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Index: P

P configuration command
sendmail, 5.3.9. Priority
sendmail, 14.4. Precedence
sendmail, 35.8.1. The P Configuration Command
p flag : sendmail, 30.8. Alphabetized F= Flags
P flag : sendmail, 30.8. Alphabetized F= Flags
P line (qf file) : sendmail, 23.9. The qf File Internals
$p macro : sendmail, 31.10. Alphabetized Reference
p option : (see PrivacyOptions (p) option)
P option : (see PostmasterCopy (P) option)
-p switch (sendmail) : sendmail, 36.7. Alphabetized Reference
P= equate
sendmail, 6.2. Define a Mail Delivery Agent
sendmail, 6.3. The local Delivery Agent
sendmail, 22.4.4. The P= of Delivery Agents
sendmail, 30.4. The Equates
pacct file : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.2. The acct/pacct Process Accounting File
pack program : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.1.2. Ways of improving the security of crypt
packages, auditing : Building Internet Firewalls, 5.8.5.1. Auditing packages
packet filtering
Building Internet Firewalls, 4.1. Some Firewall Definitions
Building Internet Firewalls, 4.1.1. Packet Filtering
Building Internet Firewalls, 6. Packet Filtering
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.7. Application Layer
TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.7.1. Packet Filters
TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
by address : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.6. Filtering by Address
advice for : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.5. Conventions for Packet Filtering
Archie : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.7.3.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
bugs in packages : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.1.2.1. Current filtering tools are not perfect
choosing a router : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.8. Choosing a Packet Filtering
configuring router : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.2. Configuring a Packet Filtering
constructing filters : TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.7.1. Packet Filters
conventions for : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.8.3. It Should Allow Simple Specification
DNS
Building Internet Firewalls, 8.10.1. Packet Filtering Characteristics of
Building Internet Firewalls, 8.10.5.5. What your packet filtering system
dynamic : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.3.3.2. UDP
example of : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.10. Putting It All Together
with exterior router : Building Internet Firewalls, 4.2.3.4. Exterior router
finger : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.8.1.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
in firewalls : TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.7. Firewalls
FSP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.2.3.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
FTP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.2.1.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
Gopher : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.7.1.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
HTTP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.6.1. Packet Filtering Characteristics of
ICMP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.12.5.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
inbound versus outbound : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.8.6. It Should Apply Rules Separately to
with interior router : Building Internet Firewalls, 4.2.3.3. Interior router
IP : (see IP)
IRC : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.9.2.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
lp : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.17.3. Packet Filtering and Proxying
lpr : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.17.1. Packet Filtering Characteristics of
NFS : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.14.1. Packet Filtering Characteristics of
NIS : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.15.1. Packet Filtering Characteristics of
NNTP
Building Internet Firewalls, 8.5.1. Packet Filtering Characteristics of
Building Internet Firewalls, 8.5.4. Good Ways to Set up
NTP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.13.1. Packet Filtering Characteristics of
performance level of : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.8.1. It Should Have Good Enough
perimeter, and encryption : Building Internet Firewalls, 10.5.3. Where Do You Encrypt?
ping : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.12.3.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
POP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.1.2.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
primitives used, listed : TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.7.1. Packet Filters
r commands : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.4.1.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
rex : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.4.3.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
rexec : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.4.2.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
RIP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.12.2.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
rules for : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.5. Conventions for Packet Filtering
in screened host architecture : Building Internet Firewalls, 9.2.2. Packet Filtering Rules
in screened subnet architecture : Building Internet Firewalls, 9.1.2. Packet Filtering Rules
sequence of : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.8.5. It Should Apply Rules in the Order
screened host architecture : Building Internet Firewalls, 4.2.2. Screened Host Architecture
by service : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.7. Filtering by Service
SMTP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.1.1.4. Packet filtering characteristics of
SNMP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.12.1.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
by source port : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.7.4. Risks of Filtering by Source
syslog : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.11.1. Packet Filtering Characteristics of
talk : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.9.1.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
Telnet : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.3.1. Packet Filtering Characteristics of
testing : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.8.7. It Should Be Able to Log Accepted and
TFTP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.2.2.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
tools for : Building Internet Firewalls, B.3. Packet Filtering Tools
traceroute : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.12.4.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
transparency of : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.1.1.2. Packet filtering doesn't require user knowledge or
UUCP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.2.4.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
WAIS : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.7.2.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
where to do : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.8.8. It Should Have Good Testing and
whois : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.8.2.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
X11 : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.16.1. Packet Filtering Characteristics of
packet sniffing
Building Internet Firewalls, 10.1.2. Packet Sniffing
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 16.3.1. Link-level Security
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.3. TELNET (TCP Port 23)
(see also sniffing)
packet switching
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 16.2. IPv4: The Internet Protocol Version 4
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 16.3. IP Security
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.5.1.1. The datagram
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.7. Application Layer
packets
Building Internet Firewalls, 4.1. Some Firewall Definitions
Building Internet Firewalls, 6. Packet Filtering
Building Internet Firewalls, 6.3.1.2. IP layer
Building Internet Firewalls, 8.12.4. traceroute
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 16.2. IPv4: The Internet Protocol Version 4
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 16.2.4. Packets and Protocols
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 16.2.4.3. UDP
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.3. TCP/IP Protocol Architecture
(see also traceroute utility)
authentication : (see authentication)
bogus, interjecting : TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.3.1.1. Options
capturing : TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
damaged : TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.1.1. Determining the Interface Name
eavesdropping : (see packet sniffing)
encrypting : (see encryption)
forged : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.3.7. Non-IP Protocols
fragmenting
Building Internet Firewalls, 6.3.1.2. IP layer
Building Internet Firewalls, 6.3.2.2. IP fragmentation
handling (by router) : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.4. What Does the Router Do with
headers of : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.3. What Does a Packet Look Like?
ICMP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.12.5. Other ICMP Packets
inbound versus outbound : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.2.2. Be Careful of `Inbound'
monitoring : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.3.1.2. Eavesdropping by Ethernet and 10Base-T
options in DHCP : TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.6.1. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
queued : TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.1.1. Determining the Interface Name
rates of : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.8.1. It Should Have Good Enough
routing : TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.5.1.1. The datagram
source-routed : Building Internet Firewalls, 5.8.2.5. Turning off routing
structure : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.3. What Does a Packet Look Like?
