
cryptography
6. Cryptography
6.7.2. Cryptography and Export Controls
14.4.4.2. Protection against eavesdropping
checklist for : A.1.1.5. Chapter 6: Cryptography
checksums : 6.5.5.1. Checksums
digital signatures : (see digital signatures)
export laws concerning : 6.7.2. Cryptography and Export Controls
Message Authentication Codes (MACs) : 6.5.5.2. Message authentication codes
message digests : (see message digests)
PGP : (see PGP)
private-key
6.4. Common Cryptographic Algorithms
6.4.1. Summary of Private Key Systems
public-key
6.4. Common Cryptographic Algorithms
6.4.2. Summary of Public Key Systems
6.4.6. RSA and Public Key Cryptography
6.4.6.3. Strength of RSA
6.5.3. Digital Signatures
18.3. Controlling Access to Files on Your Server
18.6. Dependence on Third Parties
references on : D.1.5. Cryptography Books
and U.S. patents : 6.7.1. Cryptography and the U.S. Patent System
csh (C shell)
5.5.2. Problems with SUID
11.5.1. Shell Features
23.2. Tips on Avoiding Security-related Bugs
C.5.3. Running the User's Shell
(see also shells)
autologout variable : 12.3.5.1. Built-in shell autologout
history file : 10.4.1. Shell History
uucp command : 15.1.1.1. uucp with the C shell
.cshrc file
11.5.2.2. .cshrc, .kshrc
12.3.5.1. Built-in shell autologout
24.4.1.6. Changes to startup files
CSI (Computer Security Institute) : F.1.3. Computer Security Institute (CSI)
CSLIP (Compressed SLIP) : 16.2. IPv4: The Internet Protocol Version 4
ctime
5.1.2. Inodes
5.1.5. File Times
5.2.1. chmod: Changing a File's Permissions
7.4.7. inode Modification Times
9.2.3. Checksums and Signatures
cu command
14.5. Modems and UNIX
14.5.3.1. Originate testing
14.5.3.3. Privilege testing
-l option : 14.5.3.1. Originate testing
culture, computer security : D.1.10. Understanding the Computer Security "Culture"
current directory : 5.1.3. Current Directory and Paths
Customer Warning System (CWS) : F.3.4.34. Sun Microsystems customers


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