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4.14 Order of Operations

In an expression that contains multiple operators, Java uses a number of rules to decide the order in which the operators are evaluated. The first and most important rule is called operator precedence. Operators in an expression that have higher precedence are executed before operators with lower precedence. For example, multiplication has a higher precedence than addition. In the expression 2+3*4, the multiplication is done before the addition, producing a result of 14.

If consecutive operators in an expression have the same precedence, a rule called associativity is used to decide the order in which those operators are evaluated. An operator can be left-associative, right-associative, or non-associative:

Table 4-2 shows the precedence and associativity of all the operators in Java.[7]

[7] Although the precedence of operators in Java is similar to that in C++, there are some differences. For example, new has a higher precedence in Java than it does in C++. Another difference is that the ++ and - - operators are effectively non-associative in Java.

Table 4.2: Precedence and Associativity of Operators in Java

Precedence

Operator

Associativity

1

(), []

non-associative

2

new

non-associative

3

.

left-associative

4

++, - -

non-associative

5

- (unary), + (unary), !, ~, ++, - -, (type)

right-associative

6

*, /, %

left-associative

7

+, -

left-associative

8

<<, >>, >>>

left-associative

9

<, >, <=, >=, instanceof

non-associative

10

==, !=

left-associative

11

&

left-associative

12

^

left-associative

13

|

left-associative

14

&&

left-associative

15

||

left-associative

16

?:

right-associative

17

=, *=, /=, %=, -=, <<=, >>=, >>>=, &=, ^=, |=

right-associative

As in C/C++, the order in which operators are evaluated can be modified by the use of parentheses.

The rest of the rules that concern order of operations have to do with the evaluation of operands or arguments in a single expression.

The intent of all of these rules is to guarantee that every implementation of Java evaluates any given expression in the same way.[8] In order to produce optimized code, a Java compiler is allowed to deviate from the rules governing the order in which operations are performed, provided that the result is the same as if it had followed the rules.

[8] This is different than C/C++, which leaves a number of details of expression evaluation up to an implementation, such as the order in which the actual parameters of a function call are evaluated.

References Array Allocation Expressions; Index Expressions; Method Call Expression; Object Allocation Expressions


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