TCP : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.3.3.1. TCP
UDP : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.3.3.2. UDP
update : TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.4.1. Routing Information Protocol
packetsize : TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.3.1. The ping Command
PAP (Password Authentication Protocol)
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security
TCP/IP Network Administration, A.2. The PPP Daemon
pap-secrets file : TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security
paper
backups on : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 24.5.1. Never Trust Anything Except Hardcopy
copies : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 7.3.2. Building an Automatic Backup System
logging on : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.7. Handwritten Logs
throwing out : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.3.3. Other Media
PAR (Positive Acknowledgment with Retransmission) : Building Internet Firewalls, C.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
Parallel Line IP (PLIP) : TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
parallel multipart subtype : TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
parent processes : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, C.2. Creating Processes
parentheses (), for continuation characters : TCP/IP Network Administration, C.3.1. Standard Resource Records
/parse rule-testing command
sendmail, 15.1. Test the Configuration File
sendmail, 38.5.5. Parse an Address with /parse
parsing addresses
sendmail, 15.1. Test the Configuration File
sendmail, 38.5.5. Parse an Address with /parse
(see also rule set 3)
partial message subtype : TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
partitions : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 25.2.2.4. Using partitions to protect your users
backup by : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 7.1.3. Types of Backups
root : (see root directory)
pass phrases for PGP
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.3.1. Encrypting files with IDEA
(see also passwords)
passing data : (see data, communications model)
passive FTP
Building Internet Firewalls, 8.2.1.1. Packet filtering characteristics of
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.2.2. Passive vs. active FTP
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.2.3. FTP passive mode
passive option
in pppd : TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.3.5. PPP Server Configuration
in RIP
TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.4.1.1. Running RIP with routed
TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.7.1.2. Interior gateway configurations
passwd command
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.4. Changing Your Password
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.6.2. What Is Salt?
as SUID program : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.5. SUID
-l option
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.4.1. Changing an Account's Password
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.8. Disabling an Account by Changing Its Password
-n option : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.6. Password Aging and Expiration
-x option : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.6. Password Aging and Expiration
-f nomemory option : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.5. Verifying Your New Password
using as superuser : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.5. Verifying Your New Password
passwd command line : TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File
passwd file
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 1.2. What Is an Operating System?
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.2.2. The /etc/passwd File
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 4.2.3. Impact of the /etc/passwd and /etc/group
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 7.1.2. What Should You Back Up?
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.1.1. Accounts Without Passwords
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.6. The UNIX Encrypted Password System
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 15.1.4. How the UUCP Commands Work
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 24.4.1. New Accounts
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, C.5.1. Process #1: /etc/init
sendmail, 30.8. Alphabetized F= Flags
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.3.5. PPP Server Configuration
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.4.3. SLIP Server Configuration
TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.1.5. NFS Authentication Server
TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.3. Network Information Service
TCP/IP Network Administration, 10.4.1.1. Building a sendmail.cf with m4 macros
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File
TCP/IP Network Administration, 13.2.1. Creating an FTP Server
+ in : (see NIS)
accounts without passwords : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.1.1. Accounts Without Passwords
backing up : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 7.1.2. What Should You Back Up?
gecos field : sendmail, 14.2.1. The Full-Name: Header
mail hubs and : sendmail, 6. The Mail Hub and Delivery Agents
new accounts : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 24.4.1. New Accounts
NFS : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 20.2.1.1. /etc/exports
protecting : TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.2. User Authentication
in security checks : TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.4.2. Looking for Trouble
trusted users and : sendmail, 14.6. Trusted User
user database class for : sendmail, 33.8. Alphabetized Reference
uucp user and : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 15.1.4. How the UUCP Commands Work
Passwd table (NIS+) : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.5.3. NIS+ Tables
passwd+ package
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.2. Constraining Passwords
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.4. Password Generators
Password Authentication Protocol (PAP)
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security
TCP/IP Network Administration, A.2. The PPP Daemon
password file
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.4.4.6. NIS is confused about "+"
(see also passwd file)
password modems : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 14.6. Additional Security for Modems
password.adjunct file : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.5. Shadow Password Files
passwords
Building Internet Firewalls, 10.2. What Is Authentication?
Building Internet Firewalls, 10.2.2. Something You Know
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.2. Passwords
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.6.1. Bad Passwords: Open Doors
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.8. Summary
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.4. Security Implications of Network Services
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23.5. Tips on Using Passwords
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.7. Application Layer
(see also authentication)
(see also shadow file)
accounts without : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.1.1. Accounts Without Passwords
aging
Building Internet Firewalls, 12.1.2. Managing Your Accounts
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File
assigning to users : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.1. Assigning Passwords to Users
authentication based on
TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First
TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.7.1.2. Interior gateway configurations
TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.1.5. NFS Authentication Server
avoiding conventional
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8. Administrative Techniques for Conventional Passwords
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.9. Account Names Revisited: Using Aliases for Increased
bad choices for
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.6.1. Bad Passwords: Open Doors
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.6.4. Passwords on Multiple Machines
checklist for : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, A.1.1.2. Chapter 3: Users and Passwords
choosing, generating
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.4. Password Generators
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.2.2. Choosing a Password
changing
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.4. Changing Your Password
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.5. Verifying Your New Password
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.4.1. Changing an Account's Password
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.8. Disabling an Account by Changing Its Password
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.2. User Authentication
time-based : Building Internet Firewalls, 10.3.2. Time-based Passwords
tricks used to avoid changing : TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File
constraining : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.2. Constraining Passwords
conventional : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.2.6. Conventional UNIX Passwords
cracking, guessing, stealing
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.6.1. Bad Passwords: Open Doors
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.6.3. Good Passwords: Locked Doors
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.6.4. Passwords on Multiple Machines
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.6.1. The crypt()
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.3. Cracking Your Own Passwords
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.3.2. The dilemma of password crackers
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.3. TELNET (TCP Port 23)
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.2. User Authentication
logging failed attempts : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.5.3. syslog Messages
sniffing
Building Internet Firewalls, 1.2.1.3. Information Theft
Building Internet Firewalls, 10.1.2. Packet Sniffing
Building Internet Firewalls, 10.3.1. One-Time Passwords
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 1.4.3. Add-On Functionality Breeds Problems
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3. Users and Passwords
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.7. One-Time Passwords
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 16.3. IP Security
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.3. TELNET (TCP Port 23)
(see also eavesdropping)
(see also packet sniffing)
stealing with network taps : Building Internet Firewalls, 1.2.1.3. Information Theft
encrypting
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.6. The UNIX Encrypted Password System
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.6.4. Crypt16() and Other Algorithms
expiring : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.6. Password Aging and Expiration
false authentication and : Building Internet Firewalls, 10.1.3. False Authentication
federal jurisdiction over : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 26.2.2. Federal Jurisdiction
FTP and : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.2. (FTP) File Transfer Protocol (TCP Ports 20 and 21)
hit lists of : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.6.1. Bad Passwords: Open Doors
Kerberos : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.6.5. Kerberos Limitations
logging changes to : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.7.2.1. Exception and activity reports
for MUDs : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.23. Other TCP Ports: MUDs and Internet Relay Chat (IRC)
on multiple machines
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.6.4. Passwords on Multiple Machines
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.6.5. Writing Down Passwords
over network connections : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23.3. Tips on Writing Network Programs
with network services : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.4. Security Implications of Network Services
NIS, with Secure RPC : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.3.2.1. Creating passwords for users
NIS+, changing : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.5.4.1. Changing your password
one-time
Building Internet Firewalls, 10.3.1. One-Time Passwords
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.7. One-Time Passwords
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.7.3. Code Books
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.4. Security Implications of Network Services
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23.3. Tips on Writing Network Programs
TCP/IP Network Administration, Preface
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.2.3. One-Time Passwords
password coach : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.4. Password Generators
with POP : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.10. Post Office Protocol (POP) (TCP Ports
required for Web use
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 18.3.2. Commands Within the <Directory>
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 18.3.3. Setting Up Web Users and Passwords
shadow
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.4.1. Changing an Account's Password
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.5. Shadow Password Files
system clock and : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.14. Network Time Protocol (NTP) (UDP Port 123)
token cards with : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.7.2. Token Cards
usernames as : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.8.3.1. Joetest: a simple password cracker
UUCP accounts : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 15.3.2. Establishing UUCP Passwords
verifying new : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.5. Verifying Your New Password
wizard's (sendmail) : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.4.1. sendmail and security
writing down
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 3.6.5. Writing Down Passwords
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.2.4. OPIE
patches
Building Internet Firewalls, 12.3.2. Keeping Your Systems Up To Date
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.7.2.2. Informational material
patents
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.7.1. Cryptography and the U.S. Patent System
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 26.4.4. Patent Concerns
paths : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.1.3. Current Directory and Paths
delivery agent : sendmail, 30.4. The Equates
to execution directories : sendmail, 30.4. The Equates
for .forward file : sendmail, 22.8.3.2. The ForwardPath option
return, per RFC821 : sendmail, 30.8. Alphabetized F= Flags
trusted : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.5.3.1. Trusted path
path MTU discovery code : TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
PATH variable
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.1.4.1. Restricted shells under System V UNIX
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.1.4.6. Potential problems with rsh
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23.4. Tips on Writing SUID/SGID Programs
attacks via : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.5.1.1. PATH attacks
path vector protocols : TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.5.2. Border Gateway Protocol
PATH... macros : sendmail, 18.8. Alphabetized Reference
pathname
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23.2. Tips on Avoiding Security-related Bugs
sendmail, 12.2. The File Form of Class
mail delivery program
sendmail, 6.2. Define a Mail Delivery Agent
sendmail, 6.3. The local Delivery Agent
sendmail, 22.4.4. The P= of Delivery Agents
UUCP and : sendmail, 8.1.4. UUCP and Host Paths
pattern matching
TCP/IP Network Administration, 10.6.1. Pattern Matching
(see $ operators; wildcard operators)
symbols for : TCP/IP Network Administration, 10.5.3. The Define Class Command
pax program : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 7.4.2. Simple Archives
PC NFS Authentication and Print Server (pcnfsd) : TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.1.5. NFS Authentication Server
pcbind service : Building Internet Firewalls, 5.8.2.4. Which services should you disable?
PCERT (Purdue University) : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, F.3.4.30. Purdue University
PCI bus : TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.3.1.3. Devices
PCM audio subtype : TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
pcnfsd.conf file : TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.1.5.1. NFS print services
PCs
viruses on : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.1.5. Viruses
web server on : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 18.2. Running a Secure Server
${pd} macro : sendmail, D.1. Sun Enhancements
PDP-11 processors
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 1.3. History of UNIX
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.6.1. The crypt()
PDUs (Protocol Data Units) : TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
peer
TCP/IP Network Administration, 3. Network Services
TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.5.2. Border Gateway Protocol
TCP/IP Network Administration, B.5. Options Statements
clauses : TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.7.1.3. Exterior gateway configuration
level communications : TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.2. A Data Communications Model
subclauses : TCP/IP Network Administration, B.8.5. The bgp Statement
Penn State response team : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, F.3.4.29. Pennsylvania State University
per-machine logs : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.7.2. Per-Machine Logs
per-site logs : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.7.1. Per-Site Logs
percent (%) in addresses
sendmail, 17.1.5. The % Hack
sendmail, 21.5.1. Offsite MX Hosts
performance
analyzing : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 18.4. Avoiding the Risks of Eavesdropping
compromised
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 25.2.1. Process-Overload Problems
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 25.2.1.2. System overload attacks
high-load queuing and : sendmail, 34.8. Alphabetized Reference
:include: lists and : sendmail, 25.2.2. Tradeoffs
incoming SMTP connection rate : sendmail, 34.8. Alphabetized Reference
load average
sendmail, 18.8. Alphabetized Reference
sendmail, 23.4. Printing the Queue
load balancing
TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First
TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.4.3. Checking the Interface with netstat
TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.4.4. Subdividing an Ethernet
load shedding : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23.3. Tips on Writing Network Programs
mail hubs and : sendmail, 6. The Mail Hub and Delivery Agents
with multiple interior routers : Building Internet Firewalls, 4.3.5. It's Dangerous to Use Multiple
MX records pointing to CNAMEs : sendmail, 21.3.2. MX to CNAME Causes Extra Lookups
of packet filter : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.8.1. It Should Have Good Enough
refusing connections on high load : sendmail, 34.8. Alphabetized Reference
reviews : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 13.2.3. Performance Reviews and Monitoring
with Secure RPC : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.3.4. Limitations of Secure RPC
sendmail options for : sendmail, 34.6.4. Controlling Machine Load
using FFS : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 25.2.2.6. Reserved space
perimeter networks
Building Internet Firewalls, 4.1. Some Firewall Definitions
Building Internet Firewalls, 4.2.3.1. Perimeter network
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.1.1. The Physical Security Plan
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.7. Firewalls
multiple : Building Internet Firewalls, 4.3.7. It's OK to Have Multiple Perimeter
shared : Building Internet Firewalls, 4.4.5. A Shared Perimeter Network Allows
period (.)
. line (qf file) : sendmail, 23.9. The qf File Internals
checking for in ${pd} : sendmail, D.1. Sun Enhancements
for current directory : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.1.1. Directories
to end messages
sendmail, 4.2. Verbose (-v)
sendmail, 30.8. Alphabetized F= Flags
filenames starting with, disabling creation of : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.2.1.6. Be careful of writable
host status file line : sendmail, B.1. Status file lines
leading in messages : sendmail, 34.8. Alphabetized Reference
trailing in FQDNs
sendmail, 15.3. MX Records
sendmail, 17.4. Rule Set 4
sendmail, 29.5.1. Stripping Trailing Dots
.. directory : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.1.1. Directories
.. for domain name : TCP/IP Network Administration, C.3.1. Standard Resource Records
Perl programming language
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.5.3. SUID Shell Scripts
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.1.4. Trojan Horses
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.5.1.2. IFS attacks
perl -T command
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 18.2.3.4. Tainting with Perl
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23.4. Tips on Writing SUID/SGID Programs
random seed generator : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23.9. A Good Random Seed
script for reading lastlog file : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.1.1. lastlog File
Swatch program
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.6. Swatch: A Log File Tool
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.6.2. The Swatch Configuration File
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, E.4.9. Swatch
tainting facility : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 18.2.3.4. Tainting with Perl
permissions
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 1.1. What Is Computer Security?
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.1.6. Understanding File Permissions
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.2.4. Using Octal File Permissions
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.1.5. Viruses
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.6.1. File Protections
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.6.1.3. World-readable backup devices
sendmail, 13.2.4. The Default File Permissions
sendmail, 22.5. Permissions
access control lists (ACLs)
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.2.5. Access Control Lists
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.2.5.2. HP-UX access control lists
changing
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.2.1. chmod: Changing a File's Permissions
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.2.4. Using Octal File Permissions
directory : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.4. Using Directory Permissions
directory for safe writes : sendmail, 34.8. Alphabetized Reference
/etc/utmp file : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.1.2. utmp and wtmp Files
.forward file and : sendmail, 22.5.3. Permissions for ~/.forward Files
group : sendmail, 34.8. Alphabetized Reference
intruder's modifications to : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 24.4.1.2. Changes in file and directory protections
modem devices : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 14.5.2. Setting Up the UNIX Device
modem files : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 14.5.1. Hooking Up a Modem to Your Computer
of NIS+ objects : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.5.5. NIS+ Limitations
NO_GROUP_SET macro : sendmail, 18.8. Alphabetized Reference
octal
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.2.3. Calculating Octal File Permissions
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.2.4. Using Octal File Permissions
qf file : sendmail, 23.3.2. Bad qf Owner or Permissions
queue directory : sendmail, 23.1. Overview of the Queue
of .rhosts file : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.18.4. The ~/.rhosts file
root user
sendmail, Other Books, Other Problems
sendmail, 14.6. Trusted User
sendmail, 22.1. Why root?
safe options : sendmail, 34.1.4. Options that Are Safe
SUID programs
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.5. SUID
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.5.7. SGID Bit on Files (System V UNIX Only)
symbolic links and : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.1.7. File Permissions in Detail
temporary files
sendmail, 22.8.3.7. The TempFileMode option
sendmail, 34.8. Alphabetized Reference
umasks
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.3. The umask
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.3.2. Common umask Values
UUCP : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 15.4.1.4. Special permissions
Permissions file
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 15.5. Security in BNU UUCP
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 15.5.1. Permissions File
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 15.5.3. uucheck: Checking Your Permissions File
persistent host-status : sendmail, 36.7. Alphabetized Reference
personal mail forwarding : TCP/IP Network Administration, 10.3.1. Personal mail forwarding
personnel : (see employees)
PGP (Pretty Good Privacy)
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.3. PGP: Pretty Good Privacy
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.3.6. PGP detached signatures
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.6.1. When is symmetric encryption useful?
-eat and -seat options : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.3.3. Encrypting a message
encrypting message with : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.3.3. Encrypting a message
encrypting Web documents : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 18.4.1. Eavesdropping Over the Wire
-ka option : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.3.2. Creating your PGP public key
-kg option : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.3.2. Creating your PGP public key
-kvc option : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.3.6. PGP detached signatures
-kxaf option : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.3.2. Creating your PGP public key
-o option : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.3.6. PGP detached signatures
-sat option : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.3.4. Adding a digital signature to an announcement
-sb option : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.3.6. PGP detached signatures
software signature : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, E.4. Software Resources
ph (phonebook) server : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.8.3. Replacing finger
phantom mail : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.4.2. Using sendmail to receive email
Physical Layer
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.2. A Data Communications Model
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.1.1. Determining the Interface Name
physical network
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.5.1.2. Routing datagrams
TCP/IP Network Administration, 2.3. Subnets
TCP/IP Network Administration, 2.6. Address Resolution
TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.5.1. Reverse Address Resolution Protocol
address, embedded in response : TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.6. Bootstrap Protocol
independence from
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.1.1. TCP/IP Features
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6. Configuring the Interface
physical security
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12. Physical Security
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.4.2. "Nothing to Lose?"
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.1.1. Assessing the Threat
access control : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.2.3. Physical Access
of backups
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 7.1.6. Security for Backups
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 7.1.6.3. Data security for backups
checklist for : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, A.1.1.11. Chapter 12: Physical Security
modems
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 14.5.4. Physical Protection of Modems
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 14.6. Additional Security for Modems
read-only filesystems : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 9.1.2. Read-only Filesystems
signal grounding : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 25.3.3. Signal Grounding
physical serial ports : TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.4.4. Troubleshooting Serial Connections
PICKY... macros : sendmail, 18.8. Alphabetized Reference
PICKY_QF_NAME_CHECK variable
sendmail, 18.8. Alphabetized Reference
sendmail, 23.3.1. Badly Formed qf Filename
PIDs (process identifiers)
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, C.1.3.1. PIDs (process IDs)Process identification
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, C.1.3.4. Process groups and sessions
sendmail, 23.2.1. The Queue Identifier
including with logs : sendmail, 26.1.1. syslog(3)
for sendmail : (see $p macro)
Pieprzyk, Josef : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.5.4.3. HAVAL
ping command
Building Internet Firewalls, 2.10. Network Management Services
Building Internet Firewalls, 5.6. Selecting Services Provided by the
Building Internet Firewalls, 8.12.3. ping
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.4.4. Troubleshooting Serial Connections
TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.2. The Minimal Routing Table
statistics displayed by
TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.3.1. The ping Command
TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.4.3. Checking the Interface with netstat
in troubleshooting : TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.3. Testing Basic Connectivity
PingWare program : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.6.3. PingWare
pipe (in Swatch program) : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.6.2. The Swatch Configuration File
pipe character (|) separating multiple printer names : TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.2.1. The printcap File
pipes
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 18.2.3.2. Testing is not enough!
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 18.2.3.3. Sending mail
(see also programs, delivering to)
pipes (for smoking) : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.2.1.2. Smoke
piracy of software
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.2.6. Setting up anonymous FTP with the standard UNIX FTP
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 26.4.2.1. Software piracy and the SPA
(see also software)
plain text subtype : TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
plaintext attacks : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.2.3. Cryptographic Strength
.plan file : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.8.1. The .plan and .project files
planning sheets : TCP/IP Network Administration, 4.6.1. Sample Planning Sheets
platforms : (see operating systems)
play accounts : (see open accounts)
playback attacks : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.6.1.2. Using the ticket granting ticket
PLIP (Parallel Line IP) : TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
plug-gw proxy : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.7.3. Generic Proxying with TIS
plumb/unplumb parameters : TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.1.5.5. Point-to-point
plus sign (+)
in configuration file : sendmail, 1.3.1. The Configuration File
indicating a trusted host : TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.2.5. Secure the r Commands
in hosts.equiv file : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.18.5. Searching for .rhosts files
marking users with : sendmail, 24.4.3. Plussed Users
in NIS
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.4. Sun's Network Information Service (NIS)
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.4.4.6. NIS is confused about "+"
plussed users : sendmail, 24.4.3. Plussed Users
point-to-point interfaces
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.1.5.5. Point-to-point
TCP/IP Network Administration, B.6. Interface Statements
defined : TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.1.1. Determining the Interface Name
Point-to-Point Protocol : (see PPP)
pointers : TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.3.2. Creating Domains and Subdomains
poison reverse feature : TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.4.1.1. Running RIP with routed
policy, security
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 1.2. What Is an Operating System?
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2. Policies and Guidelines
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.5.3. Final Words: Risk Management Means Common Sense
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, A.1.1.1. Chapter 2: Policies and Guidelines
(see security, policies of)
cost-benefit analysis
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.3. Cost-Benefit Analysis
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.3.4. Convincing Management
risk assessment
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.2. Risk Assessment
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.2.2. Review Your Risks
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.5.3. Final Words: Risk Management Means Common Sense
role of
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.4.1. The Role of Policy
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.4.4. Some Key Ideas in Developing a Workable Policy
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.4.4.7. Defend in depth
policy-based routing : TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.5.2. Border Gateway Protocol
database : TCP/IP Network Administration, 2.4. Internet Routing Architecture
politics : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.3. Authors
polling
TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.5.1. Exterior Gateway Protocol
TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
trap-directed : TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
polyalphabetic ciphers : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.3. The Enigma Encryption System
polygraph tests : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 13.1. Background Checks
POP (Post Office Protocol)
Building Internet Firewalls, 8.1.2. Post Office Protocol
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.10. Post Office Protocol (POP) (TCP Ports
TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.4.2. Post Office Protocol
TCP/IP Network Administration, 4.5.3. Planning Your Mail System
commands, listed : TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.4.2. Post Office Protocol
mail server : TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.7.1. POP Server
multiple services : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.1.2.2. Proxying characteristics of
pop3d.tar : TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.7.1. POP Server
popen command
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 18.2.3.2. Testing is not enough!
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23.2. Tips on Avoiding Security-related Bugs
sendmail, 18.8. Alphabetized Reference
popper17.tar : TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.7.1. POP Server
pornography : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 26.4.5. Pornography and Indecent Material
ports
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 16.2.4.2. TCP
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.1.1. The /etc/services File
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, G. Table of IP Services
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.2. A Data Communications Model
TCP/IP Network Administration, 2.7.3. Sockets
numbers
Building Internet Firewalls, C.12.2. Port Numbers
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23.3. Tips on Writing Network Programs
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, G. Table of IP Services
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
TCP/IP Network Administration, 2.7. Protocols, Ports, and Sockets
TCP/IP Network Administration, 2.7.2. Port Numbers
passing : TCP/IP Network Administration, 2.7.3. Sockets
randomly generated : TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.6. Bootstrap Protocol
reserved TCP : sendmail, 30.8. Alphabetized F= Flags
source, filtering by : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.7.4. Risks of Filtering by Source
trusted : (see trusted ports)
well-known : Building Internet Firewalls, C.12.3. Sockets
PORT directory (db distribution) : sendmail, C.2. Get the Source
portable computers : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.2.6.3. Portables
portable I/O library : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 1.3. History of UNIX
portmap service
Building Internet Firewalls, 5.8.2.4. Which services should you disable?
Building Internet Firewalls, B.5.3. portmap
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.2.1. Sun's portmap/rpcbind
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.4.4.4. Spoofing RPC
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, E.4.6. portmap
portmapper
Building Internet Firewalls, 6.3.3.4. RPC
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.11. Sun RPC's portmapper (UDP and TCP Ports 111)
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.2.1. Sun's portmap/rpcbind
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.4.5. Unintended Disclosure of Site Information with NIS
TCP/IP Network Administration, 2.7.2. Port Numbers
positional operators
sendmail, 9.2.3. The User ($:)
sendmail, 10.2.2. The RHS
sendmail, 12.1.4. Class Macros in the RHS
sendmail, 28.6.1. Copy by Position: $digit
m4 arguments and : sendmail, 19.1.3. m4 and arguments
positive acknowledgment
Building Internet Firewalls, C.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
positivity : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.4.4.2. Be positive
POSIX
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 1.3. History of UNIX
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 1.4.2. Software Quality
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, C.1.3.4. Process groups and sessions
chown command and : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.7. chown: Changing a File's Owner
post office : sendmail, 18.1. To Use or Not to Use
Post Office Protocol : (see POP)
post office servers : (see mailbox servers)
"Posted-Date:" header line : sendmail, 35.10. Alphabetized Reference
postmaster alias
sendmail, 3.1.1. The Aliases File
sendmail, 24.4.1. The Postmaster Alias
sendmail, 34.8. Alphabetized Reference
postmaster, contacting : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 24.2.4.2. How to contact the system administrator of a computer
PostmasterCopy (P) option
sendmail, 22.8.3.4. The PostmasterCopy option
sendmail, 24.4.1. The Postmaster Alias
sendmail, 34.8. Alphabetized Reference
PostScript application subtype : TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
PostScript files : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.1.5. Viruses
pound sign (#) for comments
TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.2. The Host Table
TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.4. The Internet Daemon
TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.7.1.1. A host configuration
TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.1.4. NFS Automounter
TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.2.1. The printcap File
TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.4. A BOOTP Server
TCP/IP Network Administration, A.1.1. The dip Script File
TCP/IP Network Administration, D.3. The dhcpd.conf Configuration File
power outage
logging : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.7.1.1. Exception and activity reports
possible effects of
TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.4. A BOOTP Server
TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf
power surges
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.2. Protecting Computer Hardware
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.2.1.8. Electrical noise
(see also lightning)
PPP (Point-to-Point Protocol)
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 14.5. Modems and UNIX
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 16.2. IPv4: The Internet Protocol Version 4
TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.2.1. The Serial Protocols
as default : TCP/IP Network Administration, A.1.1. The dip Script File
installing
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.1.5.5. Point-to-point
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.3. Installing PPP
interoperability and : TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.2.2. Choosing a Serial Protocol
server configuration : TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.3.5. PPP Server Configuration
in Solaris : TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.3.6. Solaris PPP
tools reference : TCP/IP Network Administration, A. PPP Tools
ppp directory, protecting : TCP/IP Network Administration, A.2. The PPP Daemon
pppd (PPP daemon)
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security
TCP/IP Network Administration, A.2. The PPP Daemon
ppplogin : TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.3.5. PPP Server Configuration
.ppprc file : TCP/IP Network Administration, A.2. The PPP Daemon
prearranging file transfer : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.2.1.6. Be careful of writable
precedence
sendmail, 34.8. Alphabetized Reference
TCP/IP Network Administration, 10.5.6. Defining Mail Precedence
(see also priority, message)
"Precedence:" header line
sendmail, 14.4. Precedence
sendmail, 25.5.5. Precedence: bulk
sendmail, 26.1.3.1. class= the queue class
sendmail, 35.8. Precedence
sendmail, 35.10. Alphabetized Reference
predefined macros (sendmail)
sendmail, 7.3. Predefined Macros
sendmail, 31.1. Preassigned Macros
Predictor-1 compression : TCP/IP Network Administration, A.2. The PPP Daemon
preference
host
sendmail, 15.3. MX Records
sendmail, 21.3. Set Up MX Records
message delivery : (see priority, message)
values for
TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.6.1. gated's Preference Value
TCP/IP Network Administration, B.6. Interface Statements
TCP/IP Network Administration, B.8.5. The bgp Statement
TCP/IP Network Administration, B.9. static Statements
TCP/IP Network Administration, B.10. Control Statements
high-cost : TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.7.1.2. Interior gateway configurations
negative : TCP/IP Network Administration, B.10.1. The import Statement
prefix-length : TCP/IP Network Administration, 2.2.2. Classless IP Addresses
preprocessing rule set : (see rule set 3)
Presentation Layer : TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.2. A Data Communications Model
preserve program : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.5.3.2. Another SUID example: IFS and the /usr/lib/preserve
Pretty Good Privacy : (see PGP)
prevention, cost of
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.3. Cost-Benefit Analysis
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.3.4. Convincing Management
pri= equate (syslog output) : sendmail, 26.1.3.7. pri= the initial priority
primary group : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 4.1.3. Groups and Group Identifiers (GIDs)
primary servers
TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.3.4. BIND, resolver, and named
TCP/IP Network Administration, 4.4.1. Obtaining a Domain Name
TCP/IP Network Administration, 8.1.1. BIND Configurations
TCP/IP Network Administration, C.2. named.boot Configuration Commands
configuring : TCP/IP Network Administration, 8.3.1.2. Primary and secondary server configurations
offsite : sendmail, 21.5.2. Offsite Servers
principals, NIS+ : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.5.1. What NIS+ Does
print servers : TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.7.2. Print Services
configuring
TCP/IP Network Administration, 4.5.2. Print servers
TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.2.1. The printcap File
print spool directory, making
TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.1.5.1. NFS print services
TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.2.1. The printcap File
print through process : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.3.2.1. Verify your backups
printcap file : TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.2.1. The printcap File
printers and printing : Building Internet Firewalls, 3.1. Least Privilege
buffers : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.3.4.1. Printer buffers
configuring protocols : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.17. Printing Protocols (lpr and lp)
delivery agent definitions : sendmail, 6.3.3. Testing the New Delivery Agent Definitions
/etc/hosts.lpd file : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.18.6. /etc/hosts.lpd file
list of delivery agents : sendmail, 38.4.2. Show Delivery Agents with =M
logging to : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.5.2.1. Logging to a printer
macro definitions : sendmail, 7.3. Predefined Macros
multiple printers : TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.2.1. The printcap File
output from printers : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.3.4.2. Printer output
persistent-host status : sendmail, 36.7. Alphabetized Reference
ports for : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.3.1.4. Auxiliary ports on terminals
queue
sendmail, 4.1.2. Show Queue Mode (-bp)
sendmail, 23.2.3.2. Locks shown when printing the queue
sendmail, 23.4. Printing the Queue
sendmail, 36.7. Alphabetized Reference
TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.2.1.2. Using LPD
security : TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.2.1.1. LPD security
sendmail.st file : sendmail, 26.2.2. Viewing Statistics: mailstats
systems : Building Internet Firewalls, 2.14. Printing Systems
priority
logging : sendmail, 26.1.1. syslog(3)
mailing lists : sendmail, 25.5.5. Precedence: bulk
messages
sendmail, 5.3.9. Priority
sendmail, 14.4. Precedence
sendmail, 23.4.1. Printing the Queue in Verbose Mode
sendmail, 23.9. The qf File Internals
sendmail, 26.1.3.7. pri= the initial priority
sendmail, 35.8. Precedence
TCP/IP Network Administration, 10.5.6. Defining Mail Precedence
TCP/IP Network Administration, B.8.4. The isis Statement
precedence weight : sendmail, 34.8. Alphabetized Reference
raising for retry : sendmail, 34.8. Alphabetized Reference
processes : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, C.1.3.3. Process priority and niceness
"Priority:" header line : sendmail, 35.10. Alphabetized Reference
privacy
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.1. Planning Your Security Needs
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.5.2. Confidential Information
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 9. Integrity Management
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.3. Protecting Data
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 12.3.6. Key Switches
(see also encryption; integrity)
Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 26.2.3. Federal Computer Crime Laws
IP addresses : Building Internet Firewalls, 4.5. What the Future Holds
key cryptography : Building Internet Firewalls, 10. Authentication and Inbound
newsgroups : Building Internet Firewalls, 2.4. Usenet News
Secure RPC : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.3.4. Limitations of Secure RPC
PrivacyOptions (p) option
sendmail, 22.8.3.5. The PrivacyOptions option
sendmail, 34.8. Alphabetized Reference
private argument : TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.1.5.3. Metric
private-key cryptography
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.4. Common Cryptographic Algorithms
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.4.1. Summary of Private Key Systems
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.6. Encryption
privilege testing (modem) : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 14.5.3.3. Privilege testing
privileges, file : (see permissions)
privileges, SUID : (see SUID/SGID programs)
probes, responding to : Building Internet Firewalls, 12.2.4. Responding to Probes
procedures for proxying, custom : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.2.2. Using Custom User Procedures for
processes
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, C.1. About Processes
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, C.5.3. Running the User's Shell
(see PIDs (process identifiers))
accounting
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.2. The acct/pacct Process Accounting File
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.2.3. messages Log File
group IDs
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 4.3.3. Other IDs
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, C.1.3.4. Process groups and sessions
overload attacks
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 25.2.1. Process-Overload Problems
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 25.2.1.2. System overload attacks
priority of : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, C.1.3.3. Process priority and niceness
scheduler : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, C.1.3.3. Process priority and niceness
processing
command-line processing : sendmail, 36.4. Processing the Command Line
flow of rules : sendmail, 29.3. The Sequence of Rule Sets
queue
sendmail, 23.5. How the Queue Is Processed
sendmail, 36.7. Alphabetized Reference
speed : Building Internet Firewalls, 5.3.2. How Fast a Machine?
procmail
TCP/IP Network Administration, E.3.5. MAILER
sendmail, 19.6. Alphabetized m4 Macros
sendmail, 25.7.5.2. The procmail program
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.5.2.5. .forward, .procmailrc
.procmailrc file : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.5.2.5. .forward, .procmailrc
.profile file
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.1.4.1. Restricted shells under System V UNIX
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.1.4.6. Potential problems with rsh
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.5.2.1. .login, .profile, /etc/profile
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 24.4.1.6. Changes to startup files
prog delivery agent : sendmail, 30.2.1. Required Symbolic Names
prog pattern : TCP/IP Network Administration, 13.3.1. archie
program database class : sendmail, 33.8. Alphabetized Reference
program form, F command : sendmail, 22.4.3. The F Command - Program Form
programmed threats
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11. Protecting Against Programmed Threats
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.6.2. Shared Libraries
authors of : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.3. Authors
checklist for : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, A.1.1.10. Chapter 11: Protecting Against Programmed Threats
protection from : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.5. Protecting Yourself
references on : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, D.1.4. Computer Viruses and Programmed Threats
programs : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23. Writing Secure SUID and Network Programs
CGI : (see CGI, scripts)
delivering to
sendmail, 3.2.2. Delivery Through a Program
sendmail, 24.2.3. Delivery via Programs
sendmail, 25.7.4. Piping Through Programs
sendmail, 30.8. Alphabetized F= Flags
filter
sendmail, 24.4.1. The Postmaster Alias
sendmail, 24.6.2. Filtering Recipients with a Shell Script
for network services : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23.3. Tips on Writing Network Programs
nonessential, removing : Building Internet Firewalls, 5.8.4.2. Remove nonessential programs
rabbit
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.1. Programmed Threats: Definitions
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.1.7. Bacteria and Rabbits
references for : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, D.1.11. UNIX Programming and System Administration
running simultaneously : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23.2. Tips on Avoiding Security-related Bugs
secure : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23. Writing Secure SUID and Network Programs
worms : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.1.6. Worms
Project Athena : (see Kerberos authentication system)
.project file : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 17.3.8.1. The .plan and .project files
promiscuous mode
Building Internet Firewalls, 5.5. Locating the Bastion Host on the Network
TCP/IP Network Administration, 6.1.5.5. Point-to-point
TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.7.1. Packet Filters
interface : TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
proprietary ownership notices : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 26.2.6. Other Tips
prosecution, criminal
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 26.2. Criminal Prosecution
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 26.2.7. A Final Note on Criminal Actions
proto clauses
TCP/IP Network Administration, 7.7.1.3. Exterior gateway configuration
TCP/IP Network Administration, A.1. Dial-Up IP
TCP/IP Network Administration, B.10.2. The export Statement
proto= equate (syslog output) : sendmail, 26.1.3.8. proto= the protocol used in transmission
protocols : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 16.2.4. Packets and Protocols
analyzers
Building Internet Firewalls, 8.18. Analyzing Other Protocols
TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.7. Analyzing Protocol Problems
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.2.3. One-Time Passwords
bidirectionality of : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.2.1. Protocols Are Usually
client server : TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
data : (see TCP/IP services)
dedicated Archie : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.7.3.3. Providing Archie service to your
IP : (see IP protocols)
above IP : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.3.3. Protocols Above
manager/agent : TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
minor : TCP/IP Network Administration, 2.7.1. Protocol Numbers
name, alias for : TCP/IP Network Administration, 2.7.1. Protocol Numbers
non-IP : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.3.7. Non-IP Protocols
numbers for
Building Internet Firewalls, C.12.1. Protocol Numbers
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.5.1.4. Passing datagrams to the transport layer
TCP/IP Network Administration, 2.7.1. Protocol Numbers
packet filtering and : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.1.2.2. Some protocols are not well suited to packet
problems, troubleshooting : TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.7. Analyzing Protocol Problems
routing : (see RIP)
security of, and proxying : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.4.3. Protocol Security
stack
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.2. A Data Communications Model
TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.1. Approaching a Problem
standards
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.1.2. Protocol Standards
TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.7. Application Layer
statements (in gated) : TCP/IP Network Administration, B.8. Protocol Statements
suite : TCP/IP Network Administration, 1.2. A Data Communications Model
time-dependence of : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.13. Network Time Protocol (NTP)
tracing : TCP/IP Network Administration, B.1. The gated Command
transmission
sendmail, 26.1.3.8. proto= the protocol used in transmission
sendmail, 31.10. Alphabetized Reference
$r macro : sendmail, 31.10. Alphabetized Reference
setting : sendmail, 36.7. Alphabetized Reference
weaknesses of, and proxy services : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.1.2.5. Proxy services don't protect you from all protocol
Protocol Data Units (PDUs) : TCP/IP Network Administration, 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
protocols file
TCP/IP Network Administration, 2.7.1. Protocol Numbers
TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.4. The Internet Daemon
TCP/IP Network Administration, 9.3. Network Information Service
Protocols table (NIS+) : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.5.3. NIS+ Tables
proxy servers/services
Building Internet Firewalls, 4.1. Some Firewall Definitions
Building Internet Firewalls, 4.1.2. Proxy Services
Building Internet Firewalls, 7. Proxy Systems
Building Internet Firewalls, 7.4. Using Proxying with Internet
TCP/IP Network Administration, 4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address
TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.3.1.1. Options
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.7. Firewalls
application- versus circuit-level : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.3.1. Application-Level Versus Circuit-Level
characteristics of
Archie : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.7.3.2. Proxying characteristics of
Berkeley r commands : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.4.1.2. Proxying characteristics of the
DNS : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.10.2. Proxying Characteristics of
finger : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.8.1.2. Proxying characteristics of finger
FSP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.2.3.2. Proxying characteristics of
FTP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.2.1.2. Proxying characteristics of
Gopher : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.7.1.2. Proxying characteristics of Gopher
HTTP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.6.2. Proxying Characteristics of
IRC : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.9.2.2. Proxying characteristics of
lp : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.17.3. Packet Filtering and Proxying
lpr : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.17.2. Proxying Characteristics of lpr
NFS : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.14.2. Proxying Characteristics of
NIS : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.15.2. Proxying Characteristics of
NNTP
Building Internet Firewalls, 8.5.2. Proxying Characteristics of
Building Internet Firewalls, 8.5.4. Good Ways to Set up
NTP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.13.2. Proxying Characteristics of
ping : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.12.3.2. Proxying characteristics of ping
POP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.1.2.2. Proxying characteristics of
rex : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.4.3.2. Proxying characteristics of rex
rexec : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.4.2.2. Proxying characteristics of
RIP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.12.2.2. Proxying characteristics of
SMTP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.1.1.5. Proxying characteristics of SMTP
SNMP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.12.1.2. Proxying characteristics of SNMP
syslog : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.11.2. Proxying Characteristics of syslog
talk : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.9.1.2. Proxying characteristics of talk
Telnet : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.3.2. Proxying Characteristics of Telnet
TFTP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.2.2.2. Proxying characteristics of
traceroute : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.12.4.2. Proxying characteristics of
UUCP : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.2.4.2. Proxying characteristics of UUCP
WAIS : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.7.2.2. Proxying characteristics of
whois : Building Internet Firewalls, 8.8.2.2. Proxying characteristics of whois
checklist for : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, A.1.1.21. Chapter 22: Wrappers and Proxies
generic versus dedicated : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.3.2. Generic Versus Dedicated Proxies
intelligent servers : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.3.3. Intelligent Proxy Servers
internal versus external clients : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.4.5. Internal Versus External Clients
Internet services and : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.4. Using Proxying with Internet
multiple operating systems and : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.1. Why Proxying?
protocol security : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.4.3. Protocol Security
providing on a firewall : TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.7.1. Functions of the firewall
SOCKS package for : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.6. Using SOCKS for
software for : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.2. How Proxying Works
TIS Internet Firewalls Toolkit for : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.7. Using the TIS
tools for : Building Internet Firewalls, B.4. Proxy Systems Tools
versus packet filtering : Building Internet Firewalls, 6.1.1.2. Packet filtering doesn't require user knowledge or
when unable to provide : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.8. What If You Can't Proxy?
without proxy server : Building Internet Firewalls, 7.5. Proxying Without a Proxy Server
proxyarp option : TCP/IP Network Administration, A.2. The PPP Daemon
pruning route addresses : sendmail, 34.8. Alphabetized Reference
pruning the wtmp file : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.1.3.1. Pruning the wtmp file
ps command
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.2. des: The Data Encryption Standard
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 10.1.2. utmp and wtmp Files
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.3.2.3. Making sure Secure RPC programs are running on every
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 24.2.1. Catching One in the Act
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, C.1.2. The ps Command
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, C.1.2.2. Listing processes with Berkeley-derived versions of
sendmail, 4.1.1.3. Kill and restart, old versions
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.4.1. Know Your System
with kill command : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 24.2.5. Getting Rid of the Intruder
to stop process overload
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 25.2.1.1. Too many processes
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 25.2.1.2. System overload attacks
PSBUFSIZ macro : sendmail, 18.8. Alphabetized Reference
pseudo-device statement : TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
pseudo-devices : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 5.6. Device Files
pseudo-domains : TCP/IP Network Administration, 10.7.1. Modifying Local Information
pseudorandom functions : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23.6. Tips on Generating Random Numbers
pseudo-terminals : TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
PTR resource records
TCP/IP Network Administration, 8.3.5. The Reverse Domain File
TCP/IP Network Administration, C.3.1.6. Domain Name Pointer record
ptys : TCP/IP Network Administration, 5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
PUBDIR= command : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 15.5.2. Permissions Commands
public key cryptography
Building Internet Firewalls, 10. Authentication and Inbound
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.4. Common Cryptographic Algorithms
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.4.2. Summary of Public Key Systems
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.4.6. RSA and Public Key Cryptography
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.4.6.3. Strength of RSA
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.5.3. Digital Signatures
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 18.3. Controlling Access to Files on Your Server
Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 18.6. Dependence on Third Parties
TCP/IP Network Administration, 12.6. Encryption
breaking : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.3.4. Limitations of Secure RPC
PGP : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 6.6.3.2. Creating your PGP public key
proving identity with : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.3.1.1. Proving your identity
publicity hounds : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 11.3. Authors
publicizing security holes : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 2.5.1. Going Public
publickey file : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 19.3.2.1. Creating passwords for users
pulse code modulation (PCM) audio subtype : TCP/IP Network Administration, 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
Purdue University (PCERT) : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, F.3.4.30. Purdue University
purgestat command : sendmail, 36.1.4. purgestat (V8.8 and Above)
purging persistent-host status : sendmail, 36.7. Alphabetized Reference
Purify : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 23.2. Tips on Avoiding Security-related Bugs
pursuing intruders : Building Internet Firewalls, 13.3. Pursuing and Capturing the
pwck command : Practical UNIX & Internet Security, 8.2. Monitoring File Format


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